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Edward Wanshaer Wynkoop.

Ned Wynkoop Studio Photo.

    Edward Wanshaer Wynkoop, youngest son of John Wanshaer Wynkoop and great-grandson of Judge Henry Wynkoop of Bucks County, Pennsylvania went west at a seminal time in our nation's history. Although he is most closely associated with the Sand Creek Massacre of November 29, 1864, (an event he took no part in), and it's aftermath, (where he took center stage), it is for his efforts on behalf of the Cheyenne and Arapaho nations that he will probably be best remembered. As Indian agent for these tribes he worked tirelessly to improve their lot and their relations with the Federal government.
    Ned, (as he was better known), was a product of his times, a man of many preconceptions who was able to rise above these early prejudices and come to a level of understanding and compassion for Native Americans which was unusual for the time. It is said that he was single-handedly responsible for the peace of 1866 that settled over the plains after the Indian wars of the early 1860s.
    Ned led an eventful life, serving as Sheriff of Arapaho County, Major in the 1st Colorado Volunteers during the Civil War, Indian Agent for the Cheyenne and Arapaho nations, later moving east for a time to supervise some family steel mills with his brother, Colonel John Estill Wynkoop, in Pennsylvania and finishing his career as Warden of the New Mexico State Penitentiary in Santa Fé, New Mexico.
    Among his many friends, acquaintances and even enemies could be counted Captain Silas Soule, Kit Carson, "Wild Bill" Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, Captain Jack Crawford, the Poet Scout, Generals William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Sheridan, Winfield Scott Hancock and George Armstrong Custer, to name a few. His life spanned one of the most turbulent eras of America's history. In reading some of the articles posted here you will find that Ned left the world a better place than when he found it.


Short Articles, Notes and Reminiscences:
Edward Wanshear Wynkoop
     Written for the Kansas State Historical Society by Edward E. Wynkoop, of Stockton, Cal.

Intimate Notes
     Relative to Col. E. W. Wynkoop by Frank M. Wynkoop (a son).

Commemoration
     Mrs. Louise M. Wynkoop, a Biographical Sketch.

Reminiscences of Frank Murray Wynkoop.
     A December, 1953 interview by Mrs. Lurene Englert.

Data Concerning Col. Edward Wanshear Wynkoop and Louise Brown Wynkoop.
     by Frank M. Wynkoop

Reminiscences of Edward W. Wynkoop 1856-1858.
     by W. Charles Bennett, Jr.

Denver Has Always Been a Good Show Town.
     by A. L. Clark.

New Mexico’s New Adjutant General:
     A brief overview of Ned's early life in Colorado.

Reminiscences: Duels in Denver & The Texas Invasion.
     Including Ned's famous "duel" with Denver's first Post-master, Park McClure.

Reminiscences: The Stub-Tailed Cow.
     Ned and some friends put up a joke on Officers of the United States Army.

1859:
Correspondence of the Globe, Letter From Nebraska Territory.
     From the Huntingdon Globe, Huntingdon, Pa., Wednesday, 26 January, 1859.

The New Eldorado.
     From the Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga County, Pa., Thursday, 10 February, 1859.

Duel.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 20 October, 1859.

Later From The Gold Mines.
     From the Chicago Press and Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Wednesday, 9 November, 1859.

Local Items.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 1 December, 1859.

Apollo Theatre.
     From the Rocky Mountain News, Auraria and Denver, Jefferson, Thursday, 8 December, 1859.

Military Meeting.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 21 December, 1859.

1860:
Military.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 8 February, 1860.

Exciting Times.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 8 February, 1860.

Celebration of Washington's Birthday in the Rocky Mountins.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 29 February, 1860.

The Late Duel.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 14 March, 1860.

The Late Duel.
     From the Western Mountaineer, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado, Wednesday, 14 March, 1860.

The Murder of William West--Escape and Subsequent Arrest of the Murderer.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 14 March, 1860.

The Murder of William West.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 21 March, 1860.

Letter From Pike's Peak.
     From the Chicago Press and Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, 5 April, 1860.

Obituary.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 9 May, 1860.

Covered Wagons and Tents.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 30 May, 1860.

A Duel--Almost.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J. T., Wednesday, 24 October, 1860.

To-day's Proceedings.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J. T., Monday, 5 November, 1860.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 20 November, 1860.

Local Matters, The Abduction Case.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 23 November, 1860.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 23 November, 1860.

Fatal Shooting Affray.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 3 December, 1860.

A Chicago Rose Abroad.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Wednesday, 5 December, 1860.

Trial of Charles Harrison, Charged with the Murder of James Hill, on the 2d Dec., at Criterion Hall.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Wednesday, 5 December, 1860.

Brutal Fight.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 5 December, 1860.

Trial of Charles Harrison, Charged with the Murder of James Hill, on the 2d Dec., at Criterion Hall.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Thursday, 6 December, 1860.

Murder of Thos. Freeman.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Thursday, 6 December, 1860.

This Day a Twelvemonth Ago.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Thursday, 6 December, 1860.

Fatal Affray in Denver.
     From the Western Mountaineer, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado, Wednesday, 6 December, 1860.

Trial of Charles Harrison, Charged with the Murder of James Hill, on the 2d Dec., at Criterion Hall.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Friday, 7 December, 1860.

The Harrison Trial.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Saturday, 8 December, 1860.

Reflections.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, J.T., Monday, 10 December, 1860.

Local Matters, The Freeman Case.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 11 December, 1860.

Charles Harrison's Card.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 11 December, 1860.

A Card.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 11 December, 1860.

Trial of Charles Harrison.
     From the Western Mountaineer, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado, Thursday, 13 December, 1860.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 17 December, 1860.

Another Homicide.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 19 December, 1860.

The Waters Trial.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 19 December, 1860.

Trial of Patrick Waters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 20 December, 1860.

The Execution of Waters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 21 December, 1860.

Watters' Confession.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 22 December, 1860.

Affair of Honor.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 31 December, 1860.

1861:
The Duel.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Sunday, 2 January, 1861.

The Dueling Question.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 3 January, 1861.

Dead Body Found.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 3 January, 1861.

Dead Body Found.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 5 January, 1861.

The Mystery Unraveling.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 9 January, 1861.

Military.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 30 January, 1861.

The Amatuer Performance.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 2 February, 1861.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 5 February, 1861.

Local Matters, The Amateur Exhibition.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 6 March, 1861.

Another Man Shot.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 12 March, 1861.

The Election.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 3 April, 1861.

Dramatic Association.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 10 May, 1861.

Another Entertainment.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 21 May, 1861.

Postponement.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 22 May, 1861.

Amateur Entertainment.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 27 May, 1861.

Theatre To-morrow Night.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 28 May, 1861.

Sheriff's Sale.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 14 June, 1861.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 27 July, 1861.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 10 August, 1861.

Local Department.
     From the Daily Colorado Republican and Rocky Mountain Herald, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 14 August, 1861.

Colorado Volunteers, Company A.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 21 August, 1861.

Married: Edward W. Wynkoop and Louise M. Brown.
     From the Daily Colorado Republican and Rocky Mountain Herald, Thursday, 22 August, 1861.

Champaigne Party.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 22 August, 1861.

Married.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 28 August, 1861.

First Regiment Colorado Volunteers.
     From the Daily Colorado Republican and Rocky Mountain Herald, Friday, 30 August, 1861.

Promotions.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 4 September, 1861.

Visit of the Council to Camp Weld.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 18 September, 1861.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 12 October, 1861.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 31 October, 1861.

Theatrical.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 1 November, 1861.

Recruits Wanted For Company A.
     From the Daily Colorado Republican and Rocky Mountain Herald, Friday, 22 November, 1861.

Carrying Fire Arms.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 23 December, 1861.

1862:
Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 7 February, 1862.

On Military Matters by "Union."
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 7 February, 1862.

Reply to "Union."
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 8 February, 1862.

Aid for Col. Canby.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 12 February, 1862.

Recruits Wanted.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 12 February, 1862.

Letter From Camp Weld.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 13 February, 1862.

For Santa Fe.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 13 February, 1862.

The Herald Office Mobbed.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 13 February, 1862.

Letter From Captain Downing.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Friday, 15 February, 1862.

The Remains of Colonel Francis M. Wynkoop.
     From the Miners' Journal and Pottsville General Advertiser, Saturday, 1 March, 1862, page 2.

Sketch of Camp Weld.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado Territory, Saturday, 1 March, 1862.

The Colorado First.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado Territory, Saturday, 1 March, 1862.

Military.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado Territory, Saturday, 1 March, 1862.

March 26-28, 1862.--Skirmish at Apache Cañon, N. Mex. - Union Reports.
     Reports of Maj. John M. Chivington, First Colorado Infantry and Capt. Charles J. Walker, Second U. S. Cavalry.

March 28, 1862.--Engagement of Glorieta, or Pigeon's Ranch, N. Mex.
     Reports of Col. John P. Slough, First Colorado Infantry, Lieut. Col. Samuel F. Tappan, First Colorado Infantry, & Maj. John M. Chivington, First Colorado Infantry.

April 8, 1862.--Skirmish at Albuquerque, N. Mex.
     Report of Col. Edward R. S. Canby, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Department of New Mexico.

April 15, 1862.--Skirmish at Peralta, N. Mex.
     Reports of Col. Edward R. S. Canby, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Department of New Mexico, Col. Gabriel R. Paul, Fourth New Mexico Infantry, commanding district, and Col. Benjamin S. Roberts, Fifth New Mexico Infantry, commanding district.

Details of the Battles of Apache Canon and Pigeon's Canon, New Mexico.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 6 May, 1862.

Colorado First.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 3 June, 1862.

From New Mexico.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 7 June, 1862.

Resolutions of the Colorado First.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 7 June, 1862.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 28 June, 1862.

Col. Chivington is on his way...
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 30 July, 1862.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 2 August, 1862.

News From New Mexico.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 21 August, 1862.

Major E. W. Wynkoop to Col. Henry W. Raguet, Sr.
     Ned Wynkoop expresses his regret at the death of his son, Major Henry W. Raguet, Jr., killed at Apache Cañon, while charging Ned's position, on March 28, 1862.

Organization of the Troops in the Department of the Missouri, as of December 31, 1862.
     According to return dated December 20th, 1862, Major Wynkoop is in command of the garrison at Colorado City.

1863:
The Arrival Of The First.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Thursday, 15 January, 1863.

Arrival of the First Regiment.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 15 January, 1863.

Sword Presentation.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 15 January, 1863.

Sword Presentation.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Thursday, 15 January, 1863.

Local Matters.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 22 January, 1863.

Saddle Presentation.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 5 February, 1863.

Accident.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 5 February, 1863.

Major Wynkoop is in command...
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 30 April, 1863.

The Evolutions of the Battalion...
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 18 June, 1863.

Skirmish with Indians at Grand Pass, Idaho.
     Report by Col. J. M. Chivington and Captain Asaph Allen, Ninth Kansas Cavalry regarding July 7th, 1863 incident.

City News, Multum in Parvo.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Thursday, 9 July, 1863.

The Indian Expedition.
     Copies of orders and instructions relating to the Indian expedition sent in aid of General Connor.

Indian Troubles Near Ft. Halleck.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Thursday, 16 July, 1863.

Maj. Wynkoop ordered to punish marauding Ute Indians.
     Report by Col. J. M. Chivington regarding this Indian expedition, dated August 7, 1863.

Maj. Wynkoop's Report on the Indian Expedition.
     Report to Col. J. M. Chivington regarding the expedition to punish marauding Ute Indians, dated August 13, 1863.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 1 September, 1863.

Major Wynkoop Arrives.
     Maj. Wynkoop arrives in Central City, Colorado, from the Central City Tri-Weekly Miners' Register, 24 September, 1863.

Central News.
     Maj. Wynkoop, Lt. Silas Soule, et. al., deliver speeches in Central City, Colorado, from the Denver Weekly Commonwealth and Republican, 1 October, 1863.

Exciting News From Fort Garland.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 30 December, 1863.

The Fort Garland Scare.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Wednesday, 30 December, 1863.

1864:
The 'Commonwealth' Indulges In An Angry Growl.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 2 January, 1864.

Major Wynkoop Explains the Origin of the Canard.
     From the Daily Commonwealth, Denver, Denver County, Colorado Territory, Monday, 4 January, 1864.

Action at Big Bushes, near Smoky Hill, Kansas.
     Lieutenant Eayre has had a fight with the Cheyenne Indians. Black Kettle is dead.

The Cheyennes are establishing a large camp in the vicinity of Camp Wynkoop.
     If they are a portion of the party of Cheyennes who have committed the depredations, Maj. Wynkoop will use the proper means to punish them.

From Denver East.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 25 May, 1864.

Governor John Evans anticipates the gathering storm.
     Information in regard to the dangers to which Colorado settlements are subjected from hostile Indians.

Received no information from Lieutenant Eayre since 1st of May.
     Rumored he had a fight with Cheyennes on Smoky Hill, and badly cut up.

Break up whisky selling to the Indians.
     Send a company or two to Wilson's camp, whenever re-enforcements are in reach of you.

J. S. Maynard is somewhat fearful for Lieut. Eayre's safety.
     Maj. Wynkoop will send the two sections of the battery right on to Larned to receive their armament at that post.

Lieut. Shoup is to send 15 men to Smoky Hill to obtain what information may be had.
     If you send party to Smoky Hill inform them that it is indispensable to be vigilant.

Lieut. Wilson reports a body of Texans approaching Fort Lyon.
     June 3rd, 1864.

Correspondence in relation to defense against hostile Indians.
     Sent by Governor John Evans, June 3rd, 1864. Including further details of Lieutenant Eayre's skirmish with the Indians at Big bushes.

Lieut. Colonel Sam. F. Tappan receives orders to make a forced march to Fort Lyon.
     Lieutenant Eayre's command has all been killed by the Indians.

The Kiowas and Cheyennes are determined on war.
     However, the Comanches and Apaches seem determined to be at peace.

Major Colley is to feed and support all the friendly Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians at Fort Lyon.
     Instructions from Governor John Evans, dated June 6, 1864.

Fort Lyon Correspondence.
     From the Weekly Commonwealth, Denver City, Colorado Territory, Wednesday, 22 June, 1864.

To the Friendly Indians of the Plains:
     Governor John Evans' circular. This is what prompted Black Kettle to get in touch with Ned Wynkoop and Indian Agent S. G. Colley.

Maj. Wynkoop's report regarding the movements of an enemy in the direction of Texas.
     A large body of Texans are rumored to be approaching.

2nd Lt. Horace W. Baldwin wishes to rejoin the Independent Battery Colorado Vol. Artillery.
     Lt. Burdsal has taken with him all property for which I am responsible and would not receipt to me for the same.

Maj. E. W. Wynkoop's scout was far beyond department lines.
     The troops were needed at Larned, where the Indians were in actual hostile attitude.

Public Meeting At Fort Lyon.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 27 July, 1864.

The Oak Grove Massacre, (Oak, Nebraska), August 7th, 1864.
     Laura Roper's story and Ned Wynkoop's involvement.

Col. Chivington regrets exceedingly that Major Wynkoop did not send forward the troops requested.
     He has not spent an hour nor gone a mile to attend to other matters than his command.

Affair near Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory.
     Major Wynkoop's official report regarding Satank, war chief of the Kiowas and his murderous crew.

Ginger Club at Lyon, &c.
     From the Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 10 August, 1864.

Skirmish near Sand Creek, Colorado, August 11, 1864.
     Reports from Major Edward W. Wynkoop, First Colorado Cavalry, and Lieutenants Joseph A. Cramer, Horace W. Baldwin and Ira Quinby.

A party of fifteen Indians chased a soldier within three miles of Fort Lyon.
     They then retreated toward Sand Creek. Major Wynkoop has no troops to spare.

Letters regarding the hostile disposition of the Indians in the vicinity of Fort Lyon.
     A Mexican train is attacked and one man killed.

Indian Troubles on the Arkansas. Major Wynkoop's Report.
     Major Wynkoop pursues Satank, war chief of the Kiowas and his murderous crew, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Saturday, 27 August, 1864.

Special Orders, No. 34, Hdqrs. Dept. of New Mexico, August 28, 1864.
     Capt. Reuben A. Hill, with all the effective men of his company (K) First Infantry New Mexico Volunteers, will march with all practicable dispatch to Fort Lyon, District of Colorado, and there report for duty for sixty days. The orders that made Major Wynkoop's expedition to meet Black Kettle possible.

Black Kettle's Letter to Major Colley, August 29th, 1864.
     Black Kettle offers Peace. The letter that changed Ned Wynkoop's life.

From The Far West.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, 2 September, 1864.

There are $20,000 worth of crops at the agency which have been left unprotected.
     Major Wynkoop has not the troops to spare.

Copy of a letter received from Major Colley, regarding Black Kettle's proposition for peace.
     Dated September 4th, 1864 and written to Gov. John Evans.

Major Wynkoop's official report concerning his 1st meeting with Black Kettle.
     Black Kettle and other chiefs of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Nations propose Peace.

Letter to Maj. S. G. Colley from Governor John Evans, September 19, 1864.
     He will wait to take action until he hears the results of Major Wynkoop's expedition.

The Indian War.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 19 September, 1864.

Interesting News From The Indian Country.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 24 September, 1864.

E. W. Wynkoop is on his way with Cheyenne and Arapaho chiefs and four white prisoners.
     Col. Chivington wants the Indians to make full restitution and then go on their reserves.

Indian Treaty.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 27 September, 1864.

Indian Treaty.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 28 September, 1864.

The Indian War: Maj. Wynkoop Has Arrived from Ft. Lyon.
     From the New York Times, Thursday, 29 September, 1864, p. 1.

Indian Council.
     From the Rocky Mountain News, Thursday, 29 September, 1864.

Editoiral Correspondence.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Thursday, 29 September, 1864.

Report Of Council with Cheyenne and Arapahoe Chiefs and Warriors, brought to Denver by Major Wynkoop, taken down by the Indian Agent Simeon Whiteley, as it Progressed.
     A verbatim transcript of the Council held at Fort Weld on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 1864, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Monday, 13 September, 1865.

Gov. Evans has declined to make any treaty with the chiefs brought in by Major Wynkoop.
     It might embarrass the military operations against the hostile Indians of the plains.

The Indians.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Friday, 30 September, 1864.

Official.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 4 October, 1864.

A Party of the Pet Lambs...
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 5 October, 1864.

General Blunt came on camp of Indians near head of the Pawnee.
     These are probably the Indians whom Colonel Wynkoop represents erroneously and unfortunately out of his command.

Major Wynkoop is relieved of command of Fort Lyon.
     November 4th, 1864.

Correspondence: Laura Roper is destitute on the trail to Fort Kearney.
     From the Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 16 November, 1864.

Scenes at Sand Creek.
     Captain McCannon reminisces about the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Wednesday, 26 January, 1881.

Dispose of Major Wynkoop.
     The treaty operations at Lyon greatly embarrass matters.

Local and Miscellaneous.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk, Colorado, Thursday, 29 December, 1864.

Maj. E. W. Wynkoop is Hereby Relieved From Duty at Fort Riley, Kans.
     He is to make a thorough investigation of the recent operations against the Indians in that part of the District of Upper Arkansas.

1865:
The Sand Creek Battle--"High Officials" Checkmated.
     Every Indian expedition hereafter should be led by a Colorado soldier, imbued with the holy aspiration of destroying as great a number of warriors, squaws and children, as fell in the memorable battle of Sand Creek, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Wednesday, 4 January, 1865.

Report of Major Edward W. Wynkoop, First Colorado Cavalry.
     The results of his investigation into the Sand Creek Massacre.

John S. Smith's testimony re: events leading up to Sand Creek.
     From the first meeting with Black Kettle to the aftermath of the battle, November 28th, 1864.

Skirmish near Fort Larned, Kansas.
     Report by Major E. W. Wynkoop regarding the skirmish that took place on January 20th, 1865.

Court of Inquiry.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 8 February, 1865.

The Indian Difficulties.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk, Colorado, Wednesday, 1 March, 1865.

The Responsibility of the Indian War.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Thursday, 2 March, 1860.

Local and Miscellaneous.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk, Colorado, Saturday, 4 March, 1865.

Maj. E. W. Wynkoop is Hereby Assigned as Chief of Cavalry.
     Special Orders No. 162, Headquarters Department of the Missouri.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Thursday, 13 July, 1865.

To the People of Colorado. Synopsis of the Sand Creek Investigation.
     Col. John M. Chivington defends his actions at Sand Creek.

Report of the Committee on the Conduct of the War on the Massacre of Cheyenne Indians.
     From the New York Times, Sunday, 23 July, 1865, p. 2.

The Cheyenne Indian Massacre.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Tuesday, 25 July, 1865.

Hersa A. Coberly Soule to Annie J. Soule, August 6th, 1865.
     Silas Soule's widow describes her new home in Lawrence, Kansas and her trip across the Plains with Maj. Wynkoop and Col. Tappan.

Statement of Mrs. Ewbanks, Giving an Account of Her Captivity Among the Indians.
     Her statement dated June 22, 1865, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Monday, 13 September, 1865.

Our Indian Policy.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Wednesday, 13 September, 1865.

The Grant and Tappan Indian Policy.
     A diatribe against S. F. Tappan, Ned Wynkoop and John Smith for their condemnation of the Sand Creek "battle", from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 6 November, 1865.

Too Much Acrimony.
     Black Kettle speaks out, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 14 November, 1865.

1866:
New Indian 'Policy.'
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 22 January, 1866.

Major E. W. Wynkoop.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Thursday, 25 January, 1866.

Andrew Johnson Proposes the Following-named Persons for Appointment by Brevet to be Lt. Colonels.
     Major Edward Wanshaer Wynkoop and his distant cousin, Surgeon Alfred Wynkoop, are among those named.

The Arkansas Indians. Maj. Wynkoop's Mission Successful.
     From the New York Times, Tuesday, 13 March, 1866, p. 5.

The Lost Found. The story of Amanda Fletcher.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Tuesday, 20 March, 1866.

From Lawrence.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Wednesday, 18 April, 1866.

Local Matters.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Thursday, 26 April, 1866.

Maj. Wynkoop.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Saturday, 28 April, 1866.

From the Plains, A Great Indian Movement--An Exciting Scene.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 30 April, 1866.

Washington News, Result of Col. Wynkoop's Mission to the Indian Tribes, etc.
     From the New York Times, Wednesday, 9 May, 1866, p. 1.

From Washington.
     Col. Ed. Wynkoop is in the city, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Thursday, 2 August, 1866.

The Decease of Col. George Wynkoop.
     From the Daily Mining Journal, Black Hawk City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Saturday, 11 August, 1866.

From Washington.
     E. W. Wynkoop is appointed Agent for the Arapahoes, Cheyennes and Apaches, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Tuesday, 25 September, 1866.

E. W. Wynkoop of Colorado.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 26 September, 1866.

A United States Senator on His Travels.
     From the New York Times, Sunday, 11 November, 1866, p. 2.

Council With the Cheyennes--Adventures Among the Indians.
     From the New York Times, Thursday, 13 December, 1866, p. 8.

1867:
Indian Affairs, etc.; Also Nominations Confirmed.
     From the New York Times, Thursday, 7 February, 1867, p. 5.

Military Commission's Inquiry into the Sand Creek Massacre, November, 1864.
     Report of the Secretary of War Communicating, In Compliance With a Resolution of the Senate of February 4, 1867, a Copy of the Evidence Taken at Denver and Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory.

Massacre of Cheyenne Indians.
     Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War at the Second Session Thirty-eighth Congress, 1865.

Chivington Massacre.
     Report of the Joint Special Committee of the two Houses of Congress, appointed under the joint resolution of March 3, 1865, directing an inquiry into the condition of the Indian tribes and their treatment by the civil and military authorities of the United States.

From the Arkansas Valley.
     From the Colorado Transcript, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado, Wednesday, 20 March, 1867.

Appearance of Fort Larned--Sketch of an Officer's Life on the Frontier.
     Henry Morton Stanley's account of General Hancock's expedition, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Cheyenne Camp, Fifty Miles from Fort Larned.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports that the Cheyennes have deserted the camp at Pawnee Fork, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Indian Incendiarism and Murder--Scalping and Burning--General Custer's Command Divided and Pursuing.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports that the fugitive Indians have burned three stations on the Smoky Hill route and killed three white men, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Burning of Cheyenne and Sioux Lodges by Hancock--$100,000 destroyed­--The Conflagration a Necessity--Hancock and the Indian Department.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the burning of the Cheyenne Village at Pawnee Fork, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Special Correspondence of the Herald.
     Letter from Fort Larnard--Arrival of General Hancock's Expedition--A Talk with the Indian Chiefs--What the Indians Say, &c, from the New York Herald, 22 April, 1867.

The Indian War.
     Official Account of the Council Between Hancock and the Cheyennes--The Flight of the Latter from their Camp--General Custer in Pursuit, &c., from the New York Herald, 24 April, 1867.

Affairs at the National Capital, Council With the Cheyenne Indians.
     From the New York Times, Thursday, 25 April, 1867, p. 4.

The Indian Expedition.
     Movements of General Hancock's Expedition--A Talk with the Indians--They Desert their Village and Retreat--A Child Brutally Ravished, found in the Village--Pursuit of the Indians, &c., &c., from the New York Herald, 29 April, 1867.

The Last Pow-Wow--The Irrepressible Satanta in Council--His Speech--His Views of War and Peace.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the last and most important "talk" with the Indian chiefs at Fort Larned on May 1st, 1867, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

The Indian War.
     Reports from Col. Wynkoop--The Arapahoes, Apaches and other Tribes still Peacefully Inclined, from the New York Herald, 9 May, 1867.

The War On The Plains Has Begun In Earnest.
     Ned Wynkoop and Dick Curtis, from Harper's Weekly, 11 May, 1867.

War With the Indians.
     From the New York Times, Saturday, 25 May, 1867, p. 1.

The Indian War.
     The movements of the column of troops under General Hancock against the Indians of the Plains have been very important, though quietly made, from Harper's New Monthly Magazine, July, 1867.

The Indian War.
     The Osages Making War According to Regulations, from the New York Herald, 7 July, 1867.

Our Indian Troubles.
     Meeting of the Indian Commissioners in St. Louis--Their Proposed Action Relative to the Reservations--Brigham Young and the Tribes at Odds, from the New York Herald, 7 August, 1867.

The Indian War, Gen. Hancock's Late Peace Expedition, His Correspondence With Indian Agents.
     He rebuts the statements of Cols. Wynkoop and Leavenworth, from the New York Times, 2 September, 1867.

The Indian Commission.
     Important Council with the Indian Chiefs--The Withdrawal of the Troops and the Abandonment of the Pacific Railroad Demanded, from the New York Herald, 20 September, 1867.

Our Indian Troubles.
     Meeting of the Indian Commissioners in St. Louis--Progress of the Indian Commission--A Council With Friendly Tribes--Rascalities of the Indian Agents--Locating Reservations for the Various Tribes, from the New York Herald, 24 September, 1867.

How Indians Are Swindled By Traders.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 24 September, 1867.

Medicine Lodge Creek, 1867: The Conference of the Peace Commission with the Southwestern Tribes.
     Newspaper reports on the travels of the Peace Commission to Medicine Lodge Creek and the Council held there with the Southwestern Tribes.

The Train of the Peace Commission--Buffalo Herds--The Encampment of the Tribes.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the travels of the Peace Commission to Medicine Lodge Creek; Col. Wynkoop narrowly escapes death at the hands of Roman Nose, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Another Council--Four Tribes represented--Distribution of Clothing--Incidents of the Council--Wynkoop's Testimony--The Cause of the War.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the Medicine Lodge Creek Councils, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

An Amphitheatre in a Grove--The Council Personages--Senator Henderson's Speech to the Indians.
     Henry Morton Stanley continues his report on the Medicine Lodge Creek Council, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

Arrival of Osage Chiefs--Indian Speeches--Senator Henderson proposes the Treaty--Its favorable Reception by the Kiowas and Comanches.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the final details of the treaty to be signed at Medicine Lodge Creek, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

The Treaty Signing.
     Henry Morton Stanley reports on the treaty signing at Medicine Lodge Creek, from My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia, Vol. 1.

The Indians; Journey of the Indian Commission To Meet the Southwestern Tribes.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Tuesday, 22 October, 1867.

The Indians; The Visit to the Southwestern Tribes.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, 24 October, 1867.

Wynkoop on the Indian War.
     Henry Morton Stanley's coverage of Col. Wynkoop's testimony before the Peace Commission, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Tuesday, 29 October, 1867.

General A. J. Smith on Colonel Wynkoop's Testimony.
     General A. J. Smith refutes Colonel Wynkoop's charges that soldiers ravished the young girl found in the Indian village near Fort Larned, from the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 12 November, 1867.

Colonel Wynkoop has gotten himself into trouble with General A. J. Smith.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 12 November, 1867.

Scenes and Incidents of the Great Indian Council, at Medicine Lodge Creek, Kansas.
     From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, New York, N. Y., Saturday, 23 November, 1867.

1868:
The Indians, Report of the Indian Commission.
     From the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Saturday, 11 January, 1868.

Major Smith, paymaster United States army.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Monday, 20 January, 1868.

The Indian Commission on Sand Creek.
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 22 January, 1868.

The Plains.
     From the Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, Saturday, 23 May, 1868.

Renewal of Indian Hostilities Apprehended.
     Colonel Wynkoop has been ordered to withhold arms and ammunition, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 21 July, 1868.

Indian Troubles. The Annuities Withheld from Several Tribes.
     From the New York Times, Tuesday, 21 July, 1868, p. 5.

Indian Troubles--War Again.
     From the Daily Register Call, Central City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Wednesday, 22 July, 1868.

Renewal of Indian Difficulties.
     The Missouri Democrat claims that Indian agents are getting up another war on the frontier, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 25 July, 1868.

Mad Wolf Attacks Soldiers At Fort Larned, Kansas.
     Several different accounts of the widely reported story from August, 1868.

From the Plains.
     The Recent Indian Trouble at Fort Lamed, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 6 August, 1868.

The Camanche Captive.
     Ned Wynkoop rescues Melinda Ann Caudle, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 9 August, 1868.

The Indians to be Thrashed.
     Ned Wynkoop's recommendations for handling the increased number of Indian raids of 1868, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 29 August, 1868.

The Herald Charges the Indian Troubles in Toto Upon the Republican Party.
     From the Daily Register Call, Central City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Saturday, 29 August, 1868.

U. S. Indian Agent, E. W. Wynkoop's Second Annual Report to Thomas Murphy, Superintendent Indian Affairs.
     United States troops, now in hot pursuit of the Cheyennes, will plunge other tribes into the difficulty, and finally culminate in a general Indian war.

A Wagon Master Causes More Trouble at Fort Larned.
     Ned Wynkoop's account of the difficulty between soldiers at Fort Larned, Kansas, and a party of Kiowa Indians, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 12 September, 1868.

Indians.
     From the Daily Register Call, Central City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Friday, 25 September, 1868.

What Shall be Done With Them?
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 30 September, 1868.

E. W. Wynkoop's Report on the Causes of the Indian War to Charles E. Mix, Acting Commissioner Indian Affairs.
     The failure of the government to fulfill its promises to the Indians to continue the supply of subsistence, arms and ammunition, is the root cause of the present war.

Indian Matters.
     The Indians within Wynkoop's agency have fled south of the Arkansas river, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 8 October, 1868.

Thomas Murphy, Superintendent of Indian Affairs to Chauncey McKeever, A.A. Gen’l.
     Letter dated October 31, 1868, in which Murphy states that Indian Agent Wynkoop has taken his family back East.

The Indians, Gen. Sherman's Report.
     Col. Wyncoop, agent of the Cheyennes and Arapahoes, sent a messenger out and made every exertion to procure their surrender, but utterly failed of success, from the New York Times, 21 November, 1868.

The Indian War Muddle.
     Apprehensions of serious troubles on the plains, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 25 November, 1868.

The Indian Question.
     Col. Wynkoop is afraid his charges will be intercepted by squads of soldiers who will massacre them, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 1 December, 1868.

Thomas Murphy, Supt. Indian Affairs to N. G. Taylor, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, December 4, 1868.
     Thomas Murphy expresses his shock and dismay at the betrayal of his Indian charges at the Battle of the Washita.

Topics of To-day.
     From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Monday, 14 December, 1868, p. 2.

J. S. Morrison to E. W. Wynkoop, December 14th, 1868.
     Ned's former Scout, James Morrison, informs him that the official reports of the fight on the Washita were very much exaggerated.

9,000 Indians on Reservation.
     From the Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, Wednesday, 16 December, 1868.

From Washington.
     Major Wynkoop, agent of the Arrapahoes and Cheyennes, will be examined before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, Thursday, 17 December, 1868.

The Indians.
     Col. Wyncoop's Letter Resigning His Agency, from the New York Times, Saturday, 19 December, 1868.

The Indian War: The Battle of the Washita.
     From Harper's Weekly, Saturday, 19 December, 1868.

The Indian War.
     From the Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, Monday, 21 December, 1868.

More of Custar and Black Kettle.
     There is a strong feeling among military men, at Washington, that Custar has made a serious mistake, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, Wednesday, 23 December, 1868.

Col. Wynkoop's Speech at the Cooper Institute.
     Given December 23, 1868 detailing the reasons for his resignation as Indian Agent and his views on restoring the peace in the West.

One Col. Wynkoop has signalized himself...
     From the Weekly Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 23 December, 1868.

Topics of To-day.
     From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Thursday, 24 December, 1868.

Gen. Hancock and Col. Wynkoop.
     From the New York Times, Friday, 25 December, 1868.

Col. Wynkoop's Letter.
     From the Weekly Tribune, Liberty, Clay County, Missouri, Friday, 25 December, 1868.

The Battle of the Washita--General Custar's Report to General Sheridan.
     From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, New York, N. Y., Saturday, 26 December, 1868.

Indian Prisoners Taken by Custer.
     From Harper's Weekly, 26 December, 1868.

Letter from Gen. Hancock--His Reply to Col. Wynkoop.
     From the New York Times, Monday, 28 December, 1868, p. 5.

Washita and Sand Creek Compared.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, 29 December, 1868.

1869:
Col. Wynkoop to Col. S. F. Tappan.
     Ned vents his anger in a letter written January 2d, 1869 to his former commander, Colonel Samuel Tappen of the Peace Commission in Washington, D.C.

The Best Yet.
     From the Colorado Transcript, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado, Wednesday, 6 January, 1869.

Exit Wynkoop.
     From the Daily Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, Wednesday, 6 January, 1869.

Indian Rebellion.
     Gen. Sheridan Repels Charge of Col. Wynkoop, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 17 January, 1869.

The Battle of the Washita: An Indian Agent's View.
     Ned's letter to the Office of Indian Affairs dated January 26, 1869.

E. W. Wynkoop to N. G. Taylor, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, January 26, 1869.
     A slightly different transcription of Ned's letter.

Indian War.
     The winter campaign designed by General Sheridan has met with signal success, from Harper's New Monthly Magazine, February, 1869.

It Seems Almost Certain.
     From the Daily Register Call, Central City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Thursday, 4 February, 1869.

Alexander R. Banks has been confirmed Indian Agent.
     From the Daily Register Call, Central City, Gilpin County, Colorado, Wednesday, 3 March, 1869.

Trying to Force Peace Montco General Ignited War on Plains.
     Historians Say Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock's Effort to Bully American Indians Made a Bad Situation Worse, from the Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 August, 2000.

By Telegraph, From Washington.
     The President submits the name of Ed. W. Wynkoop to the Senate for the post of Agent for the Indians in New Mexico, from the Daily Kansas State Journal, 20 February, 1869.

1870:
The Poor Indian, An Earnest Movement for the Amelioration of His Condition.
     Col. Wynkoop does some more work for the United States Indian Commission, at the Cooper Institute, in New York City, from the New York Times, 19 May, 1870.

1872:
Ned Wynkoop & Others Weigh-In on the Slaughter of the Buffalo.
     Arizona Representative R. C. McCormick reads letters from Ned Wynkoop and others in the House of Representatives, from The Congressional Globe, 42nd Congress, 2nd Sess., Appendix, April 6, 1872.

1876:
Reminiscences: Jim Beary as a Frontier Hero & Ben Holladay and the Bandit.
     An incident from Ned's days as a Black Hills Ranger in May, 1876.

The Chivington Massacre, A Participant in the Battle Denies That It was a Massacre.
     From the Colorado Miner, Georgetown, Clear Creek County, Colorado, Saturday, 14 October, 1876.

1881:
Frontier Reminiscences.
     From the Aspen Weekly Times, Aspin, Pitkin County, Colorado, Saturday, 30 July, 1881.

Frontier Reminiscences.
     From the Aspen Weekly Times, Aspin, Pitkin County, Colorado, Saturday, 6 August, 1881.

Frontier Reminiscences.
     From the Aspen Weekly Times, Aspin, Pitkin County, Colorado, Saturday, 13 August, 1881.

1882:
Personal Intelligence.
     E. W. Wyncoup is in town from Harrisburg, Pa., from the Washington Post, Saturday, 25 January, 1882.

Chronicles of Frontier Days.
     A biography of "Big Phil." from the Fort Collins Courier, Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado, Thursday, 4 May, 1882.

1884:
Original and Otherwise.
     From the Washington Post, Sunday, 20 September, 1884

1889:
A New Role for Ned Wynkoop.
     Ned seeks to be made Superintendent of the Penitentiary of New Mexico.

1891:
Obituary Notes.
     Col. Ewing Wynkoop has died at Santa Fe, New Mexico, from the New York Times, 13 September, 1891.

Obituary Notes, Col. E. W. Winkoop.
     From the Chicago Daily Tribune, Sunday, 13 September, 1891.

Pioneer Wynkoop Dead.
     From the Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sunday, 13 September, 1891.

Rocky Mountain Pioneer Dead.
     From the Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, Sunday, 13 September, 1891.

Colonel Edward W. Wynkoop.
     His obituary from the Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Co., Monday, 14 September, 1891.

Aftermath:
Tales of Early Days.
     From the Weekly Courier, Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado, Friday, 31 December, 1915.

In Memoriam--Ned Wynkoop.
     Captain Jack Crawford's tribute to Ned Wynkoop upon learning of his death in 1891.

Deposition A. in Case of Louise M. Wynkoop.
     W. F. Cody's deposition for Louise M. Wynkoop's Government Pension application, September 11, 1895.

Died.
     From the San Francisco Call and Post, San Francisco, California, Tuesday, 6 November, 1923.

Articles:
The Controversial Career of Edward W. Wynkoop.
     By Thomas D. Isern.

E. W. Wynkoop and the Bluff Creek Council, 1866.
     By Timothy A. Zwink. [Transcribed by yours truly - chw]

Fort Aubrey.
     Originally Camp Wynkoop.

Gold Fever in Kansas Territory: Migration to the Pike's Peak Gold Fields, 1858-1860.
     Early Denver settlers, including Ned Wynkoop and his future wife, Louise Brown. [Transcribed by yours truly - chw]

The Story of Fort Larned.
     Once Ned Wynkoop's command.

The Real Villains of Sand Creek.
     Author Gregory F. Michno blames Ned Wynkoop for the Sand Creek Massacre, from the December, 2003 issue of Wild West Magazine.

Created April 25, 1999; Revised August 11, 2007
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