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Descendants of Charles William Woolsey (1802-1840)




Generation No. 7



2. CHARLES WILLIAM7 WOOLSEY (GEORGE MUIRSON6, BENJAMIN JR5, BENJAMIN4, GEORGE II3, GEORGE "JORIS"2, GEORGE SR1) was born March 24, 1802 in NY, and died January 13, 1840 in NY. He married JANE ELIZA NEWTON June 28, 1827, daughter of WILLIAM NEWTON and JANE STUART. She was born November 09, 1801, and died December 22, 1874.

Steamboat "Lexington" disaster - 13 Jan 1840 - See George Davis Woolsey's Reminencences in "Sloops of the Hudson". One Charles William Woolsey died in this disaster, leaving a large young family and a widow, Jane Newton, who must have been a remarkable women because she raised that
family and three of the girls became well-known for their work as nurses in the Civil War. Here is a good subject if anyone would like to concentrate on women's rolls in the Civil War.

BIO: Personal Reminiscences of Captain George D. Woolsey, late of Newburgh. Photo. I became quite familiary with the names of the packet sloops sailing from Newburgh, for at this time, 1825, my father was captain of the packet sloop ILLINOIS running from Newburgh to New York. carrying passengers and produce from the farms and sailing from David Crawford's wharf at Newburgh. NOTE: The manuscript from which these reminiscences were taken was in a fragmentary condition when Mrs. Woolsey gave it to Capt. M. W. Collyer for publication. So much as appears here is all that was available or deemed germane to the subject of this book. - W. F. V. p.137. I suppose there are many alive to-day who remember the terrible, unfortunate accident on 13 Jan 1840, in a blinding. northeast snow-storm, when somewhere between Oldfield Light and Horton's Point the steamboat LEXINGTON, with many passengers on, and loaded with store goods and numerous bales of cotton, bound from New York to Providence, caught fire, burned up, and with no help for the unfortunate people on board. But three or four were saved of all the souls on board, and those endured the elements and suffered worse than death, lashed to a bale of cotton, and were for hours adrift and were not rescued, and finally went ashore on the Long Island shore. There was one of the Woolsey family on board and lost, who lived at Norwich, CT, and left a widow and seven children. This accident. I remember, cast a gloom over all, and was much conversed about through this section of the country.
Source of information:

Wilford Whitaker

GENE:  Dwight, Benjamin W. The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong. Of Northampton. Massachusetts. 2 Volumes. Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore. 1975. Reprint. Vol. 2, p.970-I.

GENE:  Woolsey,Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY-.- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1936-1969. 2.160.2.190. died as a passenger on Steamboat Lexington disaster, [See George Davis Woolsey's reminicences in "Sloops of the Hudson"

CEM:  Tombstone inscriptions from Woolsey cemetery at Dosoris: Charles William Woolsey, "lost in the Steamer Lexington on Long Island Sound, 13 Jun 1840"

PROBATE:  Genealogical Data from Administration Papers. Abstracted by Dr. Kenneth Scott. National Society of Colonial Dames. 1972. FHL# 974.7D2g. Intestate: Chas W. Woolsey. Admr: Geo. M. Woolsey. 19 Dec 1840, Liber 40: p. 329-311. #904242-3. #901442-3.

Notes for JANE ELIZA NEWTON:

CIVILWAR: Woolsey, Georgeanna. THREE WEEKS AT GETTYSBURG. Sanitary Commission. Reprinted 1996 by Edinborough Press. P.O. Box 13790, Roseville, MN 55113. 1-888-251-6336. p.4. ".... a sister remembered, 'Georgy came up here this noon, and we have been sitting together talking over all the strange scenes in those tents by the railroad, where 16,000 men have been fed and comforted in the last three weeks. Just imagine Mother in a straw flat and heavy Gettysburg boots, standing cooking soup for 200 men at a time, and distributing it in tin cups, or giving clean shirts to ragged rebels; or sitting on a pile of grocer's boxes, under the shadow of a string of codfish, scribbling notes to us." IBID: p. 5. "The family revisited their weeks at Gettysburg in the years following the war. Soldiers wrote letters or came to their home. A sister recalled, "One man, who had been at Gettysburg, remembering Mother Woolsey and greeting her with tears in his eyes, would hardly let her hand go. 'I knew you, ma'am, the minute you came in. You were at Gettysburg and were the first one that dressed my arm."'
Source of information:

GENE: Dwight. Benjamin Woodbridge, of Clinton, NY. THE DESCENDANTS OF THE REV. BENJAMIN WOOLSEY. OF DOSORIS (GLEN COVE), L.I. "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record". Devoted to the Interests of American Genealogy and Biography. Published for the Society. Mott Memorial Hall, No.64 Madison Avenue. New York City. Volume IV, July. 1873.

GENE:  Hodge, 0. J. THE HODGE FAMILY GENEALOGY. 1900. Newberry Library Index. FHL Iilm# 844955. p.280.

GENE:  Dwight, Benjamin W. The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong, of Northampton, Massachusetts. 2 Volumes. Gateway Press, Inc.Baltimore. 1975. Reprint. Vol. 2, p. 970-I.

GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY ---A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1936-1969.2.190.

Children of CHARLES WOOLSEY and JANE NEWTON are:

  i. ABBY HOWLAND8 WOOLSEY, b. July 16, 1828, CT; d. April 07, 1893; m. HOWARD.

Notes for ABBY HOWLAND WOOLSEY:
ON-LINE: Allen Co., IND. Public Library - [WebCat] Unicorn Delivery Gateway - #23-610.73 W88C
A Century of nursing, with hints toward the organization of a training school, and Florence Nightingale's historic letter on the Bellevue School, 18 Sep 1872. Hospitals and training schools; report to the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Assoc., NY, 24 May 1876. To which is added: Founding of the Bellevue Training School for Nurses, Chapter VI [of] Recollections of a happy life, by Elizabeth Christophers Hobson. pub. 1950. Abby Howland Woolsey, 1828-1893.

More About ABBY HOWLAND WOOLSEY:
Census: 1880, RI - Newport Newport, Rhode Island
Military: Civil War - Nurse
Occupation: Nurse
Residence: NY - New York City

  ii. JANE STUART WOOLSEY, b. February 07, 1830, CT; d. July 09, 1891.

Notes for JANE STUART WOOLSEY:
Jane Stuart Woolsey was one of the thousands of women who served in military hospitals during the Civil War. Woolsey came from a remarkable family with the mother, seven sisters, and one brother contributing to the Union cause. After the way, three sisters - Jane, Georgeanna and Abby - remained active in the nursing profession.

Jane, the second daughter of Charles and Jane Eliza woolsey was born on a ship off the coast of Connecticut in 1830. In 1840 her father died, leaving nine children. The widow and her family lived in relative comfort in New York City, supported by relatives and inheritances. As the children came of age, they became immersed in the political upheaval that led to the outbreak of war. As her sister wrote, "When the members of the Woolsey family gave up toys, they took up politics. Brought up by a mother who hated slavery, although her ancestors for generations had been Virginia slave-holders, they walked with her in the straight path of abolitionism." - From the pages of "Hospital Days, Reminiscence of a Civil War Nurse" by Jane Stuart Woolsey

PREFACE:
Military Medicine - History of, in campaigns, etc. United States - War of the rebellion, 1861-1864.
This account of her meeting up with a former member of the Zouaves, a New York Regiment noted for its close drill, its discipline, and bravery under fire, rang a bell and then I remembered that there was a Woolsey descendant who was a member of the Zouaves, as follows:
"In the autumn of 1865 when the new Peace on all the hills and fields made them seem so sweet and fair, we found ourselves, a family long parted, exploring the by-roads in the north New Hampshire country. Following, one day, a winding green wagon-track, farm from the main road, we came upon a desolate rough farm half way up the lower slopes of the Bartlett mountain. A dozen sheep were scattered over the stony fields, and among them sat a man in the full uniform of a Zouave, bagging trowsers, gay-braided jacket, cap, tassel, and long bright crimson scarf, complete. He had but just got home from some distant post, with very little back pay in his pocket for the sick wife, and none at all to spend in sober clothes, and had gone at once to work upon the obstinate farm, all in his gay attire. He seemed a little stunned by the silence round him. He missed the drums, he said. We had a little talk over the old days already so distant although so near, and left him, the sun touching the red and the blue of his bright garments, tending his sheep under the solemn hills. One who sits and listens for the drums to-day seems like the Zouave among the sheep-crofts; the flags and the music have marched so far away. And yet there may be some, in these times of gain-getting, pleasure-seeking, and reaction who are not sorry to look backward a little, now and then, and refresh from the old fountains their courage and their love of country." (end of quote)

After the attack on Fort Sumter, the family looked for ways to support the war for the Union. The women, barred from military service, turned to a developing network of civilian organizations created to aide the war effort. They were fortunate that New York City was a hot bed for these groups. They participated in the first meetings of the Women's Central Relief Association, precursor to the U.S. Sanitary Commission, directed by a fellow New Yorker, Frederick Law Olmsted.

Jane Woolsey remained in New York City during 1861 and 1862, helping the Women's Central Association and visiting the local hospitals as part of the Woman's Auxiliary Committee. In Jan 1863 Georgy accepted a new assignment on the staff at the Army Hospital in Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island. Jane joined her to become assistant superintendents under Katherine Wormeley. With Wonmeley and Georgeanna as her mentors, Jane learned hospital management.
Source of information:

GENE: Dwight, Benjamin Woodbridge, of Clinton, NY. THE DESCENDANTS OF THE REV. BENJAMIN WOOLSEY OF DOSORIS (GLEN COVE), L. I., "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record". Devoted to the Interests of American Genealogy and Biography. Published for the Society. Mutt Memorial Hall, No.64 Madison Avenue. New York City. Volume IV. July. 1873.

GENE: Hodge, 0. J. THE HODGE FAMILY GENEALOGY. 1900. Newberry Library Index. FHL film# 844955. p.280.

GENE: Woolsey, Ruben M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY ---A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1936-1969. 2.190.

CIVILWAR: Woolsey, Jane Stuart. HOSPITAL DAYS, Reminiscence of a Civil War Nurse. With an introduction by Daniel John Hoisington. 1996. Edinborough Press. P.O. Box 13790. Roseville,MN 55113-2293. (www purchased this book, Sep 1999, and it is now in his library.) p.3-S.

CENSUS: 1880 Census Newport Newport, Rhode Island. FHL film 1255210. N.A, film T9-1210. P. 264C.
  Abby H. Woolsey Self F S W 51 VA
  Jane S. Woolsey Sister F S W 49 NY
  and 5 others  

ON-LINE: Jane Stuart Woolsey (photo) Following her service as hospital superintendent at Fairfax Seminary Hospital. Woolsey wrote her book, Hospital Days. The New York Evening Post called this preface: "one of the most perfect bits of English prose within our knowledge."

More About JANE STUART WOOLSEY:
Military: Civil War - Nurse
Residence 2: Bet. 1861 - 1862, NY - New York City
  iii. GEORGEANNA MUIRSON WOOLSEY, b. September 05, 1831, CT; d. 1906; m. DR., FRANCIS BACON, 1866, Manhattan, New York, New York.

Notes for GEORGEANNA MUIRSON WOOLSEY:
Mrs. Georgeanna Muirson (Woolsey) Bacon, accompanied by another woman, came to Gettysburg to serve as a nurse with the United States Sanitary Commission at Camp Letterman. The main duty during the three weeks they stayed at the hospital was to help feed the multitude of Union and Confederate wounded who came into the "Sanitary Lodge" located near the camp train depot. Here the men waited for the next train to take them out of Gettysburg. The hours were long and wearisome, but Mrs. Bacon stuck through the hard times and assisted hundreds of injured soldiers. She wrote about her experiences soon after, praising the local Gettysburg women for their faithfulness and charity to the wounded and strangers who came to town. She was not so kind to the local man populace, especially in recounting the visit to the camp of a curious farmer:

"Few good things can be said of the Gettysburg farmers... One of this kind came creeping into our camp three weeks after the battle. He lived five miles only from the town, and had 'never seen a rebel.' He heard we had some of them, and came down to see them. 'Boys,' we said, marching him into the tent which happened to be full of rebels that waiting for the train; 'Boys, here's a man who never saw a rebel in his life, and wants to look at you;' and there he stood with his mouth wide open, and there they lay in rows, laughing at him, stupid old Dutchman.
'And why haven't you seen a rebel?' Mrs. --- said; 'why didn't you take your gun and help to drive them out of your town?'
'A feller might'er got hit!'- which reply was quite too much for the rebels. They roared with laughter at him, up and down the tent."
- from THREE WEEKS AT GETTYSBURG, Anson D. Randolph, NY, 1863

Source of information:

GENE: Dwight, Benjamin Woodbridge, of Clinton, NY. THE DESCENDANTS OF THE REV. BENJAMIN WOOLSEY OF DOSORIS (GLEN COVE), L. I., "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record". Devoted to the Interests of American Genealogy and Biography. Published for the Society. Mutt Memorial Hall, No.64 Madison Avenue. New York City. Volume IV. July. 1873.

GENE: Hodge, 0. J. THE HODGE FAMILY GENEALOGY. 1900. Newberry Library Index. FHL film# 844955. p.280.

GENE: Woolsey, Ruben M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY ---A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1936-1969. 2.190.

More About GEORGEANNA MUIRSON WOOLSEY:
Military: Civil War - Nurse
Occupation: Nurse
Residence: NY - New York City

More About DR., FRANCIS BACON:
Occupation: Surgeon

  iv. MARY ELIZABETH WATTS WOOLSEY 1832, CT; m. June 16, 1853 REV ROBERT SHAW HOWLAND, b. 1820; d. 1887.

More About MARY ELIZABETH WATTS WOOLSEY:
Residence: NY - New York City

More About REV ROBERT SHAW HOWLAND:
Church of the Heavenly Rest

  v. ELIZA NEWTON WOOLSEY, b. July 22, 1835, New York; d. July 03, 1917, Dutchess County, New York; m. JOSEPH HOWLAND.

Photo of Georgeanna and Eliza.

  vi. HARRIET ROOSEVELT WOOLSEY, b. 1836, CT; m. DR HUGH LENOX JR HODGE, January 07, 1869, New York.

More About HARRIET ROOSEVELT WOOLSEY:
Residence: NY - New York City

More About DR HUGH LENOX JR HODGE:
Occupation: M.D. (Medical Doctor)

  vii. CAROLINE CARSON WOOLSEY, b. 1838; m. EDWARD MITCHELL.

More About EDWARD MITCHELL:
Occupation: Lawyer

  viii. CAPT CHARLES WILLIAM WOOLSEY, b. April 18, 1840, MA - Boston, Suffolk; d. January 06, 1907, NC - Ashville, Cuncom; m. ARIXENE SOUTHGAGE SMITH, April 25, 1867.

Notes for CAPT CHARLES WILLIAM WOOLSEY:
ON-LINE:  Ellis Island New York - Passengers who came through Ellis Island.
Woolsey, Charles W. US Cit. SHIP: Le Bourgongne Arrived. 5 Oct 1896 Age: 56 Depart. Port: Le Havre. Seine-Inferior. France
Woolsey, Charles W. US Cit. SHIP: Kronprinz Wilhelm Arriv: 24 Oct 1906 Age: 66 Southampton. Southamptonshire
Source of information

GENE: Dwight. Benjamin Woodbridge, of Clinton, NY. THE DESCENDANTS OF THE REV. BENJAMIN WOOLSEY. OF DOSORIS (GLEN COVE), L.I. "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record". Devoted to the Interests of American Genealogy and Biography. Published for the Society. Mott Memorial Hall, No.64 Madison Avenue. New York City. Volume IV, July. 1873.
GENE:  Dwight, Benjamin W. The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong. Of Northampton. Massachusetts. 2 Volumes. Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore. 1975. Reprint. Vol. 2, p.970-I.

GENE:  Woolsey,Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY-.- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1936-1969. 2.160.2.190.

EDWARD JOHN7 WOOLSEY (GEORGE MUIRSON6, BENJAMIN JR5, BENJAMIN4, GEORGE II3, GEORGE "JORIS"2, GEORGE SR1) was born 1803, and died 1873. He married EMILY PHILLIPS ASPINWALL.

Child of EDWARD WOOLSEY and EMILY ASPINWALL is:
4. i. EDWARD JOHN8 WOOLSEY, b. 1841, NY; d. 1895.


Generation No. 8



4. EDWARD JOHN8 WOOLSEY (EDWARD JOHN7, GEORGE MUIRSON6, BENJAMIN JR5, BENJAMIN4, GEORGE II3, GEORGE "JORIS"2, GEORGE SR1) was born 1841 in NY, and died 1895. He married FRANCIS MARVIN SMYTHE 1870.

Child of EDWARD WOOLSEY and FRANCIS SMYTHE is:
  i. GEORGE MUIRSON9 WOOLSEY, b. August 16, 1871, NY - New York City; m. ESTHER MORRIS HUNT, February 16, 1901, RI - Newport, Newport; b. September 09, 1876; d. October 19, 1901.
Notes for GEORGE MUIRSON WOOLSEY:
Asst. to chairman, NY Co Chapter of Arc Vp St. Nicolas Soc. Clubs: St James (London), Knickerbocker, Racquet and Tennis.

More About GEORGE MUIRSON WOOLSEY:
Education: 1894, Columbia School of Mines, 1894 (Delta Phi),
Occupation: Banker and broker
Residence: NY - 39 W 54th St..



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