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Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan - Death Notices

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 2
Mr. Mason of the firm of Dowling & Mason, real estate and insurance agents, went below some time before the opening of navigation, intending to return by first boat. Sickness and death, however have visited his family and delayed his return. He has been called upon to follow a beloved sister to the grave and at last accounts was hourly expecting his father's death. His many friends in the Sault tender their heartfelt sympathy in his bereavement.

Saturday March 12th 1898 Page 3
Tone (Special Correspondence)
The funeral of Mr. Blair of Pickford, occurred Friday. Interment was made in Bethel cemetery.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
Ex-sheriff Brennah, of Bay City, died of consumption of the 4th.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
Col. Thos. S. Spragge, a well known patent attorney of Detroit, died on Monday, age 64.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
D. J. Spragge, the oldest G.A.R. man in the state, died at Bronson Saturday, aged 83 years.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
John Snyder, of Bushnell township, Montcalm county, while insane, on the 1st, crushed his wife's head with an axe, killing her instantly.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
Mrs. Chas. Martin, wife of a farmer living near Grand Rapids, poisoned herself and two of her children on the 3d, with "rough on rats."

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
Upper Peninsula News
John Nester, of Baraga, brother of Thomas and Timothy, died at his home on Sunday last.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
A terrible accident occurred in the rolling mill of the Hubbard Iron company, at Hubbard,, Ohio, shortly after 2 o'clock on the morning of the 6th. Engineer Griffith Phillipps, aged 29 years in passing around the ore crusher oiling the bearings, was caught in the wheels and dragged into the crusher. He was mangled out of all semblance of humanity, the flesh adhering to the clogs. He leaves a wife and 3 children.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
George B. Peck, whose mother lives in Onondaga county, N,Y, committed suicide in front of the residence of W. H. Dodge, a well-to-do farmer, two miles north of Elkhorn, Wis., on the 5th. It seems that Peck married Dodge's daughter a year ago while she was teaching school at Wyoming, N.Y., against the wishes of the young lady's parents. A separation was brought about and Peck went to Michigan. He appeared at Dodge's house and after an unsatisfactory interview with his wife took his life in....

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 4
John Fromer was shot and killed at Greensburg, Ind. On the 7th by his wife, in his brother Charles' bakery. They had separated a short time ago and John was living with his brother. The cause of their separation was Mrs. Fromer's violent aversion to her husband's two little children by a former wife. Since the separation she has asked him to return and put the children in a boarding house, which he refused to do. On the day of the shooting she talked to him in the bakery a while and was heard to say several times: "Won't you come, John?" As he said "No" and turned to go she drew a revolver and fired. Just then she was caught and disarmed. She said she intended to kill herself also. She talked insanely, saying God's spirit told her to kill her husband.

Thursday, May 12, 1887 Page 7
Jean P. Soquet was found guilty on the 4th at Green Bay, Wis., of murder in the first degree. The crime was committed fourteen years ago and the victim was his wife. At the time of the occurrence Soquet and August Mainsart's wife were on very intimate terms. Mrs. Soquet and Mr. Mainsart died within a short time of each other and the widow and widower at once married. Mrs. Mainsart was tried for the murder of her husband, but the case was not proved. A short time ago Mrs. Minsart, now Mrs. Soquet, sued for a divorce and suceeding development caused Soquet's arest for the murder of his first wife. Mrs. Soquet No. 2 mysteriously disappeared when the case came to trial.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
Justice Woods, of the United States supreme court, died at Washington on the 14th inst.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
At North Branch on the 11th, Alexander Hoy's little son spilled a bottle of carbolic acid over his body. The stuff burned the child from his head to his feet, and he will probably die.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
Smith J. Tooker, a pioneer, died on the 11th, at Lansing, of paralysis, aged 68 years. Tooker was a member of the first party that located in Lansing, and his wife was the first white woman there. He was one of the 15 original members of the state pioneers society.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
Mrs. Dean Mix, of Kalmo, Eaton count, was thrown from a buggy recently and probably fatally hurt, one limb being broken and other severe injuries sustained. Her father named Slater, was killed by the cars several years ago, her brother Kit was drowned two years ago while fishing, and her mother is at present almost helpless from a stroke of paralysis.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
John Huster dropped dead in a Neugaunce saloon on the 12th.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
Judge George Woodruff died at Marshall on the 13th, aged 80 yrs.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
Nahum N. Wilson, pioneer of Genesse county, is dead at Flint, aged 82 years.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 3
George Smith's two year old child at William's, Bay county, died last week in great agony after eating heartly of canned peaches.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 4
Mrs. George W. Stevenson, of Jackson, died on the 13th, from the effects of injuries received by the explosion of a gasoline stove last week.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 4
Lewis Roberts' and wife, of Galien, Berrien county, ate some berries which had been canned two years or more. Both were taken ill, but Roberts soon recovered; Mrs. Roberts died.

Thursday, May 19, 1887 Page 8
John McLain, who had been working in a cedar camp near St. Ignace the past winter, began choking at the dinner table at the Snyder house, St. Ignace, on the 11th, and died a half hour later. He is supposed to have a sister at Cheboygan.

Thursday, May 26, 1887 Page 4
Charles E. Stuart, of Kalamazoo, died on the 19th inst. at his home having been an invalid for twenty years. He was a member of congress two terms and senator one term 1853 to 1856. Thirty years ago, Mr. Stuart was one of the most prominent Democratic leaders in this state. Michigan owes Mr. Stuart the passage of the Act appropiating the land which constructed the Sault Ste. Marie Canal.

Thursday, May 26, 1887 Page 4
Wm. Bedford died at Dollarville recently, aged 60 years.

Thursday, May 26, 1887 Page 4
Mrs. Geo. H. Carey, wife of the the station agent at Dollarville, died on the 12th inst.

Thursday, May 26, 1887 Page 8
On Monday last, 23d inst., Peter Olmstead, of Detour, started from that place for the Sault in a sailboat loaded with potatoes. When near the Encampment a passing barge was hailed for a tow up. A line was thrown from the barge, which struck one of the spars of the sailboat and precipitated Olmstead into the water. He immediately sank and was drowned. His son was on board the boat at the time and witnessed the sad affair.
The deceased was about 45 years of age and had resided at Detour for upwards of 25 years. Several brothers still reside there. He leaves a widow, a daughter of Capt. Stiles, of this place.


Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 1
Death of Mrs. W. H. Smith Died- At her late residence, Ferris Street, on Monday, May 30, at 11:00 a.m., Mrs. William H. Smith, in the 43d year of her age. Mrs. Smith was born in Yarmouth, Ontario, and had been a resident of Sault Ste. Marie since 1871, during which time she had made a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. The most of these friendships were formed by the bed of sickness and were warm and lasting. Mrs. S. was a practical nurse, and understood the whims and caprices of the sick perfectly. She had charge of the Marine Hospital here for some years, and many a poor mariner tossing upon a bed of sickness, a stranger in a strange land, had cause to be thankful for many acts of kindness and attention received at her hands. Her work in that direction was not confined to the hospital, however. Wherever there was sickness and she thought she could be of service, there she was to be found. Night after night she has sat at the bedside of the suffering, comforting them in her sympathising way. These kindly traits of character won for her the love and esteem of the community, and she will always be remembered lovingly by those to whom she ministered.
Mrs. Smith leaves a husband and five children, one of them an infant a week old, to mourn the loss of an affectionate wife and kind mother. The funeral took place yesterday at 2:30 p.m. from the M. E. Church and was very largely attended.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 4
Louis Mickelson was shot and instantly killed on the 25th by Amos Rhodes at a logging camp four miles south of Manistee. During the past four months Mickelson had employed Rhodes and wife as housekeepers on his farm, a few miles south of that city, and during the spring Mickelson has been engaged, in addition to his farming duties, in logging about one mile from his farm. During that afternoon Rhodes came to Jark's store in the Village of Oak Hill, and bought some small buckshot, and after he had put the same in his pocket remarked that he was going to shoot Mickelson. Returning to the farm Rhodes learned that Mickelson had gone to his logging camp to load logs. Rhodes took a gun, loaded it, and said he would hunt up and kill Mickelson. The son of Mickelson hearing the remark, ran to his father and apprised him of his danger but his father treated it as a scare. Soon after Rhodes appeared where Mickelson was at work with a half dozen men and getting within twenty feet of Mickelson called out to him, "if you have anything to say, say it, as I am going to shoot you" Mickelson said, "Go away and don't molest me in my work" whereupon Rhodes aimed the gun and fired, over 100 shots striking Mickelson in the left breast, some penetrating to the heart, causing instant death. Rhodes returned to his home and went to bed, where he was afterwards arrested and placed in jail. The friends of Rhodes claim that Mickelson had been intimate with Mrs. Rhodes and that Rhodes is crazy. Mickelson was 45 years of age, has always been a hardworking quiet person, had a wife and several children who reside in the city, where the children can enjoy better educational advantages. Rhodes is 26 years old, of German descent and a few years ago came from the eastern part of Ohio. He has a wife and one child.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 4
Eleazer Moister, one of Bay City's oldest Jewish citizens, died there on the 23d ult., aged 63.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 4
A polish boy five years old was struck in the stomach by a base ball while watching a game at Grand Rapids last week and instantly killed.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 4
At Canton, Ohio, last week, Charles Danseizen, a bricklayer, went home drunk and, picking up a butcher-knife six inches long, murdered his wife by stabbing her in the throat. He says she drove him to the deed because she joined the salvation army.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 4
A letter from Fulton County, Ark., says James Smith and John Howell, who were passing through that couty last week were attacked by a pack of wolves. Two leaped upon the horse and seized Howell by the neck, wounding him so seriously that he died. Smith was dangerously wounded, but succeeded in escaping to the house of Jack Arnette, closely followed by the wolves. From there they went to a creek near by and attacked James Thompson, one of a fishing party, fatally wounding him and seriously injuring a companion. A party started out to hunt them down and succeeded in killing one, but the others are still in the neighbourhood.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 5
Rose Coleman, a domestic in C. L. Newell's family died on Thursday night last of paralysis after an illness of only two days. Mrs. Newell was very kind to the girl during her brief illness, doing all she possibly could for her. The funeral took place on Friday afternoon. The deceased belonged to Manitoulin Island, Ontario.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 5
Frank Gardner, a seaman on the schooner Wagstaff, while reefing, in a recent gale on Lake Huron, fell on a coil of rope, receiving fatal injuries. He is from Cleveland.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 8
St. Ignace Notes
Mrs. Hulbert, wife of William C. Hulbert, died at Erie, Pa., on May 23. The family had been residents of Mackinac Island for 20 years, but removed to Erie 15 years ago.

Thursday, June 2, 1887 Page 8
Patrick Hoban, died at Mackinac Island on the 24th, in the 85th year of his age. He had been a resident of the Island for 38 years.

Thursday, June 9, 1887 Page 2
The death is announced of Thomas Spencer Bayes, the well-known professor of logic, and one of the editors of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Thursday, June 9, 1887 Page 4
Elijah Daker, foreman of the Detroit Steel and Spring Works, dropped dead about 11 o'clock on the morning of the 2d. He stepped into an outhouse. A moment later he was heard to cry "Oh!" and seen to fall. He died before a physician could arrive. It is supposed he died of heart disease. Daker was about 40 years of age and brother of the superintendent of the works. He had just built a new house on twenty-fourth street, and was in good circumstances. He moved to Detroit with his wife and three children from Pittsburgh about three years ago.

Thursday, June 9, 1887 Page 5
A prisoner in the Ionia house of correction, named Joseph Descario while attempting to escape from that institution recently, was shot dead by a keeper. He was a Canadian Frenchman from St. Ignace and was sent to prison February 21, for three years for perjury. He was 24 years old.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 4
John Byron, aged 72, living in West Bay City, was discovered dead last week. Appoplexy was the cause.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 5
Word was received here on the morning of the 10th of the death of C. W. Endress, a former resident of this place, which occurred at his late residence, Two Rivers, Wis. Mr. Endress was engaged in the drug business here, but ill health compelled him to sell out and remove to a warmer climate. About six years ago he left the Sault and had been gradually growing worse, the past two years being almost entirely confined to his bed. He had been a great sufferer and his friends, while mourning his death, cannot help feeling thankful that his sufferings are at an end. The remains were brought here by steamer on Sunday morning and the funeral took place the afternoon of the same day. The masons of which he was an old member paid the last tribute of respect to their deceased brother by taking charge of the funeral and performing their beautiful burial service over the grave.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 5
James Campbell, of Pickford, being troubled for some-time past with a sore neck, left his home and came to the city for treatment. Dr. Rundle was attending him, and apparently he was improving. On Saturday morning, at 6 o'clock after arising from bed and getting ready for his breakfast he dropped dead. The body was sent to Pickford for burial.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 6
Cheboygan Notes
Jacob Sammons, a native of Cheboygan, and for some time bookkeeper for the Northwestern Hospital Co., died at the hospital last Sunday and was buried Tuesday afternoon by the Masons.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 4
John Brooks, an old man, dropped dead at Sturgis recently.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 7
At Brownsville, Texas, recently a thunderbolt struck a house at Chatone's ranch, killing two people and stunning four others. Manuel Portales and his wife were killed outright. Eugenio Rincones and his wife were stunned and when brought to, were each blind of the right eye. Two boys, sons of Rincones, were stunned. The entire party lay senseless for about an hour. The lightning glanced from the mesquite trees near by, entered through the roof of the jacal and struck them all down as they stood around a table. The suspicion has always existed among their neighbours that Portales and his wife killed her first husband, and they claim that Heaven's vengeance has been executed on Portales and his wife and a warning given to others.

Thursday, June 16, 1887 Page 7
At Washington, recently, while workmen were engaged in the construction of a stone warehouse in the southeastern part of the city, the scaffolding, which was covered with several tons of stone, gave way and precipitated the contractor, James McKnight, and five masons to the ground, a distance of thirteen feet. John Clark, aged 60 years had his skull crushed by a falling stone and died almost instantly. Thomas Chapman, a stone mason, and James Murray, a laborer, who were beneath the scaffolding, sustained serious injuries, and John Hogan, Wm. Lannon, sr., and Wm. Lannon, jr., and McKnight were also injured, but, it is believed, not seriously.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 5
-A Dakota Tornado-
On the 17th, Grand Forks, Dakota, was visited with a destructive tornado. The storm came from the west and travelled due east. Twenty-five or more buildings, including the Catholic Church and the University of North Dakota, were blown to the ground. The laboratory and museum in the university were almost totally destroyed, besides hundreds of smaller dwellings, storehouses and sheds.
The following were killed outright: Mrs. Follett and her mother Mrs. Davis; Cora Starbird, 12 years old: a man named Gummerson, in East Grand Forks.
The seriously injured were: Mrs. A. Starbird and child. Mrs. Ed Tierney and two children, Mrs. J. Andrew and two children, Mrs. Taltao and two children, Mrs. Guyot and daughter, at the University of North Dakota.
In East Grand Forks fourteen business building were destroyed. Both bridges across the river were swept away. The total loss is estimated at $100,000. The storm was local. The train from the North was blown from the track about four miles out, and rolled over a couple of tiimes. No one was killed, but many were seriously injured. During the storm Halver Leland, of Walle Township, was killed. The storm was reported quite severe at Manvel and Ardock, where buildings were blown away. The Andrew family had their house torn to pieces and carried 100 feet. Ed Tierney's house was overturned and his wife injured. The children were carried 150 feet and not hurt. One of them 6 years old, was carried across the railroad track and lay there during the whole storm. C. A. Myerstorm was dangerously hurt.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 5
The steamer Champlain, of the Northern Transportation Line, plying between Chicago and St. Ignace, burned at midnight on the 16th, half-way between Norwood and Charlevoix. She had fifty-seven persons on board, passengers, officers and crew, and a large amount of freight, with some horses.
The Lost
Mrs. Ella Smith, of Charlevoix; drowned; body recovered.
Geo. Wrisley, Charlevoix; drowned; not recovered.
Robert Welch, Charlevoix; burned.
Capt. G. G. Lucas, Petoskey; drowned; body recovered.
Russell Jackson, agent of the Corset Company; died of exhaustion after reaching shore.
Henry Burhan, clerk, also died of exhaustion.
Mr. and Mrs. Keogh, Chicago; drowned; bodies not recovered.
Two children of Martin Bange, steward; drowned, bodies not recovered.
Jack Hoxtley, second cook, drowned; body recovered.
Mrs. Mary Fall and daughter, Lulu Williard, residence unknown, missing.
Unknown man and little boy, who took passage at Milwaukee for Mackinac Island both drowned. The body of the father was found, but not that of the boy.
Four whites and four Indians, from Elk Rapids, of the boat's crew and Eddie Wilkins, cabin boy, of Chicago, drowned. The latter's body was found.
The following gives the identity of the "unknown-man and little boy" referred to above:
"Upon the body of one of the dead was found a piece of paper on which were these words." If anything happens to me, write my wife, Mrs. J. J. Rogers, Fort Mackinac. J. J. Rogers, Hospital Steward, U. S. Army." His little boy with him, is missing."
-The Captains's Statement-
Capt. Casey states that the first he knew of the fire the first engineer rushed up on the upper deck with his clothes all ablaze. He shouted to him to jump into the water tank and with the assistance of the first mate threw him in and extinguished the flames. The engine room was all on fire, and after seeing that there was no chance to quench the flames, the Captain headed the boat for Fisherman's Island and gave orders to lower the boats. But the boat, was rushing along at full speed, and before they could be launched the fire drove all hands upon the bow of the boat. Here all were provided with life preservers. The boat grounded about a mile from shore. The flames had been kept back by the speed of the boat and the wind, but now they came rapidly nearer and the people were forced to take to the water. Many were let down with lines, while others jumped overboard.
The captain says it was not more than ten minutes from the time the fire broke out before the boat was wrapped in flames.
The books were lost, and as the clerk died from exhaustion after being picked up, it is possible that a complete list of the lost will never be secured. The engineer and firemen who were saved, are at Smithson's camp, six miles from Charlevoix, and they were so badly burned that he made no effort to learn from them the manner in which the fire originated.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 4
Frank Monogan, an ex-soldier of the 3d Mich, calvary, was horribly mutilated by a log train on the F. & P. M. road, near Bay City recently. It is believed that he was murdered for his pension money, which he had just drawn, and afterwards placed on the track to cover up the crime.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 5
On Thursday last the body of a man was found floating in the canal, above the upper gate. It was taken from the water and identified as the remains of Thomas Wigwaus, an Indian belonging to Sugar Island, who had been missing for some time. A inquest was held in the afternoon. Medical testimony was to the effect that the deceased's brain was affected, and that he had probably walked over the pier in a fit of temporary insanity. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 5
Capt. Henry E. Brooks, of Green Bay perhaps the oldest vessel master on the lakes, is dead. He was born in 1807, and had been on the water ever since he was ten years of age. He assisted in hauling the steamer Independents from Lake Huron to Lake Superior in 1843. He retired in 1882, the last vessel he sailed being the steamer M. C. Hawley.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 7

Saturday morning John Doran, of Baraga while measuring lumber, was suddenly taken with a fit and fell into the lake and was drowned.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 7
A brakeman, named Kippen, was killed while coming through the Rock cut on the Antoine branch near Norway last Saturday night. Sixty ore cars ran over him and the unfortunate man was cut to pieces -Escanaba Mirror.

Thursday, June 23, 1887 Page 7
On the 15th inst. while J. C. Ryan and Harry Treloar were drilling out a blast which had missed fire in the Paint River Mine at Crystal Falls, the blast went off, blowing off the heads and arms of both men and horribly mangling their bodies.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 3
Giles Daubany, of Cheltenham, England committed suicide at Cheboygan on the 23d, by shooting, himself. He was discouraged, having no employment or means.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 4
Silas Holt, while in a drunken frenzy, fell or jumped from the second story of the house where he was boarding at Houghton and fractured his skull, besides receiving serious injuries. He cannot recover.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 4
Barney Drake hung himself by the neck to the ladder in his barn at Springfield, recently. Drake was 74 years old and had resided in Springfield thirty-five years.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 4
John Norman, of Escanaba, was killed at Ishpeming on the 23d, by being thrown from a buggy.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 4
The Florence, Wis., NEWS says the mystery which has surrounded the fate of Willie Dickenson, the 6-year-old son of Capt. William E. Dickenson of Commonwealth, who mysteriously disappeared while returning home from school on the afternoon of November l, 1881, has at last, it is thought, been cleared up. It is believed that the boy was kidnapped and murdered by certain disreputable parties who infested Florence and Commonwealth some six or seven years ago. The motive for the crime is thought to have been revenge, the supposed kidnappers having become incensed against Captain Dickinson because he had thwarted them in some of their acts of villainy. Recently a letter was found in Milwaukee giving a clue to the whole mystery, and the father is there engaged with the police in investigating the affair.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 4
On the 26th, Gen. James Speed died at Louisville, Ky. He was attorney general under president Lincoln.

Thursday, June 30, 1887 Page 5
A man named Lightheart, belonging to Mudge Bay, Ontario was drowned at Garden River on Monday last, while swimming his horses across the river at that point he was in some manner thrown from the back of one of the animals and carried down stream by the current, drowning before assistance could reach him. His body was recovered.

Thursday, July 7, 1887 Page 4
Wm. F. Smith, general passenger agent of the Grand Trunk railway, died suddenly while sitting at his desk in New York, on the 27th ult.

Thursday, July 7, 1887 Page 4
At Kingston, Ontario at the jubilee celebration, a sad accident occurred on the cricket field in connection with the fireworks display. A printer named Jos. Thompson was hit by a rocket which swept down upon him and instantly killed him. His head was almost severed from his body.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
At Leitchfield, Ky., on the night of the 6th, W. R. May, distiller and whiskey seller, was called from bed by some one who pretended to want a quart of whiskey. May obtained the key of his grocery and went with the man. The assassin was stationed in front of the building, and as soon as the light fell upon May's face, discharged a load of buckshot into his head, killing him instantly.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
An 8 year old son of Conductor Hubbard, of Port Huron, was hit on the nose by a batted ball, Friday and gradually bled to death dying Monday.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
A young man named Stal Neusman, of Muskegon, is in jail charged with killing his father aged 60 years.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
James Crotty of Oakland county, is dead at the age of 82; also David Turrell, an old hotel man and among the first settlers of Genessee county aged 68.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
Maud Blye, of Charlotte, was fatally injured by the cars on the 4th, and Jos. Gibbons of the same place, was killed by the bursting of an anvil used in celebrating.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
John Anderson, an employee of the S. N. Wilcox Lumber Company's mill at Whitehall, was cut in two on the 6th, his body falling in two pieces on each side of the edger saw.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
Ben D. House, adjutant general of the Indiana G. A. R., and known a poet and journalist throughout the state, died at Indianapolis on the 4th.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 4
Private Thomas N. Bateman, troop of the Second United States Cavalry, shot and killed First Sergt. Samuel M. Sopher, of the same troop, at the Presidio Barracks, San Francisco on, the 5th, for a reprimand.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 5
Hebert, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. France, died on Wednesday morning of cholera infantum, after a few hours illness.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 5
E. J. Nickerson was drowned at the mouth of Cheboygan river Sunday while rafting cedar.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 5
Mrs. Gleason, of Jonesville, Hillsdale Co., daughter of W. C. Knox of this place, arrived here on the 2d, with her three children on a visit to her parents. That evening her baby aged three month was taken ill and on Sunday the little one died. On Thursday last her little two year old son died, and at this writing the remaining child is very low. The death of the little boy was the eight that has occurred in Mr. Knox's family since September last. Mrs. Gleason's visit has been a very sad one to her.

Thursday, July 14, 1887 Page 8
A five year old son of Mr. F. Fleming, manager of the Sault Brick & Tile company, died suddenly this week.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 4
Sergeant Clark, who fired the fatal shot at Private Arthur Stone at Fort Wayne, Detroit, will be held for trial on a charge of murder in the U.S. circuit court.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 2
Near, Logansport, Ind., at an early hour on the morning of the 12th, W. A. Garner was awakened by some one groping around the room. Seeing a form at the window, he thought it was a burglar, and he fired at it. The body fell. When he got a light he found he had shot his wife and she was dead.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 2
Benjamin West second cook on the streamer Winslow, died suddenly on Saturday about 11 o'clock, while the steamer was between Port Huron and this place. On her arrival here the authorities were notified and coroner Cota at once summoned a jury and held an inquest. Dr. Marks, attending physician after an examination of the remains, and the testimony of two witnesses, stated that death resulted from inflamation of the bowels, superinduced by an attack of cholera morbus. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes. The remains were then turned over to Thompson Bros., undertakers, for burial. West had sailed on the lakes for a number of years but this was his first trip on the Winslow.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 2
A sensational murder occurred in Washington on the 13th. Joseph C. Kennedy, a very prominent lawyer and old resident of the capital, was fatally stabbed by a laborer named Joseph Dailey, without apparent provocation.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 2
The Supreme Court of Missouri has overruled the motion for a new trial in the case of Brooks, better known by his alias, Maxwell, who was tried last fall for the murder of Preller, found guilty and sentenced to be hanged on the 12th of August.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 4
Wm. Carl, for 22 years conductor on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad was killed Monday near Hillsdale, while in charge of a gravel train. He slipped and fell between the wheels.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 4
Mrs. Cole, of Marshall, fell out of the second story window of her house Monday and was killed. Whether the fall was accidental or intentional is not known.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 4
Harry Bell, a former resident of and well known in Pontiac, died at Windsor, Ontario, recently.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 5
Rev. Dr. Thomson received the sad intelligence yesterday morning that his boy was fatally injured at St. Paul. Mr. and Mrs. Thomson and son returned home to-day. No particulars.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 2
Thos. Black, who was driven out of Bessemer with a load of shot in his body, was killed by a negro in his employ, last week. Black kept a floating den on Lake Goegebic.

Thursday, July 21, 1887 Page 5
Mrs. Thos. Fahey died at her late residence, Spruce avenue, on Tuesday evening, 19th inst. The funeral will be held this morning at 10 o'clock. The deceased leaves a husband and two children, one an infant, to mourn her loss.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 2
George C. Rels, manager of the Iron River Furnace Company, of Iron River, was killed at that place by the cars. Mr. Rels was walking down the track when the train was set in motion by being struck by a switch engine. He was knocked down and dragged about a hundred feet. His legs and arms were broken and his body frightful mangled.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 2
Frank E. Heminway, of Bay City, a young attorney, died at Quannicassee last Monday.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 2
Geo. Harrington, aged 17 was fatally shot in the forehead.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 2
David Aldrick, a baker, aged 65 years, who had been a resident of Battle Creek 35 years dropped dead on the 19th.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 2
Mrs. W. A. Lambertson was fatally shot in the left breast, just above the heart.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 3
Freddie, infant son of Fred W. and Lulu Roach, died of cholera infantum on Sunday evening last, the 24th inst., at 5:30 o'clock, aged nearly four months. He was born on Sunday April 4 at 5:30 p.m., and his death occurring on a Sunday at the same hour, was deemed not a little remarkable by his parents and their friends. The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. A. B. Roach on Monday last, the Rev. Mr. Cory officiating. The parents have the warm sympathy of a large circle of friends in their affliction, particularly as the young mother was just convalescing from nearly fatal illness and it was feared that the loss of the child might cause a relapse. However, no danger is now apprehended, as Mrs. Roach is in a fair way of recovery, which is a matter of rejoicing to her family and friends.

Thursday, July 28, 1887 Page 8
St. Ignace Notes
The 7-year old daughter of Ignatius Reagan died on Sunday.

Thursday, August 4, 1887 Page 2
Capt. Wm. A. Owen, one of Detroit prominent citizen was killed last week Tuesday by being thrown from a buggy. He was one of the most prominent Democratic leader in Detroit.

Thursday, August 4, 1887 Page 2
Franklin Elmer, an Eaton county pioneer, who recently died in his 84th year, abstained from any nourishment whatever for more than 50 days previous to his death.

Thursday, August 4, 1887 Page 2
Peter W. Bursha, a locomotive engineer on the Bay City division of the Michigan Central Railroad, was shot and almost instantly killed July 27th, at Detroit. The assassin was a young man who Bursha had befriended and who had alienated his wife's affection. Bursha was an industrious hardworking man and a favorite with those who knew him.

Thursday, August 4, 1887 Page 8
The infant son of William and Anna Sparling, died Friday morning last, aged 13 months. It was their only child and an exceedingly bright and interesting boy, who was the idol of its parents. There friends will unite in sympathy in their bereavement.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 2
Homer last week was the scene of a triple tragedy. Geo. Burton shot his wife, his mother-in-law and himself. Burton and his wife are dead, but the mother-in-law will survive. Domestic bickerings was the cause. Two children are orphaned by this sad affair.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 2
Dr. Upjohn, one of Hasting's most distinguished citizens died last Wednesday. He was one of the first regents of the university.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 2
Capt. Thos. Ball, of the Youngtown mine, at Crystal Falls, was killed last week by falling down the shaft of the mine.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 2
Joseph Korniecny, a Polack, employed at "Camp 4," two miles north of Gladstone on the line of the Soo road, having spent the Friday night of last week with some companions, among the saloons at the head of the bay, was returning at about 5 a.m. of Saturday to camp, when he fell overboard from the skiff, in which the trip had been made and was drowned in about three feet of water, being too drunk to stand erect and his companions too drunk to assist him.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 4
One of the deck hands on the steamer Mackinac fell overboard on Thursday night at the Island, while the boat was lying in dock. His body was recovered. On his right arm was pricked in Indian Ink an American eagle and the initials "J. L." On his left arm was the image of a child and underneath the stars and stripes, a cannon, etc. He was buried at the Island.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 4
Died: At Mackinac Island, Aug. 1st, '87, Louis Cadotte, aged about 74 years. Funeral from St. Ann's Church on Wednesday. Mr. Cadotte was born at Mackinac Island, and had lived here his life time. He was well known as an intelligent, honest and courteous man. He was often employed by the Government as an interpreter of Indian tongues, and he was a proficient in the different dialects of the tribes of this part of the northwest.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 6
Jas. Barklay, the pioneer settler of Bay City, is dead. He settled at Bay City in 1849, and built the first hotel. He ran the first stage and traded with the Indians forty years ago. He was quite wealthy and generally respected.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 6
Geo. H. Cary lost his little child last week. His wife has just died, and he had only returned from Charlotte where he buried her.

Thursday, August 11, 1887 Page 6
Mrs. Walter Lyon, died last week at the home of her parents in Cheboygan, she had left the village but a few days before and the first knowledge her husband had of her illness was the word of her death.

Thursday, August 18, 1887 Page 4
Archie, the ten-year old son of Dr. Newkirk, of Bay City, was thrown from a horse and killed last Wednesday. The horse stumbled and fell on the boy, crushing him to death.

Thursday, August 18, 1887 Page 7
John Maloney, a private at Fort Wayne, committed suicide last week. Maloney had been troubled with rheumatics, and been in the hospital for some time and being accused of feigning sickness to escape duty, he killed himself.

Thursday, August 18, 1887 Page 8
The infant son of Mrs. John Knox died on Monday last of cholera infantum. This is the sixth child she has lost and her husband died less than a year ago. She has the sympathy of the entire community in this, her sad bereavement.

Thursday, August 25, 1887 Page 2
Sheriff Lynch, of Alpena, is dead. He was shot by "Blinky" Morgan one of the Cleveland fur robbers, who was arrested for the murder of Detective Hulligan and the rescue of the gang at Ravanuo, Ohio.

Thursday, August 25, 1887 Page 3
Arthur, the four year-old son of William Ogle died last week Saturday of scarlet fever.

Thursday, August 25, 1888 Page 3
Claudie, the seven-year-old son of W. H. O'Brien, who has been suffering from an affliction of the spine for some time, died last Thursday. The remains were taken to Grayling for burial.

Thursday, September 1, 1887 Page 4
Prof. Spencer F. Baird, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, died at Woods Hall, Mass., last Friday. He was a scientist of great ability.

Thursday, September 1, 1887 Page 8
William Guard, a popular young man of Baraga died last week Friday of Typhoid fever.

Thursday, August 25, 1887 Page 6
A telegram came Sunday for Lou Veeder, in care of Frank McGough, saying that his little boy was dead. Lou went to Cheboygan from here, but has left there, and no one seems to know where he is. Lou's many friends here will be sorry to hear of his misfortune.

Thursday, August 25, 1887 Page 6
Wm. McMahon of White Fish Point desires in our columns to thank Captain McIntire for his kindness in delivering mail to him during his unfortunate bereavement, the loss of his youngest child.

Thursday, September 1, 1887 Page 3
Judge Daniel Goodwin, died at Detroit, last week Wednesday. He was the Nestor of the Michigan Bench, having been first appointed in 1843. His death was not unexpected as he had been sick for several months.

Thursday, September 1, 1887 Page 9
Tuesday morning about six o'clock Capt. Peter Mondor died at the residence of his brother Capt. James Mondor. The Capt. has been an invalid for nearly ten years, and totally blind. Before his affliction he was one of the best pilots and captains on the lakes and popular with all who knew him. The past few years he has received the best of care from his brother and his family, at whose residence he has lived, and all that a brother's love could do has been done for him. He was not thought to be worse than usual until about four o'clock Tuesday morning when it was seen by those attending him that he was gradually sinking and the end was near. He passed away quietly without suffering and was conscious almost to the last. ....The funeral took place this morning from the Catholic Church.

Thursday, September 8, 1887 Page 2
John Shalerd was killed by a fall of ground in the Youngstown mine, Crystal Falls, Saturday last.

Thursday, September 8, 1887 Page 6
Daniel Kennedy, a brakeman, had his head crushed and died instantly, while coupling cars on the Thayer Lumber Company's logging road Friday. He was a young man, unmarried, and his parents reside in Canada.

Thursday, September 8, 1887 Page 6
Jessie Pomeroy, the boy murderer doing life sentence in Massachusetts, has confessed to the killing of Horace Miller, of South Boston, making his seventh victim.

Thursday, September 8, 1887 Page 10
From the Marquette "Mining Jounal" we clip the following: "Rev. Father Jacker died at the bishop's residence Sunday afternoon at about 5 o'clock. After mass Sunday morning he was stricken with paralysis, and failed to rally, passing peacefully into his rest. Father Jacker was one of the best known priests on the upper peninsula as well as one of the oldest in point of service....."

Thursday, September 15, 1887 Page 2
Prof. O. S. Fowler, the phrenologist and lecturer, died after a brief illness yesterday near Sharon station, Conn.

Thursday, September 15, 1887 Page 8
OBITUARY--Died -On Saturday the 10th inst., of consumption, George Osmun, in the 47th year of his age.
Mr. Osmun was born in Dempsey township, Ontario, and resided there a number of years. Afterwards removing to other parts of that Province. In 1880, he with his family removed to this country, settling in Donaldson, where he continued to reside until last fall. He then came to the city and resided here until his death. During his residence in Donaldson he made a host of warm personal friends who were much grieved to hear of his death. Shortly after becoming a resident of this city he was attacked by that dread disease, consumption. He was able to be around and do light work until about eight weeks before his death when he was compelled to take to his bed. He leaves a wife and family to mourn his death. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon from the M. E. church of which society the deceased was always a zealous and consistent member. The Knights of Labor paid a last tribute of respect to the memory of a departed by taking charge of the funeral arrangements and attending in a body.

Thursday, September 15, 1887 Page 10
Canadian Sault
A man named Goodall was drowned in the Root River last week.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 5
Gen. Edward Clark died last week, Wednesday. He was born in Connecticut and came to Ann Arbor in 1872. He was a general in the Black Hawk war, and for the past 20 years a justice of the peace. He was also the first register of deeds in Washtenaw county.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 5
Edmund H. McQuigg, one of Flint's leading citizens, is dead.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 8
Ex. Gov. Luke P. Blackburn, who has been lying at the point of death at Frankford, Ky., for weeks past, died there at 2:35 p.m. last Wednesday. His last intelligible words were spoken last Sunday, and were "Oh, the beauty of religion". Ex- Gov. Blackburn was born June 16, 1816 in Woodford county, Ky. He was governor of Kentucky during the term which preceded that of the lately retired Govenor J. Prescott Know. He was a half brother of Senator J. S. C. Blackburn.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 11
Geo. Walker, a young man of about 26 years of age, an employee of Irwin's camp, suicided last Thursday. No cause is known except that he has been drinking heavily.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 11
Gov. Bartlett, of California, is dead and his successor, Lieut. Gov. Waterman, is a republican, although elected the same year.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 11
"Blinky Morgan", who shot Sheriff Lynch, of Alpena, has been arraigned at Ravenna, Ohio, for the murder of Detective Mulligan.

Thursday, September 22, 1887 Page 12
A little niece of Geo. Wheatley died yesterday morning of Diptheria. His little boy is also sick with the same complaint.

Thursday, September 29, 1887 Page 7
Gen. Wm. Preston died last week at Lexington, Ky., aged 81 years. He was prominent in the confederate army and was confederate ambassador to England and France.

Thursday, September 29, 1887 Page 7
The fund at Ashtabula Harbor for the widow and children of the late Capt. Clements of the ill-fated Niagara has reached over $200.

Thursday, September 29, 1887 Page 10
Capt. Geo. Beringer died at Norway last Thursday of pneumonia. The remains were to be brought to Negaunee for burial on Saturday. He was one of the oldest and most experienced mining men in this peninsula, and had long been prominent in this county before removing to the Menominee range. He leaves a son and two daughters, and a host of friends all over the peninsula.

Thursday, October 6, 1887 Page 5
Gilbert Carmichael, one of Negaunee's most prominent citizens, died last week.

Thursday, October 6, 1887 Page 6
Will Mahon, conductor on an ore train, met an untimely death by an accident to his train Monday. The train while going down the grade between Bancroft and Marquette, got beyond control so that the engine had to let go and run for safety to side track, while the train of ore cars came thundering in its rear, running into another string of loaded cars at Marquette, smashing things in fearful shape. Cars were piled four high, and Mahon's body was found under the wreck when it was cleared away.

Thursday, October 6, 1887 Page 11
Milan had a case of cheese poisoning last week, in the family of S. H. Evans. The entire family partook of milk freely Friday and with one exception all were taken suddenly ill. Physicians were summoned and suspician turned toward the milk. Prof. Vaughan, of the University, was sent for and pronounced it a sure case of the effects of tyrotoxican. A boy of 12 or 14 years of age died Saturday; Mrs. Evans on Sunday, and it is feared one daughter may not recover. Mr. Evans is now believed to be out of danger.

Thursday, October 6, 1887 Page 11
J. T. Littress, a travelling man, suicided last week at the Russell House, Detroit. He said the world did not reward merit and left a letter explaining that this was the cause of his death, together with lack of funds.

Thursday, October 13, 1887 Page 4
The Minister to Mexico, Judge Thomas Manning, died in New York on the 11th inst.

Thursday, October 13, 1887 Page 9
George Reidy a son of Maurice Reidy, one of the oldest and a well known citizen of the Sault, died yesterday morning. He was around and playing about until Tuesday, when he was taken sick. From that time he sunk until death released his suffering. The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Reidy will condone with them on this unexpected loss of their bright and promising son.

Thursday, October 13, 1887 Page 9
Died- On Thursday, the 6th inst., of diphtheria, Harry T. Fitch, only son of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Fitch, after an illness, of only a few days. From the first of his illness he seemed to anticipate approaching death and although only seven years old, he talked of his going away as of going home, and tried to comfort his mother and sister, and urged them not to weep for him.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 4
Sudden Death —A Carpenter Drops Dead at the Superior House-Norman J. Scott is a carpenter who came to the Sault on or about the 9th day of July last, and has been employed for some time past on the round house. Since his arrival he has been stopping at the Superior House. Last Saturday evening, Scott quit his work, saying he was not feeling well and would rest for a few days. Until Tuesday he was feeling miserable, but did not consider himself sick, but on Tuesday he felt much better, and so expressed himself to his friends. Tuesday evening he was sitting around the hotel, reading and chatting with his friends. A little before eight o'clock he sat reading, when the guests who happened to be sitting in the office, noticed him settle back in his chair, his head drop and sway as if nodding. Once or twice this occurred, when someone walking over to where he was seated to see if he felt badly, when it was discovered that the man was dead. Without a struggle or a gasp, he dropped into the silent sleep of death as quietly as a child to repose. A doctor was hastily summoned, but too late to be of any service, save to take care of the body. It was not thought necessary to hold an inquest, as death was undoubtedly caused by heart disease. Mr. Scott was a man much liked by all who knew him, quiet in his manners, industrious and hard working. Such an unexpected death will come hard upon his wife and two children, who were not with him at his death, but at their home in Verona, Huron Co., Mich. The remains were cared for by Mr. Kennedy, who has done everything that could be done. His wife has been informed of the sad occurrence, but up to the time we go to press, no answer had been received from her.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 2
The funeral of George Reidy took place last Saturday. A large number of Mr. and Mrs. Reidy's sympathizing friends attended the funeral of their little son.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 7
John B. Finch, the well known temperance advocate, died very suddenly last week.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 10
Charles DeGroat, the colored man, who was convicted of perjury at Pontiac, committed suicide, and his body was sent to Ann Arbor, for the students to hew.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 11
Newberry Notes
Wm. Woods, while sitting in the office of the Clifton House, last Wednesday evening, was found to be dead. He had been talking but a few minutes before with several men and at the time complained of not feeling well, and the next noticed of him he was found to have fallen over on the chair in which he was sitting. Dr. Kelso was at once summoned but it was too late for medical aid. The doctor pronounced the direct cause of his death to be heart trouble. The deceased was born in Galashiels, Scotland, where he had relatives living. He came to Newberry when the railroad was building and has spent his time since at Newberry, Naubinway and St. Ignace. He has received several remittances from Scotland said to be the interest of a large estate of which he was one of the heirs. The funeral takes place this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 11
Minnie Demorse, adopted daughter of James Henderson, was arrested last week Tuesday at Manistee for larceny committed several months ago, but the real sensation in the case has just come to light. This spring Mr. Henderson's cow died, and her milk just previous to her death killed nine pigs. The girl confesses she poisoned the cow because she did not want to milk it. Mr. Henderson's house was set on fire five times in one day a few weeks ago, and the girl confesses she did that, too. Mr. Henderson's baby died suddenly, and the girl confesses she smothered it because it cried and she did not want the trouble to care for it. She is 18 years old, and was adopted 15 years ago.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 14
Upper Peninsula Notes
The eldest son of Lieut.-Gov. Macdonald, died last week, at Escanaba, of consumption.

Thursday, October 20, 1887 Page 16
Catherine Dorgan, the sixteen year old daughter of Michael Dorgan, of Waiskai Bay, died the first of the week.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 9
The funeral of the late Chas. Londraville took place last week, Saturday.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 5
The typhoid fever at Iron Mountain and examination of the wells from which the waters supply is obtained show that the water is very bad .... In all four deaths have been reported. Among the victims were M. S. Thibault a newsdealer and jeweler, and Miss Minnie Trenholm, a young lady who was soon to have been married.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 9
Last week Sunday occurred a sad accident down in Waverly township, whereby Edward Spencer lost his life by the accidental discharge of a gun in the hands of Jas. E. Hill. It seems that a party of men working in a camp down there went out in the woods to see what game they could get, and while walking along, Hill in the lead, the gun accidentally went off, the full charge entering Spencer's head, killing him instantly. The affair was a very sad one, the two men being warm friends. Justice Ward held an inquest over the body and a verdict was returned exonerating Hill. The body was brought here on Monday, and on Tuesday was buried in Pine Hill cemetery. Spencer had only been in the county but a short time, coming here from Fremont, this state.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 10
Local
John Fletcher Drowned
Last Wednesday night, a party of young people chartered the Flora Holden, for a trip down the river, to McMahon's dock, where there was to be a dance. Among the party was John Fletcher, a young man of about thirty years, well known to the people of the Sault, and the son of Landlord Fletcher of the Fletcher house, situated on Ashmun street nearly across from the DEMOCRAT office.
Every one of the party was bound for a good time and fun reigned supreme. Jack Fletcher, as he is more commonly known, was in his usual good spirits, and in coming from the cabin, he ran up the steps, on to the deck, jumped on the railing to seat himself, lost his equilibrium and fell into the water. The people on the deck saw him fall over, and quickly the cry "man overboard" was given, and the steamer stopped. The man's cries for help were distinctly heard but owing to the darkness of the night he could not be seen. Life preservers were thrown overboard but none reached him, so the young man, unable to receive assistance from the friends and unable to swim, sunk into an untimely grave in the raging waters of the St. Mary's. The people on the boat did everything that could be done, and for over an hour a search was made for the missing man but without avail. Such a death always creates the utmost sadness in a community and it is visibly felt in this. A young man with ability and promising prospects, so suddenly taken away from earthly existence, when in the midst of pleasure, is certainly appalling to those who little think when the time for their departure from this world may come. John Fletcher had a large number of personal friends with whom he was always popular and well liked. He was a member in the best of standing in both the Knights of Pythias and the Workingmen's Union.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 10
A Young Girl Cremated
The first young girl to be cremated in America was 9 year-old Alida Weissleder, the daughter of the superintendent of the Brush Electric Light company in Cincinati. Her body was burned last week at the crematory in that city.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 10
Bridge Workman Drowned
Last Thursday afternoon, about four o'clock, just about the time the heavy gale blew down upon the Sault from Lake Superior, a sad accident occurred at the bridge. One of the workman named Peter DeLisle, a half-breed,was employed on the outer edge of the span just completed. [large write-up explains his heroic fight for life ]

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 12
The remains of Norman Scott, the carpenter who died so suddenly at the superior House, were sent to his old home last week, in answer to a telegram from his wife, asking that it be done.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 13
Otter Belt, one of the greatest of Comanche chiefs, died in Indian Territory a few days ago. Five minutes before his death they held him erect and rigged him out in his best war costume. They painted him red, set his war bonnet on his head, tied up his hair in beaver skins, and laid him down just as he died. Then his five wives took sharp butcher knives, slashed their faces with long, deep cuts, cut themselves in other places, and beat their bleeding bodies and pulled their hair. They also burned everything they had, tepees, furniture, and even most of the clothing they had on. A big crowd of bucks looked on and killed ten horses, including a favorite team of Fress Addington, on whose ranch Otter Belt lived.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 13
There died in the Old Gentlemen's home at Boston, a few days ago, a man who was identified with the leading mechanical inventions of the past fifty years. His name was D. H. Chamberlin, and he was a cousin to ex-Governor D. H. Chamberlin. Some of the devices in the inventions of which he was interested were the repeating rifle, the hand and power planer, the spring roll for window curtains, the hook and eye machine, the kerosene lamp burner and the lettered wheel hand stamp.

Thursday, October 27, 1887 Page 13
It is said that Jack Fletcher, who was drowned last week Thursday, had in his possession a large sum of money. His life was insured for two thousand dollars, one thousand in the Knights of Pythias endowment rank, and another, in the Foresters. The policy for this last amount only arrived Monday last; several days after his death.

Thursday, November 24, 1887 Page 10
J. H. Hill, the millionaire lumberman of East Saginaw, died suddenly last week.

Thursday, November 3, 1887 Page 1
Mike McLenten, a man about middle age, and quite well known around town, died at the hospital Friday, from the effects of a prolonged spree. He was a very fine penman, and for some time had worked for Moiles Bros., at Detour, but more lately he had been employed by Dave Ranson, in the woods. [first pages missing ]

Thursday, November 10, 1887 Page 3
News was received by telegraph Monday from Chicago of the death of Miss Mary Schweitzer. She has been at the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago for some time, receiving medical treatment, her death resulting from a surgical operation which was recently performed. She was a sister of Mr. J. T. Schweitzer, formerly of the Falls City Laundry, who was at her bedside when she died; also a sister of Mrs. Jos. Brown of this place, upon whom the sudden news falls very heavily. The remains will probably be interred at Marquette.

Thursday, November 10, 1887 Page 8
Jenny Lind, the singer, died on the 2nd inst., at Wiesbaden. She has been growing weaker for two weeks past, and her death was the result of sheer exhaustion, her last hours having been unattended by pain.

Thursday, November 10, 1887 Page 10
Upper Peninsula Notes
Erick Wickstrom, a miner employed at the Barnum iron mine, met a horrible death last week. He was taken sick in the mine late in the evening and started to go to the surface. Being unable to climb the ladder, he got into the cage used for hoisting ore and started for the surface. Three hundred feet from the bottom of the shaft he was seized with vertigo and fell from the cage, going to the bottom of the shaft. His body was crushed to an unrecognizable mass.

Thursday, November 10, 1887 Page 10
Dr. W. W. Waite of Brighton, who was convicted of causing the death of Ida May Lee, a pretty dressmaker of that village in January last, by an attempt to produce an abortion, has been sent to Jackson for five years.

Thursday, November 17, 1887 Page 1
Capt. Soper Drowned
The steam barge Alcona and consort Alta, arrived here on Nov. 11th. The captain of the Alta reports that abreast of Thunder Bay light, her first mate, Capt. Soper, while stowing away stay sail at 5 o'clock in the evening, lost his grip and fell overboard. Before assistance could reach him, the vessel having passed on in her tow, he disappeared beneath the waves. The captain says Soper hailed from Detroit.

Thursday, November 17, 1887 Page 16
Mrs. Emery, the wife of Peter Emery, was found dead in her bed at his home some few miles out in the country on Saturday last. The cause being heart disease.

Thursday, November 24, 1887 Page 8
The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Taillon, who died last week, took place last Saturday. The services were conducted at St. Mary's Church.

Thursday, November 24, 1887 Page 8
It is said on the street that Miss Ida Carew, who mashed the patrons of the variety theatre by her song, "You can't do it, you know", died at New Orleans lately.

Thursday, November 24, 1887 Page 15
Upper Peninsula Notes
John Fortier, aged 30, a single man, in the employ of the lumber firm of F. W. Reed & Co., at Eagle Mills, three miles east of Negaunee, was instantly killed by a falling tree last Thursday.

Thursday, November 24, 1887 Page 15
Upper Peninsula Notes
Charles Birchies, a German, unmarried, and 24 years old, was caught on the skids by a heavy log last week, while decking lumber at Paint River camp No. 5, of Ludington, Wells & Van Schaack. He was crushed to death before assistance could be given.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 2
Some time ago an article in our columns announced the death of one of the patients at the Sault Hospital. His name, we discover, was given wrong, it should have been Alfred McClinton. He had wealthy relatives in Birmingham, Eng., who have been communicated with, as they had long since lost track of the unfortunate man.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 4
Canadian Sault
Emile Rose, a painter who had been working for some time past in this town, was frozen to death on the outskirts of the town on Wednesday night of last week. His body was found on Saturday and taken to the police station. No inquest was held as it was evident the unfortunate man, who was a native of France, had imbibed too much alcohol and laid down to rest. His son, who arrived here on Monday thinks he died of heart disease, but the presence of a black bottle near the remains containing some whiskey would seem to indicate that liquor had something to do with it. The body was taken to Mattawa for interment.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 4
Marquette
Lawrence Finn, a dissipated loafer, attacked his wife last week Saturday night with a heavy iron tea kettle he snatched from the stove. He knocked her down, beat her brains out and smashed the kettle in pounding her. The woman's eldest boy witnessed the assault and ran from the house screaming murder. A police officer was found who arrested Finn after he had horribly mutilated his wife's body.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 4
During a drunken row in a low dive at Negaunee on Monday, Oscar Field, the proprietor, struck Jacob Terrman a blow on the head with a club, badly fracturing his skull, and from the effects of the blow he died. Field is a Finn.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 4
John Hamm, of Owen Sound, who has been working all summer in the town, was found dead in his bed at McMullen's boarding house on Monday morning. Mr. Hamm was 67 years old and a carpenter by trade. The mayor telegraphed the sad news to Owen Sound, but no reply was received, and the deceased was buried by the town. Sufficient money was found on his person to defray all expenses. He has a son in some part of Northern Michigan.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 4
As August Gunther, an employee of the Hancock chemical works, was driving a nail into a scantling saturated with nitro-glycerine, last week, an explosion occurred, injuring him beyond recovery.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 6
Sad Death - A sad death occurred last Sunday, when the wife of Lieut. Nichols died after a short illness. Mrs. Nichols had been a marvelously well woman until she was taken sick soon after the removal of Lieut. Nichols to the post. Two little children are left with their father, to mourn this loss. Lieut. Nichols is confined to his room by inflammatory rheumatism. Col Halier, a retired army officer, the father of the deceased, has started from Seattle, W. T., for the Sault, and the remains will be taken there for burial.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 15
Geo. Watson, a young man about 25 years of age, died at the Sault Hospital Tuesday, of typhoid fever, after a short illness. He was a young man of excellent habits, and formerly worked for Dave Ranson. We understand he has, relative living in the country.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 15
Mr. Golden, foreman on the Edison Canal, returned home on Saturday from Thorold, Ontario, where he had been to attend the funeral of his father.

Thursday, December 15, 1887 Page 4
Obituary
The very sad intelligence reached here Monday, of the death of the mother of Bartley and Patrick McEvoy two well known and influential citizens of the Sault. Mrs. McEvoy, aged sixty years, died at Stayner, Ont., where she had been ill for some time, yet this blow came unexpected. By some mistake in telegraphing the message was received here only on Monday and as the deceased was buried that day, it was impossible for the two brothers to be present at the funeral. The many friends of the two brothers will unite with the Democrat in extending all the consolation that sympathy can bestow.

Thursday, December 8, 1887 Page 16
The little child of Mr and Mrs Lemond, living on the corner of Easterday avenue and Court street died last week of inflamation of the lungs and was buried Sunday.

Thursday, December 15, 1887 Page 4
The Rev. J. S. Kalloch, who was wounded by Editor De Young in San Francisco in 1879, and whose son subsequently killed the editor, died in Washington Territory recently.

Thursday, December 15, 1887 Page 6
Geo. McCarron, engaged at Jas F. Moloney, and Bro.'s will have many sympathizers here in his bereavement over the death of his sister, Mrs. Gayner, which occurred at Lucknow, Ont., on Sunday last.

Thursday, December 15, 1887 Page 10
Newberry Notes
A young man named James Gallagher of Beaver Island died suddenly at Naubinway last Sunday.

Thursday, December 15, 1887 Page 11
Upper Peninsula Notes
A distressing accident occurred at the Pilgrim mine on last week Tuesday. A young German and brother were assisting in landing at the mouth of the shaft. In grasping hold of the rope to descend he lost his hold and dropped to the bottom of the shaft, 225 feet deep. He was instantly killed, being much mangled by the fall. His body was brought to Bessemer the same evening and shipped via the Wisconsin Central to his home at Colby, Wis. His name is Chas. Weimann.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 14
At Holly last week Tuesday, F. A. Baker, Sen., father of the well known Detroit attorney, was passing over the F. and P. M. track at the depot, when he was instantly killed by being knocked down and run over by an engine that was backing up .... Mr. Baker recently celebrated his 83d birthday says the "Advertiser" and had been a resident of Holly for nearly fifty years.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 14
State News
Flushing has had a first-class mystery. A farmer named Jerry White disappeared and his body was found in the woods badly mangled. Suspicion at once fell on a laborer named Daniels, who has been arrested for the murder.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 19
News Notes
Mrs. John Jacob Astor died in New York recently. She had always given largely to charity and was greatly esteemed for her good deeds.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 19
A man named Caroll died at the poor house Sunday. He was a middle-aged person, who had been at work on the railroad and lumber camps, Consumption was the cause of his death.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 19
A young man 22 years of age named Dan. McGregor, died at John Navin's hotel early Monday morning. The young man had been employed by Messrs. Endress at White Fish Point for the past five years, engaged in the fisheries, .... His brother came down from Port Findlay, Canada and took the body home with him on Monday.

Thursday, December 22, 1887 Page 20
The remains of Mr.Albert McCoy, brother-in-law of Mr. Miller of the Pacific Hotel, Canada, arrived here yesterday from Wisconsin. He met his death by the limb of a tree falling upon him. Mr. Gabriel interred him in the protestant cemetery.

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 1
Resume of the Year 1887

January 2—John Brohman froze to death near Pine River.

January 17—Capt. John Spalding died.

February 3—Mrs. P. J. Sullivan dies of lung troubles.

February 25—Dollie Blank died after a long illness.

March 20—Nelson Nault died of consumption.

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 2
Daniel Manning, ex-secretary of the treasury, died at Albany last Saturday, in the 57th year of his age...... Cleveland owed much of his success to him, and to show his appreciation he appointed him secretary of the treasury, which he held until ill-health compelled his retirement. Since that time he has gradually sunk, until death finally released him from suffering

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 2
Obituary
On Christmas morning at the residence of his parents, occurred the death of Willie, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Danskin. The young man had been sick for a number of weeks and latterly he seemed to be gaining, but it proved to be only a temporary rally and hopes doomed to disappointment.... The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from the Presbyterian church and was very largely attended.

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 2
Virgina Lyon The death of this young lady occurred on the 22 inst, at Los Angeles, Cal.,whither she had gone in order to escape the severe winter climate of the Saul.t .... The body was not brought to the Sault for burial as was expected but was interred in Los Angeles.

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 4
In the loss of Daniel Manning, whose death occurred at Albany, N. Y. last Saturday, the Democratic party loses an able leader....

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 4
Hon. Seth C. Moffatt congressman from this district, died at Washington last week, Thursday.....(considerable elaboration in this article)

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 12
A terrible story comes from Lake Nipissing, in the Upper Peninsula, John Benoit in returning to his home, recently, found the lake partially covered with ice .... he died just as his wife had pulled him to shore.

Thursday, December 29, 1887 Page 12
A three story hotel, the Baraga House, at Baraga, was destroyed by fire last week.... John Bennick's charred body was found in the ashes.
Thusday, December 29, 1887 Page 12
Wilbur H. Hill member of the firm of J. H. Hill and Sons, the Michigan lumber king, died very suddenly at his residence in Saginaw City, recently, aged 46. He leaves a widow. He was an extensive traveler and has but recently returned from California. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of death. His father died suddenly about four weeks ago.

Saturday, January 7, 1888 Page 2
Gen. John S. Marmaduke, governor of Missouri, died at Jefferson City last week. He was a dashing rebel officer during the rebellion.

Saturday, January 7, 1888 Page 2
While two miners, James Knuckey and George Jane, were drilling a hole in the Jackson mine at Negaunee, Saturday, the drill struck an old unexploded charge that had been abandoned some time before, and it went off with terrific force, killing them both instantly. The bodies were frightfully mangled and Knuckey's head was torn from his body. Both were married.

Saturday, January 7, 1888 Page 2
Benjamin H. Hague, of Dalley, was suddenly killed, by slipping off a log, while holding the muzzle of a double-barrelled shot gun. The hammers struck the log and fired both barrels into him.

Saturday, January 7, 1888 Page 2
Barber Perkins, former resident of Quiney died at Mishawaka, Ind. His remains were interred at Quiney. Deceased contributed generously to Hillsdale College when it was financially embarrassed.

Saturday, January 7, 1888 Page 7
Detour
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Anges McDonald was buried on Friday last.

Saturday, Janurary 14, 1888 Page 3
Wm. Le Barron, an old resident of Newaygo county, was instantly killed by a falling tree, which split and kicking backward disemboweled him.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
Mrs. A. Miller, of Luther, gave her little child a dose of creosite, recently by mistake, causing the little one's death.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
Mr. Ammi Baldwin, late cashier of the broken Fidelity National bank of Cincinatti, died suddenly of paralysis at his residence on Walnut Hills. Mr. Baldwin was indicted with the other officers of the Fidelity bank but for some reason his bond was placed at $10,000 and he was able to secure bondsmen and has not been in jail.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
Emory Ormsby, who died a poor man at Deep River recently, was at one time worth $75,000, and was a soldier in the Crimean and Mexican wars, as well as in the late rebellion. His death was the direct result of late severe exposure.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
William H. Hunter, piano tuner, frozen to death near Oscoda, hailed from Alpena, not Detroit, as stated in telegrams. He was terribly frozen, his tongue clinging to roof of his mouth and his extremities being like sticks.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
R. Picket, the Cheboygan saloonkeeper who jumped from a window and performed other capers in decollette attire while delirious recently, went to Otsego Lake a few days ago and died.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 3
T. J. Pack of Marquette, was fatally scalded in a railroad collision near Cambridge, O.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 5
From Detour The sad event was the death of one of our fellow citizens, Mr. Vrisneaux, which occurred on Thursday of last week.

Saturday, January 14, 1888 Page 8
The sad intelligence is received by friends at the Soo of the death of Mrs. Geo. B.K. Pease, wife of the brother of C. H. Pease, at 431 West Fifty-four street, New York. Mrs. Pease visited in the Soo a few years ago where she formed many pleasant attachments. Her friends here receive the sad news with much sorrow.

Saturday, January 28, 1888 Page 2
The coroner's jury in the case of Mrs. Federman, the Manistee woman who was found dead, rendered a verdict recently to the effect that she drank herself into the happy hunting grounds. This entirely clears the young man who was arrested.

Saturday, January 28, 1888 Page 2
Uriah Ryan, formerly of Hanover, was frozen to death recently in Dakota. Remains will be brought to Hanover for burial.

Saturday,January 28, 1888 Page 2
Rev. M. J. Hall, who was found dead in the woods in Alpena county, is thought to have died from heart disease.

Saturday, January 28, 1888 Page 2
Two boys, orphan sons of W. Weatherbee, aged 9 and 11 years suffered a horrible death at Benona, Oceana County, Wednesday. They were digging a well when the earth caved in upon them, smothering the lads long before help reached them.

Saturday, Janaury 28, 1888 Page 3
Mrs. Eliza Ballou Garfield, mother of the late lamented President Garfield, died at Mentor, Ohio, last Saturday. She was born at the foot of Mount Monadnock, N. H., Sept 25, 1802, married Abraham Garfield in 1827, and moved to Orange, Cayahoga County, O., seven years after. The husband died when Tom, the oldest boy, now of Grand Rapids, Mich., was ten years old. She was left with four children and a cabin in the woods." How faithfully and well she performed her hard task of bringing up the little family history will tell.

Saturday, January 28, 1888 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bertram have the sympathy of the entire community in the bereavement occasioned by the death of their three year old daughter which occurred last Saturday.

Saturday, February 4, 1888 Page 2
Frank Conant, a well digger, was buried alive in a well at Albion the other day, fifteen feet of earth caving in upon him. Life was extinct when he was dug out.

Saturday, February 4, 1888 Page 2
From Detour
Died of diphtheria on the 13th inst., Anna, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sims. She was six years of age and was a sweet and pleasant child.

Saturday, February 4, 1888 Page 2
News Odds & Ends
Lemuel J. Curtis a millionaire, who died the other day at Meriden, Conn., bequeathed $750,000 to the Curtis Home for old women and orphans, an institution built and maintained by himself. Several Episcopal Charities also get $20,000 each.

Saturday, February 11, 1888 Page 5
Henry F. Harman, uncle of Mrs. Cleveland, died at Charlestown, Mass., Friday the 3d, aged 39.

Saturday, February 11, 1888 Page 8
Willard Crooks the brakeman who was injured about the head while coupling cars at Eckerman last week died Tuesday at the hospital. His skull was fractured. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from the Gabriel undertaking establishment. The South Shore officials kindly defrayed all expense connected with the funeral, and arranged the details which were complete in every particular. The remains were interred in the cemetery here.

Saturday, February 18, 1888 Page 1
The little child of a family named Boor, formerly of Detroit, was burned to death at their home, near Clyde, Wednesday. The remains were brought to Detroit for burial.

Saturday, February 11, 1888 Page 8
Evening Press Bay City
The announcement in last evening's Press of the death of Miss Rose Payment, was received with the utmost sadness by a large circle of friends, as well as her relatives. Miss Payment was 71 years of age, went to Sugar Island ten miles from the Soo, 38 years ago, to her brother and has since been a mother to his children, caring for them as tenderly as if they had been her own. She removed with her brother to Detroit eighteen years ago, and thence to Bay City. She has always been a consistent Christian lady and notable in all works of charity, being an especial friend to the poor and distressed, who will sadly miss her kindly and gentle ministrations. Her remains will be taken to Sugar Island for interment beside her mother, brother and uncle.

Saturday, February 18, 1888 Page 1
Morris Mendelshon, of the Union Clothing company, left Thursday morning for Chicago, whither he was called by the sudden death of his aged mother, who was in her eighty-fifth year.

Saturday, February 18, 1888 Page 2
The inquest on the body of Mrs. Eliza M. Palmer, of Alma, whose remains were found boxed up and buried in a stable, has ended in a verdict that she was strangled to death by her husband, Edward Palmer. Palmer is still in jail at Ithaca and is keeping very still.

Saturday, February 18, 1888 Page 2
C. A. Wing of Howell has investigated rumor that remains of his sister, Mrs. Helen Wing, had been disinterred and sent to Ann Arbor for dissection and pronounces it grossly false.

Saturday, February 18, 1888 Page 2
Michael Marony, a brakeman on the Detroit, Grand Haven & Milwaukee railroad, was killed at Vernon recently by being run over by the cars of a freight train. His home was at Owosso.

Saturday, February 25, 1888 Page 1
A Sad Death
The death of George A. Dean, which occurred last Tuesday was one which came with startling effect upon his many school mates and friends. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dean. He was at play as usual last Saturday, and Sunday started to Sunday school but feeling unwell returned home. His condition grew rapidly worse and he died Tuesdaay morning with congestion of the brain. He was a bright warm hearted boy and highly thought of by all who knew him. He was fifteen years and two months old at the time of his death, and a member of the fifth grade in the high school. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church, the Rev. Cassler conducting the services.

Saturday, February 25, 1888 Page 6
Rev. Jas. Schofield, father of Gen. Schofield, U.S.A, is dead at Chicago

Saturday, February 25, 1888 Page 1
Capt. Joseph Soulier who formerly lived at the Soo and was well known here died at Mackinaw Island on Feb. 11. He was about 90 years of age. He was one of the early sailors at the Soo, and sailed for some time for American Fur company.

Saturday, February 25, 1888 Page 3
Herschel Adkins, who shot and killed Henry Overheiser in Casco, Allegan county, during a fight, was tried at Allegan and acquitted.

Saturday, March 3, 1888 Page 6
Friends of Roy Tetet, who was killed on the Coldwater fair grounds last fall by a slab thrown from a sawing machine, sued for $10,000 damages and settled for $500.

Saturday, March 10, 1888 Page 1
Kaiser Wilhelm Dead
The Great German Emperor Passes away Thursday at the Royal Palace Last Thursday night at 6:45 o'clock the death of Emperor William of the German empire, occurred at the Royal Palace in Berlin [a large write up ]

Saturday, March 17, 1888 Page 4
Sylvanus McDaniels, who murdered Jerry White near Flushing, was sentenced to serve a life sentence at Jackson. As he boarded the train at Flint to be taken to Jackson he carried in his hand a bible. Daniels will have plenty of time to study the work, but a very limited field in which to practice its precepts, but society will be the better off for it.

Saturday, March 17, 1888 Page 6
George W. McCrary's 5-year old George drank boiling water from the spout of a tea kettle at East Saginaw and died.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 1
Mr. J. Sawyer, of Lake View farm, West Gwillimbury, Ont., has written Mrs. L. Ausman a touching poem, replete with pathos, upon the death of her little flower Lillian, who entered the angels realm on Jan. 28, last.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 1
Willie Fleming, son of John Fleming, is lying very near death from compression of the brain, caused by a horse stepping on his head last Saturday. Dr. Rundle is attending him and everything possible is being done to relieve the unfortunate little sufferer.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 2
Randall McDonald, a school teacher from a back woods district, laid down on the track of the Detroit, Bay City & Alpena railroad to sleep off the effects of liquor. He was struck by a train and mangled so that he died soon after.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 2
A four year old son of Patrick Dulin of Niles fell into a cistern and was drowned.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 2
Clare Falls, aged 11 years, son of a well-known business man of Tecumseh, while playing with an "unloaded" revolver in company with some other boys, playfully pointed it at his head and fired, killing himself instantly.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 7
Previous to the death of Mrs. Esther Potter, of Burlington, Me., she prayed that her 17-months old baby might die with her. The child, who but an hour or two before was as well as usual, playing about the room, immediately after receiving a kiss from its dying mother, closed its eyes, and in five minutes or less was dead.

Saturday, March 24, 1888 Page 7
Over four months ago a mass of molten iron was forced by an explosion into the mouth and throat of Jacob Halemberger, of Reading, Pa. The result was that the passage to the stomach was completely closed, and the man died of starvation.

Saturday, March 31, 1888 Page 1
Little Johnny Fleming died Sunday.

Saturday, March 31, 1888 Page 1
Died Suddenly at Bay Mills
The sudden and deplorable death of Mrs. W. K. Parsille, at Bay Mills on Monday last, March 26th, at 4 p.m., has filled the hearts of her many many friends in this community with the deepest sorrow and grief. The bright and sunny friend and companion whom so many knew as Julia Chisolm, and whom all who knew her loved, for her kind and noble heart, her cheerful and open spirit her brave, generous and loyal friendship has entered into her rest in the very May of her life. She was born at Bruce Mines, Algoma, in 1864, and was at the time of her death but 24 years of age. There she lived with her father and brothers and sisters until the sad drowning of her father and little brother about nine years ago, which caused the breaking up of her home, and since then, with a little interval, she has resided in Sault Ste. Marie and its immediate neighborhood. Vividly does the writer remember then her young life and lovely charater .... On July 4th, 1887 she was united in marriage to Mr. W. K. Parsille, of Bay Mills, and in the sad loss of his young wife he has the deepest sympathy. Though sick for a few days no serious danger was anticipated until Saturday and suddenly death was seen to be ready to claim her as his own. Her funeral was held in the Episcopal Church on Wednesday last. ....

Saturday, March 31, 1888 Page 3
Mrs. Carpenter mother of Alfred Carpenter, who was recently killed in Frank Boos' saloon at Battle Creek, by Conductor McCarty, and who was about to institute proceedings against Saloon-keeper Boos, has compromised the matter for $100.

Saturday, March 31, 1888 Page 3
William Dalrymple who lives near Buchanan, lost five children by diphtheria.

Saturday, April 7, 1888 Page 1
Killed by the Cars
Thomas F. Hurley, a brother-in-law of L. F. Bedford, was run over and instantly killed, about two miles from the city, on the Soo road, Thursday night. He was teaching school at Jones' Cut and was on his way thither. N. V. Gabriel cared for the remains until yesterday, when Mr. Bedford left with them for Wallaceburg, Ont., where the unfortunate Hurley had a wife and two children. The body was frightfully mangled.

Saturday, April 7, 1888 Page 1
City News
Sisters of the late John Fletcher, drowned, have received $1,000 insurance on his life, had in the Knights of Pythias endowment rank.

Saturday, April 7, 1888 Page 6
Captain Daniel Bannatyne died the other day at Toledo of rheumatism, Capt. Rannatyne located in Toledo in 1850 and sailed the lakes from then until confined by sickness. His last vessel was the H. S. Walbridge, which he commanded seven years.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 1
Louis Schimmel received a telegram from Milwaukee yesterday, announcing that his brother George is dying.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
J. R. Wright, an old resident of Sodus, Berrien County, was instantly killed in a runaway accident.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
Effie Hanks, aged 8 years, was burned to death at Quincy while burning brush in the door yard.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
Mrs. Sarah Holbrook, who was one of the pioneers of Portland in this state, died at East Tawas.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
Dr. Howard Simonds, of Allegan, died yesterday of apoplexy.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
Miss Metta Fordham, of Bronson, a music teacher and exceedingly bright young lady, died with measles. When the disease first seized her she told her friends she would never get well.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
John D. Ross, banker, of Buchanan, is dead.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
John Tear, aged 65 years, was found dead at Trenton. He was apparently as well as usual half an hour before.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 2
Horace Howe, of Buchanan, temporarily insane, blew his brains out. He was a young married man.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 3
Hudson, Wis. Star and News
Died—In this city, on the 20th of March, Mrs.Louis Massy, aged about 90 years.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page 3
Hudson, Wis. Star and News
A Soo Romance
Mrs. Massy and her husband were the first settlers in this city and county, having located here in 1840, both living to an advanced age and dying within a few months of each other.... This was the case with Mr. Massy, but those who knew him best have data and circumstances to show that he was over 100 years old at the time of his death.

Saturday, April 14, 1888 Page
In Memoriam—Willie Fleming.

Saturday, April 21, 1888 Page 3
Ex Senator Roscoe Conkling died in New York city at 2:07 o'clock Wednesday morning last, after a painful illness of ten days or more. He was born Oct. 30, 1829, and was in his fifty-ninth year.... However, in his death the county loses one of its leading lawyers and ablest men, in fact, one equalled by but few.

Saturday, April 21, 1888 Page 6
Mr. Matthew Arnold, the noted poet, scholar, critic and theologian, whose recent sharply critical on "Civilization in the United States" attracted marked attention, died suddenly Monday in Liverpool from heart disease.... Mr. Arnold was born in 1822, and was in his sixty-sixth year.

Saturday, April 21, 1888 Page 6
Robert Mills is dead at Galveston, Texas. Before the war Mills was the wealthiest planter in the south, his property being valued at $3,000,000. The emancipation proclamation "robbed" him of 1,000 choice slaves and resulted in his ruin.

Saturday, April 21, 1888 Page 7
Cornelius Austin died at Walled Lake, aged 97. He was in good health until few weeks ago, when he fell and received severe injuries. He drew pension for services in war of 1812, and spent most of his life at hard labor. He has lived in Oakland since early in '30s.

Saturday, April 21, 1888 Page 7
Patrick Wade of Waudecah, who shot Mrs. Burke, of Norway, a few days ago, has been convicted of murder in the first degree by a circuit court jury at Menominee.

Saturday, April 28, 1888 Page 3
Prof. C. W. Heywood, who has been connected with several Michigan academies, was once professor in Hiram college, Garfield's alma mater, and for a time occupied in newspaper work in Kalamazoo and Battle Creek, died at Battle Creek Wednesday night of heart disease. He was 67 years old.

Saturday, May 5, 1888 Page 1
By the death of W. B. Dinsmore president of the Adams Express company which occurred in New York on April 24, a Sooite is left a legacy. Mr. Dinsmore's wealth has been estimated at from $15,000,000 to $20,000,000. The person who is thus remembered by the deceased millionaire is E. H. Bowers who is proprietor of the confectionery stand located at the corner of Gurnoe alley and Portage avenue just west of the Michigan Exchange.....

Saturday, May 5, 1888 Page 1
A letter has been received here from John Richardson of Chippewa Station, Oscola county, Mich., on the Flint & Pere Marquette railroad stating that a James Stuart died there about three weeks ago. He claimed to have relatives at Sault Ste. Marie, but refused to give their names or address..... He was a Scotchman about fifty years of age said he left the Soo last October.....

Saturday, May 12, 1888 Page 5
John Winter, who died recently at Grand Rapids, is alleged to have said with his dying breath that his wife poisoned him. The woman and her neighbors agree that he died of dissolute habits.

Saturday, May 19, 1888 Page 5
Zysh Davis,the colored Chicago murderer was hanged Saturday night.

Saturday, May 19, 1888 Page 5
The boiler in the Caro wooden works exploded Monday, killing Henry Howland and severely injuring Joseph Randall, Frank Riddle, Albert Riddle and T. W. Wisner. The explosion was caused by low-water in the boiler, which was old and patched.

Saturday, May 19, 1888 Page 5
Last fall two trappers, McMillan and Golden, left Edmonton, N.W.T. for the Athabasca and Pembina Rivers. They lost their provisions, severe weather made hunting impossible. They boiled their furs and ate them and waited for death. Golden died April 20. Ice soon began to move and McMillan drifted down in his canoe, reaching Athabasca Landing in a most pitiable condition.

Saturday, May 26, 1888 Page 4
Josie Mansfield, whose name was familiar with the Fisk-Stokes tragedy died at Beverly, N. J.

Saturday, May 26, 1888 Page 6
Fred Marsden, the well-known playwright, committed suicide in New York last week by turning on the gas in his room. He became despondent because of the reckless conduct of his daughter whom he was unable to control, and who left her house to enter upon a shameful career. Mr. Marsden was the author of a number of very successful plays. The life which he devoted to writing comedies ended in tragedy.

Saturday, June 2, 1888 Page 1
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McGregor's little girl, twenty-two months old, died yesterday morning at five o'clock. The funeral will take place from the Presbyterian church at the usual hour for morning service to-morrow.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 2
Lysander K. Shaw, who was found dead in a swamp near Romeo last winter, left a widow and a divorced wife. Now the children of the first wife come into the probate court and charge the widow with secreting certain of Mr. Shaw's papers.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 2
Charley Maiden, resident of Duncan City, who is supposed to have last his head over a love affair, committed suicide Saturday night by jumping from the Third street bridge into the river.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 2
Mrs Frank Carmichael was arrested at Lansing on a charge of murdering her husband, Anderson Carmichael, in Hillsdale county last January by putting poison in his pie.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 5
Edward Fritzell, about whom very little can be learned, dropped dead in a chair in Clark's "Hub" saloon on Water street, Saturday evening. Fritzell had been drinking heavily. He is said to have been a watchman at Cascade mine. Dr. O'Neil was called, but too late. Supposed heart disease.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 7
Joseph Ketcham, the baggagemaster who was shot by robbers in his car on the Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St. Louis & Chicago railroad near Delhi, died of his injuries the following day. A reward of $1,000 is offered for the capture of the robbers.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 8
The funeral of little Allie Danskin, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Danskin, occurred Monday morning. The services were held in the Presbyterian church.

Saturday, June 9, 1888 Page 8
Dr. Richardson was called to Lower Canada on Sunday last, by the sudden death of his father.

Saturday, June 16, 1888 Page 2
Henry Muenchthaler killed his wife and then himself with a revolver on Monday night in Detroit. Muenchthaler was a dissipated and shiftless fellow, and committed the deed in a fit of rage.

Saturday, June 16, 1888 Page 4
A Telegram received yesterday morning announced the death of Emporer Frederick William of Germany. He fought a valiant fight for many months, but no human and could stem the tide of the dread disease.

Saturday, June 16, 1888 Page 7
Thomas McElrath, the old business partner of Horace Greeley, in the days when the New York Tribune was at the zenith of its influence, died in New York on Wednesday last. He was in the 82d year of his age.

Saturday, June 16, 1888 Page 7
The body of T. Harrison Garrett, who drowned on Thursday night last by the sinking of his yacht, the Gleam, near Baltimore, has been recovered. It was found a mile distant from the spot where the accident accurred.

Saturday, June 16, 1888 Page 7
Thomas Walsh, the Irishman who was said to be implicated in a plot similar to that which resulted in the murder of Lord Cavenish and Secretary Burke in Phoenix Park, Dublin, in 1881, has arrived in New York. He came in the La Normandie, of the French line, under the assumed name M. Walters.

Saturday, June16, 1888 Page 8
Fred Miller, presdent and chief owner of the Miller Brewing company of Milwaukee, which has a big agency at the Soo, died of cancer at his home on Monday.

Saturday, June 23, 1888 Page 1
A little son of Charles Ripley died yesterday morning.

June 23, 1888 Page 3
Ex-State Senator Charles C. Conger of California, who died recently, was son of Judge Thomas Conger and first white child born in what is now Benton Harbor. Deceased's mother was sister of Henry C. Morton, now living at Benton Harbor, and his grandfather, E. Morton, was first white settler in that vicinity.

June 23, 1888 Page 4
A Coincidence
Last week Norway, Mich., was destroyed by fire and at about the same time, its founder, Carl L. Wendell, died at Ishpeming.

June 23, 1888 Page 8
Died—Harry K., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ripley, on Friday morning, aged 11 months. Funeral Sunday from the residence. Friends are invited.

Saturday, June 30, 1888 Page 1
Mrs. Rhoda Olmstead, who formerly resided at the Soo, died at Detour last Sunday.

June 30, 1888 Page 2
Around Munising
Across Munising Bay .... At old Munising I was sheltered at the log house hotel kept by Mrs. Anthony O'Donnell and her daughters, .... Mrs. O'Donnell's husband, while fishing near Miner's Castle, a portion of the celebrated Pictured Rocks, was drowned a year ago in a very sad manner. They formerly lived on St. Joseph's Island, ....

Saturday, June 30, 1888 Page 8
William Sutherland, steward on the steambarge Waldo A. Avery, received a telegram on his arrival here last Saturday noon, anouncing the death of his boy by drowning, at Bay City, on the 22nd inst. He immediately took the train for that city.

Saturday, June 30, 1888 Page 8
A child of Mr. LaMond, who resides on the corner of Court street and Easterday avenue, died of diphtheria Thursday, and Dr. Floyd says no report of the same was made to the health office. There have been several such deaths concealed, says the health officer, and he warns physicians that there is a fine of $100 for such an offense.

Saturday, July 7, 1888 Page 1
Burned to Death.
Four People Lose Their Lives On the Canada Side.
THE DEADLY SMUDGE
It is Responsible for Another Horrible Death.
A farm house owned and occupied by George Dobbs and located in Tarentorus township about six miles east of the Canadian Soo, was destroyed by fire yesterday morning at two o'clock, causing the death of George Dobbs, aged seventy- two years: David Merryfield, aged 21 years: Alice Say Thompson, aged nine years and Margaret Melissa Thompson aged four years. It is the common theory that the fire originated in a smudge, which was burning lazily on the front stoop when the family retired to rest. Mrs. Dobbs, an old lady seventy years of age, who escaped almost miraculously from the burning building, thinks that the children must have thrown a few chips upon the smudge before they went to bed. At all events, she was awakened about two o'clock by the dread crackling of the flames, and realizing the impending danger she quickly awoke her husband and Merryfield, who was sleeping in an adjoining room. The smoke was so dense and stifling that they could scarcely breathe, but they managed to grope their way down stairs to a rear room. Mrs. Dobbs attempted to open the back door, but was stopped by her husband who thought that it would cause a draught which would aid the flames in their deadly work. At this moment she stumbled, her foot striking the ring of a trap door which opened into the cellar. By an almost superhuman effort she managed to raise the door, when overcome by the heat and smoke she fell through. Recovering from the effects of her fall she called to her husband and Merryfield to save the children, who were in a room in the upper part of the house. She then succeeded in crawling out through a ventilator in the cellar which afforded the only means of escape. She managed to work her way slowly to a safe distance from the house, when she sank exhausted to the ground, unable to move or cry out. Here she remained until long after daylight, exposed to the chill night and with no clothing on save a night dress, which in her terrible struggle to escape had been nearly torn from her body. After remaining unconscious until the sun had climbed well up above the horizon she recovered sufficiently to cry aloud. A passing farmer was attracted to the spot by her pitiful wails for help, and conveyed her to a neighboring farm house, where she was tenderly cared for by sumpathetic neighbours. Later in the day she was taken to the Canadian Soo and placed in the care of Dr. Reed. She is badly burned and this together with her enfeebled condition, and advanced age make her recovery doubtful. She is laboring under great mental excitement and can scarely talk rationally. She thinks that her husband and Merryfield tried, in obedience to her call, when she was precipitated into the cellar, to save the children. They probably reached the upper floor and were then either suffocated or quickly burned to death by the greedy flames. No cries were heard from the children by Mrs. Dobbs and it is therefore reasonable to assume that they were suffocated before being burned.
The house was a frame building and the flames spread with great rapidity, completely destroying it. Merryfield was employed on the new steamer Soo City as fireman and had obtained leave of absence for a couple of days to visit the old couple. He came from near Mitchell, Ont., and was unmarried. The children were daughters of James Thompson, whose farm is near the Dobbs farm. Their mother died two years ago, since then they have lived with their grandparents. Mr. Thompson has been employed in the Canadian Soo during the summer. He received the first news of the sad catastrophe yesterday morning.
The bodies which were burned to a crisp were recovered from the ruins yesterday afternoon. The funeral occurred this morning and the last sad rites were performed by the Rev. J. McClung, of the Canada Soo. Mr. Dobbs was born in Ireland but lived many years in Tarentorous where he was highly esteemed. He was in comfortable circumstances.

July 7, 1888 Page 1
A 23-years-old son of contractor R. Dickson was drowned Thursday at Selkirk, Manitoba.

July 7, 1888 Page 1
William Lesk, son of late Capt. Lesk of Sugar Island, was drowned while attempting to get a tow from the barge Germania, yesterday afternoon about six miles down the river. The body was recovered. Funeral tomorrow at Sugar Island.

July 7, 1888 Page 2
Profs. Palmer, Cheever and Dunster, of the Ann Arbor university, have died this year.

July 7, 1888 Page 2
Miss Aileen Harrington, of Grand Rapids is a daughter of Lieut. Harrington, who died with Custer at the battle of Little Big Horn....

July 7, 1888 Page 7
The Very Rev. Patrick Joseph Conway, vicar-general and rector of the Holy Name Cathedral, Chicago, died at the parochial residence Monday at 1:40 a.m. For two weeks he has been suffering from congestion of the stomach and lungs, and his death was not a surprise.

Saturday, July 7, 1888 Page 1
MRS. CHARLES PAINE CREMATED
The boarding camp of Charles Paine, situated a few rods from the Duluth & South Shore depot, was destroyed by fire on the evening of the Fourth of July, and Mrs. Mary Paine, wife of the owner of the place, was burned to death. The camp was a rude looking building, built partly of wood and partly of canvas, and at the time of the fire was occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Paine and three boarders named Samuel Winfield, Samuel Twelves and Richard Campbell, laborers employed on railroad work by Drew, Lewis & Co. After starting a smudge to drive away the mosquitoes, Mr. Paine and his wife retired. The smudge was built in a tin basin covered with a damp sack soaked with kerosene, and then placed beside the bed. The sack soon becoming dry and inflammable, took fire and in a few moments the whole front part of the building was enveloped in flames. Paine was aroused and after making an ineffectual effort to save his wife, who, he claims was either stupified or suffocated by the smoke, staggered to the door, where he was seen and pulled out by James Mackin. A crowd soon gathered and an unsuccessful attempt was made to subdue the flames by throwing buckets of water upon the burning shanty, but the thin boards were dry as tinder and the entire building was quickly consumed. Meanwhile Paine was rushing about almost bereft of his senses, crying wildly and talking incoherently. It is currently reported that both were under the influence of liquor at the time of the fire, but this charge is strenuously denied by Paine and his friends. At an examination conducted by prosecuting attorney Goff at the coroner's inquest, Paine acknowledged that both he and his wife were in the habit of drinking, but he would not admit that they had taken more than a couple of drinks during the afternoon and evening of the Fourth. He testified that he tried to escape through the window, but could not get it open. Then grasping his wife he staggered to the door of their sleeping apartment, where he dropped her. He claims that then he became unconscious.
The coroner's jury consisted of C.L. Newell, Francis Lessard, H. G. Wait, P. Bertram, Wm. Ireland and John A. McDougall, aided by Mr. Goff. It was his first night in the house examined a number of witnesses. There had been some whispers of foul play, but there was nothing in the evidence to support the charge and the examination was sharply and searchingly conducted by Mr. Goff. The jury therefore brought in a verdict that the woman came to her death by suffocation. The charred and blackened remains, wholly unrecognizable, were removed to Gabriel's undertaking rooms Thursday, where they were prepared for burial. The funeral took place yesterday from the St. Mary's Church and the body was interred in the Catholic cemetery. Paine was an Englishman and was married to the late Mrs. Paine about fourteen years ago in England. Paine came to this country about five years ago and established a boarding camp near Bruce Mines. He came to this side and put up a camp on the line of the Duluth & South Shore road, settling finally at the Soo. His wife did the cooking for the camp boarders, and he acted as cook at the West End saloon. An only child thirteen years old is in a convent in England.

July 7, 1888 Page 2
Frank Merchant, employee of Chicago & Northwestern railroad, had both legs smashed, both arms broken and head crushed into unrecognizable mass by cars at Norway. He lived at Quinnesec with parents.

July 7, 1888 Page 2
David Holliday fell into a mill pond at Mayfield, in the Grand Travese region Thursday, and was drowned.

July 14, 1888 Page 3
Mrs. John W. Sanders, aged 35 years, and wife of a farmer near Horton in Jackson County, suicided by hanging herself with a clothes line from a beam in the cellar. Deceased has for two years been considered mildly insane and had threatened to take her life. She leaves two young sons besides her husband.

July 14, 1888 Page 3
James Etsey and his 16-year-old stepson were killed by a Detroit, Lansin & Northern train at Meridian. Their horses became frightened and dashed into the train which was going at full speed.

July 14, 1888 Page 3

August Nearlson, 22 years of age, stepped into the shaft at the Winthrop Mine, Ishpeming, fell 300 feet and was bruised into a unrecognizable mass.

July 21, 1888 Page 9
Some light is thrown upon the mysterious suicide of G. H. Spencer, who ended his life June 16, at a hotel in Marquette, by taking carbolic acid. Copies of the two letters which he left for his wife and which the Coroner refused to open at the inquest have been received by your correspondent. In them he begged forgiveness for the trouble he had made her and said his brain was turned and that he killed himself to keep out of the mad house. It is understood that there was a woman in the case, who has always borne an unspotted reputation.

July 28, 1888 Page 2
Emil Schandein, one of Milwukee's millionaire brewers, died at Bremen, Germany, last Sunday, where he had gone for a brief visit. For fifteen years Mr. Schandein had been vice-president of the Best Brewing Company. The remains will be brought to this country for interment, at Milwaukee.

July 21, 1888 Page 9
Thomas Hayes, a hotel proprietor at Seney and a highly respected citizen, had some words with a man named McCleary and a companion. Blows followed and the two men were punishing Hayes severely, when George Everett also jumped in to do Hayes up. At this Mr. Hayes lost his self-control and pulling a revolver shot Everett three times in the breast, inflicting fatal injuries, and McCleary once through the shoulder.

July 28, 1888 Page 1
Miss Jennie Cline, sister of Mrs. Geo. A. Cady, died of consumption at the latter's residence in this city Tuesday. The remains were taken to Rochester, Mich. for interment.

July 28, 1888 Page 7
Mrs. James Crisp, wife of Capt. James Crisp of Live Saving Station No. 10, died in this city Tuesday. The funeral occurred Thursday, the Rev. P. T. Rowe of St. James Episcopal church officiating.

August 4, 1888 Page 1
Eliza, the bright little daughter of David Burnett, died of diphtheria and a private funeral from the home was held last Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Burnett have the sympathy of all their friends in their sorrow.

August 4, 1888 Page 1
Last Wednesday afternoon, Richard Clough committed suicide at the Pacific Hotel by taking laudanum. Mr. Clough was well known in the city. He was engaged for the year past until three weeks ago with Carkin Stickney & Cram who have the contract for government work here. About three weeks ago he quit the firm and has since resided in the Canadian Soo. He came over Wednesday morning to take the Minnie M. for St. Ignace where he had secured employment. He missed the boat and was waiting to take the Soo City. His wife visited him in the afternoon at his room in the Pacific House and found him badly under the influence of the drug. She immediately hastened for doctor Ennis, but death arrived before the physician did. A post mortem examination was made by Dr. Ennis who found many evidences of disease about his organization, to relieve himself from the pains of which, he probably took poison.

August 4, 1888 Page 1
The wife of Dennis Ryan of Ashmun street died yesterday morning. Mrs. Ryan has been ailing for some time. The funeral will occur tomorrow at 8 o'clock.

August 4, 1888 Page 4
The sudden death of J. R. Clark, general superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway, directs attention to the mortality list of this great corporation. Within a very few years the road has lost President Alexander Mitchell, Vice- President Julius Wadsworth, General Manager S. S. Merrill, Treasurer R. D. Jennings, General Superintendent James T. Clark, Assistant General Superintendent H. C. Atkins, Superintendent of Freight Traffic W. G. Swan, and Division Superintendent L. B. Rock. These men died in harness. They made the St. Paul road what it is to-day—the biggest railroad in the world under one management. In accomplishing this task they sacrificed their lives. Railroading today is not play. It wears men out before their time. T. J. Potter's death resulted from overtaxing the system. Is the game worth the candle?

August 11, 1888 Page 1
P. J. Byron, the well known and exeedingly popular real estate man, died Monday evening after a brief illness. He was buried at Garden River. The chamber of commerce adopted resolutions of regret.

August 11, 1888 Page 1
The young son of W. F. Ferris, who was injured by a fall last week, lingered in great agony until Sunday, when he died.

August 11, 1888 Page 1
William Burdick, son of S. Burdick, died at three o'clock yesterday morning from the effects of injuries received Thursday morning while attempting to leap aboard the steambarge Pringle at the Union dock. Burdick was employed Osborn Bros. Ice and milk dealers, and in his eagerness to secure the boat's trade he jumped from the dock to the boat while she was moving toward the wharf. Miscalculating the distance he fell and was caught between the dock and the side of the boat and severely crushed in the region of the abdomen. He was a young man highly esteemed by all who knew him. Funeral will take place tomorrow at half past one from the house.....

August 11, 1888 Page 1
Frank Bertram, the well known liveryman died Friday morning from a complications of disorders, chief among which was inflammation of the bowels. Mr. Bertram had been ill about ten days. He had not been in perfect health, his physicians say for many years.... The funeral will occur this afternoon at 2 o'clock.

August 11, 1888 Page 4
General Sheridan died Sunday night at Nonquitt, Mass. He made a strong fight for life, but was of last compelled to yield. The immediate cause of his death was heart failure.....

August 18, 1888 Page 5
Ella H. Nash, a niece of G. E. Dexter of Charles City, Iowa, died of consumption Monday at the Canadian Soo. The deceased came here early in the season with Mr. Dexter and remained for a time on this side of the river. Failing to improve she was taken to the other side. The remains were embalmed by N. V. Garbiel the undertaker, and shipped to Goshen, Ind., Tuesday afternoon.

August 18, 1888 Page 7
Two young men named Morey and Bell, formerly reporters on the Minneapolis Evening Journal, were drowned at Petoskey. Wednesday they left Minneapolis for the Crooked lake country equipped for camping. They left Oden for Burt lake in the early afternoon and were caught in the furious storm of that day, and their boat and contents were found on the shore of Burt lake. Their provisions were scattered along the shore. They had written their names on the bottom of the boat, and beyond doubt were lost in the storm.

August 25, 1888 Page 1
Capt. Geo. Hammer, whose name appears in the list of cabin passengers who lost their lives by the sinking of the steamship Geiser, is well known on the lakes having formerly owned and sailed the schooner Ashtabula.... He has resided at Highland Park, a Chicago suburb, for some time past.... [On page 6 an account is given of the sinking of the Geiser on August 14, 1888].

August 25, 1888 Page 1
An infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Barr died on Wednesday and was buried on Friday. The child was twenty days old.

August 25, 1888 Page 5
Prof. Elisha Jones, of the Michigan university, died last week in Denver Colorado. Prof. Jones graduated at the university in the class of 1859.....

September 1, 1888 Page 2
Arthur Edwards fell off Pope's wharf in Houghton and was drowned. He was 24 years old, was unmarried and was waiter on the steamer Fremont.

September 1, 1888 Page 8
Blanche Endress, the six year old child of Mrs. Charles Endress, was buried yesterday afternoon. The little one died from diptheria. Undertaker Gabriel attended to the funeral arrangements.

September 1, 1888 Page 8
Lieut. James R. Cranston, of the tenth U. S. Infantry, who was stationed at Fort Brady from 1879 till 1884, died in camp near Amargo, New Mexico, August 23. Lieut. Cranston was engaged in removing settlers from the Jicerilla Indian reservation. He was very popular here and his death will be regretted by a large cirle of old-time Sooites.

September 29, 1888 Page 8
Iroqouis
The wife of Mr. Sutton passed suddenly away to the world of eternity on the night of the 16th inst., Mr. Sutton has the sympathy of the surrounding neighborhood.

September 8, 1888 Page 8
Mrs. Mary Bennett died suddenly in Collingwood on her way to her home in the Canadian Soo. Her body will arrive to- day and the funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 1 o'clock from the residence of her son, Arthur Bennett. N. V. Gabriel has charge of the funeral arrangements.

September 8, 1888 Page 1
Undertakers Vanderhook and Cook, of the Dunning Furniture Co., were called at 1 o'clock Tuesday night to care for the mangled remains of Joseph Elliot, son of George S. Elliot, the baker, who was accidentally killed in a lumber camp near Bruce Mines, Ontario. The remains of the unfortunate Elliot, were interred at the Canada Soo Cemetery on Wednesday.

September 8, 1888 Page 1
Peter Biron, who died a few weeks ago, had his life quite largely insured. Some of the policies had lapsed on account of the premium not having been kept up. However a policy for $5,000 in the Western Union Mutual, of Detroit has been found to be in effect and the company announces that it will pay the sum promptly. The lamented Biron's friends will be glad to learn this.

September 15, 1888 Page 1
John W. W. Hamley, the three-year-old son of Samuel W. Hamley, Ridge street, died on Wednesday of diptheria. The funeral was not public.

September 22, 1888 Page 1
John Tate's little three-months-old boy babe died Tuesday, and was buried Wednesday from their residence, by Undertaker Garbriel.

September 29, 1888 Page 1
Fractured His Skull
Last Monday Norman McLeod, who has been employed by D. McKenzie, the contractor and house mover, was fatally injured, while moving a barn off of the waterpower canal property near Ashmun street. He was at the capstan when it was suddenly broken from its fastening and Mr. McLeod was hit on the head. The blow fractured his skull and he died from the results on Tuesday. His remains were taken to Ripley, Ont., for burial yesterday. He leaves a wife and seven children.

October 6, 1888 Page 1
Frank P. Jones was called to Wisconsin suddenly last Sunday, by the death of his sister-in-law. Mr. Jones will remain at Clintonville, Wis., for some time.

October 13, 1888 Page 3
Yellow fever is still making life dismal in Florida. Among the deaths at Jacksonville this week were Edwin Martin, editor of the daily Times Union and Chas. L. Forest the Detroit telegraph operator who went there to help out the force in the telegraph ffice.

October 6, 1888 Page 8
Marine Matters
The barge St. Clair, went to pieces at Sand Beach. The life-saving crew went to the St. Clair and offered to take off her crew, but they refused, though they agreed to signal for help if they required it. At 11 p.m. she showed her signal and the life-savers went out to her.... The life-boat had succeeded in taking of the barge's crew, but could not face the heavy sea, .... In attempting landing at Port Sanilac, the boat was capsized, and four men and the woman cook of the St. Clair crew were drowned. The life-saving crew are all safe. The names of the lost are: Capt. C. H. Janes, of Bay City; sailors Henry Anderson of Australia; George McFarlane, of Cleveland; Louis Fertaw, of Bay City, and the cook, Julia Greawreath of Sebewaing. The rescued men were Maurice McKenna, of Bay City and John Rose, of Detroit.

October 13, 1888 Page 8
Chief Mitchell received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of his brother, who was killed suddenly by the cars Thursday in Harford county, Md. The deceased was forty years of age and was a prosperous farmer.

October 13, 1888 Page 8
A young son of C. T. Merrifield, died on Tuesday morning of croup.....

October 27, 1888 Page 2
Peter H. Potter, drowned from a fish boat while attempting to cross the straits. He was trying to take in the jib when a sea washed him overboard. His partner, Bob Oleson, who was with him, tried to save him, but the sea was too heavy....

October 27, 1888 Page 7
Francisco Iata, Natale Sabatano and Guisseppe Canizzaro, who have been occupying cells in the Tombs in New York on suspicion of being concerned in the murder of Antonio Flaccimio, whose dead body was found on the street near Cooper union a week ago, have all made confessions to Inspector Byrnes about the murder.... Flaccimio had done both and knew he was to die. He arranged with his son to carry on his business in case of his sudden disappearance.

October 27, 1888 Page 7
Wright Sanford, the well known club man and broker, died in the Gilsey House, New York, where he had been ill for some time.

October 27, 1888 Page 7
Col. R. M. Pulsifer, for many years one of the proprietors of the Boston Herald, is dead.

November 3, 1888 Page 2
Patrick McCormick, who was tipped over and killed while riding along a dark road near Clio, lived with his brother-in- law, Joseph Belill, of Thetford.

November 3, 1888 Page 2
Alexander Brown, of Jackson, a fireman on Northern Pacific engine, was killed Saturday by accident at Crow Wing River, Dakota.

November 3, 1888 Page 5
The famous bandit, Victor Flagoso, has been killed and some of his companions wounded by the civil guard of Cuba.

November 10, 1888 Page 7
James Bell, Ben Russell and George F. Grifin were killed in Van Zand County, Texas, Wednesday night. Russell was accused of a misdemeanor, and W. L. Hayes, Sam Stanford, Claude Stanford and Will James went to arrest him. The three negroes were met together and ordered to throw up their hands. Before they could comply they were shot down. Friends of the dead men claim they were killed as the result of a political quarrel. An investigation is being made.

November 10, 1888 Page 1
Serious Marine Accident
A serious accident, resulting in the death of one man and the scalding of three others occurred on board the steambarge Baldwin, off Point au Sable, Lake Superior, on Tuesday night at 11 o'clock.... The escaping steam scalded Jerry Renney the second engineer, and he died shortly afterward in great agony.... The remains of the unfortunate man were brought to the Soo and prepared by Gabriel for transportation to Ogdensburg, the home of the Renney family.... He was on his way home to get married....

November 10, 1888 Page 1
The body of Bill Waiskai, who fell into the canal near the light house Saturday and was drowned, was recovered Monday afternoon by a diver.

November 17, 1888 Page 1
Louis Helmchrist, a Swede employed as a deck-hand on the barge Ben Brink, fell overboard into the canal Thursday night above the railroad bridge and was drowned despite the efforts made to save him. He lived at Pequaming. The body was recovered yesterday forenoon.

November 17,1888 Page 3
Judge Cooley made the burial address at the funeral of Judge C. A. Stacy, at Tecumseh. The funeral was attended by the Lenawee county bar, and by a large share of the people of Tecumseh and vicinity.

November 17, 1888 Page 3
Mrs. Charles Kimball, of Kalamazoo, aged only 25, and as handsome a brunette as you would find in a day's travel, committed suicide by taking morphine.... Although she had been married twice her domestic relations were supposed to be very happy, and her death is entirely unexplained.

November 17, 1888 Page 6
The death of Dr. Hostetter leaves the control of the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie road in the hands of the Vanderbilts. ....

November 24, 1888 Page 1
A son of Edward Stanley found the dead body of a man in the gutter on East Portage avenue, nearly opposite the residence of J. W. Sutton, at 6 o'clock yesterday morning..... It was discovered to be the body of an umnarried Italian, about thirty years of age, who is employed on the water power canal and who figures on the books of the company, as William Rose. Rose was one of fifteen Italians who "batch" in a shanty near the works. He received his pay a few days ago and had been drinking freely since.

November 24, 1888 Page 3
George Woodward, of East Saginaw, is said to have struck Thomas Howe on the head with an axe cutting a hole that may cause his death. Woodward was the bartender in Tom Kern's gin mill and Howe was a carpenter who went there and got into a fuss.

November 24, 1888 Page 3
A sailor named Wm. Hensburg was instantly killed off Sand Beach by a fall from the cross-trees of the schooner Kensky to her deck. He had no money or friends that any one knew of, and was buried in the potter's field at Port Huron.

November 24, 1888 Page 3
Isaac H. Hill, an old and prominent resident of Bay City, is dead. He was president of Michigan Pipe works and was 74 years old. He leaves widow, daughter and two sons. Remains will be buried in Schuyler county, New York State.

November 24, 1888 Page 6
Rear Admiral Baldwin is dead. He was born September 3, 1822, and on April 24, 1839, was appointed a midshipman on the frigate Brandywine, where he experienced his first sea service.....

November 24, 1888 Page 1
John Shine Killed While Pursing William Leighton Friday
Wm. Shine, of Lindsay, Ont., brother of the deceased, arrived in the Soo early in the week to attend the funeral services and look after the business affairs of the dead man. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon, the body being interred in the Catholic cemetery..... Shine had a number of cousins living in this city. [2 columns of story on the shooting incident]

November 24, 1888 Page 6
John Mahoney, was shot in a saloon brawl, in Ashland a few days ago and died from the wounds received. Mr. Mahoney was proprietor of two of the largest of the establishments known all over the country as "dens of Northern Wisconsin."....

December 1, 1888 Page 1
John Barrie, of Hay Lake, an old Canadian Frenchman, well known in these parts, died early last week.

December 1, 1888 Page 2
Capt. J. B. Muir, who for many years commanded the F. & P. M. steamer No. 1, died at his home in East Saginaw. He was buried on Monday at Buffalo, N. Y., that having been his former home. Capt. Muir made his living afloat from the time he was 10 years old.

December 1, 1888 Page 2
While 12,000 people were looking on recently, Prof. Vandegrift went up in a balloon at Exposition park. While in mid air his balloon burst, and he fell into the Chattahoochee river. He was completely enmeshed in the balloon ropes, and drowned in spite of efforts to save him.

December 8, 1888 Page 1
Louis Cadair who moved from Bay Mills to Newberry mourns the death of his child.

December 8, 1888 Page 8
Sanford Randolph, well known here, was accidently killed in the woods, near Newberry, on Tuesday.

December 8, 1888 Page 8
Geo. Thomas, who will be remembered as the man of work about the "Elk", died suddenly in his room on the third floor of the First National bank, Thursday afternoon.....

December 8, 1888 Page 8
Little Leslie Metzger, the unusually bright little son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis L. Metzger, died from a throat trouble on Sunday evening. Tracheotomy was performed as a last resort by Drs. Ennis and Lang but to no purpose. Drs Floyd and Campbell pronounced it diptheria but Drs. Ennis and Lang disagreed with them. The funeral occurred from the residence at 2 o'clock on Monday afternoon and was well attended.

December 15, 1888 Page 8
Death of Mrs. John F. Moloney
Mrs. John F. Moloney died on Wednesday morning 11 o'clock after a brief illness. The funeral occurred Friday morning and was largely attended, the members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and Catholic Mutual Benefit Association turning out in full force. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.....

December 22, 1888 Page 1
Alonysius Moloney, the 2-year-old son of Patrick Moloney of this city died Sunday morning of a complication of diseases. The remains were taken to Cheboygan for interment and were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. James F. Moloney, the father of the dead child being unable to leave owing to the illness of Mrs. Moloney.

December 22, 1888 Page 7
Alex. B. Davis, formerly largely interested in silver mines in Colorado, and at one time attorney-general for Minnesota, died suddenly at his residence in Brooklyn. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of his death.

December 29, 1888 Page 7
The body of S. J. Hughes of the United States coast survey, who fell overboard from a steamer at Puget Sound, two weeks ago, was found today 30 miles from the scene of the accident. An immense octopus or devil fish was fastened to one leg, and is thought to have been the cause of death. Five thousand dollars was found in the pockets of the dead man.

January 12, 1889 Page 5
E. J. Wetherell, the husband of Emma Abbott, the prima donna, died of pneumonia, contracted while he was en route to Kansas City from the Pacific coast

January 19, 1889 Page 8
Mike McKenna, of Hynes & McKenna, was called to Grand Rapids last Saturday, to attend the bedside of a brother who is dying with quick consumption.
Janurary 5, 1889 Page 1
Death of Mrs.T. W. Burdick
Mrs. Nancy G. Burdick, wife of Hon. T. W. Burdick died suddenly at the Battle Creek Sanitarium yesterday morning at 7 o'clock. Although Mrs. Burdick had been an invalid for several years, she so was much improved in health a few days ago when Mr. Burdick left her, that her death came as a painfull shock to her devoted husband and children..... The remains will arrive in the city this afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the residence on Portage avenue, Rev. G. C. Empson officiating, after which the remains will be taken to Decorah, Iowa, where they will be interred beside two children, who died during their residence in that city. Mrs. Burdick was forty-six years of age and was married twenty-nine years ago. She leaves four children, two girls and two boys, who will sorely miss a tender, loving, watchful mother. Mrs. C. T. Bailey is a daughter, and Mr. Bailey went to Mackinaw yesterday afternoon to meet the remains. Those here who had met Mrs. Burdick and all of Mr. Burdick's many friends, learn of the bereavement with pain. Mr. Burdicks' health is none to a good and the blow is a heavy one.

January 5, 1889 Page 3
Albert Spratt, of Concord, died about two years ago, leaving an estate valued at $200,000, which he had willed to different persons. The will is now being contested and has already been decided illegal by two lower courts. Now it is handed up to the Supreme court for a final decision.

January 12, 1889 Page 1
M. J. Doyle has returned from a trip to Montreal, Cleveland and other points. He has had in charge the work of obtaining releases of the numerous relatives of F. X. Lavigne, to a portion of the estate left by that person.....

January 12, 1889 Page 4
Benjamin Hopkins, the Fidelity bank cashier, was saved the ignominy of death in a prison cell by the timely pardon of the president. He reached his home in Cincinnati on the evening of Jan. 4 and died on the morning of Jan. 7. His death was caused by the disgrace of his sentence, and probably hastened by the arrest of his son for forgery. Hopkins' reputation was spotless until he became connected with Harper.

January 26, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Jane Cairns, daughter of William Eagle, died of heart disease at her home in Hay Lake, Wednesday night and was interred in the city cemetery yesterday. She was 26 years of age and leaves a husband and three children. Mrs. Cairns was a lovable woman and many friends sincerely mourn her death.

January 26, 1889 Page 6
One week ago William Keane, a deformed newsboy, died suddenly in a room in North St. Louis. He was 36 years of age and sold papers continually for 25 years.... His relatives live in abject misery. Keane never told anybody about his wealth.

January 26, 1889 Page 4
Gov. Macdonald's Death
The sudden and horrible death of Lieutenant Governor James H. Macdonald of Escanaba, in a railroad accident on the Chicago & North-Western road last Saturday, has caused a painful shock all through the state and particularly in the Upper Peninsula where he was better known.... [a lengthly article follows]

January 26, 1889 Page 5
Jack Mahoney, the dance house keeper, formerly of Michigan, who was recently shot and killed near Ashland, Wis., left an estate valued at $100,000....

February 2, 1889 Page 1
Sudden Death of Dr. Heichhold
A telegram was received last night by Mr. George Kemp, from Brockville, Pa., announcing the death of Dr. A. P. Heichhold, the father of Mrs. George Kemp, Miss Effie Heichhold and Harry Heichhold. Dr. Heichhold's death was very sudden and unexpected. He was well known by all the residents of the Soo, who have resided here for some years.....

February 2, 1889 Page 1
A young daughter of Orderly Sergeant O'Neil died this week.

February 2, 1889 Page 1

May, the 9-year-old daughter of John McClure, Kimball street, died on January 20th.

February 2, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Michael Dorgan, of Superior township, was called to her final rest Tuesday, [Jan 29] at two o'clock, she had only been sick a few days. She leaves a husband, two children and a large circle of friends.

February 2, 1889 Page 1
Rev. Duncan McMillan, one of the oldest ministers of the Presbyterian church in Canada, died at his residence in London this week in his 85th year. The deceased was the father of Dr. D. F. McMillan of this city, who was called to London several weeks ago on account of his father's illness.

February 2, 1889 Page 2
At the funeral of Weston Dobson, of Bethlehem, Pa., who was worth over $8,000,000, were thirteen pall-bearers whose aggregate wealth amounted to over $100,000,000.

February 9, 1889 Page 1
The baby of the Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Alleyn of Pickford was burried during the week.....

February 16, 1889 Page 3
Mrs. R. H. Emerson, of Jackson, took her baby in her arms to kiss it before going out for the evening, when it struggled, gave a plaintive cry, and was dead. The baby's brain was diseased.

February 16, 1889 Page 4
Thomas M. Nichol who was a conspicuous figure in the "hard money' agitation a few years ago, died last Sunday in New York....

February 16, 1889 Page 5
Killed by Fright
Miss Josie Carroll, a young school teacher at Birdseye, Ind., was killed by fright the other night. Her brother and some boys made a ghost, which they placed in her path as she returned alone from a neighbor's house. She was thrown into convultions and died on the spot.

February 23, 1889 Page 3
Hart Williams, of Milo, Kalamozoo county, who died Thursday, is believed to have come to an untimely grave on account of his decidedly human habit of eating wooden toothpicks. His stomach was opened and lots of little bits of wood found in it, with no other apparent reason for his death.

February 23, 1889 Page 4
Edwin Clifford an actor well known in the Lake Superior country died in Nebraska a few days ago....

February 23, 1889 Page 5
Died in the Faith
Sister Juliette Ware, one of the warmest apostles of the faith cure religion, and who has devoted the past four years of her life to work in the church, died at her home in Jersey City, recently....

February 23, 1889 Page 7
Superior
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Gilpin, of Bay Mills, lost their little baby Feb. 19, age eight months.

February 23, 1889 Page 7
Superior
The infant child of Mr. and Mr. Orien F. Scribner died on Friday the 15th, inst. age three months.

March 2, 1889 Page 5
An inquest was held Saturday on the body of Charles Gabert, killed by the train robbers near Pixley, Cal., last Friday evening.....

March 9, 1889 Page 3
Mrs. C. J. Stowell, who died at Hudson a few days ago, was a native of New Hampshire, and was a schoolmate of Zach Chandler, and of Horace Greeley.

March 16, 1889 Page 4
Capt. John Ericsson, the inventor and builder of the iron-clad Monitor, died in New York last week, aged 85 years. Ericsson was a competitor with Stephenson, the locomotive inventor, in 1829, but his invention did not prove equal to that of the latter....

March 16, 1889 Page 3
Representative Burns of Missouri, who died at Washington this session, graduated at the Harvard law school. ....

March 16, 1889 Page 3
John Diamond, of Clayton township, Genessee county, went to a remote part of his farm recently to look for some cattle which had strayed away, and in a deserted log cabin found the most ghastly spectacle his eyes had ever rested upon. Suspended from a rafter of the building was the body of Amos Jones, a man who had been missing for some time. The body had evidently hung there for some time as it was blackened and decomposed, while birds had pecked out its eyes and devoured portions of the nose.

March 16, 1889 Page 3
Congressman Richard W. Townshend, of Illinois, who has been lying ill with pneumonia for the past few days died at Washington last Saturday.

March 16, 1889 Page 3
J. P. Page of Kansas City, held his baby up to the window to look at the cable cars. It jumped from his arms, fell sixty feet to the street below, and was killed.

March 16, 1889 Page 8
Called Very Suddenly
Last Thursday about noon, Thomas Douglas Selkirk Macdonnell died suddenly of heart disease in the law office of Hamilton & Keogh.... Mr. Macdonnell was in his sixty-ninth year. He was a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, but he had lived in this country many years. He came to the Soo about two years ago from Dakota with his family. He leaves a widow and son and daughter, .... The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock this morning from St. Mary's church.
(also on same page)
DIED — On the 14th inst., at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Thomas Douglas Selkirk Macdonnell, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the sixty-ninth year of his age.

March 23, 1889 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Jos. S. Burchill
Mrs. Maggie L. Burchill, wife of Alderman Jos. S. Burchill, died after long suffering Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, aged 23 years .... No children are left to share with him the sadness of death. The funeral will occur at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon, from the Presbyterian church.

March 23, 1889 Page 2
Notice to Creditors
The creditors of John McLeod who formerly resided on the east half of lot number fifteen in the fifth concession of the Township of Huron in the County of Bruce, but who died in the city of Sault Ste. Marie, in the State of Michigan, on or about the twenty-sixth of September 1888, ....

March 23, 1889 Page 8
Obiturary
Mon, March 11, 1889, Wesley Tate, of Sugar Island, aged 19 years, 8 months and 1 day.
Wesley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Tate, died on the morning of the 11th inst. His short life has been a fight against disease, and for the greater part of the last three years he has been confined to his room. During the last few weeks he knew that the end was near yet he approached it without fear, and often, expressed the desire to depart and be with Jesus..... The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Charles Burroughs and Rev. George Empson. His remains were laid at rest in the cemetery at Garden River.....

March 30, 1889 Page 1
Killed in a Fierce Encounter
"Whitey" Smith alias Charles Lane - died with his boots on. Shot in an encounter with the sheriff. Killed in Cheboygan Saturday night by sheriff Hayes.(An extensive article)

March 30, 1889 Page 3
Among the papers of Mrs. Mary H. Latimer, of Jackson, there was found a note for $4,500 from her son, drawing ten percent interest, and dated Feb. 1, 1888. The first year's interest, $450, would have been due four days after Mrs. Latimers murder, and this is to be used to show motive in the prosecution of young Latimer.

March 30, 1889 Page 3
A 13-year old school girl at Belleville, N. J., was the cause of a quarrel between two rival school boy lovers, in which James Cronin, aged 14, was fatally stabbed.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
George Abrahams, a Hollander, age 20, was caught by the head between a wheel and a belt in the Michigan buggy works, at Kalamazoo, and pounded to a pulp before the machine could be stopped.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
Mrs. Margaret Kintern and her three children perished in their burning house at Milwaukee.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
John A. Duff, a well known theatrical manager, died at his home in New York Monday of paralysis, aged 60 years.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
Maj. M. A. Reno, late of the United States army, died at Washington, Saturday of cancer of the tongue and pneumonia.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
A man named Whaley, who used to live in Waldron, Hillsdale county, has just been executed out west for feeding poison to his wife.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
Mrs. Hannah Cook, a widow, living near Grand Rapids went to the Adventist meeting at the neighboring schoolhouse, taking her 15-year old boy Charley with her. He stayed outside, however, and got into wrestling bout with another lad, in which he was thrown, and his neck broken. No blame is attached to his companion, as the tussle was good-natured.

April 6, 1889 Page 3
Asa Kellogg, commercial agent for the "Sunset route," committed suicide with laudanum at Cincinnati. He left a note saying that "A fool is as well off dead as alive."

April 6, 1889 Page 5
Faithful Mingo
The night of the first Sunday in last May the residence of Enoch McMahen, an old and highly esteemed farmer near Anderson, Ind., was burned. All the family except the old man were away at singing school at the time, and he perished in the flames, his half-consumed body being dragged from the burning building with poles by the first persons to arrive after the fire was discovered....

April 6, 1889 Page 6
Singular Fatality
A curious matter is described in a Lewiston (Me.) dispatch in the Boston Herald: "This community is shocked over the sudden death of Mrs. Mark Robbins, and Mrs. Garcelon, and the serious illness of Senator Frye's wife. Yesterday Mrs. Frye called on Mrs. Garcelon, who had been seriously ill for some weeks. While with Mrs. Garcelon Mrs. Frye was suddenly taken ill. Mrs. Robbins, who was also visiting Mrs. Garcelon, aided in restoring Mrs. Frye. Mrs. Robbins afterward started for her home. She had gone but a short distance when she was stricken down with heart disease and was taken to the nearest house, where she soon expired. Mrs. Garcelon died this morning. Mrs. Frye is considered in a precarious condition. Mrs. Garcelon and Mrs. Frye were sisters.

April 13, 1889 Page 1
Engineer Chas. Cave Found Drowned
A floater came to surface in the ship canal yesterday forenoon. Undertaker Vanderhook took it in charge and Coroner Lang held an inquest at which it was developed that the man's name was Chas. Cave, a railroad engineer, between 35 and 40 years of age, who has been missing since last November, at which time he was stopping in the Canadian Soo. The remains were positively identified although badly disfigured from having lain in the water so long, by C. N. Simpson, who knew Cave at Windsor, Ont, ten years ago. On the remains were found a watch, several letters of recommendation and $292 in cash. Ten years ago Cave was married, had a family and was well-to-do, but addicted to drinking. The supposition is that he fell into the canal while intoxicated. The money was turned over to the county clerk, who in turn will deposit it with the county treasurer, to be remitted to the state treasurer, if not called for in two years. In the meantime the state has to pay the expenses of interment.

April 13, 1889 Page 7
Isabella, the bright fifteen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Meron, died after a long illness, on Wednesday afternoon and was interred yesterday. The funeral occurred from the Catholic church and was largely attended by sympathizing friends.

April 20, 1889 Page 1
John F. Moloney's friends were again grieved to learn this week of the death of one of his children - the youngest.

April 20, 1889 Page 4
John P. Usher died in Philadelphia on Sunday.....

April 27, 1889 Page 1
Miss Josephine Duman aged 22 years died at Bay Mills a week ago Friday. She was very highly esteemed by all who knew her.

April 27, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Charlotte V. Olmstead, wife of Wm. Olmstead, and daughter of Wm. and Ann McAleer of St. Vincent township., Gray county, Ontario died after an illness of three months on Thursday evening April 18th, at four o'clock, aged 31 years. Mrs. Olmstead was a tender and loving woman and was liked by all who knew her. She leaves behind her to mourn her loss a devoted husband, and two little children.

April 27, 1889 Page 4
The Cochrane mills at Escanaba will soon be in operation. The death of Messrs. McDonald and Cochrane, who were the prime movers of the enterprise, was a severe blow, but the stockholders have decided to go down in their pockets and raise enough money to start the works.

April 27, 1889 Page 4
Postmaster Henry G. Pearson of New York died early in the week of hemorrhage of the lungs. Mr. Pearson was in the employ of the government from the age of fourteen to the time of his death. ....

May 4, 1889 Page 2
Alice Talbot, eighteen months old, daughter of Geo. E. Talbot, who lives on the Mackinaw Road, died on Monday.

May 4, 1889 Page 2
Mrs. Louis Payment died on Sugar Island on Monday and was buried on Tuesday. Miss Temperance Tate the fourteen year old daughter of Capt. Tate of Sugar Island, also died and was buried on Tuesday. Undertaker Gabriel, officiating.

May 4, 1889 Page 5
Mrs. John Cummings, aged 28 years, residing fourteen miles from the city, on the Mackinaw Road, died from disease of the kidneys on Thursday and was interred yesterday.

May 11, 1889 Page 7
The year old son of Frank Dolsen died suddenly on Tuesday evening. The funeral occurred on Wednesday.....

May 18, 1889 Page 1
The 7 year old grandson of John Fletcher was drowned in a well on the Canada side last week.

May 18, 1889 Page 1
John Hotton received a telegram from Bruce Mines yesterday announcing the death of an uncle, Thomas Collins.

May 18, 1889 Page 4
Washington Irving Bishop, the mind-reader, died suddenly in New York on Monday of hysterical catalepsy. Bishop was in some things a remarkable man. His so called mind reading feats, for a time puzzled the wise men of two continents but his power was finally ascribe to muscle-sensitiveness, which was, in him, developed to an extraordinary degree. ....

May 25, 1889 Page 1
Eva Harding, aged twelve years, died of spinal meningitis at the house of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Harding, on Carrie street, yesterday morning.

May 25, 1889 Page 1
Miss Jennie McCoy, aged seventeen years, died of consumption Thursday night at her residence on Ridge Street. The funeral will occurr at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

May 25, 1889 Page 1
James Bennett, died of consumption at the residence of Peter Tardiff on Thursday night. He was 21 years of age. The burial took place this morning from St. Mary's Church.

May 25, 1889 Page 4
There are rumors of various changes in the cabinet. It is said that Attorney General Miller will be appointed associate justice of the supreme court to fill the vacancy made by the death of Stanley Matthews....

May 25, 1889 Page 10
Marine
Friday morning of last week the steambarge R. P. Ranney, of the Bradley fleet, Capt. Greenlee in charge, that passed through here yesterday, came in collision during thick weather with the little schooner M. F. Merrick, off Presque Isle, in Lake Huron and all on board of the Merrick were lost except the captain, Alex Rusho, and one seaman, Frank Goodfriend. Those lost were Martin Johnson, of Detroit; John Charlebois, of Detroit; Wm. Ours, Ashtabula; Patrick Hanaly, Clayton, N. Y.; Mrs. Cole, the cook, Cleveland....

May 25, 1889 Page 4
The sudden death of Allen Thorndyke Rice, editor of the North American Review, makes it necessary to appoint another Minister to Russia. Mr. Rice was preparing to start for his new post when death overtook him....

May 25, 1889 Page 9
A tree fell on William McKerwin in the lumber camp of James Reidy out on the Soo Line, on Monday night, killing him instantly. N. V. Gabriel was notified and dispatched a coffin to the camp where the interment took place.

June 1, 1889 Page 1
Mr. and Mrs. N. I. Martin's babe, only a few weeks old, died last Saturday morning. It was their first and their sorrow is deep. Their friends extend heartfelt sympathy.

June 1, 1889 Page 8
Timothy Dorgan, who resides on the South Shore railroad died suddenly last Sunday.

June 1, 1889 Page 8
Duncan Anderson, unmarried, aged sixty years, was buried here on Monday. His home was at Port Elgin, Ont.

June 1, 1889 Page 8
Molly Mulligan, the companion of "Whitey" Smith, who was killed a short time ago in an encounter with the officers in Cheboygan, committed suicide in that town on Tuesday.

June 1, 1889 Page 8
Maggie Parker, aged sixteen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Parker, of Court street, died on Tuesday, and was interred at Donaldson. The remains were cared for by Undertaker Jacob Vanderhook.

June 1, 1889 Page 10
Marine
Capt. Robertson, of the United Empire, passed down yesterday. He furnished The News with the following drowning item: "A party of seven Indians left the Catholic mission, Fort William, in a sail boat to go to Port Arthur for seed potatoes. A stiff gale was blowing, and after leaving Kaministiqua river and entering the bay a sharp gust of wind capsized the boat.... As soon as I saw the state of affairs, by the aid of a glass, I turned to the rescue, lowered a life boat and picked up the perishing Indians, not, however, before one of them, Michael Matchiassin, had gone down to his death. A second one, Sam Desmoulin, died on board the steamer shortly after the rescue."

June 8, 1889 Page 1
A Pitiful Tale
H. F. Snyder and F. A. Lane, while in search of angle worms yesterday about noon, crawled into a shed in the rear of Hebard's lumber yard and found a black valise, partly open.... Among the papers was found the report of the physicians who examined the body of poor Christina Paishabenoquai, the unfortunate woman who was so horribly outraged and then murdered at Little Current, Ont., 100 miles down the line of the Canadian Pacific from here....

June 8, 1889 Page 11
Lollie Bellmere, of the Soo, aged eleven years, died at Marquette on Monday, of consumption.

June 15, 1889 Page 1
Marine
Capt. W. J. Trinter, of the steambarge Onoko, was caught in the pony hoist while making canvas last Sunday, and was instantly killed. The vessel was off Ashland at the time. His body was brought to this city, where it was embalmed by Undertaker Vanderhook. The remains were then forwarded to Cleveland for interment. Capt. Trinter was on his last trip. He had made all preparations for retiring.

June 15, 1889 Page 4
Leonard Swett, the great Chicago lawyer is dead. Mr. Swett was an intimate and confidential friend of Abraham Lincoln and nominated him for presidency in the 1860 convention....

June 15, 1889 Page 8
Death of Mrs. L. P. Trempe
The death of Mrs. L. P. Trempe on Monday night was a severe shock to the family and her many friends in this city. Mrs. Trempe had long been an invalid. She was a woman of education and refinement and was highly respected for her many estimable qualities. The family has the sympathy of a large circle of friends. The funeral was largely attended and was very impressive, the services at the Catholic church being unusually elaborate. The family desire to express their sense of appreciation for the many marks of kindness shown them in their hour of affliction.

June 15, 1889 Page 7
Joseph Ketcham, the baggagemaster who was shot by robbers in his car on the Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St.Louis and Chicago Railroad, near Delhi, died of his injuries the following day. A reward of $1,000 is offered for the capture of the robbers.

June 15, 1889 Page 8
Fred Miller, president and chief owner of the Miller Brewing Co., of Milwakee, which has a big agency at the Soo, died of cancer at his home on Monday.

June 22, 1889 Page 1
A little son of Charles Ripley died yesterday morning.

June 22, 1889 Page 4
John Gilbert, the famous comedian, died at Boston on Monday. He was seventy-eight years of age and went upon the stage at the age of eighteen.

June 22, 1889 Page 11
Elijah M. Haines Gone
In the death of Mr. Elijah M. Haines at Waukegan, recently, Illinois loses a histroic figure and the Legislature one of its ablest, most experienced, and adroit members.... (a lengthy article follows)

June 29, 1889 Page 1
It Killed Him
John Moloney Died From the Effects of a Blow
John Moloney, a fisherman aged twenty-five years, died at Detour Thursday night from the effects of a blow on the head inflicted by a man named Dan Whiteford. Thursday afternoon Moloney, who was intoxicated and very quarrelsome, got into an altercation with Whiteford about some target shooting, in Murray's Saloon ....

June 29, 1889 Page 1
Roadmaster Freeland, of the Soo Line, buried a baby here Sunday that died of diphtheria, and another of his little ones is down with the dread disease.

July 6, 1889 Page 2
The killing of Moloney, at Detour, last week, occurred in the street, and not in Murray's saloon, as was stated.

July 13, 1889 Page 1
Accident on a Barge
A Wealthy Young Man falls Through a Hatchway and is Fatally Injured.
While the steambarge Phillip Minch was passing down the river Thursday evening, W. A. Rogers fell through the hatchway, striking on his head and causing two fractures of the skull. The boat stopped at Detour and the injured man was attended by Dr. House. He was in a critical condition when the boat left for below. Mr. Rogers is a young man and lives in Cleveland. He is the son of wealthy parents and was taking a pleasure trip. His injury will probably prove fatal.

July 13, 1889 Page 4
John Norquay, ex-premier of Manitoba, is dead. Norquay was a remarkable man. He was born in Red River colony and became a force in the politics of his country very early in life. In October 1878, he became premier and provincial treasurer, and held office until 1888. .... He was of Indian descent.

July 13, 1889 Page 5
Allen Thorndike Rice
A Literary Career Brought To A Sudden Stop
One of those sudden deaths that come as a shock to the community, and in fact to the entire country, was that of Allen Thorndike Rice, who was stricken down in the prime of manhood as he was about to enter upon an exalted and important position in the service of his country, that of Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to Russia. Mr. Rice was taken ill on Saturday .... Mr. Rice was born in Boston June 18, 1853.... Mr. Rice never married. Both of his parents are dead, and he has no brother or sister. (extensive article)

August 3, 1889 Page 1
Geo. Martin, of Colwell & Martin, left yesterday for his home at Naperville, Ill. Mr. Martin's father died last week and he will not return to the Soo for some time.

July 20, 1889 Page 1
Death Steps In
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Chapman Lose Their Only Child
The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Chapman in this city and throughout the state will be pained to learn of the death of their only child, Guy, four years old, who died early Monday evening. The child was an invalid and had been failing for the past few weeks. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. P. T. Rowe at the family residence at nine o'clock on Tuesday morning, and the remains were taken to Pontiac, which is the old home of Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, for interment, at eleven o'clock. ....

July 20, 1889 Page 8
Drowned at Detour
Capt. Strauss Loses His Life in Trying to Save a Boy
A special message to THE NEWS from Detour says Capt. Ben Strauss was drowned Thursday afternoon while trying to save a six year old son of Robert Hill, who fell from the dock. Capt. Strauss bravely plunged into the water and was himself drowned. John Butler, of the crew of the Wahnapitae, which was lying at the dock, saw the boy struggling in the water, jumped in and succeeded in rescuing him.
Coroner House was called and the body of Capt. Struass recovered. The deceased was about 42 years old, and leaves a daughter who lives in New York....

July 27, 1889 Page 2
An Indian Drowned Detour Furnishes Another Inquest For the Coroner On Thursday, May 30th, two Indians left Anthony's dock at Detour, in a fishing boat. They were John Augusta, commonly known as John Ottawa, who was in the employ of Thos. Sims, and William Minnequott, a stranger.... Last week Friday Coroner House was notified that the body of John had been found on the beach of a small island in Pigeon Cove, eight miles from Detour.... The remains were identified as John Augusta.... John leaves a widow and several children without support. ....

July 27, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. N. C. Morgan returned from Northport on Wednesday, where she attended the funeral of her father.

August 3, 1889 Page 3
The Chief Difficulty Mr. Onderdonk, who died recently on the Hudson, left a $4,000,000 estate. ....

August 3, 1889 Page 8
Died Mrs. Margarete Shardin, mother of Mrs. P. W. Shute, after a long and painful illness. Funeral private.

August 17, 1889 Page 1
Percy, the little twin boy, of David Povey, died Thursday night of cholera infantum.

August 24, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Patrick Lawless, who died Wednesday, was buried yesterday from St. Mary's church.

August 24, 1889 Page 1
John Cameron, aged 50 years, died yesterday at the Ontario House, He came from Port Huron.

August 24, 1889 Page 1
A Mr. Cleghorn, a wealthy gentleman from Toronto, died at the International Hotel Wednesday, from kidney trouble. N. V. Gabriel embalmed the body and shipped it east on the Athabasca.

August 24, 1889 Page. 4
The authorities in California will undertake the defense of Deputy Marshall Nagle who killed Judge Terry while protecting the person of Justice Field....

August 31, 1889 Page 1
Both Bodies Found and Buried
The body of William Minnoquet, one of the two Indians who, were drowned May 30, near Detour, was found last week on the shore of Burnt Island, about twelve miles from Detour, where it had been lying evidently, six or eight weeks. The body was taken in charge by Coroner House and given a decent burial. The body of the other Indian, John Ottawa, was recovered and inquest held July 20. William lived on Manitoulin Island and was the one who bought the liqour from M. M. McLeod on which both became drunk and unable to manage their boat,....

August 31, 1889 Page 4
St. Louis lost a firm friend and a great philanthropist in the death of Henry Shaw. He left an estate of $2,500,000 most of which will go to charitable institutions.

August 31, 1889 Page 8
Obituary
At the residence of his father, at Hay Lake, Julius Earl Lindsay, the infant son of Robert and Sophia N. Lindsay, on the morning of the 28th of August, 1889; age, two months. Cause of death, Cholera Infanutm. The funeral took place on the 29th and was attended by a large number of sympathizers, who accompanied the remains to the family burying ground. The Rev. T. R. Easterday conducted the service at the house and at the grave.

August 31, 1889 Page 8
Miss Helen Danskin arrived from Vassar, Mich., yesterday. She was called home to attend the funeral of her little niece, Helen Floyd.
Little Helen Florence Floyd, the bright four year old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Floyd, died Wednesday of membraneous croup. The funeral will occur this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock from the Presbyterian church.

September 7, 1889 Page 7
Dafter Jottings
Jessie McKiddie, aged ten, died after a brief illness of 4 days, from diphtheria.

September 7, 1889 Page 1
A Fatal Shot - Young Charley French Accidentally Killed While Hunting Near Seney
C. G. Clarke received the sad intelligence Wednesday morning of the accidental fatal shooting of his nephew, Charley French, age fifteen years, at Seney. It appears that the young man was an enthusiastic sportsman, was out duck shooting, when his gun was accidently discharged, the contents striking him under the chin and resulting in instant death. The accident occurred Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. He was a son of Dr. French who has many friends and acquaintances in this city.

September 14, 1889 Page 8
Drowned in the River
Corporal Place, of Fort Brady, Loses His Life while out Sailing
Corporal Place, of Company A, 23d infantry, Fort Brady, was drowned Monday afternoon, while out sailing with Private Curran. While opposite Seymour's dock in the main channel and near the Canada side the small boat capsized and both occupants were thrown into the water. Their cries for help were unheard and they drifted with the fierce current. The weight of the two men kept the boat underneath the surface of the water most of the time and seeing that there was little chance of both escaping, Corporal Place volunteered to swim ashore. He started and got about half the distance, when it is supposed he was taken with a cramp in the cold water. "Good bye, I've got to drown," he cried and disappeared from sight.... The body has not yet been recovered. Corporal Place was an Englishman and had no relatives in this country....

September 14, 1889 Page 1
Fr. Chartier's Bereavement
Members of St. Mary's Church United in Expressions of Sympathy Mrs. Margaret Chartier, mother of Father Chartier, pastor of St. Mary's church, was buried at St. Madeline, Canada, last Sunday. Mrs. Chartier had lived to a ripe old age, being in her eightieth year when she died. Death resulted from a cancer which made its appearance near the eye. The members of St. Mary's church sympathize deeply ....

September 21, 1889 Page 4
Bob Younger, the noted outlaw, died on Monday in the Minnesota penitentiary, of consumption.... Bob Younger was an active participant in all the lawless deeds of the James and Younger gang.

September 21, 1889 Page 8
Matt Mattson, a Finlander, is at the Soo general hospital with a severe spinal injury, from which he is not expected to recover.

September 21, 1889 Page 8
Frank Bean, the tailor, who has worked at Fort Brady for the past few years, died at the Soo Hospital, yesterday afternoon, at 2 o'clock with pneumonia. The funeral will occur this morning from Gabriel's undertaking establishment at 8:30 o'clock. The services will be held at St. Mary's church.

September 28, 1889 Page 1
Buried With Military Honors
The body of Corporal Wm. Place, of Fort Brady, who was drowned a couple of weeks ago while out fishing, was recovered last Saturday morning near Garden River. The remains were interred in the Fort Brady cemetery with military honors. The last sad call was sounded by the company bugler and the mournful ceremony was over. The burial service was preached by Rev. P. T. Rowe.

September 28, 1889 Page 6
Miss Josie Bampton of the Canadian Sault died last Wednesday evening at her home in that city. Her funeral will occur this morning at 10 o'clock.

October 5, 1889 Page 3
Charles L. Ellet, a noted engineer, born January 1, 1810, and died June 21, 1862, planned and built the first wire suspension bridge in the United States across the Schuylkill River at Fairmount, which was opened to the public on January 2, 1842....

October 12, 1889 Page 1
Death of Miss Lottie Danforth
Miss Lottie Danforth the fifteen year-old daughter of William Danforth of this city died on Tuesday of typhoid fever. The funeral took place at the Presbyterian church last Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Rev. J. E. Bitting preached the funeral sermon.... The following schoolmates acted as pall bearers: John Doench, Herbert Adams, Arthur Durrent, Lorin Rouleau, Alfred Barrett and Allie Kemp....

October 12, 1889 Page 8
The little daughter of Thomas Anderson, who was poisoned at Bay Mills by strychnine, found the bottle from which she drank water, in the rear of the house. The child was about two and a half years old and was playing in the rear of the house. She found the bottle which was empty, filled it with water and drank from it. Where the bottle came from is a mystery as strychnine was not kept in the house.

October 19, 1889 Page 8
Died - Monday at 10:30, Bennie Tymon, oldest son of Mark Tymon, of typhoid malaria, eight years and seven months of age. Funeral from home Tuesday.

October 19, 1889 Page 8
Mrs. J. N. Murray died on Tuesday evening at her home on Ashmund street. The funeral occurred yesterday afternoon from the Presbyterian Church.....

November 2, 1889 Page 6
B. M. Chambers, of the St. Louis Times, who shot and killed Attorney Frank J. Bowman for levying on his property, said at the preliminary examination a few days ago: "When I think what he has done and what he wanted to do, I rejoice that I killed him." ....

October 26, 1889 Page 1
Death of Mr. James Comb
Last Thursday night at 7 o'clock Mr. James Comb died at his residence on Dawson street. Mr. Comb was born in Leith, Scotland, in 1815, and was in his 74th year. He came to Canada in 1858. The past twelve of his life were earnestly devoted to his family in this vicinity. He leaves a wife and a large family to mourn the loss of a dear husband and kind father. The funeral will occur from the residence on Monday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. The services will be conducted by the Rev. T. R. Easterday.....

November 2, 1889 Page 1
Thomas Lucas Dies Suddenly of Heart Disease, on the Lock
Thomas Lucas, a resident of Dollar settlement, dropped dead from heart disease suddenly Sunday afternoon, about 5 o'clock, while walking along the lock. Mr. Lucas came down Sunday from Bay Mills in a sailboat, accompanied by Pete Clow. He put up at Wm. Lane's boarding house on Water street, where his wife was visiting. After resting awhile he started out with Mr. Clow to lock the sailboat through, but got no further than the lock when he fell over and expired. Dr. Lang was called, but death was instantaneous. Mrs. Lucas was sent for and moaned piteously over the remains of the husband who had left her a few moments before healthy and vigorous. The funeral occurred Tuesday from Mr. Lane's house. Rev. H. P. Cory officiated and the remains were interred in the Protestant cemetery. The deceased leaves three sons and one daughter, all grown up. One son runs the sawmill at Church's Landing.

November 2, 1889 Page 1
Capt. McDougall's Sad News
Capt. McDougall, of the Ontario, was met with sad news upon his arrival here with his boat on Wednesday. Capt. Symes was sent here to relieve him and notify him of the death of his three children by diphtheria and of the serious illness of two others. Capt. McDougall lives in Owen Sound and he reached here too late by an hour to catch the C. P. R. boat, so was compelled to go away round by rail. His wife is also very ill.

November 9, 1889 Page 8
Little Fay Floyd, the baby son of Dr. Floyd, died Saturday night of lung fever and was buried on Monday. Dr. and Mrs. Floyd have the sincere sympathy of their many friends.

November 16, 1889 Page 1
O. J. Taylor, the six year old son of Henry Taylor, died at the family residence Wednesday afternoon.....

November 16, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Emma Kingshot, beloved wife of Stephen Kingshot, died at the age of 44, Wednesday morning, from typhoid pnuenonia. The funeral occurred from the Methodist church, of which the deceased was an active member, yesterday afternoon and was largely attended.

November 16, 1889 Page 1
He died a Hero
The correspondent of THE NEWS at Detour sends the details of another sad case of drowning, which happened near that place a few days ago. George O'Neil, whose home is near Ottawa, went out in a sailbout on the 12th, with five others. The wind was blowing fresh and the boat scudded through the water at a rapid pace. When off Point au Frene it struck a snag and filled at once. The occupants clung to the boat for a half an hour, until they were benumbed with cold. They talked over their chances of escape and came to the conclusion that unless assistance from the shore was secured quickly they would become so chilled that they would have to relinquish their hold upon the frail boat that stood between them and a watery grave. O'Neil, who was a good swimmer, volunteered to make the attempt and with prayerful wishes of his friends for his success he struck out as vigorously as his chilled condition would permit. The men watched him near the shore with glad hearts, knowing that with darkness coming on, they stood but little chance of being rescued by passing boats. Nearer and nearer he got to the shore until only ten rods separated him from it, when to the unspeakable horror of the men on the boat, he suddenly threw up his hands and sank out of sight. The survivors managed to hold on for an hour when they were espied by a passing boat and rescued. O'Neil was in the employ of Smith & Hossack the well known lumbermen, and was well liked. The body was recovered the next day and an inquest was held by Dr. W. B. House of Detour..... O'Neil was a single man. The remains were sent to his home near Ottawa.....

November 23, 1889 Page 1
Mysterious Disappearance Probable Drowning of Hugh McKenzie at Detour. Another case of drowning is reported from Detour. On Wednesday evening of last week while the tug Sea Gull was lying at Moiles' lumber dock, Hugh McKenzie, one of her fireman, went up town and became drunk. At a late hour he started from one of the saloons to go to the tug. Since then all trace of him has been lost....Mr. McKenzie leaves a wife and family in St. Ignace.

November 23, 1889 Page 1
Death in W. B. Cady's Family The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Cady died suddenly Thursday morning. The child betrayed no signs of illness and the shock was therefore all the more severe to the sorrowing parents. The funeral occurred yesterday and the remains were interred in the Fort Brady cemetery. Rev. P. T. Rowe conducted the services. The young wife bears up bravely under the affliction.....

November 23, 1889 Page 1
Death of Alexander Day
Clarence Alexander Day, aged 64 years, died of obstruction of the bowels last Monday and the funeral occurred on Thursday from the Catholic church. Mr. Day was born in the Soo and was one of the best known of the old citizens. He leaves a family of eight children. Mr. Day was a courier du bois for the Hudson Bay Company, and had an eventful life.

November 23, 1889 Page 1
The remains of George Warren, a bricklayer, who died last Sunday of typhoid fever, were embalmed by N. V. Gabriel and shipped to Meaford on the Atlantic. Warren was twenty-three years of age.

November 23, 1889 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Latimer
Mrs. Robert Latimer, of the Canadian Soo, died last Tuesday afternoon. Her body was taken to Kingston for interments. Mrs. Latimer had been married but ten months. During her residence at the Canadian Soo she had made many friends on both sides of the river, who sincerely mourn her death. Mr. Latimer has the sympathy of a large circle of friends in his great affliction.

November 30, 1889 Page 1
The infant child of Walter Thompson died last Monday. Friends extend sympathy.

November 30, 1889 Page 7
A Double Affliction (Canada Soo Pioneer)<
Mrs. Cumberland, the widowed sister of the late Mrs. R. S. Latimer, is in town and quite prostrated with grief at the double loss which she has sustained in one short year. A year ago she and her departed sister stood at the same altar and together plighted their marriage vow. In a few weeks afterwards her husband fell, a victim to typhoid fever; and now she is called upon to witness the death of her sister. What a brief span of time in which to reach a sea of sorrow.

November 30, 1889 Page 8
Died at Detour
At Detour last Sunday, Mrs Wm. McKenzie died at the age of 62 years. The deceased was held in high esteem by all her acquaintances and bore with great patience her long and tedious illness.

November 30, 1889 Page 8

Mayor Fowles' Father Dead

Thursday morning Mayor Fowle received a telegram that his father had died the night before. He immediately left for Moscow, this state, where his father resided.

December 21, 1889 Page 1
Paid His Ferry Fare With Morphine
A. B. McLellan, from Bay City, committed suicide at Martin Van Dusen's hotel on Ashmun street, Sunday last, by taking morphine. He was a black smith by trade and came here in search of employment. McLellan was fifty-eight years of age and leaves a wife and seven children who reside in Bay City. Coroner Lang held an inquest Monday night, which developed nothing new. His son John McLellan, who is a fireman on the Michigan Central, arrived in the city Tuesday and left with the remains on Wednesday for Bay City. The suicide had been drinking to excess for some days before his death

December 7, 1889 Page 1
Death of a Veteran
Sergeant Kelly, Father of Mrs. Robert Campbell, on His Last March
Mrs. Robert Campbell and Joseph W. Kelly, returned to Stirlingville this week from Goderich, Ont., where they went to attend the funeral of their father, Sergt. Kelly, an historical character. Mrs. Kelly, their mother, who is eighty years old, accompanied them home and will make her home with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Campbell. The Goderich Star has the following interesting sketch of Sergt. Kelly's life: A Veteran gone—After a long struggle with the infirmities of old age, Sergeant Kelly, the well known veteran soldier and Orangeman, passed to his rest on Thursday morning, at the ripe old age of eighty-three years and six months. Deceased was born in Tipperary, Ireland, and at the age of seventeen enlisted in the English Hussars, after serving a term in which he volunteered into the Third Light Dragoons for active service in India, where he put in nearly fourteen years, when he returned to England, and after several years he came to Canada serving the last seven years of his long term as drill sergeant in London, Ont. His total service was thirty-one years and six months, a rare and most honourable record. He was an enthusiastic member of the Loyal Orange Order, and in this too bore a record far above the average having joined the order over sixty years ago.... During the twelve years of his residence in Goderich he was one of the most familiar figures .... He was a life-long devoted member of the church of England, a staunch Conservative in politics.... Besides his widow, two sons and a daughter survive the veteran—Mrs. Robert Campbell and Mr. Joseph W. Kelly of Sault Ste. Marie, and Jacob M. Kelly, of Parry Sound—all of whom have been attending him in his last illness. The funeral will take place tomorrow afernoon, at 2 o'clock, under the auspices of the Orange order.

December 7, 1889 Page 8
The infant child of John Fletcher died on Tuesday.

December 14, 1889 Page 4
Jeff Davis is dead at the age of eighty-one....

December 21, 1889 Page 1
Mrs. Henry Pickford Dies in Virginia
On Saturday, of last week, C. W. Pickford received a telegram from Fredricksburg, Va., announcing the sad news of the death of Mrs. Henry Pickford, wife of his son, a former resident of this county. Mrs. Pickford, was twenty-nine years of age and had a large circle of acquaintance in this city. She leaves, besides a loving husband, two children, one six and the other three years of age.

December 21, 1889 Page 1
Peter Paul, one of the Soo's oldest citizens died at his home on Johnston street, Friday morning at 5 o'clock, of dropsy. He was 79 years of age and lived in the city forty-one years. The funeral will be held at St. Mary's Church Sunday, 8:30 a.m.
December 21, 1889 Page 8
Mrs. W. H. Peck received a telegram on Thursday announcing the death of her sister, Mrs. Seanlake, at Capac, Mich. Mrs. Peck left yesterday to attend the funeral.

December 28, 1889 Page 4
Extradition proceedings have been started to secure Mike Lamaran, aged eleven years, who threw a stone and killed Ellen White, about the same age and then skipped to Canada—all in Keweenaw county.

January 4, 1890 Page 1
Death of John Roussain, of Sugar Island
Ex-Supervisor John Roussain died at his home on Sugar Island, last Saturday night at 11 o'clock, aged 64 years. Mr. Roussain was one of Chippewa county's oldest settlers and for eight years represented Sugar Island township in the board of supervisors. He was a member of the G. A. R. post, of this city, under the auspices of which the burial took place Tuesday. Two sons, James and Robert, survive him. In many respects Mr. Roussain was a character. For a long time he controlled the political situation on Sugar Island and came to be known as the "boss" of the Island. Many will be found to remark "Old John had a big heart and always meant well."

January 4, 1890 Page 1
A Sudden Death
Nicholas Victor Gabriel Dies at Mt. Clemens
He was a well man a week ago.
A useful life cut short in its very prime.
One of the Soo's Best Known Citizen is Removed from Earth
Without a Particle of Warning
Nicholas Victor Gabriel is dead of complications of brain and typhoid fever. He breathed his last on Tuesday afternoon at the Kendrick House, Mt. Clemens. The funeral was announced to occur at 8:30 o'clock this morning, from St. Mary's church, the remains to be interred at the Catholic cemetery, under the auspices of the Catholic Mutual Benevolent Association, of which he was a much-loved member.... He was on a train to meet his children at Windsor.... N. V. Gabriel was one of the Soo's most solid and most popular business men. Sauer's illustrated atlas of this city contains the following highly complimentary allusion to him: "Since the early settlements in Canada, France has sent but few of her sons to this side of the world and of those few one of the most genial and enterprising is N. V. Gabriel." He was born August 24, 1853, at Petit Unquin, Department of the Moselle, Lorraine. He reached Detroit in 1872, but soon gravitated to this place, reaching here in 1874, at first manufacturing carriages and wagons. Nine years ago he commenced dealing in furniture and by his thrift and enterprise he has kept his establishment at the front. He added to this undertaking, of which he is an expert.....
In 1874 Mr. Gabriel married Miss Kate Sobraro, daughter of Frank Sobraro. Mrs. Gabriel and five bright children, three girls and two boys survive him.....

January 4, 1890 Page 1
A Family Nearly Wiped Out
The Clark family is indeed sorely afflicted, or at least what is left of it, as the father and two brothers met with accidental deaths in 1889. They lived on St. Joseph Island and during the summer Mr. Clark and a son were drowned. Last fall Mrs. Clark and son Henry, upon whom she depended entirely for support, moved to the Soo. The young man went to work in the woods near Newberry, and had only been in a short time, when he was killed by a falling tree. The poor mother is almost crazed with grief. ....

January 4, 1890 Page 10
The Good Mother of Twenty-nine Dead
On Thursday Mrs. J. D. LeBlanc, of the Lake View hotel, received the sad intelligence of the death of her mother. Madame Pilon, of Montreal, aged 81 years. Madame Pilon was the mother of twenty-nine children, of which Mrs. Le Blanc is the youngest. The bereaved daughter left yesterday to attend the obsequies....

January 11, 1890 Page 6
Mrs. W. H. Peck returned from Capac, Mich., on Monday where she was called by the death of a sister.

January 11, 1890 Page 6
Alex Vanyer Killed at Reid's Camp
Alex. Vanyer, of Cheboygan, was instantly killed at William Reid's camp, on Pine River, Tuesday. While falling a tree it struck the butt of another, glanced and hit him in the abdomen, causing instant death. He leaves a wife and four children, the oldest a son of seventeen, who is employed in the same camp. His remains were taken to Cheboygan on Wednesday for interment.

January 11, 1890 Page
Mary Charlotte, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Black, died of brain fever on Monday last, aged three years. She was a bright child. The sympathy of their friends is extended to the bereaved parents.

January 18, 1890 Page 8
Mrs. E. Bennett Dead
On going to press it is learned the death of Frances Maria, wife of E. Bennett, at their home on Ashmun Street, at 4 o'clock this morning, aged 41 years. Besides a loving husband she leaves seven children. The funeral will take place on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. The family have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

January 18, 1890 Page 8
Myra Mabel Montgomery, the little step-daughter of Donald McFarlane, a teacher on Sugar Island, died last Sunday night, at 9 o'clock, of lung trouble, aged eight years and four months. Her remains were interred Tuesday on the Island.

January 18, 1890 Page 8
Death of Wm. Lane
After a Week's Agonizing Illness He Passes Away
Wednesday night.
After an illness of only a week, during which he suffered great agony, Wm. Lane died at his residence on Water street, Wednesday night at 10 o'clock of complications of pneumonia and disease of the liver, aged 42 years. He was born at Renfrew, Ont., May 7, 1847. He was married to Julia Navin in the fall of 1873. Shortly after his marriage he came to the Soo, where he was very successful in business, but unfortunately lost everything he acquired in the fire of 1886. After the fire he went into the hotel business, where he made many friends, who are grieved at his sudden death. Mr. Lane was a man of good habits and a friend to all. He was a member of both the C.M.B.A. and A.O.H. from which Mrs. Lane, who is childless, will receive an insurance of $3,000. The deceased had scarcely been sick a day until his last illness and his sudden death is made all the more hard to bear for the widow and many sympathizing friends. The remains will be taken to Douglas, Ont., this afternoon, for burial.

January 18, 1890 Page 8
Death of Robert Condlon, Sr.
On Tuesday Will Condlon received a telegram announcing the death of his father Robt. Condlon, Sr., at Stayner, Ont., and left for there at once. Mr. Condlon was a resident of this city for about ten years, and had gone to Canada to spend the winter with a married daughter. He was 79 years of age and leaves a wife and eight children, three of whom reside in the Soo.

January 25, 1890 Page 2
Mrs. Daniel McDonald, whose home was on Hart street, died Tuesday. Her remains and those of her new-born infant were taken for burial to Goderich, Ont., via the Canadian Pacific on Wednesday. Rev. H. P. Cory officiated at the funeral services, which were at the residence.

January 25, 1890 Page 7
Death Of A Chief
O-Jib-Wa, a Character of Long Standing, Carried Away by the Grippe Chief Joseph O-Jib-Wa, the only remaining Chippewa chief here and one of the last of the full-bloods, died Thursday night of La Grippe. O-Jib-Wa's age is not known to a certainty, but he is reputed to have been a centenarian. He lived on Lake Superior all his life and was an American citizen. The old chief had a kindly disposition and although he saw troublesome in his youth, he was always a staunch friend of the whites and of the Americans. He was sick eight days. Joseph, John and Justine are the chidren who survive him. His wife still lives at an advanced age.

January 25, 1890 Page 8
Addie Bellmere, one of the wards of the Bellmere estate, of which C. H. Chapman is executor, died at the Marquette convent school last Sunday. Both of the girls are now dead. Two boys remain living.

January 25, 1890 Page 8
Thos. Lane, of Sudbury, Ont., is in the city. Mr. Lane received the telegram too late to attend the funeral of his brother, the late Wm. Lane.

February 1, 1890 Page 1
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. John McKee, who reside on Peck street, died last Monday of diphtheria. The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon.

February 1, 1890 Page 1
Will Condlon returned from Stayner, Ont., Friday of last week, where he was called by the sudden death of his father.

February 1, 1890 Page 1
The Catholic Mutual Benefit Association beats the record for paying death losses. The late N. V. Gabriel died Dec. 31 and on Thursday, within thirty days, .... paid Mrs. Gabriel $2000 ....

February 1, 1890 Page 4
George Duel, aged 27, sentenced from Schoolcraft county, for three years, for larceny, was killed by a fall of frozen clay, while working outside the walls at the Marquette prison last week.

February 1, 1890 Page 4
Alonzo Cheeseman, a Mackinaw county farmer aged 78, fell and broke his neck last week, says the St. Ignace News. He was a King Strong Morman, once had six wives and had two when he met his death. Notwithstanding this he was an honest, frugal and respected man.

February 8, 1890 Page 8
The bright little son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Newton died on Wednesday and was buried yesterday.....

February 8, 1890 Page 8
Belle Gurnoe lies at the point of death with heart disease.

February 15, 1890 Page 8
Thos Watchorn received a telegram Tuesday announcing the death of his sister Mrs. W. Brandon of Thessalon, Ont. Mr. Watchorn and daughter Ellan left at once to attend the funeral which occurred on Tuesday.

February 22, 1890 Page 1
Gave His Life for a Hand Car
Last Wednesday John Nelson, a Soo Line section foreman, at Cook's Mills, was struck by an extra west-bound freight. He received injuries of the spine and lived but three hours after the accident. Mr. Nelson, in company with one of his men, was repairing some tracks on a curve. They tried to save the hand car and Nelson was struck. He leaves a wife, who resides in Algoma Mills, Ont., where the remains were taken for burial. Nelson was 35 years of age and had been employed by the company about a year.

February 22, 1890 Page 1
A Fatal Gash
Yacob Ysakson Mortally Stabbed by one Shoemaker
Murderous Cutting Affray in the Finnish Quarters Last Night
A murder occurred at a Scandinavian boarding house on the west side of Ferris street, between Ridge and Portage, at about 9 o'clock last night. A Finlander named Shoemaker stabbed another Finn with a Norwegian knife, a wicked general purpose weapon, and Dr. Bacon, who was called, says the wounded man will die .... None of the parties speaks English and particulars were hard to obtain. The man who was stabbed is Yacob Ysakson, a laborer for Collins & Farwell, on the government contract. He is about 28 years old and unmarried.....

February 22, 1890 Page 3
Stevensburgh
Rev. Dr. Campbell preached the funeral sermon of Miss Alice Coulter, on last Sunday to a large assembly.

February 22, 1890 Page 8
Died. Osborn—Lillian Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chase S. Osborn, at 2:30 o'clock on the afternoon of Saturday, February 15, 1890, aged 4 years, 1 month and 19 days.

February 22, 1890 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Lawrence Ermatinger
Mrs. Lawrence Ermatinger died at her home on Cary street, early Thursday morning, of intermittent fever. She was 24 years old. A loving husband and four small children, the youngest being only five weeks old, survive her. The funeral was announced for 8 o'clock this morning from St. Mary's church.....

March 1, 1890 Page 1
Death of Martha Willoughby
Martha Willoughby died at the Soo General Hospital Wednesday morning at 8 o'clock, of typhoid fever. She was 22 years of age, single, and had been under the doctors care two weeks. Her parents live on Drummond Island. They were notified of her death, but as no reply was received, the remains were taken charge of by Superintendent of the Poor Gurnoe. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church Thursday morning.

March 1, 1890 Page 2
Patrick Malone died at the residence of Francis Payment last Tuesday night of heart failure, after an illness of three weeks, aged 23 years. He was taken sick in one of Hall & Buell's camps near Bay Mills. The deceased had no friends in this country and Mr. Payment buried him, bearing all expenses.

March 1, 1890 Page 4
John Jacob Astor, grandson of the original John Jacob, died last Saturday in New York, of heart failure, at the age of 69 ....

March 1, 1890 Page 8
Shoemaker is a Murderer Yacob Ysakson, the Finn stabbed by "Shoemaker", on Friday night of last week, died last night. This makes his assailant a murderer....

March 8, 1890 Page 1
Gone To The Beyond
Charles R. Stuart Dies Suddenly in Detroit on Monday Last
Charles R. Stuart is no more. He passed from earth, on Monday night last, in Detroit, where he was engaged in editorial work. His sickness was of so short duration that his demise could not but surprise his friends here; where he had been known so long and well.
Mr. Stuart was born Detroit in 1835, and belonged to one of the first families of that city.... His fortunes and tastes led him to editorial chairs in other localities until in 1883 he came to the Soo and founded the Democrat, which he carried on until he sold it to its present owners.... In 1886 he became deputy collector of this port, which office he held for two years. He was a prominent member and officer of our local G. A. R. post and an enthusiastic Odd Fellow.... The funeral and interment took place in Detroit.

March 8, 1890 Page 1
Death of John F. Seymour
John F. Seymour, of Utica, N. Y., who was interested in the building of the first lock at the Soo, has passed away. Mr. Seymour was a lawyer of the old school, a stirring man of affairs, and deeply interested in the development of the country.....

March 8, 1890 Page 8
Martha Willoughby who died at the hospital last week was buried by the county.

March 8, 1890 Page 8
Philip Weybrant, who settled in Chippewa county sixteen years ago died at his home in Stalwart on Tuesday last at the age of 72.

March 22, 1890 Page 1
Coulter Would Shoot
At Least He Prevents the Service of an Execution by Threatening To
John E. Connors, the blacksmith, secured a judgement of $236.75 and $10.00 costs and execution therefor, against Geo. Coulter, who lives out some twelve miles on the Meridan road, for care, doctor's bill and funeral expenses incurred in behalf of Coulter's daughter who died at Conner's home....

March 22, 1890 Page 3
PICKFORD
Wm. Aldrich, son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Aldrich, died on the morning of March the 17th, of acute phthysis. Deceased was a promising young man of about 20 years of age, who was held in high esteem by all who knew him. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. C. Hicks, the Methodist minister of Pickford.....

March 22, 1890 Page 6
Notes About Old Folks
Mrs. Susan Saunders, of Sonora township, Illinois, died recently at the age of 91 years....

March 22, 1890 Page 8
The last one of David Povey's little twin boys died yesterday morning from the effects of measles. Little Freddie was nine months and eleven days old. The funeral will occur at 2 o'clock this afternoon.....

March 29, 1890 Page 1
Dropped Dead
John Crawford dropped dead while at work on the new lock last Thursday morning. He was born in Scotland and was twenty nine years of age. He came to this city two years ago and worked on the water power canal some time. He was also employed by the Edison company and had worked for Collins & Farwell since last fall. He was a good workman and was well liked by all who knew him. His remains were sent to Ottawa for burial.

March 29, 1890 Page 1
Death of Matthew Beattie Late Wednesday afternoon Matthew Beattie was found dead in his bed at Holts boarding house on Water street. Coroner Lang was notified, and on examination found that Beattie came to his death by taking an over dose of laudanum. A two oz. bottle labeled laudanum was found by his bedside, and it is supposed that he took the entire contents. Beattie was 55 years of age and a native of Ireland, and had been in this country about thirty-seven years. He was an old soldier having been in the service twenty-seven years. He was discharged from Fort Brady in January 1889, on account of disability, and was employed by John Maloney as bartender, but gave up the job about a month ago. He was buried with his comrades in the Fort cemetery on Thursday, with military honours.

March 29, 1890 Page 3
Mrs. Victoria Schilling, the millionaire Morisini's child who eloped with her father's coachman, some years ago, is dying of consumption at her father's home in New York.

March 29, 1890 Page 6
The flag at Fort Brady was at half-mast this week in deference to the memory of General Crooke the old Indian fighter who died a few days ago.

April 5, 1890 Page 2
SUPERIOR Mrs. Joseph Dollar was buried in the Mission cemetery on Monday last. She died at Bay Mills March 28th. Mrs. Dollar leaves a large family of children. The only son, Manly and the two youngest girls are not married and were at home with her when she died. Manly was sick at the time of his mother's death and is still very ill. There has been much doubt of his recovery. Mrs. Dollar's excellent character procured her many friends.....

April 5, 1890 Page 2
SUPERIOR
Mrs. Frank Smith died Sunday morning last, and was buried from the Catholic church at Sault Ste. Marie. She leaves a bereaved husband and three little children to mourn her loss. Mrs. Smith's infant was buried a few days previous to her death. Mr. Smith has the heartfelt sympathy of all who know him and his excellent late companion. Mrs. Smith was born in England, where she received an excellent education. She finished her musical education in Germany, was married to Frank Smith in England, and a few years later they moved to Canada and from there to the United States where they have lived for some years. They have no relatives in this country, but many friends.

April 5, 1890 Page 3
Napoleon Trudeau, of Houghton, who is charged with poisoning his step-child, has been held for murder by the verdict of the coroner's jury. The habitual abuse of the child was proven by witnesses, and that the stomach contained poison was established by the analysis of Prof. Packard, of the Mining school.

April 12, 1890 Page 3
Superior
Manly Dollar was buried from Bay Mills, April fourth, just four days after his mother's burial.

April 19, 1890 Page 4
John Johnson, a Swede, who lived at Trombley, a settlement six miles south of Lathrop, on the C. & N. W. Ry., was so weary of existence that he cut off his life with a drawing knife.

April 19, 1890 Page 8
William Hannah, Deceased Died, in Pickford, suddenly on Wednesday morning, April 16, William Hannah, aged about 40 years Mr. Hannah was of Scotch descent and inherited many of the sterling traits of character of that race. He settled in Pickford some ten years ago and rapidly won for himself a prominent place in the community where he was a conscientous republican. He took his full part in church matters, and it was in Sunday school about a month since, that he was stricken down with the fatal malady, inflammation of the outer membrane of the heart. He was regarded as a good man and had the highest respect of his neighbors who will sadly miss him. He leaves a wife and a number of children to grieve over his early demise.

April 19, 1890 Page 8
Body of Hugh McKenzie Found at Detour
Detour April 14, 1890.—The body of Hugh McKenzie, of St. Ignace, drowned here last fall while he was attempting to board the tug Sea Gull, on which he was firemen, was found yesterday lying on the bottom near where he fell in. He was buried today.

April 26, 1890 Page 2
SUPERIOR
Henry Elliott, of Sault Ste. Marie, was drowned about 10 o'clock, a.m. Tuesday morning in the Waiski River. Mr. Elliott came up on the morning train with other men to go up the river to raft or drive pulp wood for Donald McLelen. They walked from Bay Mills station to G. Bertrand's place through the woods, where they procured a boat to go down to Mr. McLelen's place. Seven of the party got into the boat, but on starting out found it leaking so badly that they returned to the shore, where five of them got out, and two, young James O'Brien and Henry Elliott got into a small log canoe and started out with it. The canoe was very "cranky" and upset not far from the shore. O'Brien turned the canoe over but finding it would not hold them as it was full of water, he struck out for the shore, and as he passed Elliott he asked him if he could swim. Henry said he could, so James swam to the shore as soon as possible. The water was very cold and as he caught hold of a hanging alder he was taken with cramps and would probably have drowned if he had not reached the shore just as he did. As soon as he reached shore he looked around to see how Henry was getting on, as he supposed he was close behind.... His hat was floating on the water near where the canoe had upset. Henry had evidently sunk very soon after the accident occurred. The men were soon at the place making every effort to recover the body but up to the present time 10 o'clock a.m., Thursday, no news has come down of success from the searching party. George Elliott, a brother of the deceased will be up today with grapples and other arrangements to make a thorough search, .... Three years ago this coming summer Silas Mason, of Iroquois had a son drowned almost in the same place.....

April 26, 1890 Page 8
Thomas Kennedy Dead
Thomas Kennedy died at his home at the Superior house in this city, on Tuesday April 22, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, aged 23 years, 1 month and 5 days. Thirteen months ago Mr. Kennedy was stricken with pneumonia which finally turned into comsumption which caused his death. Mr. Kennedy was born at Port Austin, Huron County, Mich., and came to this city with his father, H. C. Kennedy, who is propietor of the Superior House, in May 1887. He was a gentleman of quiet tastes and highly thought of by all those who were favored with his acquaintance. The his immediate family and friends his taking away is a serious blow, in which they have the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church on Thursday morning.

April 26, 1890 Page 10
Elliott's Body Found
The body of Henry Elliott who was drowned in Waiskai river on Wednesday was found on Thursday and was brought to this city. The funeral takes place this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence of John Martin, who resides at 277 Ashmun street.....

April 26, 1890 Page 5
Calvin Hollinger, clerk at Conway's drug store received a telegram on Thursday announcing the death of his youngest sister, Hattie, who resided in Hanover, Ont.

May 3, 1890 Page 6
Biography of The Late William Hannah of Pickford
William Hannah late of Pickford, was born Dec. 28, 1840, in Harwick, a manufacturing town in Roxburyshire, in the southern part of Scotland, situated at the confluence of the Poviot and the Slitrig, and about fifty miles from Edinburgh. Here he spent his childhood, in the vicinity of ancient fortresses and other conspicuous memorials of the old border life, surrounded by the inspiring, influences of the many legends and traditional stories of the early history of Scotland. His father's name was William Hannah, and his mother's maiden name was Katie McMorine, both natives of Scotland. The family consisted of three brothers and one sister; one brother and the sister are still living, the mother died in Canada about twelve years ago, and the father who is about eighty years of age, is living with his only daughter, Mrs. Hogg, in Seaforth, Ontario. The brother, Walter Hannah resides in Pickford. The parents emigrated from Scotland to Canada when deceased was about seven years of age, and there he received a liberal education in the public schools of Canada. The family first located at Windsor Mills in the Province of Quebec in 1847, then moved to Clinton, Huron Co., Ont., and from there to McKillop township next to Hullett, where he married Janet Neilans daughter of Thos. Neilans, a well to do farmer of the same place, Oct. 13, 1876. In 1878, Mr. Hannah moved with his wife to Michigan, and located on a farm in the township of Pickford, near to what is now known as the village of Stirlingville. There he remained about five years proving himself an active and preserving pioneer and idenifying himself with every movement for the welfare and advancement of the community in which he resided. In 1883 he came to the village of Pickford, where he started a boarding house, and continued at the business, sometimes working at the carpenter trade, up to the sickness which ended his life.
Mr. Hannah was a genuinely religious man, and an active Presbyterian and held important offices in both the church and Sunday school. In politics he was a staunch republican, firm in his convictions, and a useful supporter of the party. He held the office of township clerk, and has been director of district # 15 for a number of years. He was a member in good stading in both the Odd Fellows and Orange societies, both of which rendered valuable services in his sickness and at his death.
His last illness was inflamation of the outer membrane of the heart. For six weeks he was in a very low condition when he seemed to gain strength, and his friends, as well as himself, entertained hopes of his recovery. The day before his death he sat up, walked about, and talked quite freely with the neighbors who called to see him. On Wednesday morning April 16, he awoke without feeling any worse, but about six o'clock he took a sudden change, and in a few minutes with scarcely a struggle, his soul had left the earthly tenement and entered upon the eternal rest.
The funeral took place on Saturday the 19th inst. The services at the house were conducted by the Orange brethren of Pickford, who afterwards marched in procession preceeding the casket to the Presbyterian church, where further services were held by Rev. Mr. Holt, assisted by Rev. Mr. Hicks. Mr. Holt spoke very feelingly from the 12th verse of the 90th Psalm: "So teach us to number our days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom." The building was densely packed, and a large procession followed the remains to the cemetery where they were interred with the honors and rites of the Orange society. A bereaved wife and a family of eight children, three sons and five daughters, are left to mourn the loss of a true and loving parent, the church an earnest adherent, and the community one of its most valued citizens; and a large circle of friends to mourn with the bereaved ones.

May 10. 1890 Page 1
Max Lenhoff
The death of Max Lenhoff, which was announced in this city on Sunday last, as having occurred in Detroit the day previous, caused many expression of regret at the early demise of a gentleman of more than ordinary business ability, and social tact. Max Lenhoff was of foreign birth, and forty years of age. He engaged in mercantile pursuits in early life, and for some years has carried on the clothing business in a number of localities simultaneously. He opened his doors in the Soo some five years ago, and leaves not only his store here, but also one in Saginaw, Romeo, Oxford and St. Louis, Mich.. The fatal malady which carried him off had pursued him sharply for the last six months, but he bore up under the strain of sickness with a manly fortitude. He was a member in prominent standing of the fraternal orders of Masons, Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows and Maccabees. Mr. Lenhoff leaves a wife and three children to mourn his early removal. He was laid to rest with the ceremonial of the Jewish faith in one of the Detroit Cemeteries.
.
.May 10, 1890 Page 8
Mrs. Maltis who resided on Ashmun Street, died on Thursday evening os psoasabcess, aged 40 years. She leaves a husband and four small children.

May 17, 1890 Page 4
The home of Mrs. Chris Kahn, a homesteader in Mastodon township, Iron County, near Stager, was totally destroyed by fire, together with contents, Friday afternoon of last week. Forest fires raged in that locality all last week and with great suddeness came down upon the home of the lady, who lived there alone. This is the second time within a few months that misfortune has fell to the lot of the poor woman. During the winter her husand while returning from town late one night, was caught in a blinding snow storm, became bewildered and lost his way. His dead body was found the next morning, a short distance from him home. [Diamond Drill]

May 10, 1890 Page 2
Miss Lizzie Kennedy, the subject of the frightful burning accident mentioned in The News last week, died on Friday morning, the 2nd inst. just one week after the unfortunate occurrence. The funeral took place on Saturday, services being conducted by Rev. Mr. Hicks and the remains were interred in Graham's cemetery. The parents have, many sumpathizing friends in the vicinity. Mr. Kennedy's hands were so badly burned that it will probably be some weeks before he will be able to do his usual work.

May 24, 1890 Page 3
Mrs. Abram Mitchell, Sr., Mrs. D. W. Powell and Arthur Mitchell, of Marquette, were in the city on Monday attending the funeral of little Charley Mitchell.

May 17, 1890 Page 5
Passed To The Majority
Thomas Nester, the Great Lumberman Dies Suddenly
While walking on his lumber dock at Baraga on Saturday last, Thomas Nester was stricken with apoplexy, and died at an early hour on Monday morning. His remains were taken to Detroit for burial.
Thomas Nester was born in the west of Ireland about fifty-five years ago and when a well grown boy came to this country with his family. After some stay in Canada the Nesters finally settled in Sanilac county. From a logger Thomas Nester began to take small contracts for lumbering, increased the size of his operations and became a purchaser of pine lands. He became interested with A. W. Wright, Charles Wells and F. C. Stone in large tracts of lands in Gladwin and Roscommon counties. In 1881 he became interested in the upper peninsula. In company with the gentlemen named above and with Thomas Merrill he had bought the Ward tract in Ontonagon county and a tract on Sturgeon river of R. K. Hawley. When in 1881–82 Mr. Nester sold out of the Well-Stone combination he received $510,000 as his share, most of which he took in the upper peninsula lands owned by the concern. The big mill at Baraga was set going in 1882 and quite a town has grown up about it. Other purchases of pine were from the Lake Superior Ship Canal company about Keweenaw Point and from the Michigan Land and Iron company on Sturgeon river. The business was a flourishing one and the Baraga plant became noted in the annals of pine lumber. To Mr. Nester belongs the credit of building the first vessel of modern dimensions on Lake Superior, and his venture in that direction was a successful one....

May 17, 1890 Page 8
David, a bright young son of Mr. and Mrs. Miller, of the Central hotel, died early Thursday morning of inflammation of the bowels, aged 11 years. The funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. P. T. Rowe officiating. Shortly before his death the little fellow made the request that four of his school mates lay him to rest, and they were his pall bearers. The bereaved parents and relatives have the sympathy of their friends and community in the loss of their boy.

May 17, 1890 Page 5
A Sad Drowning
Jeremiah Dorgan whose parents reside at Bay Mills and whose sister is the wife of John McMahon of the canal office, while driving logs in a small creek near Escanaba on Friday of last week slipped into the water, but after a hard struggle succeeded in grasping a pike pole which had been reached to him by his fellows, who dragged him ashore. The rescue came too late, for he expired almost immediately on being lifted from the stream, presumably from the sharp chill sustained by being in the cold water. His remains were brought to tis city and the interment took place from St. Mary's church on Monday last. Deceased was a bright young man 18 years of age, and held in high estimation by all who knew him.

May 24, 1890 Page 3
Supervisor W. K. Parsille of Bay Mills, was in the city on Tuesday to attend the funeral of Abe Mitchell's child.

May 24, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
George H. Hombach, of the St. Ignace Watchman, after a long sickness, has passed to the majority.

May 24, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
The murder of Lottie Morgan still remains a mystery. The latest reports are that she was summoned as a witness in the Perrin case, but left town to avoid being called.... —Ironwood Times

May 24, 1890 Page 7
Burned to Death
Little Charley Mitchell, the child of Mr. and Mrs. A. Mitchell, was so badly burned on Saturday last as to cause death in six hours after the accident. Shortly after dinner he took from the match box in the kitchen several matches and went out into the backyard, where he, child-like, proceeded to build a bon-fire. On account of the high wind that prevailed that day, the blaze ignited his clothing and in an instant his entire body was enveloped in flames.
.... The unfortunate child died shortly before 7 o'clock Saturday evening. He was conscious until nearly the last, while opiates deadened the pain and he slept peacefully away at the end. He told his father how he caught fire and inquired for his grandma and other relatives and was exceedingly bright for a child only 4 years old. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. P. T. Rowe, officiating.....

May 31, 1890 Page 1
If there are any survivors in Chippewa county of vicinity, of the late John E. Ward, member of Co. I, eighth regiment Connecticut infantry, they will confer a favor and may learn something to their benefit by calling The News office at once....

May 31, 1890 Page 6
Death of Mrs. Gilpin, of Bay Mills
Mrs. Thomas Gilpin died at her home at Bay Mills on Sunday morning last, of a complication of diseases, aged forty years. The remains were brought to this city for burial and were interred in the city cemetery on Monday, Rev. P. T. Rowe, officiating. Besides a bereaved husband, who is employed by Hall & Buell, as foreman two children survive her.....

June 7, 1890 Page 1
He Had a Nest Egg
Shortly after Jerry Sullivan's death on Monday it was found in looking over his clothing and an old trunk of his, that he had concealed about $840. The discovery was made by Joseph Fletcher, proprietor of the Tremont House, where Sullivan had been boarding for sometime previous to his death. The bulk of the money will probably go to Mr. Fletcher for board and the balance for doctor's bill and other incidental expenses. Sullivan was thought to be in needy circumstances and was buried by the fraternities to which he belonged. The lodges also paid the expenses of his sickness. The finding of the hoarded money, was a great surprise.

June 7, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
Mrs. Tom Reynolds and her two children were crossing a tressel sixty-feet high on M& N railroad when a train came along. Mrs. Reynolds jumped off with the girl. The boy threw himself on the ties and escaped. The girl is dead and Mrs. Reynolds cannot live.

June 7, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
Hiram Ross, a painter of Florence, Wis., was found dead in a barn at that place last Saturday

June 7, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
Northern Wisconsin and Michigan were shocked on Tuesday to read of the tragic ending of the life of A. C. Brown, of Marinette, Wis, by his own hand. Mr. Brown was wealthy and had a happy family, but could not purchase the health that only leads to a contented mind. He was a factor in the development of the Menominee iron range and did a great deal of good during his life. The sudden and awful ending of his career is a lesson to others who neglect health in their perpetual pursuit of wealth.

June 7, 1890 Page 7
Death of Jerry Sullivan
Ex-Policeman Jerry Sullivan died at the Fletcher House, Spruce avenue, late last Sunday night, of consumption, after an illness of nine months, aged forty-seven years. The remains were taken charge of by the Odd Fellows and Masons, of which he was a member. Both lodges were represented at the funeral which took place on Monday afternoon, Rev. P. T. Rowe officiating. Mr. Sullivan was well known in the city and had many friends.

June 7, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
The Chicago & North-Western railway will build a monument in memory of Lieut. Gov. McDonald who was accidentally killed on that road.

June 14, 1890 Page 8
Gatesville Happenings
Wilbert Mitchell, aged one year and eleven days fell into a pot of boiling lye on the fifth inst., and lived in excruciating pain for fourteen hours and then died. The large concourse of people from near and afar, who, followed the remains to their resting place, gave evidence of the high esteem in which the invalid father is held by the settlers of Raber, and adjacent settlements.... Mr. Mitchell was able to attend the burial leaning on crutches. This was an only child.

June 7, 1890 Page 8
Trout Lake Catches
Mrs. J. C. Cline, of the Union House, received a telegram this week, announcing that her youngest sister was dead. She took the first train to Canada to attend the funeral.

June 21, 1890 Page 10
James Kelley, who had been working in one of Reidy's lumber camps on the Soo Line, near Trout Lake, for some time past, dropped dead last Saturday. Kelley was a Canadian and having no friends in this country he was buried by Mr. Reidy, who paid all expenses.

June 14, 1890 Page 1
Said Result of a Girl's Ruin
Annie Smith, a Canadian dressmaker, aged 23 years, from Wiartown, Ont, died of uraemic convulsions, at the home of J. S. Heaney, on Court Street, Monday, surrounded by misery and squalor and without friends. She was enciente and had been ruined by a man named Richard McIntosh, of Cape Rich, Ont., so says Henry Smith, the girl's father, who arrived here after her death. An attempt was made to sensationalize the matter and cast unjust reflections on Drs. Lang and Ennis, who attended the girl, by having an inquest. Dr. Harcison made a post mortem examination and found, as above stated, that uraemic convulsions produced death. The coroner's jury rendered a verdict, after careful testimony, of "death from uraemic poisoning, caused by Bright's Disease of the kidneys.

June 28, 1890 Page 10
Death of Julian M. Case
Julian M. Case, of Marquette, burst a blood vessel and died in London, England, on Wednesday. Mr. Case was a cousin of Mayor J. M. Longyear, of Marquette, and Hon. J. M. Turner, of Lansing. He was one of the Upper Peninsula's brightest and best men and his loss is a great one. Mrs. Case and children will have the sympathy of friends in Sault Ste. Marie and all who knew of Mr. Case's excellent qualities.

June 21, 1890 Page 1
William Corrigan, a deck hand on the Northwest Transportation steamer United Empire, fell overboard and was drowned in Mud Lake last Sunday morning. His body has not yet been found.

July 5, 1890 Page 1
In Early Day
Transactions of One Hundred Years ago Gone Over
Tuesday and Wednesday of this week were taken up in the Circuit court in determining the legal heirs of Louis Gurnoe, who died some twenty-five years ago. It was claimed by the petitioner, John Gurnoe, son of Louis, and the representative of the children of Louis Gurnoe by Archange Cadotte, that his branch of the family are the only legitimate children and heirs at law of Louis Gurnoe. This was disputed by Isabelle Cota, and her descendants who contend that previous to the marriage of Louis Gurnoe and Archange Cadotte in 1820, Gurnoe had taken unto himself a lawful wife in the person of Angelique Defoe and that his children by her, to-wit: Isabella Cota, Frank, Louis and Joseph Gurnoe are his legal heirs. Many interesting features arose during the progress of the trial, as, in attempting to prove the marriage of Gurnoe and Angelique Defoe 1809, the marriage ceremonies as performed by the Indians, and by contract with witnesses in the early days of the Sault were pretty thoroughly described by witnesses, some of them so far removed from youth that their own ages had been long since forgotten. The Gurnoe family was represented by E. S. B. Sutton, C. C. Yerkes and M. J. Doyle and the Cotal branch by J. W. McMahon. Decision reserved.

July 5, 1890 Page 9
City Brevities
A cannon was fired every thirty minutes on Monday, at Fort Brady, in honor of the memory of General George W. McCrary, ex-secretary of war under Hayes, who died at St. Louis, June 23.

July 5, 1890 Page 10
S. W. Hollister of Garden River, returned this week from Oshkosh, where he went to attend the funeral of his father, who died at the age of seventy-four. Mr. Hollister sr., was one of the pioneers of Oshkosh and came to Wisconsin at an early day. The venerable man was highly respected.

July 12, 1890 Page 1
Col L. A. Harris Dead
He Expires Suddenly at Cincinatti Last Saturday
Col L. A. Harris of Cincinatti, who is well known here and who also has large real estate interests here, among which is the Superior House, died suddenly at Cincinatti last Saturday morning, of heart disease, aged 64 years. Col. Harris was a member of the board of managers of National soldier's homes. He served with distinction during the war of the rebellion, was an ex-mayor of Cincinnati, and was at one time collector of internal revenue for that district.....

July 12, 1890 Page 1
A Frenchman named Frank Gingrass, hailing from Lower Canada, was instantly killed at Reidy's camp, near Gilchrist, on Tuesday. He was at work on the train road and was struck on the head with a large stick of timber, causing instant death. Gingrass was unmarried and thirty-two years of age. He had been with Mr. Reidy for some time and was considered a good and attentive man.....

July 12, 1890 Page 2
PICKFORD PARAGRAPHS
Last week a two-year-old child of John Donlan's, a lumberman residing at McKay's Bay, while playing, accidently fell into a tub of boiling water and was frightfully scalded. Dr. Webster was called, but found the case hopeless. The child died about an hour after his arrival.

July 12, 1890 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR
Matt Mattson a Finlander, was run over and killed by a switch engine at Newberry July 2nd.

July 19, 1890 Page 4
Death Of General Fremont
General John C. Fremont, the Pathfinder, has gone to his final rest. He died Sunday at his home on Staten Island.... He was born in Savannah, Ga., January 24, 1813, and graduated from Charleston college in 1830. General Fremont next formed the acquaintance of Jessie Benton, the daughter of "Old Bullion", the great Missouri senator, and ran away with her when she was only 15.... His wife is now a white-haired lady of 65, engaged in writing reminiscences of the past 40 years ....

July 19, 1890 Page 1
Death of Dick Boore
He Expires Suddenly as a Result of Continued Alcholic Excesses Richard Boore, proprieter of the Elk saloon was found dead in his bed about 8 o'clock Wednesday morning, by his bartender. Mr. Boore had been on a spree for some time previous to his death. Dr. Ennis was called to see him Tuesday night and was with him until 1 o'clock Wednesday morning, at which time he was sleeping. Coroner Lang did not consider an inquest necessary, death having resulted from excessive drinking. Richard Boore was about thirty-seven years of age and had resided in this city for three years, coming from Winnipeg shortly after the boom in that city and is said to have been worth $25,000. Mrs. Boore, who has been visiting relatives in Toronto, was notified of her husbands's death and arrived in the city yesterday morning. The remains were taken to Toronto yesterday for burial. Boore was a bright young man and there is a lesson to be found in his death.

July 26, 1890 Page 1
Mrs. J. D. McKenzie, better known as Mrs. Churchill, who has been in the restaurant business in this city for several years, died at 10 o'clock Thursday night, of Bright's disease, after an illness of some duration. She was sixty years of age. The county will bury her. The woman led an erring life.

July 19, 1890 Page 1
Death of Captain Stille He Expires Rather Suddenly In Texas Where he Went Recently
A dispatch was received here Wednesday announcing the death, at San Antonio, Tex; of Capt. Stille, of Co. A. Twenty- third infantry, recently stationed here. Capt. Stille was one of the finest appearing officers in the army and had been in the army since 1862, participating in most of the battles of the army of the Potomac and was breveted for conspicuous gallantry at Hatcher's Run. He was a brother-in-law of Capt. Vernon, of the Nineteenth, now stationed at Fort Wayne, and had many friends throughout the state. His family reside in Philadelphia. While stationed at Fort Brady those who became acquainted with Capt. Stille, learned to love and admire him. His wife is an invalid and her sufferings were shared by him and marked his daily life. His face wore a sad, but kindly expression.....

July 26, 1890 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Ryan
She Passes Away Monday Morning After a Life of Patient Suffering
Mrs. Thos. Ryan, who had been an invalid for many years, died last Monday morning at 8 o'clock, at the age of 53 years. Mrs. Ryan had long suffered from an ovarian tumor. She was a patient lady of many Christain qualities and was warmly beloved by her large circle of relatives and acquaintaces. She had been married thirty-four years. Mrs. Ryan leaves a sorrowing husband and three children Mrs. W. S. Royce, Mrs. L. O'Mara and Alderman J. R. Ryan. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church and was one of the largest ever witnessed in the city. The impressive and elaborate ceremonies at the church were attended universally, without regard to denominational belief. The remains were interred in a vault at the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Ryan spent many years of her life in this city. Now she has only gone to meet friends who went before and await loved ones who are certain to join her.....

July 26, 1890 Page 2
An infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Burk died suddenly Sunday. The funeral took place Tuesday morning.

August 2, 1890 Page 5
A little son of Contractor Robert Whiteman, of the Fourth ward, died suddenly in a convulsion, Wednesday. Friends extend profound sympathy.

August 2, 1890 Page 5
Mary Margaret McMahon, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McMahon, died Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock, aged fourteen months. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning. Mr. and Mrs. McMahon have the sympathy of their friends and the community in the loss of their little one.

July 26, 1890 Page 3
Died Of Heart Disease
Sam Ewart's Sudden Demise at the Hotel Arundle Monday
Samuel L. Ewart, of Detroit, who represented John A. Scott & Co. of Findlay, Ohio, died suddenly of heart disease at the Arundel House at 8 o'clock Monday evening. Mr. Ewart arrived in the city Wednesday of last week in good health, went fishing with some of his friends Friday and Saturday and was on the street attending to business Monday morning. He was taken sick about 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Drs. Ennis, Rundle and Lang were called, but too late. Mr. Ewart was 40 years of age and has made trips every sixty days to this city for six years past and had many warm friends. He was a member of Lodge 34, of Detroit Elks, and also of the A.O. U. W. Forresters, and Knights of Pythias. The body was taken to Detroit Tuesday by Undertaker Harry Blake. Many local members of the lodges to which the deceased belonged accompanied the remains to the depot and Sergt. W. F. Granlee, Otto Supe, L. Cornwell and L. H. Conley acted as pallbearers. Mr. Ewart was married.

August 9, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
J. M. Taylor, and Miss Minnie Gorgan, going from Hallston to Munising on a railroad tricycle were struck by a train. The latter was instantly killed but the former escaped with slight injuries.

August 9, 1890 Page 5
Drowned At Superior
Thomas Ellis Tries to Cross the Waiskai on Logs and Fails
Thomas Ellis was drowned here in Waiskai river about 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. He attempted to cross the river on the logs, which was made somewhat difficult to do on account of pulp wood being mixed with the logs. Another man was crossing the river at the same time, but some little distance from Ellis. He saw Ellis, when near the shore, fall onto his knees on the logs. He called to him, when Ellis recovered and got on his feet again. The other man reached the shore and turned around only to see Ellis in the water struggling with the pulp wood. He reached a log and attempted to climb onto it but before the other man could reach him or render any assistance Ellis disappeared under the logs and wood and was not seen again until his body was recovered about an half hour later.
The coroner was telegraphed for, but as he could not reach the place until next day noon, the body was given in charge of Ellis' brother who came on the evening train from Dollarville and took the remains to the Soo. Ellis was a single man. His home was in Canada. He had been working here only a half-day.

August 9, 1890 Page 8
A greatly beloved little son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Rundle, of the Hotel Arundel, died last Tuesday evening after long suffering. The bereaved parents have the sincere sympathy of the community.

August 9, 1890 Page 7
Death of Mrs. L. A. Launderville
The sad news has been received by telegram to Fabian Launderville, of the death of his daughter-in-law, wife of Louis A. Launderville, at Murphysboro, Ill., of consumption. Mrs. Launderville was a lovable, patient lady, who, although she saw plainly the inevitable, never murmured. Her husband did all that could be done for her on earth. The news will be painfully received by her many warm friends here. Besides her husband Mrs. Launderville left a little daughter, two years old. The following lines are gladly published in this connection, at the request of Mr. Launderville.
She has gone from us forever,
No! She has only passed from sight
We shall meet beyond the River
Where there is no Death nor Night.

August 16, 1890 Page 2
News From Gatesville
The birth of a posthumous daughter to Mrs. Jacob Huffman, whose husband died on the 15th of July ultimo, confined the doubly stricken mother to her bed so she could not attend her mother's [Mrs. Fountain] funeral. The little girl was born five hours before the death of her grandmother and three weeks after her father's death.

August 16, 1890 Page 2
News From Gatesville
Sudden Death of Mrs. Fountain and Other Recent Occurrences
The people of Gatesville were startled by the news of the sudden death of Mrs. Fountain, on the morning of the 7th inst. in her seventieth year. For twenty hours she complained of a pain in her breast, but did not seem to think seriously about it, for she attended to her house hold duties most of the time. Before sunrise she was up and about, but feeling very weak she called to her son for a drink of water which he was prompt in bringing to her, but of which she did not taste, for as her son approached her with the water he beheld her swaying towards him, and dropping the cup and water he sprang and caught her in his arms and bore her to a lounge, where he laid her in cold grim death, the lifeless form of a beloved mother. The large concourse of people who followed her remains to their last resting place in Montrose cemetery, on the 9th inst., was a testimonial to the esteem with which she was regarded by neighbors. Her sorrowing sons Andrew and George, gave evidence of such grief as is rarely noticeable in men of their calm demeanor. The only daughter (Mrs. Wall) who was able to attend her funeral, was so overcome with sorrow we were not disposed to intrude upon her thoughts. The numerous grandchildren old and young alike, showed great reverence for the fond grandmother. Mrs. Fountain was born in Nova Scotia, from where she emigrated thirty years ago to Ontario and again ten years ago to Michigan, settling in Gatesville in company with three other families, who were the first four settlers in the wild forests of Detour township....

August 16, 1890 Page 1
John Silk, a laborer in the Canadian ship canal, was instantly killed last Saturday by a falling derrick.

August 16, 1890 Page 4
Eliza Cook, the poetess, died lately at Wimbleton, Eng., where she had been living in seclusion for many years, subsisting chiefly upon the literary pension of £100 per annum which she obtained in 1864. She was seventy-one years of age.

August 16, 1890 Page 5
Fine Flour Mill, etc. Pickford
James Rutledge, son of Wm. Rutledge, of Blair's settlement, who went to Canada in the spring for the good of his health died in that place on Sunday, the 10th inst. His father was on his way to see him, when the information was received here. James Rutledge was well known and esteemed here, and his relatives have many sympathizing friends.

August 23, 1890 Page 1
Identified a Dead Man
H. W. Heichhold, of The News, returned from an eastern trip Wednesday. While in Detroit he had occasion to visit the telegraph office and there overheard a description given of a man who had been found dead in his bed at the Griffin House last Saturday morning. Mr. Heichhold identified the man as an old acquaintance named J. Louis Linn, of Erie, Pa., private secretary of Senator Chas. M. Reed. It was the first information the Detroit coroner had obtained as to the identity of the man and Harry thinks he has partly earned the title of "morgue reporter."

August 23, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
John Cassidy, was caught in the belting of a sawmill at Menominee, last week, and injured so severely that he died soon afterward.

August 23, 1890 Page 6
Bay Mill Mites
The youngest daughter of A. Laronsie died Monday, aged fourteen months. Funeral to Mission Hill cemetery on Tuesday.

August 30, 1890 Page 2
Bay Mills Mites
The youngest daughter of Silas T. Mason died on Sunday last, aged fourteen months. It was buried in Mission Hill cemetery on Tuesday, Mr. McGregor of Superior conducting the service.

August 30, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
A desperate attempt to escape was made by three prisoners confined in the Florence county, Wis., jail last week, but owing to the bravery of Deputy Sheriff Keyes, the effort proved only partially successful. Thos. Gallagher was shot and killed by the officer, while Frank Burke and Joseph Wylie managed to get away....

August 30, 1890 Page 5
John E. Daniels, a laborer employed on Anthony's dock, and who resided at Coleman's boarding house on Tyson street, died at 6 o'clock Monday afternoon of perforation of the bowels, after an illness of two weeks. Mr. Daniels was thirty-five years of age and formerly resided at Mount Forest, Ont.

August 30, 1890 Page 7
Death of Peter Renner
Typhoid fever claimed its second victim early Thursday morning in Peter Renner, who, up to the time he was taken sick, was chief cook at the Hotel Iroquois. He was sick a little over a week. Mr. Renner was about 30 years of age, and a wife and one child survive him. He had been at the hotel three years previous to his death and was a general favorite with all who knew him. His parents, who live on a farm near Point aux Pins, were notified of his death and arrived in the city Thursday afternoon. The remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery, at the Canadian Soo, yesterday afternoon.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
The Grim Reaper
End of the Life of George F. Grand - Other Victims of the Fever
On Tuesday afternoon, at 5:45, was announced the sad intelligence of the death of George F. Grand, at his residence, on the corner of Sova street and Portage avenue. The deceased had been sick for several weeks with typhoid fever, but seemed to be improving until Tuesday morning, when several hemorrhages occurred, and he gradually grew weaker, and finally his sufferings ended at the time stated. The funeral took place Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, at the residence, and was conducted by Rev. Bartlett Foskett, who accompanied the sorrowing relatives to Fort Wayne, Ind., where the remains were shipped for interment. The members of the Y.M.C.A. escorted the sad procession to the depot in a body. George F. Grand was born in Norwich, England, and came to this country about six years ago. He was nearly twenty-six years old. He was a member of the Baptist church and was actively engaged in Y.M.C.A. work during the time he has spent in the United States. He was assistant secretary of the association at New York city, and later was secretary of the railrad branch association at Fort Wayne, Ind. He took charge of the association here, as secretary, about a year ago, and has done excellent work in the cause, and has been chief the actor in bringing the association up to its present high condition of prosperity and excellance.....
He was married September 13, 1888, at Fort Wayne, Ind. to Miss Clara E. Doty, who, with a little one year old daughter, survives to mourn his loss. Mrs. Grand will reside, hereafter, with her mother, at Fort Wayne, Ind.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
The funeral of the late Mrs. Cadott, who died Sunday, after an illness of three years, of disease of the spine, took place from St. Mary's church, Wednesday morning.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
William Trempe, of this city, mate of tug Sarah Smith, was drowned in Epoufette Bay, twenty-five miles west of St. Ignace, Thursday afternoon. His body was found yesterday afternoon and will be brought to this city for burial. Mr. Trempe was twenty-two years old and is well known here.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
Daniel Munn, who has for the past three years been baker for Robert Prosser, died Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, of typhoid fever, aged 29 years. Mr. Munn was from Paisley, Ont., where his remains were taken Thursday for burial. He was unmarried, was an active member in the Presbyterian church and had a wide circle of friends, who will be grieved to learn of his death.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
Conrad Rudell, an old and respected citizen, died at his residence twenty-nine Peck Street, early Thursday morning, of heart disease. Mr. Rudell was about sixty-four years of age. The funeral will occur on Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Two of his children are on their way home from California.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
Miss Jennie Cameron, a dining-room girl at the Exchange, died at 8 o'clock, Wednesday morning, of fever. She was 26 years of age, and came from Owen Sound, Ont., about three months ago. Her remains were taken to that place for interment, on the C.P.R. boat, Wednesday afternoon.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
Mrs. Carr died at her residence, on Bingham avenue, Sunday afternoon, at 5 o'clock, of typhoid fever, after a week's illness. She was 19 years of age, and had been married but a short time. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church Tuesday morning. Mr. Carr, who is employed by Keith & Co., as engineer on the steam roadroller, has the sympathy of his friends in his bereavement.

September 6, 1890 Page 1
Mrs. Hannah Meehan, died at her home at the Marine Hospital, early yesterday morning, of general debility, aged 74 years. She was the mother of Mrs. Martin Lynch, Mrs. M.J. McNeely and Wm. Meehan, all of this city. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church this morning.

September 6, 1890 Page 8
J. W. Burgess, of the popular and enterprising livery firm of Lennon & Burgess, received a telegram Sunday morning notifying him of the sudden death of his brother at Klineburg, Ont. He departed at once by steamer for that place and will be gone several weeks. He will visit Detroit before he returns.

September 13, 1890 Page 1
Theodore Sechter, an eight-months old child of John Sechter, died of inflammation early Thursday morning. The remains were deposited at Riverside Thursday afternoon.

September 13, 1890 Page 1
The funeral of the late Conard Rudell took place from his residence on Peck street Thursday afternoon. The city brass band was in attendance. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside Cemetery.

September 13, 1890 Page 1
Harry Chambers, a butcher by trade, died at the residence of John Noble, on Division street, early Tuesday morning of fever. The deceased was about thirty-five years of age and unmarried. His remains were interred at Riverside cemetery Tuesday morning.

September 13, 1890 Page 1
William Trempe, who lost his life by drowning near St. Ignace Sept. 4, was brought to this city Thursday for burial. It was found on examination of the body that his neck had been broken while he was at work trying to free the wheel from a tow line that had become entangled in it. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church yesterday morning.

September 13, 1890 Page 1
James McDougal died of consumption at the Franklin house, at 12 o'clock Thursday night, aged thirty-six years. Mr. McDougal had been in this city for three years previous to his death, and filled responsible positions with McArthur Bros. and Collins & Farwell. He was unmarried and a cousin of Mrs. A. B. McDonald, of the Franklin house. The funeral services were held at St. Mary's church this morning at 8:30 o'clock.

September 13, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior
Dr. J. M. Mead, a pioneer physician of Iron Mountain, died last week.

September 13, 1890 Page 8
Margaret A., daughter of John Noble, Division street, died at noon yesterday, at the age of 12, of fever. Funeral will occur Sunday at 2 p.m. at the residence and body will be interred at Riverside Cemetery.

September 20, 1890 Page 8
Marine
The steamer Columbia, Captain Gunderson, arrived in port early Wednesday morning and reported her consort, the schooner Comrade, missing.... Captain Peterson, of the Comrade, is well known here. He leaves a family who reside in Cleveland.

September 27, 1890 Page 1
Little Grace McLaren, died Sunday, of fever. The funeral was held Tuesday at two p.m.

September 27, 1890 Page 8
Emilio Carmelino, an Italian, residing at 46 Magazine street died Wednesday night from a hemorrhage of the stomach, aged 27 years.

September 27, 1890 Page 1
Cut Off In His Prime
Demise of Thomas J. Martin After an Illness of Two Weeks.
At 11:25 last Saturday night, Thomas J. Martin, one of the ablest and most promising young lawyers of the city, received the command to "come up higher," and the sad intelligence of his death cast a gloom over the entire community. He had been suffering for two weeks with fever, and though attended by the best medical skill, and ministered unto by loving relatives and friends, he finally succumbed to the inevitable and his spirit took its flight. His demise occurred at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. B. Sutton, near the court house, where everything possible was done to make him comfortable and cause his last hours to be peaceful. At the end there were present the loving parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Martin, of Albion, Miss Eva Turner, his fiance, Mr. and Mrs. Sutton, and many other anxious friends. The funeral took place at the Sutton residence at 10:30 Monday morning, and was attended by a large concourse of sorrowing friends. Rev. P. T. Rowe, officiated.....The Masonic fraternity both from the Canada Soo and this city, the members of the Chippewa bar and the Algoma Bar and numerous friends, accompanied the sad procession to the depot, where the remains were placed upon the 11:30 train and sent to Albion, where they were interred Tuesday with Masonic honours.... Thomas J. Martin was born at Harrisburg, Pa., and was twenty-four years and about six months of age at the time of his death. ....

September 27, 1890 Page 1
Death Of Walter J. Peffers
Another Popular Young Man Called to His Last Repose
The death of Walter J. Peffers occurred at about 10 o'clock Monday night at the residence of Thomas Gowan, on Ashmun street, and as he was a general favorite the sad news was soon told throughout the city with genuine sorrow. The deceased had been in poor health for some time and his constitution could not long with stand the ravages of the fever with which he was seized about two weeks ago. The funeral occurred on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, under the auspices of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias Lodges, and the large concourse of friends who attended testified to the high esteem in which he was held. The firm of Prenzlauer Bros. closed their establishment, and with their employees were present in a body. The remains were interred in the Rivers de cemetery.
Walter J.Peffers was born in Mornington, county of North Perth, Ont., and was 23 years old last June. He came here about six years ago and was employed for a time in the store of C. A. Loughin. He soon accepted a position with Prenzlauer Bros., with whom he remained until taken sick, and was always a faithful and efficient employee: .... He was a member of the Episcopalian church..... He was engaged to Miss Rachie Gowan daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gowan,....
Mr. and Mrs. Peffers, the bereaved parents, who reside near Pickford, were present at the bedside and funeral of their beloved son,....

October 4, 1890 Page 1
Robert Burns' Death
An Account Copied From the Columns of a Contemporary Newspaper Here is an account of the death and funeral of Robert Burns taken from a newspaper of the time: "On the 21st (July, 1796) died at Dumphries, after a lingering illness, the celebrated Robert Burns...."

October 11, 1890 Page 5
The State of Superior
Chas. Olson, a brakeman on the C. & N. W. railway was fatally injured at Iron Mountain last week by coupling cars. He got under the wheels and was mangled horribly. Death put an end to his sufferings a few hours after the accident.

October 18, 1890 Page 1
Death of Frank W. Phillips
Frank W. Phillips, who it will be remembered was associated during the spring of 1887 with C. H. Chapman in the publication of The News, died at his home in Westfield, Wis., last week. He had been in poor health for two years and consumption developed rapidly. Mr. Phillips was a well-known newspaper writer in this state. After leaving the Soo he took the position of editor of the Eau Claire, Wis. Daily Leader, going from there to Detroit two years ago, and was connected with the editorial staff of the Sunday News until his health became so poor that he was forced to quit work.....

October 18, 1890 Page 11
The State of Superior
Nicholas Thompson, a Swede mason, committed suicide at Iron Mountain Oct. 10.

October 18, 1890 Page 11
H. Beauregard, a man who has been engaged in selling hospital tickets near Iron Mountain, was shot by a hunter in the woods adjacent to Metropolitan and killed, last week. He was mistaken for a bear.

October 25, 1890 Page 5
The State of Superior
A man named George Barry was run into and probably fatally injured, Friday, Oct. 17, by the east bound limited express on the D.S.S. & A. Ry., Eest of Dollarville. His skull was badly fractured.

October 25, 1890 Page 5
The State of Superior
The founder of Marquette, Amos R. Harlow, who recently died, has left as part of his legacy, a diary of incalculable historic value. Therein are recorded minute details of the discovery and development of the Lake Superior iron interests and the early history of Marquette city.

October 25, 1890 Page 1
An Afflicted Family
On Thursday, October 16, occurred the death of Joseph R. Kent, at his home, on the Hay Lake road, eight miles from the Soo. Mr. Kent was in his 58th year of his age; he followed the occupation of farming and was highly respected by all who knew him. The remains were interred on St. Joseph's Island on the following Sunday. His death was preceded only a few weeks by that of a little daughter.....

November 8, 1890 Page 1
A Fatal Accident
Chas. Morrison is Killed by a Falling Derrick on the Government Dock. A fatal accident occurred Tuesday morning, at 10:30, on the government work on the new canal, resulting in the death of Chas. Morrison, one of Collins & Farwells's employees. One of the supports of a derrick used for the hoisting of stone and other material gave way, and it fell, striking Chas Morrison, Mat. Ramsey and a Finlander. Morrison was felled to the ground by a heavy piece of timber which struck him on the forhead, and his skull was crushed on the sharp rocks. The other men were not seriously injured. The men were attended by Drs. Ennis and Rundle. Mr. Morrison was taken to his home in the Easterday grove, and received the best of medical attention, but all efforts proved unavailing and he died Wednesday morning. He was an industrious hard- working man, and leaves a wife and two sons, one of whom was working with his father at the time of the sad accident. This is the first serious casualty that has occurred since the commencement of the work,....

November 8, 1890 Page 8
Obituary
Died-At his residence in Easterday's Grove, this city, Thursday morning, Nov. 6, at 7 o'clock, A. M., Hugh McIntosh Morrison, aged 47 years.
At about eleven o'clock Tuesday, the 4th inst., an accident occurred in the new lock, Collins & Farwell, contractors, resulting in the fatal injury of the deceased. Mr. Morrison was conveyed to his home and Drs. Ennis and Rundle performed two surgical operations and all was done for the patient that was possible to do, but to no other purpose than to alleviate his sufferings. Mr. Morrison came to this country from Drumnaquix, Kiniochberrie, Lairg, Scotland, eighteen years ago and has lived in this city two years. He was married sixteen years ago, and leaves a wife and two children, Willie fifteen years old, who had just begun to work along with his father, and Marion, eight years of age. The deceased was one of the most trusty and faithful laborers in the community. He was buried from his home yesterday forenoon with appropriate services, conducted by Rev. T. R. Easterday, assisted by Rev. G. W. Luther, pastor of the Presbyterian church, a large attendance of friends and neighbors being present.

November 15, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior.
William Valier, of St. Ignace, was drowned last week off the tug Maud Simmons, between that place and Mackinac Island.

November 8, 1890 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
John J. Gearley, a farmer living near West Superior, recently set a gun trap for deer near his home, and in the gloom of an early morning accidently ran into it with fatal results. He was found dead several hours after. He was seventy-six years old.

November 15, 1890 Page 1
A. J. McClung, of the First National bank returned Saturday from Canandaigue, Mich., where he was called some time ago by the sickness of his father, who expired a few days after the arrival of his son. Mr. McClung's friends extend their sympathy in his bereavement.

November 15, 1890 Page 1
Paid the Penalty.
Birchall, the murderer of Benwell, was hanged at Woodstock, Ont., at 9 o'clock yesterday. He died without a word, and was nervy to the last minute.

November 15, 1890 Page 4
The State of Superior.
An Italian miner named Pavonan got one of his legs crushed to a jelly last week, at the Huron mine, near Houghton. He may die from the effects of the injury.

November 22, 1890 Page 1
A Sad Accident.
Little Ray Cory Burned So Badly That He Dies....
The news of the sad accident that resulted in the death of Ray, the bright little son of Rev. and Mrs. H. P. Cory, at Greencastle, Ind. was received here this week. A letter from the bereaved father gives the full particulars of the affair. On Thursday of last week the unfortunate child, in company with a brother, was playing in front of a neighbor's house, where some leaves and twigs from trees had been burning, and by some means he stumbled and fell into the smouldering embers. His clothes caught fire and before any one could get to him he was so badly burned that five hours later he breathed his last. As soon as his screams were heard Mrs. Cory rushed out, enveloped him in a blanket and smothered the flames. The child was not burned deeply, but over a large surface of his body, arms neck and under the chin, while his face was disfigured but little. It is thought he must have inhaled the flames, or his injuries would not have been fatal. To use the language of the letter, "the funeral was held on Saturday afternoon, under a gray November sky, with the kind administration of loving friends, smoothing out and hiding under flowers and evergreens, so far as possible, the repulsive features of burial, we laid his little body to rest in the beautiful cemetery on the hill." The bereaved parents are sustained in their poignant grief by the divine grace that they have so often commended to others. Rev. and Mrs. Cory resided here for several years, the former being pastor of the Presbyterian church. Their many friends extend heartfelt sympathy in the sad affliction with which they have been visited.

November 22, 1890 Page 4 The State of Superior
As August Beck, a respected citizen of Negaunee, was returning to his home from business, Monday evening, Nov. 10, he was met by a crowd of fiendish Finlanders, a number of which held him, while the balance drew knives and carved him, inflicting dangerous wounds in his breast and frightfully cutting his arms in numerous places. The murderous fiends left their victim in an unconscious state, and he was picked up by friends, who at once took him to a hospital where he received medical attention. He will probably die. Hanging is too good for the inhuman perpetrators of the outrage.

November 22, 1890 Page 4 The State of Superior
John Byestrom, of Ishpeming, fell through the ice last week while skating, and was drowned.

November 29, 1890 Page 4 The State of Superior
Harry Rickard, a well known man of Hancock, suicided last week at the Douglas House, where he was stopping. He took the pistol route.

November 29, 1890 Page 4 The State of Superior.
Clarence Smythe, a young unmarried man, employed in the Hamilton mine, near Iron Mountain, was instantly killed last week, while being raised a short distance toward the top of the shift house. He stepped on top of the bucket, the signal was given to hoist, but it was not stopped at the desired place, and his head was caught between the edge of the bucket and the heavy timber above.

November 29, 1890 Page 4 The State of Superior.
Daniel Boyle, a railway laborer, was killed at St. Ignace. He was struck on the back of his head by a flat car, which left the track and rolled down an embankment, to where he was standing.

November 29, 1890 Page 8 Nebish Island Nuggets.
'Tis with much sorrow we announce the death of Mrs. Charles Wier, who departed this life at Nebish, Nov. 21, 1890. She leaves behind a sorrowing husband and three small children to mourn her loss. ....

December 6, 1890 Page 10
James Farling, an old resident of the Soo, died Tuesday night. The funeral was held yesterday.

December 6, 1890 Page 10
Ebeneezer Perry, of Saginaw, died at that place Monday, after a short illness. He was a brother of R. D. and Frank Perry, of this city, who attended the funeral and returned yesterday. The deceased was a wealthy and highly respected lumberman and leaves a wife and family.

December 13, 1890 Page 1 Attorney Horace M. Oren received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of his grandmother Mrs. Jane Oren, aged 85 years, at Wilmington, Ohio. Mrs. Oren was also the grandmother of Mrs. William Chandler. She was a pioneer of Ohio and a most estimable lady in every respect whose life was full of good work and kindly deeds.

December 13, 1890 Page 8 Half hour guns were fired at the Fort yesterday in memory of the late surgeon General Baxter who died at Washington about ten days ago. General Baxter was appointed about three months ago after a life-long struggle for the office. He was 53 years of age.

December 13, 1890 Page 8
Death of Mason Howlett
Mason Howlett, of Newberry, died at the home of his father, William Howlett, in Soo township, Monday morning last, of dropsy, aged 27 years. Mr. Howlett who had resided in Newberry for some time, came to his father's house on Friday of last week, suffering from dropsy, to be treated by physicians in this city, but on Saturday other complications set in which caused his death. Mr. Howlett was a married man and leaves a wife. The funeral, which was conducted by Rev. P. T. Rowe, occurred Tuesday afternoon. The remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery.

December 13, 1890 Page 8
Suicide Near Newberry
Victor Keithen, an old man residing about twelve miles from Newberry, committed suicide Tuesday morning by shooting himself in the head with a revolver. Mr. Keithen had been in poor health for some time, and it is supposed he was temporarily insane.

December 20, 1890 Page 1
Mrs. H. A. Harrison, W. F. and J. L. Lipsett were called to Meaford, Canada, last Sunday by a telegram which announced the death of their father. The funeral occurred Tuesday and the Messrs Lipsett and Mrs. Harrison returned home yesterday.

December 20, 1890 Page 1
Andrew Perie, a French sailor, died at the marine hospital early Tuesday morning, of typhoid fever. He was about 26 years of age and unmarried, Piere was taken to the hospital from a vessel some two months ago. He was laid to rest in St. Mary's cemetery Tuesday afternoon, services being held at St. Mary's church.

December 20, 1890 Page 1
Miss Elizabeth Hoornstra, daughter of Ex-Supervisor Dirk Hoornstra, of Soo township, died at the residence of John Pigeon on Wednesday of last week, of heart trouble, aged 16 years. The funeral took place on Saturday and the remains were buried in Pine Grove cemetery. Mr. Hoornstra has the sympathy of the community in his bereavemet.

December 20, 1890 Page10
A Boy's Skull Crushed
On Monday, shortly afternoon, George Wilins, a boy about 12 years of age, received what may prove a fatal injury. Young Wilkins was endeavoring to get a ride on a hay sled which was driven by a farmer named Thos. White. The boy, in trying to get out of the way of another sled, was caught by one of the horses which sunk the cork of one of its fore shoes clear through the skull, into his brain. He was taken to Dr. Rundles's office, where an examination was made by the Doctor and a cut an inch in length and one-half an inch in depth was found.Two pieces of skull were removed and they were almost a half inch square. The boy retained consciousness through the operation, after which he was removed to his home in a small house in the rear of the McEvoy hotel. The boy has had several convulsions since Tuesday and if he recovers it will certainly be unusual.

December 27, 1890 Page 1
Death of Mrs. P. T. Rowe's Father
Mrs. P. T. Rowe received a telegram Monday which announced the sudden death of her father, the Rev. Dr. J. Carry, who resided at Port Perry, Ont. Rev. Carry was 72 years of age and was one of the oldest Episcopalian ministers in Canada .... Besides Mrs. Rowe, a wife and three children survive him. The funeral occurred Wednesday. Mrs. Rowe was unable to attend the funeral.

December 27, 1890 Page 1
Death of George Wintle.
George Wintle, a pauper, died at the poor house Monday afternoon of diabetes, from which he had been a sufferer for two years. He had been an inmate of the county house ever since he was taken ill. Wintle was 30 years of age and came from England about four years ago. Previous to going to the poor house he was employed by B. McEvoy and others and was said to be a good accountant. He was buried in the city cemetery Wednesday afternoon.

December 27, 1890 Page 2
Called Home By Illness
Congressman Stephenson was called home to Menominee last week by the death of his grandson and the serious illness of his daughter. He has the sincere sympathy of his constituents.

December 27, 1890 Page 8
Bennett Smith, brother of H. P. Smith died at his home in Toledo, Monday night, aged 86 years. The telegram announcing his brother's death sent to H. P. Smith did not reach this city until late Tuesday which made it impossible for him to attend the funeral.

December 27, 1890 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. Dirk Hornstra wish to thank their friends in the city and country for the kindess shown them during the sickness and death of their daughter Elizabeth.

January 3, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The residence of Victor Rogers, near Ironwood, was burned last week, and two of his children aged 3 and 10 perished in the flames.

January 3, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Peter Robinson, of Escanaba, was fatally shot last week by his son-in-law while handling a revolver. Another case of didn't know it was loaded.

January 3, 1891 Page 11
Capt. Wallace Known Here.
One of the Wounded Knee Victims An Old Associate of Capt. Hoyt.
Capt. George D. Wallace, of the Seventh Cavalry, who was tomahawked, by the Indians of Big Foot's band, at Wounded Knee creek, South Dakota, last Monday .... "He was a loyal South Carolinian, graduated from West Point in 1872, was a first lieutenant in 1876, a captain in 1885 and was a fighter every inch of him. His belonging to the Seventh Cavalry which was in the Little Big Horn Campaign, and participated in the Custer massacre ...."

January 3, 1891 Page 12
Mrs. Cotteau, aged 86, fell at the poor house, of which she is an inmate, broke the surgical neck of her hip and is lying at the point of death. Her extreme age makes recovery very doubtful.

January 3, 1891 Page 12
S. F. Bernier received a telegram Friday morning from Bruce Mines stating that his sister-in-law Miss Sophia Rousseau, died at home at 3:30 o'clock Friday morning. She was a niece of S. Lalonde and cousin of H. J. Lalonde.

January 10, 1891 Page 1
The Newberry Accident.
A Falling Scaffold at the Furnace Kills one and Hurts Several
About 10 o'clock Wednesday night a scaffold on the furnace stack at Newberry came down with such force as to carry away the south and east sides of the top house, the falling walls of which demolished over half the roof of the casting house. The report was heard a long distance off, and the whole town was brilliantly illuminated with the burning gas for several minutes. The fire alarm was sounded and village fire department helped to subdue the fire, which was fiercely burning in the top house and approaches. The accident occurred right after the casting was run off and when the falling walls carried in the roof of the casting house several men were employed in front of the stack, and sanding the cast. John Labombard, a top filler, was literally cooked to death before he could be rescued. Henry Woolner, night watchman, remained on the wreck over half an hour. He is badly cut about the head with his body and limbs badly burned. Alex. Terrece, a helper, has a badly sprained back and is burned. Charles Sinquist, a top filler, who was in the casting house at the time of the accident, had his face and head badly cut and body bruised. John Johnson, helper, badly cut about the head and his body bruised. Louis Liberty had his feet burned in bad shape by the hot iron. Claude W. Case, secretary and manager, was carried down under the falling roof, but miraculously escaped, with a few scalp wounds.

January 10, 1891 Page 1
Mrs. Hodgins Died Thursday.
Mrs. Minnie Hodgins, aged 30, died at her home on Ridge street, Thursday evening at 6:30 o'clock. She had been ill for six months. At her request the rare operation of panhysterectomy was performed on her last Monday afternoon, but it was of no avail, although she survived .... days. She will be buried by .... and the funeral will occur ....[unreadable].

January 17, 1891 Page 1
Poor Billy Hughes
He Died from a Cold Contracted at the McEvoy Fire
William Hughes, a harness maker by trade, died at Lemon's boarding house on Ashmun Street, at 10 o'clock Thursday night, aged 26 years, of consumption, from which he had been a sufferer for the past year. Mr. Hughes came to this city from Wingham, Ont., seven years ago and secured employment in the shop of William Netterfield, where he followed his trade for four years. He was also employed by Hector McDonald. About a year ago he took a severe cold at the McEvoy saloon fire, where he was discharging the duties of fireman. This resulted in pneumonia, and consumption later. By the advice of his physician Mr. Hughes went West last spring, improved rapidly, and soon returned to this city. Here he contracted a fresh cold, which resulted fatally. He was at Newberry until last Tuesday, only two days before his death. Mr. Hughes was engaged to Miss Mamie Armstrong, and their marriage was to take place soon. The remains will be forwarded to Wingham for interment, and the father of the deceased is expected to arrive in the city today. William Hughes was an exemplary young man and was loved and respected by all who knew him. He was a valued member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of this city.

January 17, 1891 Page 1
Death of Rev. Fr. Ferrard.
The Rev. Fr. Ferrard died at Montreal last Saturday, aged 81 years. Father Ferrard was stationed at St. Mary's church, this city, about ten years ago. At the time of his death he was busily engaged in writing and had almost ready for publication an Indian dictionary, and had spent most of his leisure time during the last twenty years of his life on the work. He was at one time an Indian missionary, and has been over all the territory on the north shore of Lake Superior and the Northwestern country. Father Ferrard was possessed of many good qualities and always made friends wherever he went. He was well known here by the older settlers.

January 17, 1891 Page 1
W. C. Clark returned home from Collingwood Thursday. Mr. Clark was called away about the first of the month by the serious illness of his mother. She died Jan. 8, aged 74 years.

January 24, 1891 Page 1
Death of Jerry Brennan.
Jerry Brennan died at his home on Gros Cap avenue, Friday night of last week, of apoplexy. Mr. Brennan was 60 years old and was born in Ireland. He came to this country when a boy and served all through the war of the rebellion. He had worked on the ship canal continuously since its completion and was an active Grand Army man. Besides his wife, one daughter, Mrs. John Grant, of Marquette survives him. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Monday, under the direction of Marcellus Post, G. A. R.

January 24, 1891 Page 1
Geo. S. Wheatley's Demise.
A Sincerely Good Man Exchanges This World for a far Better One.
At six o'clock last Monday evening the spirit of George S. Wheatley passed from this world to its reward in a better place. Death was caused by apoplexy and the illness was only of a week's duration. Mr. Wheatley had been a resident of this city for twelve years. He was born at Sarnia, Ont. May 12, 1854. Six years ago, he embarked in the grocery business in this city and was apparently successful up to the time of his failure in August last, caused by his large heartedness and liberality in giving credit to one and all. Mr. Wheatley went with his family to Manistee in August last, but returned to this city three weeks ago, with the intention of opening up a small grocery again. George S. Wheatley was an honest, honorable, Christain gentleman, and was an active member of the Methodist church. He did not know an enemy and was held in the highest esteem by every one. By his death he leaves a widow and two sons. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church Thursday afternoon and the remains were taken to Sarnia, where they were interred yesterday afternoon. Benj. Wheatley, of Manistee and Joseph Wheatley, of Sarnia, arrived in the city Wednesday and accompanied Mrs. Wheatley and children to the final resting place of the beloved husband, father and brother. ....

January 24, 1891 Page 1
A Heartless Grandfather
Dan Sullivan Deposits the Corpse of an Infant on a Snow Drift
.... The dead child proved to be that of the girl mother Ellen Sullivan .... It died on Sunday morning last ....
January 24, 1891 Page 4
In the village of Commonwealth, Wis., last week, the dwelling occupied (by) H. L. Hind was destroyed by fire and one of the young children, a boy of about 5 years perished in the flames. Heroic efforts were made to save the unfortunate child but all in vain. Mrs. Hind is related to the Anthony's of this city, and the stricken parents have the sympathy of all their friends.

January 24, 1891 Page 12
A Cruel Crime.
Old George Coulter's Awful Murder By His Son.
An Unnatural and Needless Act.
Montgomery Might Have Prevented the Terrible Patricide.
The Brute Examined Before Justice Warner and Remanded Without Bail for Trial in the Circuit Court.
William Coulter, who killed his father George Coulter, Wednesday afternoon at about 3 o'clock, was brought before Justice Warner for a preliminary examination yesterday afternoon and was bound over for trial in the circuit court.... Coroner Bacon said he held an inquest on the body Thursday and found that death was caused by a gun-shot, which had severed the aorta, causing instant death....
The murder of George Coulter, an old farmer aged 65 years, on his farm about twelve miles southwest of the city, by his son William, aged 30 years .... seems to have been as brutal an uncalled for a patricide as ever occured .... The murdered man was buried at Donaldson cemetery yesterday....

January 31, 1891 Page 1
Secretary Windom Dead.
Secretary William Windom, of the U.S. Treasury department, dropped dead at a banquet given by the Board of Trade in New York, Thursday evening. Heart disease was the cause of death.

January 31, 1891 Page 1
R. M. Morris received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of Mrs. J. M. Lenhoff, mother of Mrs. Morris, at 10 o'clock Thursday night. Mr. and Mrs. Morris and children left for Saginaw on the afternoon train yesterday.

January 31, 1891 Page 10 Joseph H. Thomas, who murdered Michael Downey on New Year's Eve, in Ontonagon county, has been sentenced for twenty-five years

January 31, 1891 Page 11
Death of Mrs. John N. Adams.
Mrs. J. N. Adams died at her home on Ashmun street, Sunday morning of puerpal fever. She had been ill for a month previous to her death. The funeral took place from the Methodist church, of which she was an active member, Tuesday afternoon and was attended by a large concourse of friends. Mrs. Adams was born in Scotland thirty-two years ago and came to this country, at the age of twelve years. A husband and two children survive her, who have the sympathy of the entire community in the loss of a loving wife and mother. The remains were buried temporarily in the city cemetery, but will be removed to Riverside in the spring. Mrs. Adams was a Christian lady of sweet disposition and many charming qualities of heart and mind and her death will leave a void never to be filled.

January 31, 1891 Page 11
An infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Fleming, died suddenly last Saturday afternoon. The funeral was held on Monday.

February 7, 1891 Page 1
The Death of Mrs. J. A. Noble.
Mrs. J. A. Noble died at her home on Division street, at 4 o'clock last Saturday morning, of spinal disease, aged 40 years. Mrs. Noble had only been ill for three days previous to her death. She had been a resident of this city for ten years, and was an active member of the Methodist church from which the funeral services took place on Monday afternoon, and the remains were interred at Riverside Cemetery. Besides a husband, two children, John and Allie, survive her. The family desire to extend thanks to many friends who so kindly gave assistance and comfort.

February 7, 1891 Page 2
Mrs. Thomas Cadreau died at the residence of Mrs. Duquette, on Spruce avenue, early Monday morning, at the age of 40 years. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church Wednesday morning.

February 14, 1891 Page 1
Death of John A. France's Father.
John A. Francis received the sad, intelligence of the death of his father John France, of Detroit, Tuesday afternoon, aged 70 years. The immediate cause of death was heart failure, brought on by bronchitis. Mr. France Sr., is well known in this city, having spent several weeks here two years ago. John A. left for Detroit Thursday afternoon to attend the funeral. A widow and four children survive his father.

February 14, 1891 Page 1
W. H. Peck received a telegram from Toronto Thursday announcing the death of Mrs. Richard Boore in that city at 5 o'clock Wednesday evening of consumption. She was the widow of the late Richard Boore, who established and run the Elk in this city for several years and who died last summer. Mrs. Boore was 26 years old. The funeral occured at Toronto yesterday.

February 21, 1891 Page 1
Miss Stella Wolfe, sister of Sol Wolfe, bookkeeper at Prenzlauer Bros., died at Bellvue, Ohio, last Saturday, from disease of the spine. Miss Wolfe was a bright young lady and her death will be a great blow to her family, who have the sympathy of Mr. Wolfe's friends in this city. Sol will return tomorrow to resume his position at Prenzlauer Bros.

February 21, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
At Marquette last week a Polock by the name of Smith was clubbed to death by a father and son named Nowak. The murderers are in jail.

February 21, 1891 Page 7
The mother of Dr. J. T. Biggs, who was stationed at Fort Brady last summer, died at Cincinnati last week. Mrs. Biggs spent two months at the Internaional Hotel, Canadian Soo, last summer.

February 21, 1891 Page 8
Bay Mills.
J. Johnson, an employee of the Hall and Munson Co. was instantly killed while unloading logs at the mill Monday afternoon. A large log rolled upon him breaking his neck. He was 20 years of age and resided with his parents at the Bay. The funeral occurred Wednesday, and the body was buried at the Mission Hill cemetery

February 21, 1891 Page 8
Superior [Special Correspondence]
News has just reached us of the sad and untimely death of our young friend Josiah Johnson of Bay Mills. Mr. Johnson was holding some logs from falling off the sleigh from which they were being unloaded, his feet slipped and he fell, the logs falling onto him causing instant death; Mr. Johnson was the son of our friend and neighbour Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Johnson who are very worthy and highly respected people. Josiah was a very worthy and highly respected young man about nineteen years of age. ....
[Obituary on February 29, 1891 Page 2 states death on February 16, 1891, funeral on 18 from Methodist Episcopal church].

March 7, 1891 Page 1
Mrs. James R. Tilt Passes Away.
Mrs. James R. Tilt died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Smith, West Cleveland, Ohio, at eight o'clock Saturday night. Mrs. Tilt had been failing for the past year and while here last summer was under the care of a physician. After a visit of a couple of months she returned to Cleveland and for a time improved in health, but the change was not permanent and six weeks ago she was compelled to take to her bed from which she never arose. Mrs. Tilt was born in this city 37 years ago and had spent most of her summers here at the Chippewa House, of which her father H. P. Smith is proprietor. During her childhood she received an injury which crippled her for life. Besides a devoted husband, a daughter Miss Florence, survives a loving wife and mother. The body was interred in Lake View cemetery Wednesday afternoon. The bereaved family and friends have the deepest sympathy of the entire community in their affliction.

March 7, 1891 Page 1
Death of Horace Seymour.
Horace Seymour died at Mrs. Ruby's boarding house, on Ridge Street, at 10 o'clock Thursday morning. The immediate cause of death was rheumatism of the heart, but for some time he had been afflicted with consumption. He was 21 years old last October and had been associated with Harvey's marine bureau for two years. He was a son of Rev. Edward Seymour, who was rector of the Episcopal church in this city in 1884. Horace Seymour was a bright young man, always attentive to his duties, and a general favourite with all who knew him. His many friends rge sorely grieved at his death. Funeral services were held at the Episcopal church yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, after which the remains were taken to the depot, followed by a large number of sorrowing friends. His brother Frank, of Newberry, was with him during his last hours, and took the body to Ashtabula Harbor, O., for interment.

March 7, 1891 Page 2
Death of an Aged Lady.
Mrs C. B. Cook, aged about 75, died at the residence of Henry Lark, Hay Lake road, last Saturday morning of paralysis. Mrs. Cook came to this city ten years ago with her husband from Ann Arbor. Mr. Cook died shortly after their arrival. Mrs. Cook had lived with Mrs. Lark for six years past. She was the mother of Mrs. Charles Tubbs, late of this city, but who is now residing in Chicago; Mrs. Cook was beloved by all who knew her and she was a highly respected Christian woman. The remains were taken to Ann Arbor Monday and laid to rest by the side of her husband Wednesday afternoon. Mayor Fowle accompanied the funeral party to Ann Arbor, where Mrs. Tubbs met them.

March 7, 1891 Page 2
J. D. Cameron, aged 67, died at his residence on Arlington street, at two o'clock Monday afternoon, of Bright's disease. The funeral occurred Tuesday afternoon and the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery. A wife and six children survive him and are said to be in destitute circumstances.

March 7, 1891 Page 8
Fatal Accident.
William Moore Meets His Death in a Lumber Camp
William Moore employed at Redy's camp at Alexander this winter as teamster, was instantly killed by a falling tree Thursday afternoon. The deceased was from Seaforth, Ont., and was 25 years old. The body was brought to this city yesterday morning and was taken to Gardner & Mondor's from which place it will be buried at 8 o'clock this morning. James Redy paid all bills and gave the unfortunate man a respectable burial. The deceased during the summer months always spent his time in the 'Soo' and boarded at the Sherman House.

March 14, 1891 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Edward Buchanan.
Mrs. Edward Buchanan died of consumption at her home on Nolte street, at 10 o'clock last Sunday morning, after an illness of a year. The funeral was held from the Methodist church Monday afternoon. Mrs. Buchanan was 22 years old and was married to Edward Buchanan about eighteen months ago. Six weeks ago a bright girl baby was born to the happy couple, but from that time Mrs. Buchanan failed repadly until her sufferings ceased at the time above stated. Her mother, Mrs. Catherine Lowery, was with her through her last illness and all loving hands could do was done. Mrs. Buchanan possessed excellent traits of character and was loved and respected by all who knew her. The bereaved husband has the deepest sympathy of the community. The little child is quite sick and fears are entertained as to its recovery.

March 14, 1891 Page 1
The happy home of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Eccles was filled with sadness this week by the death of their twin babies, which were born seven weeks ago. One died Monday night and the other Tuesday night. They were laid to rest Thursday morning in the city cemetery in the same coffin. The report that Mrs. Eccles is seriously ill is without foundation, she is improving rapidly.

March 14, 1891 Page 8
Death of George Kennedy.
George Kennedy, a barber formerly in the employ of Samuel Parker, of this city, died of consumption last Saturday, at the residence of his mother in the Canada Soo. The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon and was largely attended from this side. The Knights of Pythias, of which order he was a member, buried him with lodge honours. Mr. Kennedy was a most exemplary young man, and his demise is regreted by many on both sides of the river.

March 14, 1891 Page 8
Death of an Aged Lady.
Mrs. Francois Tessie D. La Vigue, one of Chippewa County's oldest residents, died at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Frank Roll, at 7 o'clock yesterday morning. Mrs. La Vigue was born at River La Grace, on the St. Lawrence river in 1804. She was married twice, her only issue [by her first husband] being Edmire McCloud. After death of her first husband, she married Francois Tessie D. LaVigue, and came to this country in May 1874. In 1850 her daughter Edmire was married to our honored and respected citizen I. P. Trempe. Mr. and Mrs. La Vigue accumulated considerable property in this vicinity from which their grandchildren reaped the benefit. Mrs. LaVigue survived her husband twenty years and her demise will be regretted by all the old French residents of this city, and by all who knew of her sterling qualities. Her funeral took place at 8 o'clock this morning and full services for the dead being held at St. Mary's church.

March 21, 1891 Page 1
Gone to Her Rest.
Death of Mrs. Margaret P. Jackson, of Blood Poisoning.
Margaret P. Jackson, wife of J. A. Jackson, died at No. 90 Ridge street, at 10 o'clock Thursday morning, of blood poisoning, at the age of 34 years, 4 months and 15 days. The deceased had resided in this city for three years, and came from Toronto with her husband, who is now employed on the Soo Line as conductor. Mrs. Jackson was taken ill two weeks ago with la grippe, which with blood poisoning, caused her death. She was one of God's noble women and had a kind and pleasant word for every one. She was the secretary of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Y.M.C.A., and was also an active member of the ladies' aid society of the Presbyterian church. To the bereaved and stricken husband the entire community extends its deepest sympathy. Short services were held at No. 90 Ridge street yesterday afternoon by the Rev. G. W. Luther, of the Presbyterian church, after which the remains were taken to Toronto for burial....

March 21, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
Last week a miner named Herman Ako was instantly killed at the Hamilton mine near Iron Mountain. He fell 100 feet into No. 2 shaft.

March 28, 1891 Page 1
Peter Bell, a well known Indian, died at his home on Bell's Point, near Garden River, Tuesday, of dropsy, aged 60 years. He was laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery at Garden River Wednesday. Three sons and two daughters survive him, his wife died several years ago.

March 28, 1891 Page 1
Death of an Old Resident.
Thomas Trelease, who was a resident of this city for many years and a pioneer of the Upper Peninsula, died at his residence on Spruce Street, at 8 o'clock last Saturday night, of a complication of diseases, being an invalid for some time previous to his death. Mr. Trelease was born at Perranzabuine, Cornwall, England, June 8th, 1823. The funeral took place from St. James church Wednesday afternoon and the remains were laid to rest in Riverside. The pall bearers were George W. Brown, Capt. W. P. Spalding, Louis P. Trempe, Capt. Fred Trempe, S. La Londe and John Hotton, all old friends of the diseased.

March 28, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John McGuire, ex-postmaster of Republic, perished from exposure in a snow storm last week near the Mansfield mine.

March 28, 1891 Page 4
Lawrence Barrett, the actor died at the Windsor Hotel, New York, at 10 o'clock last Friday night, of pneumonia, after an illness of only two days. Lawrence Barrett was born April 4, 1838, at Patterson, N.J., and his first appearance on the stage was at Detroit, in 1853....

March 28, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
Mrs. John Lyons died at Cheboygan recently aged 102 years.
April 4, 1891 Page 1
The remains of W. C. Givens were buried yesterday in Erie Street cemetery, in the presence of a number, of relatives and friends. He died at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich; August 28, 1885, and was a son of Mr. Wm. Given, a well known citizen of Cleveland. Cleveland Leader, March 29, 1891.

April 4, 1891 Page 7
Kinross News.
It is our sad duty to announce the death of Katie Clow, of Pickford, who died March 30th. She, with her mother was visiting Mrs. Cameron, who is Mrs. Clow's mother. She was taken sick on the 23rd and grew steadily worse in spite of the best of care.... Katie was eight months and four days old at the time of her death....

April 4, 1891 Page 10
Sugar Island.
We are sorry to relate the death of Peter Bell, who died March 24, and Mrs. Mastaw, who died March 25, both residents of the Island and well known and highly respected. We as a community heartily join in with heartfelt sympathy for the mourners.

April 4, 1891 Page 10
J. D. Taylor received a telegram this morning from his home in Madison, Wis., which announced the sudden death of his father, Judge David Taylor. Judge Taylor was one of Wisconsin's oldest pioneers and was highly respected in Madison. J. D. Taylor will leave for Madison this morning to attend the funeral.

April 4, 1891 Page 10
Pickford Items. (Special Correspondence)
The only child of Mr. and Mrs. David Clough died on Monday. The parents have the sincere sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

April 11, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Gordon Michael received a telegram Wednesday morning announcing the sudden death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. John Saunders, of Detroit.

April 11, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. James Porter, aged 69 years, died on Friday, April 3. The funeral occurred at the Methodist church and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

April 11, 1891 Page 8
The funeral of the late Associate Justice David Taylor, of Madison, Wis., father of Assistant Postmaster Jared D. Taylor, of this city, was held on Tuesday, at Madison, and the remains were taken to Cheboygan for interment. Jared D. Taylor who was called away by the sudden death, is expected home again next week.

April 11, 1891 Page 8
Prospect Hill.
Died at her home April 1st, the beloved wife of Edgar G. Smith, aged 67 years. May she rest in peace. Funeral sermon, on Sunday at the Roe appointment by Rev. Perdue. Mr. Smith is also stated as being in a very low condition.

April 18, 1891 Page 7
Prospect Hill.
The funeral sermon of the daughter of David Clow will be preached next Sunday by Rev. Holt at the Roe appointment.

April 18, 1891 Page 8
Death of Jos. Richley.
In Sound Slumber He Crossed the Mystic River Without Suffering.
Joseph Richley, proprietor of the Soo bus and baggage line, a well known and genial character, slept off to death at one o'clock Thursday morning, as a result of an acute attack of pneumonia, due to exposure during a recent trip to West Superior. Mr. Richley was not sick long and never realized the near approach of dissolution, as he fell into a profound slumber, with stentorous breathing and was in that conditon without once rallying for 36 years previous to his demise. He had been in this city for several years and prospered here sufficiently to acquire considerable property. Born in Canada he came to the states at an early date and was a famous bus driver for years at Bay City. He leaves a wife but no children. A sister resides at Bay City and a brother at Hurd's Corners, Mich. To the latter his remains were taken at 3:30 o'clock yeserday afternoon. Frank and Fred Cooper and gentlemen of good repute, will continue the bus and baggage line here. The world would be a great deal better if it had no worse men than Jos. Richley was. Decency was his motto at all times and if a man had no money Joe, hauled him 'for nothing.'.... The deceased was 43 years old.

April 18, 1891 Page 8
An Old Resident Gone.
Thomas McNight Dies in Chicago and is Brought Here for Burial.
Thomas McNight, a former well known and respected resident of this city, died Wednesday morning, of paralysis, at the ripe old age of 80, at the residence of his son, Lester McNight, 5925 Wright street, Chicago. The remains accompanied by the sorrowing son, were brought here Thursday afternoon for burial.... A large number of old citizens and friends met the body at the depot and escorted the remains to the Presbyterian church, where funeral services were conducted by Rev T. R. Easterday, in the presence of a large audience ... The pall bearers were M. W. Scranton, Thos. Ryan, Guy H. Carleton, A. B. Roach, Fred Trempe and Wm. Ruckle. The body was interred in the family lot on the old McNight farm on the hill just south of the city, where also repose the remains of his mother, a wife and three sons, and also of Mrs. McDonald, who was an old friend of the family. Thomas McNight was born in St. Johnsbury, Vt., and there married also. Mr. and Mrs. McNight came to Sault Ste. Marie, in 1852, having buried in their old home two children and bringing with them their son Lester. Three children were born to them here, all of whom are gone to the beyond.
He had the management of the Chippewa Portage company's business of transferring the freight around the rapids and was afterwards a member of this company. When the lock and canal were finished in 1855, he assisted in locking the first boat through to Lake Superior. He acquired considerale property in those early days. At one time he owned most of the land on which the business portion of the city now stands, as well as several tracts of farming land. Mrs. Olive W. McNight was one of the original members at the organization of the Presbyterian church of this city; two only of the number still remain in the church below. For many of the early years of the church Mr. and Mrs. McKnight were its earnest suporters. On Jan. 22, 1867, while crossing the river in a cutter with Mrs. McDonald, his housekeeper, and his son Frank, about twelve years old, the ice gave way; Mrs. McKnight only was rescued and he more dead than alive. The body of the housekeeper was found and laid away just three months later beside the wife and two children she had nursed with such tender hands. The body of the son will be recovered only when the sea shall give up its dead. About two years later the grandmother suddenly died of heart disease and so the the family was broken up.
For many years Attorney McKnight was a prominent character here, being plentified with many interests and holding many offices in the gift of the people. While this was the collector of customs port he was the deputy, and at the time of the change he went to Marquette and was chiefly the instrument in establishing the office there. Shortly afterwards the infirmities of age came upon him and for five years or more past he has been quite an invalid. Death at last came by two strokes of paralysis, the first on the fifth inst. and the second about a week later.
Lester McKnight, who accompanied the remains of his father here, is the only surviving member of the family. He has been employed for fifteen years by Libby, McNeil & Libby, beef packers, of Chicago. He was warmly greeted by his friends here, who extended their heartfelt sympathy in his affliction, and rendered him great assistance in his sad errand. Mr. McKnight desires THE NEWS to thank all the old friends of his father who so kindly volunteered their services. He expects to return home today.

April 18, 1891, Page 8
Death of a Cherished Child.
Died, at McMillan, Sunday morning, April 12th, after a brief illness, James Henry, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Holland, of Lakefield, aged 9 months and six days. The little one was buried with suitable services conducted by Rev. T. R. Easterday Monday afternoon. ....

April 25, 1891 Page 2 Congressman Ford, who died at Grand Rapids Monday, was well known by several residents of the Soo, all of whom speak regretfully of his untimely demise.

April 25, 1891 Page 5
Death of an Old Sooite.
M. G. Payment, Once the King of Sugar Island, Dies at Bay City.
Old residents of the Soo will be pained to learn of the death of M. G. Payment, at Bay City. A very full biographical sketch appeared in a Bay City paper, from which the following is taken:
"M. G. Payment passed peacefully away at 1:05 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his residence on the southwest corner of Campbell and Johnson street, in the 80th year of his age. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence and the remains will be interred in the family lot in Oak Ridge cemetery, West Bay City. Services will be held at the house by Rev. J. S. Holmes, pastor of the First Baptist Church.
"Deceased was born at Pointe Claire, near Montreal P. Q. Jan 20, 1812. After completing his education he was engaged in the mercantile business at Montreal and Vaudrueil, and in 1837 he removed to Detroit, where he established trading posts with Lake Superior, Mackinaw and Sugar Island. In 1840, he was united in marriage to C. Edesse, the oldest daughter of Dominique Riopelle, a young lady of wealth and accomplishments, who died at Sugar Island in 1850, at the age of 30 years, leaving four young children, the youngest an infant daughter who died at the age of six months. Miss Rose Payment, sister of the deceased, made her home with her widowed brother and his three sons until her death, which occurred in Bay City in 1888. In 1876 Mr. Payment removed from Detroit to Bay City, where he engaged in the real estate business and devoted his spare time to the study of the English language, in which he was successful, becoming quite proficient in both the French and English language. Mr. Payment's life was one of constant struggle, but he was a man of uncommon natural talents and indomitable energy and activity, and he remained perseverent to the end, in spite of the deepest calamities and loss of money in speculations of various kinds. He studied the scriptures diligently for twenty- five years and knew the New Testament by heart. His mental faculties remained bright and clear to the last, and the noble example which he set will make him regretted by all with whom he came in contact. He left a collection of valuable manuscripts to his son, F. C. Payment, who was deeply attached to him and was constantly in his company for months up to the time of his death. The surviving members of his family are Dr. R. C. Payment, dentist, of Detroit; Clovis C. Payment, engineer, at Sault Ste. Maire, and Fred C. Payment, of Bay City, who has been engaged in the real estate business, and was also connected with the grocery business for several years.

April 25, 1891 Page 7
A Thrilling Occurrence.
Fell Into the Raging Munoscong. Other Interesting Items From Pickford.
A young child of Mr. Reading, who lives near Prospect Hill, was buried last Saturday. Rev. Thomas Purdue conducted the service.

April 25, 1891 Page 8
Clarence J. Johnson's sister, who was so ill, died at Minneapolis this week and was interred yesterday.
Apri 25, 1891 Page 8
An infant boy of Mr. and Mrs. Leighten Mould died suddenly Tuesday morning. The little one was a bright child and the blow is a heavy one to the bereaved parents.

May 2, 1891 Page 1
They Were Poisoned.
Eight Persons Drink Water From an Old Well, and One Dies
Last Monday Louis Marble's entire family, eight in number, including himself, was suddently seized with griping, fever, green vomiting, pains, chills and other indications of foul water poisoning. In ten hours after taking ill, one of the family died, a little girl ten years of age. Dr. Richardson was called and succeeded in saving the others. The baby was the worst poisoned of those now recovering. The family had been taking water from an unused well at the house owned by Capt. Frichett, next to the corner of Spruce Ave. and Sova street. Marble is a brother-in-law of James Myotte and moved into the city from the Shunk settlement only a few days ago. The entire family had a close call. Mrs. Myotte and others were unremitting in their attentions to the afflicted.

May 2, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior
A pension and back pay to the amount of $1,800 has just been allowed to Herman Hetkamp, who froze to death in the woods in the copper country last winter. His heirs will get it.

May 2, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Antoine Fisher, aged 52 years, wife of the engineer on the Mentor, died yesterday morning at 6 o'clock, of pneumonia. She leaves a husband and five children. Funeral Monday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Mary's church.

May 2, 1891 Page 8
His Father Died.
Laundryman A. S. Brown Off To Marquette on a Very Sad Errand.
(Marquette Mining Journal)
Charles S. Brown died yesterday afternoon at the residence of his son W. C. Brown, on West Ohio street, of heart failure, aged 70 years. Mr. Brown had a very severe attack of the grip, followed by pneumonia, two or three weeks ago and was brought so low that his death was expected daily. He rallied, however, and recovered sufficiently to get out of the house again. Yesterday afternoon he walked from his residence on North Front street over to his son's residence, less than a block; but the effort was too much for him and soon after reaching his son's house he was seized with the attack which resulted in his death at 2:30 o'clock. He leaves three sons, Ambrose, of Sault Ste. Marie, Will C. and Joe, of this city, and one daughter, Miss Minnie Brown. The time for the funeral will be decided after the arrival of his sons, Ambrose and Will, the latter having left the city for Ontonagon yesterday morning.

May 2, 1891 Page 8
Prospect Hill.
Sorry to have to chronicle the death of Lottie Reading, aged two years.... of croup and was buried on Thursday morning.

May 9, 1891 Page 1
Left a Big Family Destitute.
Mrs. J. D. Cameron, died at her home on Division street last Monday morning of pneumonia. She was 32 years of age and leaves a family of twelve children. Her husband died a month ago and left her and her family in destitute circumstances. The Y's took care of her during her illness and gave her every attention. She was buried in the city cemetery on Wednesday.

May 9, 1891 Page 1
Died Under The Knife.
A Patient Too Old and Feeble Insists Upon a Surgical Operation
Richard Cullis, of Bruce Mines, died while undergoing a surgical operation at the residence of James Walker Thursday afternoon. Mr. Cullis came to this city last week to have the operation performed, and was advised by his family physician, Dr. McCourt, of Thessalon, not to submit to it. This was also told him by Drs. Ennis and Clendenin, of this city, but he decided to try the ordeal. Thursday afternoon Drs. Ennis and Clendenin, of this city, and Dr. James McCourt, of Thessalon, assisted by E. M. Lacy, commenced the operation to remove a cancer which extened the entire length of the breast. When about through the patient began to sink and died in a few minutes. The deceased was 68 years old and was one of Bruce Mines most respected citizens. The remains were taken to Bruce Mines yesterday for burial accompanied by two sons.

May 9, 1891 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Eckardt.
A Good Woman Goes to Her Home Eternal in the Skies
Elizabeth Cecelia Eckardt, wife of W. P. Eckardt, died at her home, No. 272 Bingham avenue at 6 o'clock last Monday morning, of la grippe and complications. She was only ill ten days. Mrs. Eckardt was born at Meaford, Ont., May 25, 1841, and had reside in this city for several years. She was closely identified with the Methodist church and was one of its most active members. She was a noble and kindhearted lady and will be greatly mourned. Besides her husband, four daughters and two sons survive her, who have the sympathy of the community. The remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery Wednesday afternoon. Rev. J. E. Whalen officiating. The appended testimonial, presented by the ladies of the W. C.T. U. indicates the esteem in which Mrs. Eckardt was held by her associates.....

May 9, 1891 Page 4
Gatesville.
It is with regret that this week we have to announce the death of Elizabeth, youngest daughter of William Forman. The funeral took place at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. Services were conducted by Mr. Malins. The remains were laid to rest in the Montrose cemetery....

May 9, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The minor heirs of L. L. Dennis, of St. Ignace, have received a pension certificate and back pay to the amount of $1,400.

May 9, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of August Bengston, who has been missing since January, was found floating in the lake near Gladstone last week.

May 9, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Eben Green received a dispatch yesterday announcing the death of her brother Dr.S. H. Hunt of Long Branch, N. J. Dr. Hunt was one of the most prominent physicians and surgeons of New Jersey. He was well known of in the Soo.

May 16, 1891 Page 1
Killed in a Soo Line Accident.
The mail from the south and west was seven hours late on Thursday, occasioned by a wreck on the Soo Line.....Fireman Percy Robinson. of Minneapolis, was instantly killed and Engineer White was seriously injured. The train was running at a high rate of speed at the time.

May 16, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
George Dewick, Jr., committed suicide last week at Ishpeming, by cutting his throat with a razor, during a fit of despondency.

May 16, 1891 Page 7
Iroquis Items.
(Special Correspondence.)
Death-On Monday, May 4, Mary Ann, eldest daughter of George Sutton, of this place, passed peacefully to her home of eternity. She was highly respected by all who knew her and her death, has caused a dark shadow to fall on the minds of her acquaintances. Her remains were taken to the cemetery near the Congregational church for burial and were followed by a large number of sympathizing friends. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of the whole neighborhood.

May 16, 1891 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Emeline Wood.
Died, at Cleveland, May 11, at the residence of her adopted daughter Mrs. Lucius Skinner, Mrs. Emeline Wood, in the 73rd year of her age. The deceased was a daughter of Mr. Ephriam Johnson, who moved from Bloomingville, Ohio, to Sault Ste. Marie in 1822. Her remains will be taken to Chicago for burial.

May 23, 1891 Page 5
Death of Mrs. David Parish. She Passed Away on Drummond Island Happy in her Christain Belief.
Editor News- Another manifestation of Christ's saving ability and another testimonial of the faithfulness of God as expressed in Pa., 23-4: Mrs. Ada Parish, nee Miss Shannon, was born April 4th, 1870, in South Hampton, Ont., and died in Drummond, April 29, 1891, aged 21 years, 3 weeks and 4 days. Sister Parish came to Drummond two years ago in company with her parents and other members of the family. On January 14, 1891, she was united in marriage to David Parish, of Drummond, who now mourns his loss. Her married life was of short duration, being only 3 months and 15 days. Her suffering was intense but brief .... The funeral took place May 2, at 3 p.m. Services were conducted by Rev. A. R. Bartlett.

May 23, 1891 Page 7
Death of John Bott.
His Life Insured But the Policy Reported as Having Mysteriously Disappeared.
John Bott, the well known proprietor of the depot lunch counter, died at the Tremont House, Spruce avenue, at three o'clock Tuesday afternoon, aged 34 years. Mr. Bott had been in ill health for some time, and contrary to the advice of his physician would not give up work. He had grippe a month ago and never fully recovered from its effects. Last week he had a hemorrhage, but was on the street on the same day and as late as last Saturday afternoon was down town and called on his physician who found his temperature up to 104. He was at once sent to bed and his case was diagnosed as double pneumonia. Mr. Bott was not conscious from Saturday night until his death. John Bott was a hard working and industrious man. He came to the Soo five years ago from Birmingham, England, and was employed by C.E. Ainsworth, on the dock, packing fish, and also assisted Cace Robotham in the same business. Two years ago he had charge of McKay's dock in the Canadian Soo, where he remained until the fall of 1889, at which time he opened the lunch counter at the depot. Every railroad man and many others knew John Bott and he knew no enemies. He was buried at Riverside Wednesday afternoon, Rev. P. T. Rowe officiating. The only living relation he had was a sister who resides in Birmingham, England. Mr. Bott had some insurance on his life, but the policy is said to have mysteriously disappeared.

May 23, 1891 Page 7
Pickford Items.
A young child of Mr. and Mrs. James Smith was buried Sunday. Rev. Thos. Purdue conducted the service.

May 23, 1891 Page 8
A bright little son of George Elliott, Ashmun street, died suddenly Wednesday.

May 23, 1891 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Mary Ann Sutton.
Editor News: The first week of May brought the tidings of death to the homes of the many friends of our departed sister, Mary Ann Sutton, of this settlement. She was beloved by all ....She died on May 4, and was interred near the Congregational church May 7....Services were conducted by the pastor of the church, Rev. J. McGregor....
Iroquois, Mich., May 20, 1891

May 30, 1891 Page 2
Death of John LaLonde.
John LaLonde, son of Frank LaLonde, died at his home on Cedar street last Saturday of consumption, aged 15 years. The deceased had been sick for two years. The funeral occurred Monday morning at 8 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

May 30, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Wallenty Nowak was convicted at Marquette Tuesday of the murder of Mike Smith, on the night of February 10 last. Judge Stone sentenced Nowak to Marquette prison for twenty-five years. Nowak's son was acquitted.

May 30, 1891 Page 5
Found His Body.
The remains of Capt. Knowlton of the Atlanta, Washed on the Beach.
The body of the late Captain James Knowlton, of the ill-fated Schooner Atlanta, which foundered in Lake Superior May 4, was found by Captain Sam Bernier, of Life Saving Station No. 9 on the beach about three miles east of that station, last Saturday morning....The family and Eastman & Co. owners of the Altanta, were notified and the body was embalmed and forwarded to Toledo Tuesday afternoon....

May 30, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Kennedy, an aged lady who resided near Parkerville, Bruce township, died suddenly Monday. She was 65 years old. The funeral services were held at St. Mary's church Wednesday morning and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

June 6, 1891 Page 1
Death of Miss Minnie Bentley.
Miss Minnie Bentley died Wednesday at the residence of her brother, John Bentley, Spruce avenue, of peritonitis. She had been ill for a year. The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, the Rev. P. T. Rowe officiating, and the remains were buried in the city cemetery.

June 6, 1891 Page 8
Mary Jane Roussain, an 18-year-old unmarried daughter of James Roussain, a rapids fisherman, died on Sugar Island Wednesday afternoon. She had been betrayed....

June 6, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Janet Chandonnais, aged 78 years, died at her home on East Spruce avenue Thursday morning. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church yesterday morning.

June 13, 1891 Page 1
An Old Resident Gone.
Sudden Death of Henry P. Smith From Heart Failure.
Tuesday morning, a few minutes before 11 o'clock, Henry P. Smith dropped dead at the Ashmund street entrance of the Chippewa house. All Tuesday morning Mr. Smith had been very cheerful and a few minutes before his death had been laughing and joking in his usual manner. At the time stated he was about to take a walk with his daughter, Miss Kittie, and was going out of the door when he dropped dead from what the doctors pronounced heart failure. Everything was done to resuscitate him, but he died in an instant. The news of his death spread rapidly and it fell with stunning effect upon the entire community.
Henry P. Smith was born at Ridgeville, Ohio, July 2nd 1821. He worked upon his father's farm, for several years and went to Cleveland to live when a young man. He resided there until May, 1851, and came to the Soo on the steamer London, in company with M. W. Scranton, May 10, 1851. Mr. Smith had kept hotel here for forty years and first opened the old St. Mary's House, which he ran until June, 1855, at which time he opened the famous Chippewa House. Every one knew "Chippewa Smith," and tourists have traveled many miles to partake of his fish dinners.
Besides his devoted wife, to whom he had been married for over forty years, he leaves a daughter, Miss Kittie. They have the sympathy of the entire community. The remains were taken to Cleveland Wednesday afternoon and were buried there yesterday.....

June 13, 1891 Page 2
Burned to Death.
Little Annie Orr, a five-year-old daughter of William Orr, of Superior, was fatally burned Monday afternoon. The child was playing in the yard, where a small fire was burning, and went too close to it, when her clothing caught fire and burned entirely off. She lived in great agony for twenty-four hours. The funeral occurred Wednesday. Mr. Orr is one of Superior's most respected citizens and has the sympathy of his many friends.

June 13, 1891 Page 2
Naubinway News in a Nut Shell.
Pete Reffiel, a farmer living eight miles from Naubinway, committed suicide last Friday by hanging. He was found early in the morning in an almost sitting position....He was always looked upon as a courteous, sober, industrious man, respected by all who knew him, and many are the stories rife in regard the rash act. The inquest was held in the opera house, and up to the time of writing the jury had not come to a decision.

June 13, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Mary Linsey, of Rogers Park, Ills., a sister of Mrs. Captain W. P. Spalding, died suddenly at her home last Saturday.

June 20, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The South Shore depot at L'Anse was demolished by a runaway freight train, last week. There is a heavy grade there and the brakes failed. The loss to the company is estimated at $25,000. Engineer Con Harrington, who stuck to his post, received fatal injuries.

June 20, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
Robert McIntyre, a young man of 27, was asphyxiated at the Summit House, Marquette, last Saturday night.

June 27, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
John Rogers, of Hancock, attempted to take the life of Miss Minnie Harris, because she refused his attentions, and then committed suicide by drowning.

June 27, 1891 Page 7
Sugar Island Items.
James Wigwans, of Garden River, died Monday and was buried Thursday.

June 27, 1891 Page 10
Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Williams desire The News to express their heartfelt thanks to the many kind friends who were so tender in their sympathy and efforts to assist, occasioned by the death of little Louie P. Williams aged four years and ten months, Monday noon. The remains were interred at Riverside, Wednesday. It was a heavy blow to Mr. and Mrs. Williams.

July 4, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Johnnie Gardner, a young boy, was drowned at Newberry this week.

July 4, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Wm. Schellman and Jerry Kelly were drowned in Portage lake last week.

July 4, 1891 Page 5
Superior.
A few of the friends of George H. Barr,who died here last March, visited the Mission Hill cemetery and placed a lasting tribute of their friendship and regard at the stranger's grave. A beautiful white marble slab, with appropriate designs and verse, was placed at the head, and the ladies planted roots and seeds of flowering shrubs on the grave.... His family, who live in Finelon Falls, Canada, were a long way from here and did not know that he was dangerously ill until shortly beore his death. His mother was already to come to him when she received a telegram notifying her of his death....

July 11, 1891 Page 1
Robert Lindsay Dead.
The death of Robert Lindsay was announced Thursday morning at his home on the Hay Lake road. The deceased had been a sufferer for over a year from consumption and all hope of his recovery was given up several months ago. He was sixty years of age and had resided in Chippewa county for ten years. A wife and four children survive him. The funeral will be held from his late home on the Hay Lake road, Sunday, at 2:30 o'clock. The Rev. T. R. Easterday will conduct the services, and the remains will be interred at Riverside.

July 11, 1891 Page 2
Another Victim Found.
The Body of Frank Durell, Mate of the Atlanta Washed Ashore
Last Sunday Daniel Parish and Henry Mills, fishermen who reside on Iroquois Island, Lake Superior, found the body of a man on the beach. The body was brought to this city, and Coroner Bacon notified.....A card of the Lake Seamen's Benevolent association, No. 513 issued at Buffalo May 1, 1891, bearing the name of Frank Durell, was also found on the body, and by this the jury rendered a verdict that he was evidently the mate of the ill-fated schooner Atlanta, which foundered off Life Saving station No. 10 early in May. The owners of the Atlanta were communicated with, and Undertaker Blake, who took charge of the remains, received a telegram to take the body to New Baltimore, Mich., where the deceased has a family. Mr. Blake left Wednesday afternoon. The watch found on the dead man had stopped at 8:12 and that is about the time the boat went down.

July 11, 1891 Page 2
Drowned in the Canal.
The Body of Malcolm McDonald Discovered on Sunday Morning.
The body of Malcolm McDonald, a Bay Mills carpenter, was fished out of the canal Sunday morning. McDonald left Bay Mills Saturday noon for the Soo to spend the Fourth. He arrived here on the afternoon train, and it is said had considerable money on his person. He visited several places during the afternoon and was seen on the street as late as seven o'clock Saturday night. Coroner Bacon's jury rendered a verdict of accidental drowning. The deceased was about 60 years of age, and left a family at Ripley, Ont., who are in destitue circumstances. Undertaker Vanderhook buried the remains Tuesday.

July 11, 1891 Page 8
The colors at Fort Brady were displayed at half mast Wednesday in respect to the late Ex Vice President Hannibal Hamlin, who died at Bangor, Me., last Saturday.

July 18, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Abraham Smolk, aged 100 years, 5 months and 12 days, died at Mackinac Island last week.

July 18, 1891 Page 10
Death of James Rutherford Jr.
James Rutherford, Jr., died at the home of his father, on Kimball street, at 7:30 Wednesday morning, of consumption aged 19 years. The deceased was sick for over a year, but was confined to his bed only a week. The young man was of a quiet disposition and was well and favorably known by every one. He was industrious and worked with City Engineer Brown as assistant up to within a few months before his death. A father, two sisters and one brother survive him. His remains were interred in the city cemetery yesterday afternoon. Rev. Thos. R. Davis of Lawrence, Kas, officiating.

July 25, 1891 Page 1
Young Newcomb Drowned.
His Mysterious Disappearance Accounted For by the Finding of His Body.
The mysterious dissappearance of Henry A. Newcomb, a 15-year old son of Wm. Newcomb, of the Hay Lake road, was solved yesterday morning by the discovery of his body in Hay Lake by his father. The boy left the dinner table on July 15, and at the request of his father started to furl the sail of a boat anchored out a hundred feet from the shore. From that time nothing was heard from him. His watch was found in the path leading from the house to the bank of the lake, but nothing was thought of this as he never wore a chain and had lost it many times before. Coronor Bacon thought it accidental drowning and did not hold an inquest. The boy had to use a small skiff to reach the sail boat and it is surmised that he fell from it as it was very narrow. Henry was a bright and industrious boy, and his death is a severe blow to his parents. The remains will be interred at Riverside at 10 o'clock this morning.

July 25, 1891 Page 2
C. W. Farr received a telegram from Cheboygan Wednesday announcing the death of Mrs. James Farr, which occurred Tuesday night. Mr. and Mrs. James Farr lived at the Soo at one time and were well known here.

July 25, 1891 Page 2 "Old Narcisse' Dead.
He Expires With His Boots, Overcoat and Sash on Tuesday Noon.
Narcisse Bresbean, known to every resident of the Soo as "Old Narcisse," died at the residence of Cap. A. Stiles, No. 185 Cedar street, at noon Tuesday, of inflammation of the bowels. He had been sick but a week. "Old Narcisse" was a character long to be remembered, and especially by the city children. He was born in the far Northwest and came to this city seventy years ago, so the oldest residents say. He was known by everybody, and his peculiar dress, consisting of a long overcoat, worn winter and summer with a bright red sash, a quaint old hat and heavy walking stick, was most noticeable. He could be seen from early morn until dark slowly promenading the principal streets, muttering incoherently and fighting back at the nagging street gamins. Poor fellow, half-witted, he had no living relative and outside of old Cap. Stile and wife, he called none other friend. With them he had lived off and on for over forty years. No one present when a NEWS reporter called at the house where his remains reposed, Wednesday, could tell his age. Several claimed he was over an hundred years old. At his death the remains were removed to an adjoining house, as the Stiles residence would not even accomodate the friends of the deceased Mrs. Stiles, who died the same day. There was the body in a cheap coffin provided by the county, in an unoccupied house, where the only furniture was the casket, stools and three chairs. Two women were in charge and the spectacle was a sad one. Narcisse was buried in the Catholic cemetery Thursday morning at 8 o'clock.

July 25, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Three persons were drowned at Cheboygan last week. They were George G. Boggs, Charles Carlson Jr., and a Polander name Cilieski.

July 25, 1891 \Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jim McCormick, the Crystal Falls pugilist, died last week from injuries received in a recent prize fight with William Daniels of Rhinelander, Wis., who has been arrested

July 25, 1891 Page 7
Death of Mrs. Cap. Stiles.
An Old Settler Leaves the Declining Circle For the Bourne Beyond the River.
Pauline Johnson Stiles, wife of Cap. A. Stiles, died at her home, No. 185 Cedar street, at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, of inflammation of the bowels, after an illness of eleven days, aged 75 years. Mrs. Stiles had been an invalid for two years, but bore her sufferings bravely and never failed to look after and care for her household duties. She was known by many and every one who knew her held her in the highest esteem. She was a friend to the friendless, and a poor person never left her door empty handed. She was born and reared in this city and her birth place was near the present Fort Brady. Besides a husband, who is one of the oldest employes on the canal, she leaves a sister Mrs. Sophia Edwards, and three nieces, Mrs. Joseph Rouleau, Mrs. Allen Rains and Miss Sophia Edwards, and a nephew Captain Edward Edwards. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church Thursday morning at 9 o'clock and the remains were interred at St. Mary's cemetery. Mrs. Stiles was one of the most interesting of the Soo's very old settlers. Her mind was clear, her memory strong and her fund of reminiscence consequently large. She had been heard to tell of unrecorded events in the Soo which occurred on from the time she was five years old. In the older circle, where the evening of life grows fast into darkness, there will be a vacant chair and it will not be filled, but will keep company with those vacated before.

August 1, 1891 Page 1
Death of Lew McKnight.
Lew McKnight, well known to old residents in this city, died at Bellevue Hospital, New York, this week. He was sand- bagged on Lexington avenue and robbed of $400 and other valuables. Lew McKnight was a son of Col McKnight who at one time ran a line of steamers from Detroit to Lake Superior. He was well known all over the state. He went from Detroit several years ago to St. Louis where he met with severe business reverses and lost a very handsome fortune. He was in New York on business at the time of his death. He married the daughter of Commodore Gardner, of the navy, who survives him. His death will be heard with genuine regret by his many friends in the city.

August 1, 1891 Page 1
Mrs. J. H. Bunten at Rest.
Mrs. J. H. Bunten died at 10:30 yesterday morning, at her home corner of Maple and Sova streets. She had been an invalid for several years and during the past two months suffered greatly until relieved by death. Her maiden name was Libbie Loring, and she was married at Chicago nearly four years ago. Short services will be conducted this morning at the residence by Rev. J. E. Bitting and the remains will be taken for interment to Chicago, where relatives reside, accompanied by her sorrowing husband, and a loving sister, Mrs. J. L. Laubuer, of Chicago, who constantly ministered to the wants of the deceased during the last few weeks.

August 1, 1891 Page 1
D. O. Sabin Run Over by a Wagon and Killed Near Pickford.
D. O. Sabin, who resided near Pickford, met with an injury last Monday afternoon which caused his death on Tuesday. He was on his way from Pickford to his home and was driving a team of young horses. Just after leaving Pickford the rains became entangled on the neck yoke in some manner, and while he was walking out over the tongue the team became frightened and ran away. Mr. Sabin lost his foot hold and fell to the ground, the wagon passing over his neck and breast. He was picked up and walked to his home, and did not appear to be dangerously injured. Late Monday night he was taken worse and died Tuesday afternoon. The deceased was 50 years old and had lived in Pickford Township for fifteen years. A wife, five daughters and two sons survive him. He was the father of Mrs. W. S. Lines and Mrs. C. E. Speck, this city. The funeral took place from the residence of Orlow Sabin his son, yesterday afternoon.

August 1, 1891 Page 1
A Bad Man's End.
Dan Dunn Killed by James Harcourt at Trout Lake.
Vengeance Inspired The Deed..... Last Sunday evening at Trout Lake another cold blooded murder was added to Chippewa county's record. The victim was Daniel Dunn, of Seney, a notorious character, and he was killed by James Harcourt, whose brother met death at the hands of Dunn in Seney a few weeks ago.... Daniel Dunn of Seney, was assassinated by James Harcourt Sunday, July 26th, at 6:10 p.m....

August 1, 1891 Page 4
Peter Pascoe, Jr. and James Dower, Jr., were suffocated by smoke in the Republic mine last week. The mine was also greatly damaged by fire.

August 8, 1891 Page 2
Bay Mills Items.
The Rev. Leonard of Bay Mills, officiated at the funeral of Mrs. Harrington, of Superior, at the Soo on Wednesday. A good many of the relations and friends of the deceased attended from Bay Mills, and in this way testified to the high esteem in which she was held.

August 8, 1891 Page 2
R. D. Perry was in St. Catherines this week, attending the funeral of his friend and former partner, James Morris. Mr. Perry is expected home today.

August 8, 1891 Page 8
Superior. [Special Correspondence.]
Another noble woman has been called away. Our little community is again mournful on account of the death of Mrs. Eleanor Harrington, of this place, at her home on the 4th inst. Her death was quite unexpected. Alhough she had been very ill for about eleven days, we had hopes of her recovery up to almost the last hour. No one has been called away who was more universally loved and respected than our dear friend and neighbour. She had words of kindness and friendship for every one. Her home was made pleasant by many pet animals, birds and flowers which were tenderly cared for by their loving and beloved mistress.... Mrs. Harrington was about 48 years of age and was a member of a large family of very worthy and respectable people. She leaves one son, a number of brothers and sisters and very many friends, who mourn her departure. She was followed to her resting place in the cemetery in the city of Sault Ste. Marie by many relatives and friends. Owing to the burial place being so far from here there was only a short service of prayer at the residence before going. A funeral service will be preached in the Pilgrims church of this place, and perhaps at Bay Mills also tomorrow, by Rev. Leonard, the Methodist pastor.

August 15, 1891 Page 1
Death of Old Joseph Payment.
Grandfather Joseph Payment, who resided on Sugar Island opposite Garden River for forty years, died last Sunday morning, aged 89 years. He came to Sugar Island from New York state about the time his brother began operations on the Island. Mr. Payment leaves three sons, four daughters, and numerous relatives, among his children are Mrs. E. J. Penny and Miss Vic Payment. His remains were interred by Undertaker Blake at the old homestead on the Island.

August 15, 1891 Page 1
Capt. Foster, of the barge Mary Wilson, died on board the vessel Monday morning, near Mackinac Island, of cholera dysentery. Capt. Foster resided at Bay City, where his remains were taken for burial.

August 15, 1891 Page 3
An infant boy of Patrick Tracy, living on Maple street, died Tuesday night of cholera infantum.

August 15, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ambrose Phelps, a prominent Norway merchant, died from heart disease last week, while horse back riding.

August 15, 1891 Page 8
David Tallion, one of the old settlers in this region, died at his residence in the Fourth Ward last night after an illness of three months. Mr. Tallion was 69 years of age and leaves two sons and two daughters to mourn his loss.

August 22, 1891 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Geo. W. Hopkins.
Mrs. Geo. W. Hopkins died at the home of her father, Thomas McGrory, at Peck, this state, last Sunday afternoon, of consumption. The deceased was 30 years old and had been a sufferer from lung and throat troubles for several years. She resided in this city for many years and last spring went to her old home, where she and her friends thought health and strength might be restored. Besides a husband, who was in Newberry at the time of her death, one child, a daughter, survives her. Her remains were laid to rest at Peck on Tuesday. Mrs. Hopkins was a sister of John and Edward McGrory, of the Chippewa, who were unable to be present at the funeral. Mrs. Hopkins has many friends here, who will be grieved to learn of her death.

August 22, 1891 Page 8
David Tallion died last Saturday at the age of 72 years. He was an old resident.

August 22, 1891 Page 8
Corporal C. F. Dugger's infant son died Wednesday of cholera infantum. The funeral was from the house yesterday afternoon and was very impressive. Rev. P. T. Rowe officiated and the exercises were semi-military. The remains of the little one were interred in the soldiers' cemetery, south of Fort Brady. Corporal and Mrs. Dugger desire to tender their heart-felt thanks to kind and sympathizing friends and neighbors, all of whom were exceedingly thoughtful.

August 29, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Borgo, who was arrested for poisoning Flora Grenall and tried at Iron Mountain, was discharged, the jury not agreeing on a verdict.

September 5, 1891 Page 1
Killed a Babe.
A Canadian Bald Eagle's Fatal Attack on a Pappoose.
The details of an uncommon and awfully tragic event that occurred last Sunday in the Echo River region, about twenty miles from here, arrived in the city through the medium of a Scandinavian pulpwood worker named Svenson, who came in Monday. From his recital in badly fractured language, it appears that a Chippewa squaw named Quo Quak, one of a camping party of Indians, near the river, had her papoose tied in the usual wooden frame used in transporting children, on their backs. It leaned against a convenient tree, while the dusky mother packed various things and otherwise prepared for a journey. While thus engaged the squaw was aroused by the child's terrified screams. Hastening to it she found a large bird, no doubt an eagle, of which considerable numbers breed in the Canadian mountains near by, attacking the defenseless child with beak, claws and wings.....Their efforts were for naught as the baby died the next day....

September 5, 1891 Page 3
Pickford Items.
A little five-year old boy of Chas. Stalker, died on Sunday at 10:30 o'clock. The funeral took place on Tuesday at 1 o'clock, and was quite generally attended.

September 5, 1891 Page 3
Pickford Items.
The funeral procession of a little child of William Dodd's passed through Pickford on Tuesday for the graveyard at Sand Hill.

September 5, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
Andrew Roemmlinger was instantly killed at Iron Mountain by the explosion of a soda water generator.

September 5, 1891 Page 8
James Fitzgerald who was killed at the Gladstone coal dock, Wednesday, was brought here for burial.

September 5, 1891 Page 8
At the residence of Mrs. Nelson Nault, on Portage avenue near Sova, on Tuesday, Mrs. Joseph Plant, an old citizen, died at the age of 70 years.

September 5, 1891 Page 8
Pickford Items.
We regret to announce the death of Andrew, youngest son of Chas. Stalker. For the past two weeks he had been regaining strength, until Saturday morning he was suddenly seized with convulsions. He suffered intense agony until Sunday morning when all pain left him, looking bright for only a few moments, when he closed his eyes and passed peacefully away. He was a very bright, cheerful boy, six years of age. The parents have the sympathy of the whole community in their bereavement.

September 12, 1891 Page 7
A Proper Action.
The Soo Line deserves credit for its action in the death of James Fitzgerald, of this city, who was killed while in the employ of that company at Gladstone. It furnished the coffin and shroud and transported the body here in charge of Joseph McBarney, Henry Sellers and Albert Griffith, companions of the deceased. Mr. Sellers, who conducted the funeral for the company wishes to thank Undertaker Vanderhook for his reasonable charges, and also friends who rendered valuable assistance. Mr. Fitzgerald left a wife and several children in a destitute condition. A subscription was circulated for their benefit.

September 12, 1891 Page 8
J. K. Russell, Jr., received the sad intelligence by wire Thursday evening that his father was dying. He left for Chicago yesterday.

September 19, 1891 Page 1
Left Large Estate.
The will of the late John K. Russell, of Oak Park, was admitted to probate yesterday and letters testamemtary issued to the widow, Mrs. Mary J.Russell, and the American Trust and Savings Bank. Mr. Russell left an estate valued at $146,500, besides realty in the state of Michigan, estimated at $30,000. All the property is devised to the widow and three children. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 17.
Two of the children above named are J. K. Russell, Jr. and E. T. Russell, of the Encampment mill, and resident in this city.

September 19, 1891 Page 1
J. K. Russell Jr., returned Tuesday from Chicago, where he was called by the death of his father in that city Thursday night of last week. The deceased was the head of the firm of J. K. Russell & Co. of the Encampment saw mill, and had made several visits to the Soo within the past year. Mr. Russell leaves a widow and three children. Mrs. Russell and her daughter, Mrs. Lewis, arrived from Europe last Saturday in time to be at his side before he passed away.The funeral services were held at 2 o'clock Sunday, from the residence.

September 19, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. James Hallahon, of Crystal Falls, was burned to death last week while attempting to extinguish fire in her house caused by dropping a kerosine lamp. She leaves a husband and two children.

September 19, 1891 Page 8
Stevensburgh Items.
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Follis died on Thursday afternoon. The parents have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

September 26, 1891 Page 1
Death of W. L.Scott.
Ex-Congressman W. L. Scott, of Erie, Pa., died last Sunday morning at Newport, R. I. The deceased had considerable interests in this region, having explored for iron for several years in the Echo Lake district, and had a number of acquaintances in the Soo.

September 26, 1891 Page 1
The infant child of Alderman Andrew Short died Thursday morning.

October 3, 1891 Page 1
Six Lives Lost.
The Schooner Frank Perew Founders in a Gale.
Only One Of The Crew Survives.
Another terrible wreck in which six persons lost their lives and only one escaped to tell the story, was added this week to the already long list of marine accidents on old Lake Superior.
On Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, during the terrible gale, the schooner Frank Perew foundered off Vermillion Point, 18 miles from Whitefish Point.... The schooner was commanded by Capt. J. N. Markey, and the cook was Mary Ann McKay, daughter of Geo. McKay, of Bay City, who was at once notified of the casualty. The names of the other members cannot at this writing be ascertained....

October 3, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
W. F. Montgomery, editor of the Republic Sun, died Monday from the effects of burns and injuries received while rescuing his family from a burnng building a short time before.

October 3, 1891 Page 8
Geo. Deale, whose skull was fractured recently at Hay Lake, died Monday at the boarding house of Mrs. Lane and was buried the next day.

October 3, 1891 Page 8
James Kelly, an old resident of the county, died last week at his home in Bruce Township. The funeral occurred on Saturday at St. Mary's Church.

October 10, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Andrew Holm, a railroad crossing flagman, was run over by a train of cars and killed at Marquette, last week.
James Harrington, of Iron River, died last week from injuries received in a runaway accident, while on a spree.
A miner named Matt Saari was killed by falling rocks in shaft No., 3, of the Cleveland mine at Ishpeming last week.
While an old building was being torn down at Ishpeming Friday of last week one of the walls fell and nearly buried a workman named S. Biladeau. His left leg was broken, his right leg crushed and he received othert bruises about the head and body. He will probably die.

October 10, 1891 Page 6
Gatesville.
This week we have to announce the death of Mrs. William Hart, of this place. She died at her father's residence at Detour, Thursday at 3 o'clock a.m. She was buried in Detour cemetery Friday afternoon. Rev. J. W. Holt, of Pickford, conducted the funeral services. The many friends of Mr. Hart sympathize with him in his bereavement.

October 10, 1891 Page 6
Prospect Hill Echoes.
The remains of Mr. Little were interred in the Sand Hill cemetery last Friday. The Orangemen took charge of the funeral, Mr. Little being one of them, and the funeral service was conducted by Rev. Purdue.

October 10, 1891 Page 8
The body of Mary Ann McKay, one of the victims of last week's gale, was sent by undertaker J. Vanderhook to her relatives at West Bay City. Wm. Loose, an undertaker of that place, writes Mr. Vanderhook a very complimentry letter in regard to the fine condition in which the body was received. He says her friends were well satisfied with his work.

October 10, 1891 Page 8
The bodies of Capt. J. H. Markey, Mate J. E. Christenson and cook Mary Ann McKay, of the ill-fated schooner Frank Perew, were shipped to their relatives. The three unknown sailors were buried here.

October 17, 1891 Page 1
Mrs. Jacob Bainbridge, accompanied by her brother, Alex McLean, returned by the C.P.R. train Wednesday from Bruce Mines, where they had been to attend the funeral of their sister, Mrs. Robert Scott, who died Sunday Oct. 11.

October 17, 1891 Page 3
Pickford Items.
John Little, who was sick for some time with heart disease, died Wednesday, September 30th, at 10:30. The funeral took place on Friday. The remains were interred by the Orangemen of Pickford lodge. Deceased was an old and respected citizen and his wife and family have the sympathy of many friends and relatives.

October 17, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Denmash, a brakeman on the Chicago & Northwestern Ry., was killed at Iron Mountain last week by being crushed between an engine and tender.

October 17, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior
While stealing a ride on a Chicago & Northwestern train at Iron Mountain, Sunday, Charles Nelson, a thirteen year old boy slipped and fell to the track and the train cut his body in two.

October 17, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior
Nils Lundstrom, a lumberman, was found dead on the railroad track at Republic last week, with a bullet hole in his back. The motive for the murder is not known and the assassin has not been discovered.

October 24, 1891 Page 1
Another Pioneer Gone.
Death of Rev. W. H. Brockway, a Prominent Character Here in early Days.
The Detroit papers of the 22nd note the death of Rev. W. H. Brockway, of Albion. Mr. Brockway was one of the best known pioneers of Methodism in Michigan and was instrumental in establishing the Indian mission which was located at the Little Rapids near Sault Ste. Marie, in 1837, or thereabouts. He was located at the Soo for several years at that time and was an important factor in the early religions history of this region. For many years he has been a professor at Albion College. His death is to a certain extent a matter of local interest and among our oldest citizens numerous interesting incidents are related of his residence here.

October 24, 1891 Page 2
Prospect Hill Echoes.
The remains of the late Benjamin Belcher, of Pickford, were interred in the Sand Hill cemetery last Sunday, in presence of a large concourse of friends, who mourn his loss. The whole community have the sincerest sympathy for the bereaved relatives.

October 24, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
While digging potatoes last week, Mrs. R. Bolton, a farmer's wife living near Newberry, was instantly killed by a fallling tree which broke her skull.

October 24, 1891 Page 4
THE STATE OF SUPERIOR.
Peter Thomas, an employe of the Queen mine near Negaunee, was buried by falling ore and rocks last week, and killed.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
Later, Mary Dun Thurman, the wife of Judge Allen G. Thurman, died at Columbus, O., aged 80 years. She was the victim of la grippe during last winter and never recovered from the attack.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
Henry Hahn, living near McGregor, Ia., enraged because the daughter of John Otto would not marry him, shot and killed Mr. Otto, his brother William, and then escaped.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
George Coe, or Smith, the negro who was lynched by a mob in Omaha, Neb., recently, had his back broken in three places and sixteen wounds on his head. Notwithstanding these facts, the coroner testified in court that he died of fright.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
At a dance at Fort Seneca, O., Frank Workley fatally shot Frank Lewis and George Williams during a quarrel.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
Four children of John Long, a farmer near Lime Rocks, Ala., were burned to death by the house taking fire during the absence of their parents.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
Thomas Rooney, the oldest man in Michigan, died at Fremont, aged 109 years.

October 24, 1891 Page 7
Dr. Franklin D. Clark, an old and wealthy resident of Chicago, committed suicide by asphyxiation. Family troubles were the supposed cause.

October 24, 1891 Page 8
Joseph Nevin, aged 32 years, died at the Marine Hospital Thursday. He had been ill for a week with obstruction of the bowels. He had been employed as a sailor on the steambarge Yakima. His remains were emblamed by Undertaker, Blake and will be sent to Cincinatti, O, this morning for burial.

October 31, 1891 Page 1
Death of an Old Resident.
Mrs. Elizabeth Cadreau died Tuesday morning at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. McCoy, and the funeral took place from St. Mary's church Thursday morning. Mrs. Cadreau was undoubtedly the oldest living person in Chippewa County, being 101 years of age at the time of her death. She was the mother of fourteen children, nine of whom are living. Her oldest child died last April, aged 86 years.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
The East.
Off Gurney Point, Mass., the schooner Franklin was wrecked and Capt. Kelly, his two sons and three men were drowned.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
Mrs. Julia Benson died at Bridgeport, Conn., aged 100 years.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Owing to ill health Ralph Cunningham, aged 21, son of one of the most prominent business men in Fostoria, O., threw himself into the furnace of his father's factory and was fatally burned.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
The death of Miss Nancy Gish occurred at Chillicothe, O., aged 69 years. She had been a bedridden invalid for fifty years, and forty years ago made the shroud in which she was buried.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
West And South
In the works of the gas company at Louisville, Ky., a boiler explosion started a fire which caused a loss of nearly $500,000 and the fatal injury of William Adams.

October 31, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
William Kilpatrick and Frederick Himkehs, farmers, were killed by a panhandle train near Zanesville, O.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
News Notes.
A mob took Lee Green (colored), who murdered the wife and child of Farmer Lowe near Queen City, Tex., from jail, fastened him to a tree and burned him to death.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
News Notes
A confession was made by Murderer Williamson, under sentence of death, at Sedalia, Mo., for killing his wife, that in 1883 he butchered an entire family near Centralia, Ill., and also killed an old German named Koch.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
News Notes.
In a collision on the "Soo" road at Glenwood, Minn., O. E. Holmes, Fred Renn, Conrad Prince, Brazil Lyle and John Collin were killed and seven other persons were injured.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
News Notes.
At Oshkosh, Wis., David Chapman died at the age of 68 years, and his wife expired while sitting at the side of her husband's body.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
Foreign Intelligence
The three children of John Cummings, a farmer living near Penetanguishene, Ont., set fire to their home and perished in the flames.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
Foreign Intelligence
Joseph Howell, a school teacher of Brookfield, Mo., was sentenced to be hanged for the murder of Mrs. Minnie Hall and her four children January 19, 1889.

October 31, 1891 Page 7
Foreign Intelligence.
The two small children of Jerrard Jensen, living near Austin, Minn., were torn to pieces by wolves.

October 31, 1891 Page 1
John McLennan, one of Carkin; Stickney & Cram's employes, was drowned in Hay Lake Wednesday morning. His body was soon recovered, brought here and shipped by Undertaker Blake to friends of the deceased in Canada.

November 7, 1891 Page 1
A Sudden Death.
Mrs. J. W. McTavish and Miss M. Clarke received a telegram Thursday announcing the death that day of their mother, Mrs. Margaret Clarke, of Meaford, Ont. They at once departed for that place to attend the funeral, which will be held at 2 o'clock today, and will return some time next week. Their friends here sympathize in their bereavement. The millinery store of M. Clark & Co. closed on account of the death, will be opened again this afternoon after the hour ofthe funeral.

November 7, 1891 Page 1
Rev. C. F. Bronson, the new pastor of the Tabernacle has just learned the sad news of the death of his father, Rev. Benj. F. Bronson, D. D., of Massachusetts. Dr. Bronson died at the home of his son, Prof. Bronson, of Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., where he was staying.

November 7, 1891 Page 1
Nelson Leete, a sailor on the schooner Oneonto, last Saturday was caught in a check line while the vessel was making the canal. He sustained such severe injury that his arm had to be amputated. He died Tuesday morning, and his body was shipped to his friends at Gilford, Conn., by Undertaker Blake.

November 7, 1891 Page 2
Foreign Intelligence.
John Clarkson, Peter Hewis, Leo Johnston and William Alliston, four young boys of Midland, Ont., were drowned by the capsizing of a sailboat.

November 7, 1891 Page 2
Bay Mills Items - Obituary.
Entered into rest on Tuesday, Nov. 3d, 1891, at Bay Mills, Mich., after a lingering illness, borne with uncomplaining sweetness, Lilly Scott, daughter of Mr. Scott, aged 12 years. Lilly was a patient sufferer for over two years and a child thoughtful beyond her years, with a sweet trust in her Saviour, so that her death was a "falling asleep in Jesus." The remains were taken to Garden River for burial, many friends accompanying the bereaved father and relatives. Mr.Scott desires to express his deepest thanks to the people of Bay Mills for their great and constant kindness throughout his child's sickness, for their sympathy and affections to him and his in his sorrow.
Wm. Scott's daughter Lilly died on Tuesday of consumption. The funeral took place at Garden river on Wednesday.

November 7, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The six year old son of Thomas Atwell, of Ishpeming, was killed while playing on a car which was side tracked. He was seated on the brake wheel and the brake was released by a companion, starting the car, which bumped against another, the collision hurling the little fellow from his seat just in time to be caught between the bumpers as the cars rebounded and came together the second time.He was crushed in a terrible manner.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
The East.
The death of H. A. P. Carter, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary from Hawaii to the United States, occurred in New York, aged 54 years.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
The East.
In Melrose, Mass. Daniel W. Gooch, a member of Congress from 1856 to 1868, died at his home, aged 70 years.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
For the murder of his wife, Lee Hughes (colored) was hanged at Brenham, Tex.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
Near Elizabethtown, Ind., James Beggs, a well-to-do farmer, was fatally beaten by John and Frank Newby, two colored toughs, and robbed of a sum of money.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
Lucy Todd Gilbert, the mother of Bishop Gilbert, was found dead at St. Paul, Minn., lying in a pool of blood on the sidewalk fronting the bishop's residence.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South
A mob hanged Larkin Nix at Camilla, Ga., for criminally assaulting a girl named Mize.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
At Sedalia, Mo., Thomas Williamson was hanged for the murder of Jefferson and Thomas Moore in that city in May 1890.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South. Alexander Scott and his wife, living near Indianapolis, Ind., quarreled, and the latter shot and killed her husband.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
Mrs. Keifer and Mrs. Johnson were driving in the country near Lima, O., when their horse took fright and running away dashed down a 60-foot embankment and both women were killed.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
West And South.
Eliza Richy (colored) of Warsaw, Ill., went on an errand leaving two small children locked up in the house, which took fire, and both were burned to death.

November 7, 1891 Page 8
Death of James Greer.
James Greer, son of Edward Greer, on the McKnight road, died Wednesday, at Stratford, Ont. The remains will be brought home for burial today. The funeral will take place on Sunday from his father's home in charge of Undertaker Vanderhook. The deceased was 28 years of age and was in perfect health until a year ago when he caught a cold that led to consumption and death.

November 14, 1891 Page 1
Wm. Frichette, Jr. died of consumption Tuesday night. The funeral services occurred Thursday morning at St. Mary's church.

November 14, 1891 Page 1
Rev. David Casler, at the M. E. Church Sunday morning, preached the funeral sermon of Mrs. John Noble, who died the previous day at Bay Mills. The remains were taken to Donaldson for interment.

November 14, 1891 Page 2
The East.
The death of ex-Gov. S. Gregory Smith, of Vermont, occurred at St. Albans, aged 73 years.

November 14, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At Bridgeport, Conn., John Kopp, a member of the suicide club, took his own life by hanging. Seventeen members of the club thus far have slain themselves. But two remain to die.

November 14, 1891 Page 2
The East.
The noted piano inventor, Frederick Mathuschek, died at his home in New York, aged 77 years.
November 14, 1891 Page 2
Foreign Intelligence.
At Orangeville, Cal., Z. P. Brandon and wife died from arsenic poisoning. The drug was used by mistake for baking powder in making biscuits.

November 14, 1891 Page 2
Foreign Intelligence.
At Montague, Mich., George A. Wiard died after sleeping since May 1. He weighed fifty pounds at the time of his death.

November 14, 1891 Page 2
Foreign Intelligence.
The death of Samuel Chipman occurred at Cornwall, N. S., aged 101 years. He had been a free mason since 1813.

November 14, 1891 Page 3
Detour Notes.
On Tuesday, Nov. 3, several Indians had been indulging in strong drink .... On the following morning one of the Indians was missing .... on Thursday when a body was discovered in the river which proved to be that of the lost man. The body was taken in charge by the coroner and after investigation was forwarded to the friends of the deceased, who reside in Canada. "Crooked Neck," the father of the dead Indian, was burned to death in his wigwam a few years ago while drunk.

November 14, 1891 Page 4
Current Notes.
E. A. White, of Boston, who died recently, left about $500,000 to his widow and an umbrella to his daughter's husband. Though thus provided with something to put up for a rainy day the daughter is to contest the will.

November 14, 1891 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jacob Hungistro, a Finlander, was killed by a knife thrust dealt by Jacob Reini, near Newberry, Monday night of last week.... He was placed on Trial last Friday charged with manslaughter, convicted and sentenced Saturday and taken to Marquette prison, Sunday, where he will remain fifteen years. He is only 22 years of age, but is evidently a hardened villain, as the only remark he made when sentenced was, "Well, it'll be a hell of a long time between pay days."

November 14, 1891 Page 8
C. W. Given was called to Cleveland, last Saturday by the death of his brother-in-law William Gill. The deceased was the father of John Gill, who visits the Soo most every summer and who has many friends here who will be sorry to hear of his sad bereavement.

November 21, 1891 Page 1
Death of the Hon. Walter S. Greene
State Senator Walter S. Greene, of Fort Atkinson, Wis., one of the Badger state's most prominent democratic politicians, who was well known in the Soo and a member of the Espanore Island club, died in Milwaukee this week of cancer of the stomach. Mr. Greene spent his vacation in the Soo last summer and fished at Biscuit creek with E. W. Ellis. He was a warm-hearted, genial, successful man, of unsullied honor, manhood and firmness of character. Many a man lost his best friend when Walt Greene died.

November 21, 1891 Page 3
She Was A Good Woman.
Account of the Life of Miss Clark's and Mrs. McTavish's Mother.
The Meaford, Ont., Mirror has this account of the life of the late Mrs. Robert Clark, mother of Miss Clark and Mrs. J. W. McTavish of this city.
As the late Mrs. Robt. Clark, who death was referred to in our columns last week, was well known to many of our readers, a short sketch of her life may be of some interest. Mrs. Clark was a daughter of Mr. David Miller. she was born in the county of Monaham, Ireland, in the year 1833 and came with her parents to Chingacousy township, Ontario, when seven years of age. After remaining there for sometime, the family removed to St. Vincent, where her father took up considerable property in the vicinity of Meaford, and built the first grist mill in the place. At the age of seventeen years she was married to Mr. Robt. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Clark settled on a bush farm on the townline of Euphrasia and St Vincent. By industry and perseverence they soon made for themselves and children a comfortable home. Besides the old homestead consisting of 200 acres of land, Mr. Clark owns considerable other property, and we need hardly add that his wife contributed much to his success. Six years ago they moved to Meaford, where they have resided since. Mrs. Clark had two sons and ten daughters, of whom two are dead. Several of the children are married and comfortably settled in life. Two, Mrs. McTavish and Miss Minnie Clark, resides at Sault Ste. Marie. Mrs. Clark was a member of the Methodist church, and there is consolation for the sorrowing family in the thought that she has only gone before, to a land where parents and children may be reunited and where parting is unknown. The funeral on Friday afternoon to Meaford cemetery was largely attended by sympathizing friends and relatives.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
The East.
Near Dixmont, Pa., an explosion on the towboat Tice killed Capt. John Dippolod and six men.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
The East.
On seeing his mother drunk William Ruddy, 26 years old, of Wilkesbarre, Pa., committed suicide by pouring kerosene oil on his clothes and setting it afire.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
The East.
The death of Henry Ropes, of New York, formerly United States consul at St. Petersburg, occurred at Tenby, Wales.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
The East.
George H. Cooper, rear admiral of the United States navy, died at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., in his 61st year.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
At Fayette, Miss., Alexander Chambers, alias Tom Sutton (colored) was hanged for the murder of Robert Henry the 18th of last July, and William Somerset (colored) was hanged at Marion, S. C., for the murder of Ed. M. Fore. He protested his innocence to the last.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
An entire family, Charles Betheard, his wife and three children lost their lives in the flames which burned their house at Columbus, O.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South Benjamin Farley was sentenced at Frankfort, Ind., to twenty-one years in prison for the murder of Alexander Stewart at Whitestown June 13, 1891.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
At the age of 58 years Edwin E. Pratt, for over twenty years connected with the A. N. Kellogg Newspaper Company, and for several years president of the company, died suddenly at his home in Chicago. His death was the result of a severe attack of the grip last winter for which he had never entirely recovered.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
At Kenosha, Wis., Oliver Hoye and his little grandson were fatally kicked by a vicious horse.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
Capt. Hattie Smith, of the Salvation Army, was fatally shot in Omaha, Neb., by Miss Nettie Biedler, who then took her own life. Jealousy was the cause.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
Flames in San Francisco did $100,000 damage. John Higginbotham was burned to death.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
The wife of George W. Franke, of Fort Wayne, Ind., stepped on a rusty nail, lockjaw developed and she died in terrible agony.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
John Cox shot and killed John Anderson and J. L. Calhoun in a row over a game of cards in a saloon at Chandler Creek, Col.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
At Beatrice, Neb., J. H. Baldwin and his wife were both fatally burned by the explosion of a gasoline stove.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
West And South.
Frank Raynor, 19 years old, was instantly killed and his younger brother fatally injured by the bursting of a shotgun near Celine, O.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
Later
At Lopel, Ind., Mrs. Mary Hoffman and her two sons aged 16 and 22 were suffocated by gas.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
Later.
An aged couple, James Ellis and his wife, were found dead in their home at Troy, O., from inhaling natural gas and their three children were not expected to live.

November 21, 1891 Page 7
Later.
A passenger train rolled down a 30-foot embankment at Silver Springs, N. Y., and Mr. Boyd of Rochester, was fatally injured and his wife killed.

November 21, 1891 Page 8
Mrs. Henry Fitzshugh, eldest daughter of Gen. Poe, who has been in the Soo frequently with her father, died suddenly on Monday, of pneumonia, at Allegheny City, Pa.

November 28, 1891 Page 8
Sudden Death of Miss Kitty Day.
Kittie Day, aged 23 years, daughter of Mrs. Clarence Alex. Day, No. 109 Spruce avenue west died after only a day's illness, Wednesday. She was a sister of Mrs. Louis G. Bernier of this city and of Mrs. Jacob Yeager, of Ft. Mead, Dakota, and of Mrs. John Burtenshaw, of Woonsocket, Rhode Island. Besides these she had two other sister and two brothers. The funeral will occur tomorrow from St. Mary's church, upon the arrival of Julia and Jennie Day, from Rhode Island. Many friends and relatives sincerely mourn Miss Day's death.

November 28, 1891 Page 8
C. W. Parker, once a photographer for Bell, who left the Soo last year, seems to have gone from bad to worse. He died this week at Bay City of delirium tremens.

November 28, 1891 Page 8
General News.
Falling limbs of trees at Raleigh, N. C., struck two boys, Charles Stone and John Briggs fatally wounding them.

November 28, 1891 Page 8
Death of Henry Feldman.
Last night, at 11 o'clock, occurred the death of Henry Feldman, at his home on the Shunk Road, after a short illness. For years Mr. Feldman held the position of hospital steward in the army, later owning a drugstore in the city, which he successfully operated. A few years ago he purchased a farm and retired from business. He was favorably known by all with whom he was acqauinted, and his death will be regretted by all. He leaves a family to mourn his loss. The funeral will occur from his residence Monday morning at 11 o'clock.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
The East.
William and John Graham and William Roberts were drowned near Erie, Pa., by the capsizing of a boat.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
The East.
After fasting 148 days, Mrs. Mary McVeagh, aged 68 years, died at Braddock, Pa. She had been suffering with a cancer in her mouth and had subsisted on buttermilk, wine and laudanum.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At Springfield, Mass., George E. Barr, proprietor of the Hotel Warwick, shot his wife and then committed suicide because she refused to give him money.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At the age of 102 years Maj. Thomas Harward died at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y. He secured his military title during the war of 1812.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
John Miller and Joseph Wolph, neighbors fought with an ax and a hatchet near Lima, O.,and both would die.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
At Marshalltown, Ia., D. C. Thomas, an employe of a packing house, shot and killed John Hockridge, the proprietor of a boarding house, and then committed suicide.

December 5, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
The death of young Wheaton Allen, better known as "Land Bill Allen", .... occurred at Columbus, O., aged 88.

December 5, 1891 Page 6
General News.
Andrew Gulick's three children were killed and partially devoured by wolves at New Brighton, but a few miles from St. Paul, Minn.

December 5, 1891 Page 6
General News.
John Fleck and John Huth were fatally injured by a Pennsylvania train at Tiffin, O.

December 5, 1891 Page 9
General News.
The death of Josiah Carpenter, whose age was given at 120 years, occurred in Preston county, W. Va.

December 5, 1891 Page 9
General News.
Fire destroyed the window-glass works at Bellaire, O., causing a loss of $100,000. One man, James Stewart, was burned to death.

December 5, 1891 Page 9
General News.
James N. Johnson, ex-governor of Georgia, died at Columbus.

December 5, 1891 Page 9
General News.
The death of Isaac M. Brown, the founder of many newspapers and the oldest editor in Indiana, occurred at his home in Columbus, Ind., aged nearly 75 years.

December 12, 1891 Page 1
Sudden Death Of Will Price.
Dr. Rundle Says he was Carried Away Without Warning by Cerebral Apoplexy.
The many who knew young Will B. Price, brother of Fred R. Price, the druggist, were shocked Thursday morning by the news of his death. He had been sick but a few days. About nine o'clock Wednesday evening, while Dr. Rundle and Dr. Rogers were sitting by his bedside at Comb's boarding house, Dawson street, young Price received a stroke of cerebral apoplexy and died within about five hours. Dr. Rundle pronounced his illness typhoid fever Wednesday, and the convulsion which directly resulted in the young man's death, was a complication that arose.
Will B. Price was 18 years of age and had been in the Soo a little over a year. He occupied a position in his brother's drug store and was very popular wth all who knew him. Will was tirelessly active and up to within a few days of his death was a picture of health. His parents who reside at Goderich, Ont., received the news of his illness and of his death at the same time. The remains were prepared for burial by Undertaker Vanderhook and taken to Goderich Thursday afternoon by Fred R. Price. A large number of friends accompanied them to the depot, including delegations of members of Y. M. C. A. and K. of P. Peculiarly sad were the circumstances that surrounded the death of young Price, who was in the fullest bloom of youthful vigor. It will be a sorrowful Christmas for his fond parents and the children who remain.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
The East.
In New York H. D. Wilson entered Russell Sage's office and demanded a million dollars. On being refused Wilson threw a dynamite bomb, injuring Mr. Sage and five other persons, and killing Benjamin F. Morton, a clerk, and himself.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At Sing Sing, N. Y., Martin D. Loppy was electrocuted for murdering his wife on July 4, 1890, in New York city.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Edmond Dick Taylor, the father of greenback currency, an intimate personal friend and adviser of President Lincoln, died at his home in Chicago, aged 89 years.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Mr. and Mrs. Levi Mills, an aged couple near Liberty Center, Ia., were cremated by the burning of their home.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
At Mount Vernon, Mo., Charles M. Seaton was hanged for the murder of Lewis Channel at Joblin, Mo., July 5, 1889.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
On his death bed Dr. Felix Roan, a prominent citizen of Caswell county, N. C., confessed that he killed Senator John W. Stephen twenty years ago.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
In a fit of jealousy, Prof. W. H. McCubbins, of Maysville, Ark., shot and killed his wife and then killed himself.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
At ------ N. D. Stephen Olson and his daughter aged 23 years, were frozen to death in a blizzard.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
A mob shot Uncle Lundy (colored) to death at Edgefield, S. C., for the murder of James Ouzts, son of the sheriff of the county.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
On his death bed Frank Miller confessed to the murder of his father-in-law near Mason City, Ia., in 1875. He had been acquitted by a jury.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Robert Cochran and his wife died within an hour of each other at Bellefontaine, O. They had been married sixty-four years.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
The hanging of Forrest Thomas (colored) took place at Greenville, Miss. for the murder of Hayward Bryant in November 1890.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
At the age of 103 years Isaac Anglin died at his home near Warsaw, Ind.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
Later.
Joseph R. Lampkin, the night watchman at the Santa Fe depot at La Junta, Col. was killed by J. W. Knorsa, a crazy man, who then took his own life.

December 12, 1891 Page 2
Later.
John De Rush and Lewis Rhodes, of St. Mary's had a fight over a woman at Lima, O., and both were fatally injured.

December 12, 1891 Page 7
General News.
John B. Hier, aged 52, was shot and fatally wounded by his jealous wife at East Buffalo, N. Y.

December 12, 1891 Page 10
Mrs. Felix Payment, living in the east end, died Thursday of abscess of the lungs. The remains were taken yesterday to Sugar Island for interment. The deceased leaves a husband and two young children.

December 12, 1891 Page 10
Mrs. Mary Crain, aged 85 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Lane at 1 o'clock yesterday morning, after a long illness. Mrs. Crain had resided in the Soo for over forty years. Two daughters, Mrs. John Lane, of this city, and Mrs. John Cassen, of Ishpeming, survive her. The funeral will take place from St. Mary's church at 8 o'clock next Monday morning.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At the age of 82 Russell M. Little died at Glens Falls, N. Y. He founded the Glens Falls Insurance Company and was its president since 1864.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
The East.
The death of Miss Julia A. Ames, editor of the Union Signal, the official organ of the Woman's Christian Temperance union and a resident of Evanston, Ill., occurred at Boston. Her remains would be forwarded Streator, Ill., for burial.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
The East.
At Boston, Pa., John Law crushed Lew McCracken's head with a stone because McCracken danced with Law's girl.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
The East.
Edmond S. Connor died at his home in Rutherford, N. C., aged 82 years. He was the oldest actor in America.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South
Mrs. Mary Gotschalk, her little daughter, Lettie, and Mrs. Mary Witt were killed by the cars at Homewood, Ill.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
At Melbourne, Ark., Mrs. N. Mason was burned to death by falling into the fireplace while in a fainting fit.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
John Miller while on a drunken spree fatally wounded his wife and them committed suicide by shooting at Mount Olive, Ill.
Decemer 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Hank Lovett and two companions, all notorious cattle thieves, were lynched near Custer City, S. D., and their bodies riddles with bullets.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Frank Puckwood, Miss A. H. Bruce, Mrs. L. D. Hatelt and her little son were all found murdered in a house 6 miles south of New Smyrna, Fla.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Inias Bisland, a drunken planter, quarreled with Conductor Turner, of the Louisville, New Orleans & Texas railway near Canonburg, Miss., and while pursuing Turner, shooting at him, fell off the train, and broke his neck.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
West And South.
Dr. F. W. Peck, a prominent physician of Davenport, Ia., died at the age of 58 years.

December 19, 1891 Page 2
Later.
Mrs. Manuel Ford and her infant child, of Columbia, S. C., were burned to death by the explosion of a lamp, and Mr. Ford was probably fatally injured.
Decemb er 19, 1891 Page 2
Later.
L. J. Delone, Denton Duke and Joseph Duke were killed at East Barnard, Tex., as a result of a quarrel.

December 19, 1891 Page 10
Forest, the three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Robotham, died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, of scarlet fever. The funeral will take place Monday.

December 26, 1891 Page 1
Levi Montney Drops Dead.
Levi Montney, a farmer of Iroquois, suddenly dropped dead Tuesday while drawing wood. Miss Lizzie Montney, of this city, left Wednesday for her home on hearing the sad news. The deceased leaves a wife and six children.

December 26, 1891 Page10
A. H. Hasebrook on Thursday received the sad news of the death of his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Hasebrook, at Piqua, O., but owing to the delay in getting the message he could not attend the funeral.

January 2, 1892 Page 1
Death of Alderman Rains' Mother.
Mrs.Fannie Rains, aged 84, of St. Joseph's Island, died Dec. 24. The deceased was the mother of Mrs. Ford Hursley and of Alderman Hoel D. Rains, of this city.

January 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior

August Johnson, a miner, fell into a tank of boiling water near Iron Mountain and was scalded to death.

January 2, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. Hatch, wife of W. L. Hatch, who was once secretary of the Y.M.C.A, at this palace, but now secretary of the Y.M.C.A., at Greenvile, N.C. died at her home at Fredericksburgh, Va. at one o'clock Thursday.

January 2, 1892 Page 8
Sexton W. T.Burton on Tuesday removed from the city cemetery to Riverside the remains of the father and mother of Chas. H. Spalding. The remains of his mother were interred in the old burial ground, now known as the city hall site in 1852, and were removed in 1887, at the time of the burial of her husband, to the city cemetery.

January 9, 1892 Page 1
Death of Louis P. Trempe
An Old and Respected Citzen Takes That Last Mysterious Journey.
(.... a verse). So lived and so died Louis P. Trempe .... After a year or more of gradually approaching dissolution in obedience to that inevitable law that Shakespeare in Hamlet, so emphasizes' "All that lives must die; passing through nature to eternity," all that was mortal of L. P. Trempe completed that last mysterious transition, at a little after 7 o'clock, last Sunday morning....
Mr. Trempe was 62 years, ten months and nine days old and was born at St. Ambroise, Quebec. In the very spring of youth, when 18 years old, he came to Sault Ste. Marie with his father and helped to improve a homestead where the residence of Andrew Blank now stands. His father opened a store in 1848 where the First National Bank in now located and before very long the son succeeded to the business ....
Left to mourn their great affliction are five sons and four daughters. They ministered to his last wants lovingly. Death came like a peaceful calm and the remains suggested those lines of Shelley, in Queen Mab: ....
The funeral cortege, Thursday, was the largest ever beheld in the city. It moved from the residence to St Mary's church where, at 9 o'clock, the remains were received at the door by the director Rev. Father L. T. Garceau, who consoled the deceased during his departing hours.... At 10 o'clock the solemn service was concluded and the funeral procession wended its way to the City of the Dead....

January 9, 1892 Page 2
Gatesville.
Rev. W. Hall did not make his appointment here Sabbath on account of attending the funeral services of a young son of Joseph Kelly, a few miles east of Pickford.

January 9, 1892 Page 2
A Noble Woman Gone
Particulars of the Death of Mrs. W.L.Hatch ....(Fredericksburgh, Va., Star.)

Thursday evening at 1:30 o'clock, Mrs. Mary Wellford Hatch, wife of Mr. Walter Livingston Hatch, and only daughter of Mr. J. Willard Adams, died at her father's residence, in this city. For many years prior to her death she was a consistent and active member of the Presbyterian Church.... She left an infant two days old. Her husband and other relatives have the deepest sympathy of the entire community....

January 9, 1892 Page 4
A man named Patrick Carey was murdered and robbed last week near Iron Mountain.

January 9, 1892 Page 8
A Dastardly Murder at Ishpeming.
John Gleason, paymaster of the Cleveland Iron Mining Co. was brutally murdered by an unknown man Monday night, at Ishpeming while in the money vault. He was robbed of a gold watch and chain and $300 cash and $10,000 worth of bortz were taken from the vault. [bort- imperfect or inferior diamonds used for polishing other stones.]

January 16, 1892 Page 1
Good Old Peter McFarland Dead.
Peter McFarland, one of the Sault's oldest citizens, died at the home of his daughter, Miss Charlotte McFarland on Kimball street, last Saturday and was buried from St. Mary's church Monday morning. Mr. McFarland was in his ninety third year.

January 16, 1892 Page 1
E. J. Martyn was called to St. Thomas, Ont., Monday by telegrams which announced the death of his sister and the serious illness of his father. His friends here extend heartfelt sympathy.

January 16, 1892 Page 1
Whiskey Did It.
Archie McArthur Killed at Corinne in a Drunken Row
Body Brought Here Yesterday.
Charles Strung the Murderer Said to be a Whilom Sooite
Conflicting accounts ....
The corpse of Archie or Dan McArthur who was murdered at Corinne, 80 miles west of here on the Soo Line early Thursday morning, passed through the Soo yesterday on its way to Owen Sound. McArthurs's brother was in charge. He claimed to know nothing of the affair. ....

January 16, 1892 Page 2
Strongville.
The many friends of J. D. Smith, our enterprizing farmer and dairyman extend their sympathy in the loss of his wife by death, which occurred Dec. 6, at Elkhart Ind., where she was on a visit to her brother.

January 16, 1892 Page 7
Not Without Friends.
Henry Miller died of consumption at the McEvoy House Monday night. He was in destitute circumstances, with no relatives near. Messrs. A. S. Case and A. Agnew circulated a subscription paper to raise funds to defray expenses of his sickness and burial and met with generous responses. The funeral occurred Tuesday morning at St. Mary's church and the body was interred in the Catholic cemetery.

January 16, 1892 Page 8
Died: Thursday morning, Bertie Louisa, the infant daughter of Ira E. Allen. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the Tabernacle, Rev. C. F. Bronson, officiating.

January 16, 1892 Page 8
Dr. and Mrs. Wm. Richardson have received the sad intelligence of the death of Mrs. Richardson's mother, Mrs. Peter Valleau, at Carson City, Mich. The deceased who has visited here and is well known, was a most estimable lady. Mrs. Richardson returned yesterday from her sad journey to Carson City.

January 16, 1892 Page 8
Relatives in this city have been notified of the death of Mrs. Lemon, the mother of Mrs. Alex. Danskin, who has visited her at various times.

January 16, 1892 Page 8
Friends here of Mrs. H. P. Cory, of Worthington, Minn., have just learned of the death of her beloved mother, who was known by many in the Soo.

January 23, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. Michael Jarden Magee was saddened this week by receiving the intelligence of the death of her grandmother.

January 30, 1892 Page 1
Accidental Death of Jacob Ufland.
David Ufland received yesterday the sad news of the death of his brother Jacob, who was foreman of the coal dock at Gladstone, and who was crushed to death by a fall of coal. Mr. Ufland will leave this morning to take the remains to Meaford, Ont. This is a sad occurrence to Mr. and Mrs. Ufland, particularly as they have a little child that is momentarily expected to die.

January 30, 1892 Page 8
Willie, an 11-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ranson, who died last Saturday, was buried Sunday in the Catholic cemetery.

January 30, 1892 Page 8
Miss Nellie Sanford, stenographer for P. M. Church and Co.is in Detroit, where she was called by the death of her mother.

January 30, 1892 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McMahon, on Sunday, lost by death their 15-year-old daughter Maud, who had been an invalid from infancy Her infirmity required loving care and attention which was freely bestowed by parents and relatives, who have the sympathy of many friends in their loss.

February 6, 1892 Page 1
Col. C. Y. Osburn Dead
The News Received Here With Feelings of Sincere Regret by All who Knew Him.
The flag at the custom house is at half-mast. Col. Charles Y. Osburn, collector of the customs district of Superior, of which the Soo is by far the most important port, died at Marquette, Thursday noon, of heart failure. His health had been precarious all winter and for a week he had been alarmingly ill. Col. Osburn was born in Meadville, Pa., in 1842 and came to Owosso, Mich. in 1857....He was a member of Jackson Post No. 300. G.A.R., of Marquette, under whose auspices the funeral occurred. The remains were taken to Owosso. The wife of the deceased died ten years ago and he left no family.

February 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Spung and Beatin have been bound over for trial for the murder of Donald McArthur at Corinne.

February 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Register Geo. S. Royce, of the land office at Marquette, who recently lost his aged mother by death, has the sympathy of his host of friends.

February 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Anna Sophia Anderson, a Finnish girl, has been sent to the Marquette prison to serve five years for causing the death of her infant child, at Escanaba.

February 6, 1892 Page 8
George Clark, of the firm of Clark Bros, died at Collingwood, Ont., Monday.

February 13, 1892 Page 1
Louis Lessard, aged 76 and a long time resident here, died Sunday.

February 13, 1892 Page 1
A brakeman named McGraw was killed in a wreck on the Soo line near Gladstone Friday of last week. Fifteen cars were wrecked.

February 13, 1892 Page 1
Death of Hon. Ezra L. Koon.
A telegram from Hillsdale to Otto Fowle received Wednesday announced the sudden death there Tuesday of Hon. Ezra L. Koon, who is well known in this city, and county, where he has considerable realty interest....

February 13, 1892 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Newcomb.
Another Very Old Resident Crosses to That Mysterious Bourne Beyond.
Mrs. Mary Newcomb, one of the Soo's old residents and mother of Customs Inspector Wm. Newcomb and Mrs. R. I. Mitchell, died at the residence of the latter Saturday morning at the age of nearly 72 years. Funeral services were held at the Mitchell residence Sunday afternoon. Rev. J. E. Bitting officiated and the remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery. Mrs. Newcomb was born in Bloomingdale, Erie county, ---- and came here in 1824 with her parents Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Johnson. They were among the first white people who lived outside the old fort stockade in those early days. The deceased united in marriage here with Frank Newcomb, who, with another named Peck in 1849 located land in claim No. 3 near the head of the canal, which land is now owned by M. W. & G. G. Scranton, the city & others. Mrs. Newcomb was a lady of remarkable memory and related many interesting events in the early history of this place.

February 13, 1892 Page 2
Wm. Ferris of Buffalo was called to this city this week by the death of his father.

February 13, 1892 Page 2
Mrs. John B. Johnson of Marquette, came here to attend the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Mary Newcomb. She was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Mitchell.

February 13, 1892 Page 4
State of Superior.
Edward Lipping, a boy of 14, was drowned at St. Ignace Monday by breaking throught the ice while skating.

February 13, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Fleckenstein, who murdered Patrick Carey, near Sagola, Dickinson county, six weeks ago has been arrested at Chicago and has confessed to the crime.

February 13, 1892 Page 7
Death of John G. Ferris
John G. Ferris, the well known farmer, died Saturday afternoon at the age of 64 years, at his home on the McKnight Road, four miles from this city. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the residenc near which the remains were interred. Memorial services will be held to-morrow evening at the M.E. church by Rev. J. E. Whalen. The deceased had been a resident of the county since 1880 and was highly respected. Among his surving children are Mrs. Geo. Blank and Mrs. Wm. Ruchle, of this city and Charles and Maud Ferris.

February 20, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of Edward Tipping, who was drowned at St. Ignace, was recovered by Diver Dodd.

February 20, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior
James C. Rice, a well known post trader of the upper country, died at Chicago last week at the age of 74 years.

February 20, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. Fabian Launderville, who lived here for many years, but who moved to Cleveland a year ago with her family, died at that place Monday. Soo friends extend sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.

February 20, 1892 Page 8
Dr. George McCullough, of the Canada Soo, died suddenly from heart failure Wednesday. Dr. Ennis was called to join him in a consultation, but found him dead when he called for him. Dr. McCullough was only 37 years old and was a leading physician.

February 20, 1892 Page 8
Samuel W. Hitt, father of Mrs J. E. Burchard, and who is known to many here, died at the age of 72 years, at Urbana, O, last Saturday. Mrs. Burchard left for her father's bedside Thursday of last week and was greatly shocked at the unexpected death. She will probably not return for several weeks.

February 27, 1892 Page 1
Cut To Pieces.
Edward Kennedy Killed by Cars at Trout Lake
The local freight train, east bound, was switching at Trout Lake.
Another name was added to the long list of victims of fatal railway accidents at an early hour Thursday night, when Edward Kennedy was ground to pieces beneath the cruel wheels at Trout Lake, at 10:30 p.m. Thursday, when Brakeman Edward Kennedy, of Montgomery, Minn., fell from the top of a box car and was ground to pieces beneath the wheels. The unfortunate man was not missed for several minutes, and when found he was in an unconscious condition, both legs and one arm being severed from his body. He was picked up tenderly by his brother employees and taken to Trout Lake depot. Dr. B. D. Harison the company's surgeon and Rev. Father L. T. Garceau, were summoned, but the sufferer died in an hour after the accident and before medical aid could arrive. All day yesterday the dead man lay in Trout Lake depot awaiting word from his parents, who had been notified. Late yesterday afternoon word was received to bury the man where he had been killed. But as Trout Lake has no cemetery, the body was sent to this city and is now at Undertaker Vanderhook's establishment, where Coroner Bacon will hold an inquest this morning. Mr. Kennedy, the unfortunate victim of the accident, was about 22 years old and unmarried. He had been employed on the Soo Line only a short time, but had made many friends who are sadly grieved to learn of his terrible death. The remains will be buried at Riverside cemetery at the expense of the Soo Line company.

February 27, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Marshall Mayotte, of Houghton, will be examined for killing Alexander Perala while attempting his arrest.

February 27, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior
Albert, Marie and Charles DeLonscamp, aged 7, 6, and 2 years respectively, were burned to death last Saturday at Ironwood. Several citizens were also badly burned while attempting to rescue the unfortunate children.

March 5, 1892 Page 7
The funeral of Mrs. J. Arnold was held at the M. E. Church Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. She leaves, besides a husband, a daughter Marian, aged 14 years, and a baby boy three months old.

March 5, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. Dennis Gleason was called to St. Ignace last Saturday by the death of her father Peter Paquin. Mr. Paquin was one of St. Ignace's most prominent citizens and was highly respected by all who knew him.

March 5, 1892 Page 8
H. H. Taylor yesterday morning received the sad news of the death of his sister, Mrs. Clark Murdock, at Cavalier, N. D. The news came too late to allow him to attend the funeral.

March 5, 1892 Page 8
The twin boys of Joseph Griffis, of Neaseville, died this week of heart failure and were buried at the Riverside cemetery. It was a severe blow to the parents and they are sincerely sympathized with.

March 12, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. Erickson, was killed at the Commonwealth mine last week.

March 12, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ogeno Genonino, an Italian miner, was fatally injured at Crystal Falls last week.

March 12, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Gus Peterson, of Ashland, suicided last Saturday by throwing himself under a train.

March 12, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Daniel Kloeckner, a well known resident of Hancock, killed himself last week while in a fit of despondency.

March 12, 1892 Page 6
Gatesville. (Special Correspondence.)
The many friends of Garbet Tour will be saddened to hear of his recent death. His trouble was caused by dropsy of the heart. He had only been off work for about three weeks, although he had been complaining more or less for the last six months. He passed peacefully away on Saturday, the 27th ult. He was taken to St. Joseph's Island at 2 o'clock Sunday, the 28th, for burial. Mr. Sims, of Stalwart, officiated at the burial services. Mr. Tour leaves a sorrowing wife and two children.

March 12, 1892 Page 8
Little John Blue's Death.
After a brief illness, John Blue, aged nearly 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Blue, died Tuesday morning. Short funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday by Rev. P. T. Rowe A.M. and the remains were interred in the city cemetery Mr. Blue and son George E., who were in Chicago, were called here by telegram Monday. Skilled physicians were in attendance and everything was done to save the life of the little sufferer, but in vain. The sudden death of the bright boy is a great blow to the sorrowing relatives, who have the heartfelt sympathy of all.

March 19, 1892 Page 2
Contractor C. H. Crane has returned from his sad errand to Leamington, Ont., where he was called by the death of his aged and respected father.

March 19, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
George Goff, a 6-year old boy, was killed by the street cars at Marinette Monday.

March 19, 1892 Page 7
End of a Useful Life.
Death of Leroy L. Gilson, an Evangelist in This
City Last Sunday. Leroy L. Gilson, an evangelist of the King's Sons and Daughters of New York, died Sunday morning at the residence of Dr. Floyd. He had been in the city only a short time. Last week he had a tumor revoved from his back, and as his system was run down by exposure and arduous labor, the place failed to heal and finally caused his death from exhaustion. Mr. Gilson's remains were placed in charge of Undertaker Vanderhook to await the orders of his friends for their disposal....

March 26, 1892 Page 8
Miss Bertha Cameron, aged twenty, and daughter of Thomas Cameron of Rosedale died at the Alpena House, Tuesday afternoon. Rev. C. F. Bronson preached the sermon Thursday, at the Tabernacle, and the remains were interred by Undertaker Vanderhook at Rosedale cemetery.
The funeral services of Miss Bertha Cameron, who died so suddenly on Tuesday last, were held at the Tabernacle this morning. Rev. C. F. Bronson, officiating. Miss Cameron was of a quiet, retiring demeanor, but was highly esteemed by all who knew her and the family have the sympathy of the community. The burial was in the Rosedale cemtery.

April 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Daniel Stephenson and Louis Nelson were cremated, near Crystal Falls, last week, when in a drunken stupor, by the burning of the house they occupied.

April 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Solomon Anderson, of Ford River, committed suicide last week by taking strychnine.

April 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Fieckenstein, the murderer of Pat Carey, in jail at Menominee, cut a hole through the floor and was just ready to skip when he was nabbed by the jailor.

April 9, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Hunt, a cedar inspector of Menominee, committed suicide last week by stabbing himself to the heart.

April 9, 1892 Page 7
The Convict's Baby.
Early yesterday morning a knock was heard at the big door of the Fulton county jail .... It was Jim Wesson, the moonshiner, who escaped from the Fulton county jail a week ago to go home to see his sick baby. "I'm sorry, Mr. Miller,".... "I heard the baby was sick, .... They done buried the baby, an I come back, an I hope you ain't mad..... Altanta Constitution.

April 9, 1892 Page 8
Drowned at Garden River.
James Tate and Young Sylvester were drowned at Garden River at a late hour yesterday afternoon.

April 16, 1892 Page 2
Death of an Old Soo Boy.
Henry C. Carleton was called to Redwood, Minn., last Saturday by the death of his son, Guy H. Carleton, from typhoid fever, on the 7th inst. Guy H. Carleton was an old Soo boy and attended school here in early days with Fred W. Roach, G. G. Scranton, George Blank, Will and John Rueble. After receiving his education he went west and took up railroad work, and at the time of his death was agent for the Minneapolis & St. Louis railroad at Redwood. He was 30 years of age and leaves a wife and three children, who have the sympathy of Soo friends in their bereavement.

April 16, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The four year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Anson Caswell of Rapid River, was burned to death last week. Her mother left her alone in the house and her clothing caught fire.

April 16, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jacob Kraemer one of the pioneers of Marquette died last week.

April 16, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Charles Waldon, an engineer of Houghton, committed suicide last week by cutting his throat. He was intoxicated.

April 16, 1892 Page 8
W. C. Clark returned Wednesday from Collingwood, where he was called by the death of his brother George.

April 16, 1892 Page 9
The remains of a little child of Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Metzger, who died four years ago, were removed from the city cemetery and shipped to Milwaukee in an airtight casket yesterday by Undertaker Harry Blake.

April 16, 1892 Page 10 Undertaker Harry Blake supplied a casket for the body of Mr. Sylvester, who was drowned near Garden River last week and whose body was recovered Wednesday.

April 23, 1892 Page 1
The Women's Reading Club adopted appropriate resolutions on the death of the late president, Mrs. Geo. W. Brown.

April 23, 1892 Page 1
E. S. Wheeler was called to Detroit by a telegram from Mrs. Wheeler, which announced the death of her sister, Mrs. J. A. Jones. Mrs. Jones visited here last winter and made many friends. Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler have the sympathy of their many friends.

April 23, 1892 Page 3 The many Soo friends of W. M. Snell will be pained to learn of the death of his mother, which sad event occurred last week. She was an exemplary and Christian lady and all that fine womanhood means.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Alex. Morrison slipped while coupling cars at South of Manistique last week and the cars passed over his leg and foot. He died from his injuries.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. Hess, of Mastodon, was run over and killed by a locomotive last week.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Greb committed suicide at his home near Hancock, last week, by swallowing two ounces of carbolic acid.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Chandor, a miner, was killed by a cave-in at the Ludington mine last week. He leaves a wife and four children.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Stein, who murdered Patrick Carey near Sagola last December, has been sentenced to Marquette prison for twenty- five years.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
A Finlander named Wateglen was found dead in the road, four miles west of Hancock. The man drank a quantity of whiskey and pure alcohol, then laid down on the frozen ground and perished from the exposure.

April 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
For the second time within a year the Iron River jail has been destroyed by fire, a helpless prisoner in each case being cremated. Tuesday evening, April 12, flames were seen issuing from the jail in which was confined Mrs. Guertine, who had been arrested during the afternoon for indecent conduct in the street. Before help could arrive the entire building was enveloped and her rescue was impossible. On the former occasion a man named O'Rourke was burned to death in a similar manner.

April 23, 1892 Page 7
Clement Sylvester desires to thank his friends for there kindness, manifested at the time of the recent death of his father, Louis Sylvester, by drowning. He and other relatives greatly appreciate the services rendered.

April 30, 1892 Page 1
Another Old Citizen Gone.
Irwin Follis, aged 62, and a wellknown resident, died yesterday morning after a long illness. Rev. P. T. Rowe will preach the funeral service tomorrow and the remains will be interred in Riverside cemetery by Undertaker Vanderhook.

April 30, 1892 Page 2
Appropriate and touching resolutions on the death of the late Mrs. C. W. Brown were adopted by the council Monday night.

April 30, 1892 Page 1
Captain George Granger, of the schooner G. M. Stephenson, died at the Arundel House, Portage avenue at midnight Tuesday, aged 49 years and 9 months. The unfortunate Captain was taken from his boat late Sunday night, suffering from a violent attack of pneumonia and he grew rapidly worse until death relieved his sufferings at the hour above stated. His wife was with him at the time of his death. Captain Granger was a resident of Detroit, and was a Mason in high standing. His remains were embalmed by Undertaker Blake and were sent to Detroit for interment Wednesday night. Local Masons showed the Captain every attention.

April 30, 1892 Page 1
The cook of the schooner S. M. Stephenson fell overboard and was drowned in the canal just after dark Sunday night. The canal watchmen heard him call for help, but before he could be reached he had sunk. He shipped at Chicago, was only known as Jack and was about 20 years of age. The body has not been recovered.

April 30, 1892 Page 2
DONALDSON.
Fred Cummings has returned home from Charlevoix where he was called by the death of his father, George Cummings an old resident of this place.

May 7, 1892 Page 1
Yesterday's Southeast Blow.
James C. Ford, aged 26, a sailor on the steambarge, Passadena, was literally cut in two at 6 o'clock last Saturday night.... he was caught between the boat and pier and was crushed to death; the upper portion of his body falling on the pier and the lower portion from the waist down, dropping into the canal. Death was instantaneous. Coroner Bacon was notified and the remains were gathered up and turned over to Undertaker Vanderhook. Ford was unmarried and resided near Sarnia, Ont., where his remains were sent last Sunday. This was his first trip. He had taught school before, was well connected and was the only support of his parents, it is said.

May 7, 1892 Page 1
Death of Wade G. Footte.
A Pioneer of the Two Soos Passes Away In a Detroit Hospital Last Week
Wade G. Footte, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of the Canadian Soo, died at Detroit last week. Mr. Footte was customs officer at the time of his death, and was well known on this side of the river. Two daughters survive him, who have the sympathy of their friends in this city. Mr. Footte was a brother of Mrs. Beatty, of Detroit and for years was located at Point Aux Pins, when that was a busy place. He made warm friendship, and was always thought of as a genial, kindly big-hearted man. The old folks of both towns have lost a good friend.

May 7, 1892 Page 2
The infant son of Daniel Martin died on Tuesday. It is a sad blow to the loving parents and they are the recipients of deep sympathy.

May 7, 1892 Page 2
The Rev. M. L. Weakly, uncle of Mrs. George Kemp and of the Misses Heichhold, died in Pennsylvania this week at the age of 95. He was the oldest Methodist minister in the United States and preached at Pittsburgh for many years.

May 7, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John McGuire, a brakeman, was killed by the cars at Menominee last week.

May 7, 1892 Page 8
News of the death of Mrs. J. W. Goss, wife of the junior partner of the firm of Johnson and Goss was received by E. D. Johnson Thursday. She died at Genesco, Ill., Monday. It is a great blow to Mr. Goss.

May 7, 1892 Page 8
N. L. Martin, of The News received a telegram Thursday announcing the death of his aged and respected mother, at Roodhouse, Ill. It was received too late to admit of his attending the funeral.

May 14, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. H. Kirkwood, of Ishpeming, was run over and instantly killed by the electric cars last Saturday night.

May 14, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. P. Bonno died suddenly Thursday night.

May 14, 1892 Page 8
Hulbert. (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Geo. W. Dyer, of Hulbert, Chippewa county, Mich., who has been steadily failing for some time, quietly passed away at an early hour Monday, May 9th, 1892. The sympathizing friends gathered at the house 4 o'clock p.m. on Tuesday. Where a short but very appropriate service was held. The bereaved husband and son started on the evening train, with the remains for interment at Tecumseh, Mich. The deceased was born at Saline, Washtena county, Mich. Oct. 2nd, 1840 and was married to Geo. W. Dyer Aug 29, 1862. During her six months residence at Hulbert she had won the love and respect of all and will be greatly missed. Mr Dyer desires to thank his kind friends for their service in his hour of trouble. Adrian papers please copy.

May 21, 1892 Page 1
Death of Wm. G. Phillips.
Wm. G. Phillips, an old and respected resident, died yesterday morning, after an illness of eight weeks, at the age of 74 years. Brief services will be conducted Rev. C. F. Bronson at the residence, Cedar and Barbeau streets, at 9 this morning, and the remains will be taken to Freeport, Ill., for interment. Mr. Phillips was a brother of Mrs. E. C. Johnson.

May 21, 1892 Page 1
Mrs. A. P. Swineford, and daughter, of West Superior, were called here by the death of Mrs. Alf Richards. Mrs Swineford is the wife of Ex-Gov. Swineford of Alaska and is an intimate friend of the Hursleys.

May 21, 1892 Page 1
Gone To Her Rest.
Demise of Mrs. Alf. Richards, a Highly Esteemed Lady, Sunday Morning.
Mrs. Gertrude E. Richards, the beloved wife of Alf Richards, and only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Capt. Wayne Hursley, died Sunday morning after a lingering illness, at the age of 22 years and 8 months. The funeral was held at the residence of the parents, Tuesday afternoon. Rev. J. E. Whalen officiated, with appropriate music by the choir of the M. E. church. Among the floral offerings were a shield with the initials U.R.K. of P., from the Knights of Pythias members, a cross from the employes of Prenzlauer Bros., and an anchor from Mr. and Mrs. George Kemp. The pall bearers were: S. G. Carleton, T. R. Harvey, H. J. LaLonde, F. W. Roach, Geo. Blank, N. A. Burdick, L. H. Conley, and Will Reuhle, Jr. A large procession followed the remains to Riverside Cemetery, where they were interred by Undertaker Blake. Mrs. Richards was a lady of many excellent qualities and was admired by all who knew her. Her death, though not unexpected, is a sad blow to her loving husband and idolizing parents. Mrs. Hursley is prostrated by illness and almost broken-hearted in consequence of the loss of her only child. The sorrowing relatives have the heart felt sympathy of their many friends.

May 21, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Bertie Coyler, a 14-year-old deaf and dumb boy was burned to death at Bessemer last week.

May 21, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Edward Dodd, a member of the life saving station near Ontonagon was drowned last week.

May 21, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. Michael Bengson, of Crystal Falls, who was destitute and too proud to beg, died of starvation last week.

May 21, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. A. G. Schrafield, a sister of John Sayers, an employee of the Boston Clothing House, was murdered at Duluth last week by her husband, who afterwards killed himself.
May 28, 1892 Page 1
Found His Bones.
William Ruehle Identifies Geredot Who was Drowned Here in 1869.
Last Saturday, while a couple of men were digging in a sewer trench near the opera house they unearthed a box which contained the bones of a man. William Ruehle, who is an old resident of the Soo, identified the remains as that of Henry Geredot, who kept a saloon on Water street in 1869 and says the man was drowned in the river in April of that year. Mr. Ruehle was at that time custom inspector at this port,and Corporal Cloit, a lieutant, and two privates from Fort Brady and Geredot engaged a boat from Mr. Rueble to go to Canada and while returning the boat was capsized in some manner and Geredot and Corporal Clore were drowned. Geredot was buried in the old grave yard which was located where the city hall now stands. Mr. Ruehle was present at the funeral and knew just where the grave was located. To make the identification doubly sure there were hanging to the feet of the corpse, which was moved to the city cemetery Saturday, sewed boots which Mr. Reuhle had made for the man a few weeks previous to his untimely end. It is thought that many more graves were neglected when the transfer was made from the old to the new burying grounds.

May 28, 1892 Page 1
Died Far From Home.
Edward Lindsey died at a boarding house at the corner of Court and Ann streets Thursday night of pneumonia. He was on his way from the West to Nova Scotia and was beyond relief when he stopped here. Word is being waited for from his relatives for the disposition of his remains.

May 28, 1892 Page 1
Poor Ford's Leg Found Floating.
The leg of George Ford, who was killed by the steamer Pasadena three weeks ago at the canal, was found floating just above the lock Thursday afternoon. It was buried by the canal authorities.

May 28, 1892 Page 2
Rosedale Items.
We regret to announce the death of Joseph, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph House. The child was eighteen months old and was interred in the Rosedale cemetery Sunday. Miss Cusick conducted the funeral. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community.

May 28, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. Catharine McMahon whose husband while drunk was killed by the cars, has just received $1,100 from a Menominee saloonkeeper who furnished the liquor.

May 28, 1892 Page 7
Mrs. Leo Bonno.
A Friend Contributes an Interesting Sketch of a Late Resident.
ED, NEWS: Mrs. Leo Bonno, who dropped dead, the other day, at the residence of Mrs. Chas. Giest, on Canal street, was an old and respected resident. Mrs. Bonno was feeling quite well and walked to the depot to see a friend go away on the train. Shortly after the train left she had a fainting spell and thought she would go to Mrs. Giest, her niece, who lives near the depot, but before she got to Mrs. Giest's she beckoned to them to come to her. She was seen and helped to the house and died shortly after. The only words she spoke being, "Oh, My children." Mrs. Bonno was a good mother and a hard working woman, always pleasant and pleasing to converse with. The writer had many a pleasant chat with her. Mrs. Bonno was the widow, of the late Leo Bonno, who died here quite suddenly twelve years ago. Mrs. Leo Bonno was born at Red River, Minn., February 24th, 1821, and came to the Soo when but a mere child in 1830, in company with her parents coming from Red River to the Soo in a birch bark canoe. Steamboats in those days were very scarce on Lake Superior. Mrs. Bonno had three brothers and one sister, two brothers enlisted in the late rebellion and both were killed on the battlefield. Her sister is still living and it is supposed she has a brother still living at red River. She was married at Sault Ste. Marie in the year 1841 to the late Leo Bonno. She was the mother of fourteen children, nine of whom grew up to manhood and womanhood. Seven of them who live in this city, and are well known, are: Mrs. Antoine Piquette, Mrs. Joseph Lecoy, Mrs. Adolph Pigeon, Miss Josephine, Joseph, Leo and Peter Bonno. Mrs. L. D. Jenne, who died at Cheboygan two year ago, was another daughter and Mrs. Bonno's oldest son, Johnnie Bonno, was killed many years ago at Negaunee. Mrs. Bonno was a grandmother to a great many children and also a great grandmother. Her death was similar to her late husband, quite sudden. She died at Sault Ste. Marie, May 12th, 1892, of heart trouble at the age of seventy-one years and three months. She was very smart and active for one of her years. Her death is a sad blow to her children, who have the sympathy of the entire community. AN OLD FRIEND.

May 31, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Lucas Billingwa and Anton Marencish, were run over and killed by the cars on the Hecla & Torch Lake railroad last week.

May 31, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of Joseph Seidl, an old resident of Menominee, who has been missing for weeks, was found floating in the water at that place last week.

June 4, 1892 Page 1
Mrs. Benjamin Van Luven Died Monday.
Mrs. Benjamin Van Luven, an account of whose fatal burning at Iroquois, while heroically rescuing her children from a flaming building, appeared exclusively in THE NEWS, was released from her agony by death last Monday. It is a pitiful case.

June 4, 1892 Page 2
A Pioneer Resident's Death.
The Freeport (Ill) Journal thus speaks of Wm. W. Phillips, who recently died in this city.
William W. Phillips, an old settler of Stephenson county died Friday morning at 2:30, at Sault Ste. Marie, aged 74 years. The remains reached here Sunday afternoon accompanied by his son George, and were interred in the city cemetery this morning at 10 o'clock. Mr. Phillips was a native of Albany county, New York, and came west about forty years ago. He settled on a farm in Lancaster Township, this county, which he operated until about five years ago. He then sold his farm and went to Kansas where he remained two years. He then went to Northern Michigan where he remained until his death. During his residence in this county Mr. Phillips made many friends who sincerely mourn his death. He was a member of the Methodist church and contributed liberally of his means to the cause of Christianity. Three children survive him. They are Wesley of Kansas, and George and Verne, of Sault Ste. Marie.

June 4, 1892 Page 6
A Treasured One Gone.
Lines on the death of Leslie Violet, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph House, who died Friday, May 20, 1892, aged one year and six months....

June 4, 1892 Page 7
Engineer J. Nasky, of the C.P.R., was run over and killed by the cars Saturday near Chalmsford.

June 4, 1892 Page 8
Miss Laura Grandy was called to Yale, Mich., Thursday by the severe illness of her father who died just after her arrival.

June 11, 1892 Page. 2
Drowned In Little Rapids.
James Mitchell Loses his Life in the Treacherous Waters.
James Mitchell, engineer on Dunbar's tug Phil Sheridan, met his death by drowning in Little Rapids at 8 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Mr. Mitchell had purchased a horse on Sugar Island and was in the act of bringing it to this side when the accident occurred. He was on the horse's back and the horse was swimming across the swift current when suddenly Mitchell fell off and was swept away. He sank in an instant. The drowned man lived with his wife and one child on Cary street and had been married but a little over a year.... The body was found by the party of faithful searchers at 6 o'clock Monday night, thirty feet below where the accident occurred. It was then taken to Undertaker Harry Blake's establishment and after being prepared for burial was removed to the late home on Cary street. The funeral was held in St. James church at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon. Rev. Mulligan officiating, Rev. Rowe being absent from the city. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

June 11, 1892 Page 2
Death of James Murray.
James Murray, a well known engineer, died at the American House, at noon last Saturday, of consumption, aged about 50 years. The deceased had lived in the city for fifteen years and was master mechanic on the lock for Boyle and Roach. After the completion of the lock he went to work for C. S. Barker and remained with him until Mr. Barker went to Duluth. Mr. Murray was employed by Collins & Farwell and Hughes Bros, & Bangs and was always found at his post of duty. The remains were sent to his former home at Forester, Mich., on Sunday morning's train and a large number of Maccabees and Masons followed the remains to the depot. Undertaker Harry Blake had charge of the funeral.

June 11, 1892 Page 2
Relieved from Suffering by Death.
Mrs. St. Pierre, the wife of Paul St. Pierre, and daughter of Capt. and Mrs. Wm. Greenough died Monday morning of consumption. The funeral was held Wednesday morning at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. A notable fact is that the burial occurred on the third anniversay of Mr. and Mrs. St. Pierre's wedding. Two little children, the youngest only a few weeks old, are left motherless by the untimely death of the young mother whose relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of all.

June 11, 1892 Page 2
His Sufferings Ended.
Death of Frank Kennedy of Consumption Tuesday Morning.
Frank Kennedy, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Kennedy, died at his home on Maple street, at 1 o'clock Tuesday morning of consumption, aged 17 years and 9 months. For sometime the young man, had been a sufferer from that dread disease, but was only confined to his bed a little over two weeks. He will be remembered as an employee in E. M. Lacy's drugstore, where he went to learn the business, but on account of close confinement was obliged to give it up. Last summer he sailed on the Minnie M. thinking it would be beneficial to his health, but as the disease advanced he was compelled to throw up his position on the boat. He was a young man of good habits and his gentlemanly conduct made him a general favorite. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church Thursday morning, and his remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community in their affliction. H. C. Kennedy who has been in Minnesota for several months, was summoned, but did not arrive until Wednesday afternoon.

June 11, 1892 Page 3
Detour.
.... Late in the morning of May 31st, a Coburn Island negro commonly known as "Pompey," came from Bruce Mines with whiskey and potatoes and anchored off the east end of Drummond Island, .... Early next morning his boat was found to have no occupant, and on investigation Pompey was found lying near the boat in six feet of water with a whiskey bottle by his side.... brought to Detour and placed in charge of Coroner House, who buried him on 2d inst.... Deceased is not known to have any relatives and your correspondent has been unable to learn his real name. He was perhaps forty years or more....

June 11, 1892 Page 3
Death of Old Time Sooite.
Mrs. Charlotte Bendry, wife of Capt. James Bendry, who died at Baraga last week of la grippe, was at one time a well known resident of this city. She was born here July 4, 1829, and was married to Capt. Bendry in 1849, removing to her late home shortly after. Her death will be mourned by her large circle of olden time Soo friends.

June 11, 1892 Page 3
Death of Old-Time Sooites.
Rev. Peter Marksman, who was interpreter at the Indian Mission in this city over 50 years ago, died at L'Anse last Saturday. The deceased was 74 years of age and had many acquaintances in Chippewa county.

June 11, 1892 Page 9
Mary Ida, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick O'Brien, died at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning, of croup. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Thursday, and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

June 18, 1892 Page 1
Another Tidal Wave.
John Evans, a sailor aged 60 years, died at the marine hospital here at 5 o'clock Wednesday afteroon, from injuries received in a riot at Toledo about a month ago. He had been in the hospital here three weeks. His body was removed to Blake's Undertaking establishment and will be sent to Milwaukee this morning, where his daughter, Mrs. J. R. Pierson, resides.

June 18, 1892 Page 1
Theo. Holsizer Drowned in Hay Lake.
Thoe. Holsizer, scowman for Carkin, Stickney and Cram's dredge No. 15, was drowned in Hay Lake Wednesday night. He was winding up the pocket when the bar slipped and he fell off the scow. Although a good swimmer he drowned at once. He was probably stunned by the fall. Holsizer was about 22 years old, unmarried and lived at Saginaw. The body has not been recovered.

June 18, 1892 Page 1
Death of John Vanderheyden.
John Vanderheyden, superintendent of the Ryan brick yard, died Wednesday afternoon at the residence of Sandy Ross, as the result of being caught by a belt and thrown twenty feet at the yard last week. The remains of the unfortunate man were taken to Ann Arbor Thursday for interment. Mr. Vanderheyden was about 60 years of age and a highly respected citizen. His son Frank, and his brother William and wife, were called here from Iowa by the accident and were here at the time of the sad death. Mr. Vanderheyden's sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of all.

June 18, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Borchetti, an Italian, murdered his wife at Iron Mountain Monday. The murderer escaped and was still at large at last account.

June 18, 1892 Page 9
Pickford Items.
William, the son of Mr. and Mrs. McGill, was drowned at Chassel. His body will be brought here for interment. The parents have the sympathy of the community in their sad affliction.

June 18, 1892 Page 10
John McDonald of Chatsworth, Ont., was killed at Mr. Kimmel's mill and he came here to meet his father.

June 18, 1892 Page 10
Miss Laura Grandy has returned from Southern Michigan, where she was called by the death of her father.

June 18, 1892 Page 10
Sudden Death of Mrs. John Moher.
Mrs. John Moher, aged 35 years, died at her home on the Seymour road Tuesday morning of heart failure. She was only sick two days. Funeral services were held at St. Mary's at 8 o'clock Thursday morning and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. The A. O. H. of which Mr. Moher is a member, attended the funeral in a body.

June 18, 1892 Page 10
Death of the Aged Mrs. Miniclier.
Mrs. Mary Ann Miniclier died at the residence of her son, Capt. Wm. Greenough Monday night, at the advanced age of 81 years. Funeral services were held at St. Mary's church Wednesday morning and the remains were placed in a vault at the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Miniclier was an old and well known resident, having lived here ever since she was 13 years old.

June 25, 1892 Page 1
Gone to His Rest.
Death of Wm. Ruehle Sr., an Old and Well Known Citizen.
Wm. Ruehle, Sr., an old and respected citizen, died at 1:35 yesterday morning of pneumonia, at the age of 60 years, 1 month and 24 days. Mr. Ruehle was born in Baden, Germany, April 30, 1832. He first arrived in the Soo in 1856. He afterwards went to Detroit, where he was married Nov 8, 1857, and then returned here, where he has resided ever snce. He was one of the Soo's most highly-respected citizens. The sorrowing relatives speak in the highest praise of the attention of Drs. Lang and Harison, the attending physicians. The funeral will occur tomorrow at 2 o'clock at the Presbyterian church, under the auspices of the Odd Fellows and Revs. T. R. Easterday and C. W. Luther will officiate. The remains will be laid to rest in Riverside cemetery, under direction of Undertaker Vanderhook....

June 25, 1892 Page 1
Another Victim of the River.
Robert Miller, aged 22 and unmarried, who has been living with Levi Mix, at Echo Bay, was drowned opposite Luckes' mill, Garden River, Friday night of last week. He was swinging a sledge on a scow, missed what he was striking at and fell overboard. As he was an expert swimmer, but never came up, it is presumed he clutched the sledge handle and the heavy hammer held him down until he was drowned.

June 25, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Emil Brasier was killed last week at L.'Anse by being thrown from a buggy in a runaway.

July 2, 1892 Page 1
Judge McCrea Dead.
Judge McCrea, an old and highly respected citizen of the Canadian Soo, died Thursday night. His funeral will occur today and Judge Steere and the bar of this county expect to attend in a body.

July 2, 1892 Page 1
Death of James Curtis at Traverse City.
Word has been received here of the death of James Curtis, a former Soo boy, who died at Traverse City last week. Mr. Curtis was well and favorably known by all the old residents of the Soo as a bright and promising young man. He was a trusted employee of W. C. Given and later of Pease and Sevald, until seven years ago, when owing to ill health and over work, his mind became slightly deranged and his friends took him to Traverse City for treatment. Lately the reports received from him were favorable and the news of his death, which was caused by heart disease, was a painful surprise to his friends and relatives here.

July 2, 1892 Page 1
Mrs. David Jackson of Bruce Mines, and William Roach, of Thessalon, arrived in the city Thursday to attend the funeral of John P. Roach.

July 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Winegar, of Escanaba, was run over by a train of cars and killed.

July 2, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A young man named Thos. Waters was killed at the Lake Angeline mine last week by the discharge of a blast which hung fire.

July 2, 1892 Page 8
The infant child of Paul St. Pierre died at noon Thursday. It was buried yesterday.

July 2, 1892 Page 8
Capt. Granger, who died here a short time ago, was a member of Detroit Lodge No. 6, A.O.U.W. His beneficiaries received $2,000 insurance June 11th.

July 2, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. G. M. Mulford, of Detroit, sister of John H. Ruehle, arrived in the city last Saturday, to attend the funeral of her uncle, the late Wm. Ruehle, Sr. Mrs. Mulford will return home tomorrow.

July 2, 1892 Page 8
Mrs. C. A. Watson, wife of Chairman Watson, of the county board of supervisors, died Tuesday night at Detroit.

July 9, 1892 Page 1
Mrs. Elizabeth Carr, mother of Mrs. B. D. Henley, died Tuesday morning. The remains were taken to Negaunee, Thursday, accompanied by the sorrowing relatives, for interment.

July 9, 1892 Page 1
The bright and beautiful infant son of Mr. and Mrs. George Kemp died Wednesday afternoon after a short illness of cholera infantum. The remains of the little fellow were interred at Riverside. Mr. and Mrs. Kemp have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their sorrow.

July 9, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Wm. James was drowned at Iron Mountain last week.

July 9, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Paul Lavoi, a brakeman was instantly killed in a railroad collision at Norway last week.

July 9, 1892 Page 6
C. A. Watson's Great Loss.
Detroit Evening News.
On the 16th inst. Mrs C. A. Watson, of Detour, Mich. registered at the International Hotel, Windsor, and had with her a two-year-old boy, whom she had brought for the purpose of having an operation performed on him. The operation was successfully performed by Dr. Wyman and Carney of Detroit. Mrs. Watson was in a delicate condition and the shock was so great to her that she died on Tuesday. Her funeral took place from the International this morning. She leaves a husband and three small children.

July 9, 1892 Page 7
N. J. Gibbs, a well known architect, who figured quite prominently in the Soo building boom four years ago, died suddenly at Mount Clemens last Saturday.

July 9, 1892 Page 7
Rosedale Items.
Miss Maggie Boddy, teacher of Rosedale school, received word of her father's death on Tuesday. Miss Boddy has the sympathy of her many friends here.

July 9, 1892 Page 8
Resolutions of Condolence.
Resolutions of condolences adopted by Sault Ste. Marie Lodge No. 123, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in memory of Wm. Ruehle, deceased June 24th, 1892....

July 23, 1892 Page 2
Duncan Smith, 21 years old, was killed Thursday of last week at Bradley and Hurst's camp, on the Sucker river.

July 23, 1892 Page 2
Wm. S. Philips, sergeant in the 23rd, infantry, stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas, died of pneumonia, July 6th. The deceased leaves a widow and five children to mourn his loss. He was well known here, having resided at Fort Brady for six years previous to his departure for Texas, three years ago.

July 23, 1892 Page 2
The respected and venerable father of John Q. Look, cashier of the Savings bank, died at Lowell, Mich., Sunday, at the advanced age of 91 years.

July 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Richard Hulbert, aged 72 and a pioneer of the Upper Peninsula, died at St. Ignace last week.

July 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ed. C. Loomis, engineer at Ashland mine, near Ironwood, was crushed to death in the crank pit last week.

July 23, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Peter Peterson, aged 50, living near Marinette, committed suicide last week by cutting his throat with a razor.

July 30, 1892 Page 2
An infant daughter of Joel Potter, died Monday and was buried at the city cemetery. The little child was a niece of Mrs. Clarence White, who had taken care of her since her mother's death several months ago. The funeral was conducted by Revs. C. F. Bronson and J. E. Whalen.

July 30, 1892 Page 2
Mrs. E. H.Conway returned home this week, only to be summoned to St. Clair again by a telegram announcing the death of her aged mother, Mrs. Waterloo.

July 30, 1892 Page 3
Mrs. E. H.Conway and Mrs. F. V. Flower were called to St. Clair Wednesday by the death of their mother, Mrs. C. H. Waterloo.

July 30, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Fred Bohlman, of Marinette, was drowned last week while bathing in the abandoned pit of the Grand Central mine.

July 30, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph A. Hemsteger, the Negaunee representative of the Ishpeming Daily Press, committed suicide at Negaunee last week by taking arsenic.

July 30, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ed C. Loomis, who had charge of the Cornish pumps and the dynamos of the electric light plant at the Ashland mines at Ironwood, was crushed to death in the crank pit of the pump around which he had evidently been working when the ponderous arm came upon him. Death was instantaneous.

August 6, 1892 Page 1
Marine.
John Bray, aged 30, seaman on the schooner John W. Hanaford, was knocked overboard and drowned, near the Spry dock, this city, shortly after noon on Monday. Bray was engaged in hauling in the tow line and was standing near one of the forward timber heads, when, by a sudden jerk, he was pulled overboard. He did not come up after sinking the first time. The unfortunate man shipped at Toledo, and it was not known by the captain whether the man had a family or not The body has not been recovered.

August 6, 1892 Page 1
Death of Pioneer Frank Gurnoe.
Frank Gurnoe, brother of John Gurnoe and Mrs. W. S. Shaw, died at Marquette Thursday night. Mr. Gurnoe was one of the Soo's pioneers, having been born here about 76 years ago, and homesteaded the lot now occupied by the Iroquois Hotel. He has not been a resident of the Soo for 20 years. He leaves many relatives here. During his residence here he made many friends, and was an ardent republican and at an early date was the leader of the republican party in this country.

August 6, 1892 Page 1
Fell from a Scaffold.
John N. Murray, a carpenter employed at new Fort Brady by Contractors Forster and Smith, fell from a scaffold Wednesday morning and received fatal internal injuries. Dr. Rundle, the attending physician, says the unfortunate man cannot recover.

August 6, 1892 Page 1
Fred Perkins, of Hulburt, died in this city Thursday. He leaves a wife and two chldren in needy circumstances. The remains will be taken to Fife Lake, Mich., today.

August 6, 1892 Page 1
Joseph Talbot, first cook on the Canadian Pacific Steamship Manitoba, dropped dead at Port Arthur Monday night. His remains were taken to Owen Sound for burial.
August 6, 1892 Page 3
Mr. and Mrs. R. Common, Jr., returned from Detroit last Sunday, where they had been called by the death of Mr. Common's youngest brother.

August 6, 1892 Page 3
The 9-year-old son of Benj. Holley, of Hulburt, who was crushed by a log Friday of last week, died the next morning.

August 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Eddie Koch, aged nineteen years, was drowned at Crystal Falls last week while bathing.

August 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. Sharon was instantly killed at Menominee while operating an edger in a sawmill last week.

August 6, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of Maggie Erickson, of Escanaba, who mysteriously disappeared three weeks ago, was found floating in the bay last week.

August 13, 1892 Page 1
Still It Grows.
The body of sailor John Bray, who was drowned off the schooner Hannaford last week was recovered Monday. An inquest was held by Coroner Bacon and a verdict of accidental drowning was rendered. The remains were buried at Riverside.

August 13, 1892 Page 1
Death of C. H. Reutinger.
He Expires Suddenly at the Perry Tuesday Morning.
Conrad H. Reutinger, aged 61, of Chillicothe, O., died at the Perry Hotel at 1:45 o'clock Tuesday morning, of uræmic convulsions, brought on by acute Bright's disease. Mr. Reutinger came to the Perry from his home Wednesday August 3, just having partially recovered from a violent attack of rheumatism. The first few days he seemed to gain in strength, but on the fourth day after his arrival he was stricken with a convulsion, from which he rallied, but on Monday last two more convulsions followed and caused his death at the above hour stated. Mr. Reutinger had made fifteen annual visits to the Soo. Being a sufferer from hay fever, he usually came here about August 1, remaining for two months. Shortly after the boom he purchased a tract of 160 acres of land down Hay lake road, which he owned at the time of his death..... With his sons, Conrad, Jr., and Otto, he was engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business in Chillicothe. Besides his wife, nine children survive him. Mrs. Reutinger and son Otto arrived in the city Wednesday afternoon, and left with the remains the same evening for home.....

August 13, 1892 Page 2
Mrs. W. H. Peck returned Wednesday from, Capac where she was called by the death of her mother, Mrs. Eva Proctor, aged 68.

August 13, 1892 Page 4
The State Of Superior.
Freddie Gilbertson was drowned at Menominee last week while in bathing.

August 13, 1892 Page 4
The State Of Superior.
Andrew Johnson, of Escanaba, fell from a moving railway car last week and the wheels passed over both his legs. Amputation was necessary and the man died during the operation.

August 13, 1892 Page 4
The State Of Superior.
Henry Laird, a homesteader near Red Jacket was found dead in the woods last week. He had left Baraga to go on his homestead alone and it is supposed he was taken suddenly ill.

August 13, 1892 Page 9
Soo friends of Commander Heyerman were grieved this week to learn of the death of his son Stirling.

August 13, 1892 Page 9
The body of John Bray, a sailor on the John W. Hannaford, who was drowned last week at Spry's dock, was recovered on Monday.

August 13, 1892 Page 10
Nebish Nuggets. (Special Correspondence.)
Alfred, the two year old son of Mr. James O'Grady, died about 2 o'clock Wednesday morning. He had been suffering from an attack of inflamation of the lungs. He appeared to be getting better, but had a relapse Tuesday evening. The mill shut down for the funeral, which was held Wednesday evening at the little church at Sunny Side, St. Joe. Mr. and Mrs. O'Grady have the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends in their sad bereavement.

August 27, 1892 Page 1
Death of Mrs. J. H. Veysey.
Mrs. Veysey, the beloved wife of J. H. Veysey, did Sunday at 4 a.m., after four months illness, of consumption. The funeral occurred Sunday at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred at the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Veysey was aged 22 years and 5 months, had been married two years, and leaves one child 15 months old. She was an estimable and highly respected lady. The sorrowing husband greatly appreciates the kindness of his neighbors in his affliction.

August 27, 1892 Page 1
Death of an Aged Resident.
Robert VanWyck, aged about 66 years, died at noon last Saturday. The funeral was held at the M. E. Church the following day and the remains were interred in Riverside cemetery. Mr. VanWyck was the father of Gilbert VanWyck, of the firm of McDonald & VanWyck, and a well known and highly respected citizen.

August 27, 1892 Page 3
Raber. (Special Correspondence.)
Died on the 16th inst., Charles, infant son of A. Goetz. The remains were interred in the Wayside Mound cemetery Thursday. The many friends of the bereaved parents extend their warmest sympathy. Alex. Goetz, of Sault Ste.Marie, was present at the funeral.

August 27, 1892 Page 3
Raber.
We are sorry to announce the death of Anthony Goetz's baby. They awoke Wednesday morning about 4 o'clock and found it dead in the bed.

August 27, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Patrick Sullivan, a switchman employed in the A. N. W. Yards at Ishpeming, was killed while uncoupling cars last Saturday.

August 27, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior. (1st & 2nd pages of this paper are missing.)
John Kinnear, a young brakeman on the C.&N.W. Ry., was crushed to death between two cars at Florence last week.

Saturday, September 3, 1892 Page 8
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Died-Oren Chandler, infant son of Chase S. and Lillian G. Osborn, Friday morning, September 2, 1892, at ten o'clock, aged eight months and eleven days, of cholera infantum. Funeral at residence at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Interment at Riverside.

Saturday, September 3, 1892 Page 8
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The body of Albert J. Kelly, who was drowned at the Nebish, was recovered late last week and buried in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, September 3, 1892 Page 8
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A baby of Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Whiteman, died Monday and was buried Tuesday, at the city cemetery by Undertaker Gardner.

Saturday, September 3, 1892 Page 8
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An infant of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lalonde died early Tuesday morning and was buried the same day at the Catholic cemetery.

September 10, 1892 Page 2
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Chapenski died of cholera infantum last Saturday and was interred in the Catholic cemetery Monday.

September 10, 1892 Page 2
On the body of Captain P. G. Minch, owner of the Western Reserve, over $700 in cash was found by Captain J. H. Frahm, of Life Saving Station No. 12, who turned the money over to the late captain's son, Phillip Minch, of Cleveland.

September 10, 1892 Page 7
The State of Superior.
Jeremiah Leary, of the Atlantic mine, Houghton, committed suicide Sunday by hanging. He was mentally unsound.

September 10, 1892 Page 7
The State of Superior.
Riley H. Fuller, one of the pioneers of Luce county, died August 28th aged 72 years.

September 10, 1892 Page 7
The State Of Superior.
James Kirkpatrick, a commission agent at Escanaba, committed suicide last Saturday by shooting himself. He leaves a wife and child.

September 10, 1892 Page 9
Nebish Nuggets. (Special Correspondence.)
The friends of Alex McFadden were shocked to hear of his horrible death. It would be hard to find a more exemplary young man in this community, or any other, than he was.

September 17, 1892 Page 1
A Strange Killing.
Mrs. Dalton Shoots James Wice Dead at Her Doorway

Saturday Night.
Another killing affray was added to Chippewa county's annals of tragedies shortly after 8 o'clock last Saturday evening, when Mrs. Mary Dalton shot down James Wice, at the door of her home, in the western part of the city. Wice was shot in the left eye, with a revolver bullet, the ball passing clear through the head, causing instant death. One story runs about as follows: James Wice, a hard working man who lived with his wife at Raber and who was employed in the mill of Feltus & Treadwell, came to this city on the Faxton last Saturday evening in search of a woman to accompany him home to take care of his sick wife. Mrs. Harriet McIntyre was recommended and he started out to find her. Shortly after 7 o'clock he called at M. Reidy's grocery store, corner Magazine and Spruce Sts. and asked Mr. Reidy to direct him to Mrs. McIntyre's house, which is located in that part of the city. He was shown the way, but the night was very dark and a dreary rain was falling at the time Wice made a mistake and knocked at the door of the Dalton house, and was shot by Mrs. Dalton. This occurred about 8 o'clock, Abram Dalton, the husband, said to The News that he was down town at the time and returned home shortly before 9 o'clock. He was told by his wife that she had shot at some one three times, but did not know whether she hit him or not. Dalton said he than retired, and did not see the dead man until 6 o'clock Sunday morning. At 7 o'clock Sunday morning Dalton went to the home of Officer David Ellis and informed him of the affair, and requested Mr. Ellis to remove the body, as he did not care to have it so close to his house. The dead body laid with upturned face and outstretched arms all night long and until almost noon next day in a torrent of rain when, by order of Coroner Bacon, it was removed to Blake's morgue.
Mrs. Dalton was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Lessard. She was taken before Justice Warner Wednesday morning,.... The murdered man was 30 years of age, and is said to have been a quiet, sober and industrious man. He married a daughter of Andrew J. Smith two years ago, who with one child, survives him.

September 17, 1892 Page 3
Messrs. Randolph and Charles Bishop received the sad intelligence Saturday by wire that their father was dead. They left for Woodstock, Ont., immediately.

September 17, 1892 Page 3
Raber. (Special Correspondence.)
Died, on the 1st. instant, George Muir, the 19 year old son of Wm. Muir. The deceased had been ailing for some time past, but had only been bedfast a few days when he was called away at about eleven o'clock Wednesday night. The friends extend sympathy to the bereaved parents.

September 17, 1892 Page 8
Six More Bodies Found.
Western Reserve Victims Float Ashore-Other Waftings of the Waves.
Six more bodies from the Western Reserve wreck came ashore twelve miles north of life saving station No. 12 Thusday morning. They were the remains of Capt. Albert Meyers, the Reserve's commander, the little son of Capt. Peter G. Minch, the owner, and four unknowns. They were in a bad state of decomposition and had to be buried on the shore by the life saving crew at station 12. One of the four is thought to be that of Martin Klausen, the look out, but Capt. Frahm said he was not sure. The bodies of Capt. Meyers and the Minch child will be exhumed and taken to Cleveland. This makes a total of twelve found so out far of the twenty-six lost.

September 24, 1892 Page 2
R. S. Hart was called to Detroit Wednesday by the death of his brother.

September 24, 1892 Page 2
F. E. Ketchum returned Thursday from West Superior, where he went to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, A. J. Owen. Mrs. Ketchum remained in West Superior.

September 24, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
By the death of his father, Luther Beecher, of Detroit, Geo. W. Beecher, who has been a resident of Negaunee for fifteen years, becomes a seven-time millionaire.

September 24, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Anton Wylzeck, a pumpman at the Aurora mine, near Ironwood, was killed by a blast last week.

September 24, 1892 Page 7
Rosedale Items. (Special Correspondence.)
Mrs. Jas. Wyce has the sympathy of the neighborhood in her sad bereavement. What imagination can picture, what pen can indite the pang that stung that poor woman's heart when she realized her husband's untimely end. There is one consolation, which is that her husband was a gentleman and respected by all who knew him, for his past history gives him a spotless reputation.

September 24, 1892 Page 7
Iroquois. (Special Correspondence.)
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Ranson Van Luven died last Saturday.

September 24, 1892 Page 8
Herman Klasen, of Huron, O., Horace Fisher and Captain Frank Coles, of Cleveland, arrived in the city yesterday on the steamer LaSalle. They expect to leave tomorrow in company with Undertaker Jacob Vanderhook for Lite Saving Station number 12 to exhume the bodies of Mrs. Captain Minch, her two children, Captain Albert Meyers and Marten Klasen, and take them to Cleveland for burial. Mr. Klasen is a brother of Martin Klasen, the lookout who was drowned in the wreck of the Western Reserve. Mr. Fisher is a stepson of Captain Meyers, and Captain Coles came up to look after the removal of the Minch's. Other friends and relatives of the others buried at Station 12 are expected to arrive today from Chicago on the same mission. All the bodies, excepting the six that were in the metalic life boat and that of the Egglesby child have been recovered. The six unfortunates who were in the metalic boat will probably never be found, as they went down twenty miles from shore in deep water, and it is a rare occurrence when old Superior gives up its dead.

October 1, 1892 Page 1
Death of Reuben Montgomery.
The Coulter Murder Revived by a Set of Peculiar Circumstances.
The Coulter murder is fresh in the memory of every one in Chippewa county. A few days ago Reuben Montgomery, brother-in-law of William Coulter, the murderer, and who was the only person who saw the fatal shot fired, died at his home in the country. Reports from the branch prison at Marquette are to the effect that Coulter, who is serving a sentence there, is slowly dying of consumption.... The death of Montgomery and the serious illness of Coulter are peculiar coincidences.

October 1, 1892 Page 1
Marine.
Undertaker Vanderhook this week brought down from Deer Park the remains of Capt. Meyers, Florence and Charles Minch, Martin Klausen and an unknown man, all victims of the Western Reserve. The bodies will be sent to Cleveland for burial.

October 1, 1892 Page 1
Marine.
James Wiseman, first cook on the City of London, fell over board near Spanish River Sunday afternoon and was drowned. Mrs. Wiseman, second cook on the boat, and who witnessed the accident, was almost crazed with grief.

October 1, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Three-year-old Frankie Frederickson fell into an unused pit of the Cleveland Iron Company at Ishpeming, Friday and was drowned.

October 1, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Adolph Thibodeau, a lumber contractor, died suddenly while on his way from Lake Linden to his camps on Huron bay. His death was caused by a piece of beefsteak lodging in his throat while eating.

October 1, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Freddie Kraemer, of Menominee, six years old, was run over by a team last week and killed.

October 1, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Wm. Walton, an old and well known resident of Ishpeming, dropped dead suddenly on the street Tuesday of last week.

October 1, 1892 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Early Tuesday morning, at Marquette a row boat, containing Levi Frazer and George Cromiller was struck by a fish tug and wrecked outside the breakwater. Frazer succeeded in reaching the pier and saved himself, but Cromiller less fortunate was drowned.

October 1, 1892 Page 7
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
Catherine St. Leger, infant daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Armitage, died last Saturday evening, of cholera infantum. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved parents.

October 8, 1892 Page 2
The bodies of Mrs. P. G. Minch, Florence and Charles were taken to Cleveland on the steamer Wawatam, and the funeral services were held at the Black & Wright's undertaking parlors Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. The bodies were taken to Woodland cemetery for interment.

October 8, 1892 Page 2
Bay Mills.
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. McDonald died last Sunday of cholera infantum. We sympathize with the bereaved parents. The little one had been a great sufferer for eight weeks and everything that could be done for it had been done. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald feel very grateful to their friends and neighbors who helped them in their affliction.

October 8, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Thomas Spellman, a 13-year-old youngster of Ontonagon, was accidently shot last week by a companion who was carelessly handling a shot gun. He died the next morning. He is the fifth boy that has been shot there this season.

October 8, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Philo M. Everett, the oldest resident of Marquette and the pioneer of Marquette county, died at Marquette Sept. 28, aged 85 years.
Octobet 8, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of Jerry Sullivan, of Hurontown, who has been missing for the past month, was found in Portage Lake last week.

October 8, 1892 Page 10
Mrs. B. M. Morris was shocked yesterday by receiving a telegram from Saginaw announcing the sudden death of her only brother, Maunie Lenhoff, a bright young man, 24 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Morris will leave for Saginaw this evening.

October 15, 1892 Page 10
Marine.
Messrs. L. C. Davis and Edward Simpson, of Cleveland returned Thursday on the City of Green Bay, the former having recovered the body of his son, the latter that of his brother, washed ashore near Lonesome Point, L.S.... The bodies were fully identified and were shipped to Cleveland by steamer Colonial.

October 22, 1892 Page 1
Death of Lester McKnight.
Capt. A. B. Roach informed The News last evening of the death of one of his oldest and dearest friends, Lester McKnight at Vineland, Cal., October 11. Mr. McKnight had consumption, but heart failure was the direct cause of death. He was born in the Soo, where he had many friends. His father was a pioneer of this locality, owned the old Portage railroad around the rapids, valuable dock property and other interests. McKnight road was named in his honor. Many Sooites will be saddened by the news of Lester McKnight's death, and all his old friends here extend deep sympathy to his widow. He was 45 years of age and a good man in every way. Mrs. McKnight and three children survive him.

October 22, 1892 Page 1
A Fatal Accident.
Alex. Watson Meets Death by a Bullet From an Unknown Source.
A sad and fatal accident occurred near Stirlingville last Saturday afternoon, resulting in the death of Alex. Watson, a most estimable young man. David Hill jr. and Alex. Watson, bosum friends, living in the vicinity of Stirlingville, were returning home from a hunt. Mr. Watson was walking behind Mr. Hill, who was carrying a rifle over his shoulder. Following the report of a gun, Mr. Watson cried "I am shot," and would have fallen had he not been caught by his friend. Mr. Hill called his brother Henry Hill who was working near. Dr. Webster was summoned, the injured man taken to the residence of the Hills and everything possible done to relieve, his sufferings. But his wound was so severe that he died within a few hours. From whence came the bullet that cut off the life of Mr. Watson is a mystery. The wound was in the left side, just above the hip bone, and two low to have been caused by a shot from a rifle carried in the ordinary manner by a man of Mr. Hill's height. This, with the fact that Mr. Hill had as many cartridges on his return home as he did when he started out, and the additional fact that other rifle reports were heard at the time of the accident, leads to the belief that the wound was caused by a shot fired by some unknown person. David Hill Jr. was almost crazed with grief over the tragic affair and Dr. Webster had to administer opiates before he could be calmed. He is exonerated from all blame in the terrible affair by the Watsons. The remains of Mr. Watson were interred Tuesday at Graham's cemetery. His death has cast a gloom over the entire community.

October 22, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.

August Johnson, of Crystal Falls, was crushed to jelly by a C & N. W railroad train at Mastodon last week. Liquor was to blame for it.

October 22, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A 2-year-old boy of Mr. and Mrs. Reiner Hoch was accidently drowned in an unused shaft of the Pendill mine, Negaunee, last Saturday morning. Mr. Hoch was the nominee for senator from the 31st district on the democratic ticket, and in consequence of the sad accident he has withdrawn from the contest.

October 22, 1892 Page 8
Milton Peterman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Peterman, died at his home at 6 o'clock last Sunday morning of stomach trouble. The remains were buried at Riverside Tuesday. The family have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

October 22, 1892 Page 8
J. W. Meyers, of Niagara Falls, arrived in the city Tuesday night for a visit with his brother-in-law, Charles Hoffmaster, at the Linsley farm. Mr. Meyers brought the news that Mr. Hoffmaster inherited $3,000 by the death of his father in New York state a few weeks ago.

October 29, 1892 Page 2
Hon. N. W. McMahon was called to Mariet last evening by a telegram announcing that John H. Becket, his brother-in-law was dying.

October 29, 1892 Page 11
Marine.
W. Lloyd, of Cleveland, arrived at the Perry Tuesday and left Thursday for Deer Park to secure the body of Engineer William Seaman, who was engineer of the ill-fated Western Reserve. Mr. Lloyd was delegated by the Masonic Lodge of Cleveland to exhume Mr. Seaman's remains, which are buried on the beach near station No. 12. A wife and five children survive the unfortunate engineer.

October 29, 1892 Page 12
Death of Mrs. W. J. LaLonde.
The remains of Mrs. Millie LaLonde, wife of William J. LaLonde, who died at Carondelet, Mo., arrived in the city Tuesday and were interred Wednesday. The death of Mrs. LaLonde was sudden and unexpected. She leaves a husband and three children. Mrs. Lalonde possessed a kind and lovable disposition and made friends of all who knew her. Relatives have the sympathy of all their friends.

October 29, 1892 Page 12
A Noble Woman.
Sad Death of the wife of Pres. Harrison Tuesday Morning ....
Mrs. Caroline Scott Harrison, the beloved wife of President Harrison, died at the White House at 1:40 o'clock Tuesday morning, of quick consumption, ....
Mrs. Harrison, who was 60 years of age at the time of her death, was the daughter of Dr. John W. Scott, who was president of an academy for young ladies in Oxford, O....
(Harrison) - A little more than a year afterwards he returned to Oxford and was married to Miss Scott Oct 20, 1853. He was then but little over 20 years of age and his wife was still younger.

November 5, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
George Craig, another of the pioneers of the Upper Peninsula, died at Marquette last week at the ripe age of 73 years.

November 5, 1892 Page 6 The State of Superior.
While out hunting last week John Corbett, of Ishpeming accidently discharged his gun and was shot through the heart. He leaves a wife and six children.

November 5, 1892 Page 8
John F. Moloney was called to Cheboygan this week by the death of his aged father, John Moloney, one of Cheboygan's oldest and most respected citizens. Mr. Moloney returned Wednesday from his sad journey.

November 5, 1892 Page 12
Edward Emery, aged 17 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Emery, died at his home Wednesday evening, of typhoid fever. The funeral occurred yesterday. Edward was a bright and promising young man, and his death is severe blow to his parents who have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

November 12, 1892 Page 9
Rosedale Items. (Special Correspondence.)
John Allen, born at Belfast, Ireland, Dec. 5th, 1821, departed this life at his home in Rosedale, Nov 5th, 1892. He was happily converted to God, only about five days before he died and being questioned closely in regard to his soul he said "I am saved." .... A wife and six children survive. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Chas. Harger at the Congregational church, after which the remains were placed in the cemetery here to wait the resurrection morn.

November 12, 1892 Page 10
A little child of Mr. and Mrs. John McPherson died yesterday morning of inflamtion of the lungs.

November 19, 1892 Page 2
Rosedale Items.
We are sorry to state that John Allen, of this place, passed away Friday evening at 4 o'clock. The Congregational minister preached the funeral sermon, which was very interesting. The funeral was largely attended, there being twent-nine rigs. The remains were interred Sunday in the Rosedale burying ground. His widow and family have the hearfelt sympathy of this community in their sad bereavement.

November 26, 1892 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Henry Lahti, a skip tender in the Buffalo mine near Negaunee, had his head caught between the cage and timbers in the shaft and it was torn off as clean as though guillotined. It was the result of his own carelessness.

December 3, 1892 Page 1
On The Wane.
The body of Chas Lebeau, second mate of the steamer Western Reserve, which was lost on Lake Superior, August 31st, was brought down on the steamer City of Green Bay Sunday, and shipped Monday to his late home at Sand Beach. Lebeau's body was one of the first to be discovered after the wreck. It was buried near Deer Park, but through some misunderstanding his relatives were not notified until recently.

December 10, 1892 Page 1
An Afflicted Family.
A Destitute Widow and Children Given Relief by Kind Neighbours
One of the saddest sights that has been witnessed in the city for many years was that observed at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Abram Beacock, on East Portage avenue, Thursday. At 3:15 a.m. that day Mr. Beacock, who had been sick with typhoid fever for many weeks died. At about the noon hour James Harvey entered the house and found the father dead, Mrs. Beacock almost sick from overwork and six children, ranging in age from one to twelve years old, suffering with hunger and shivering with cold, there being no fuel in the house and but little, if anything to eat. Mr. Harvey at once notified the neighbors, and with the assistance of E. J. Penny, R. J. Stuart and others, soon ministered to the wants of the unfortunates. Willing hands soon arrived and the good women of the neighbourhood did everything in human power to lighten the grief of the heart-broken Mrs. Beacock and children. The deceased came here from Bay Mills two months ago, and opened up a meat market in the Ireland's building, just below Johnstone street, on Portage avenue. When he arrived here he had about $500, but in opening up his business spent most of it, and was just beginning to realize some profit when he was stricken down a month ago. He was 40 years old and before coming to this country lived at Wyevale, Ont. The funeral will occur today. The widow is deeply grateful to R. J. Stuart, E. J. Penny, James Harvey proprietor of the Wilbur House, and the ladies of the various church societies for their kind attentions. Mrs. Parker, mother of Mrs. Beacock, arrived here yesterday.

December 10, 1892 Page 1
Died of Diphtheria.
Mr. and Mrs. P. McEvoy Lose Two Children by the Dread Disease.
Rose, the bright 3-year-old daughter, and Willie, aged 5, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. McEvoy, died at the Arundel House Thursday of diphtheria. The little ones had only been ill for a week and their death is a severe blow to their parents. It was necessary to close the hotel when the children were taken down. The property has been thoroughly disinfected and necessary steps have been taken to keep the malady from spreading. Mr. and Mrs. McEvoy have the sympathy of the community in their double bereavement. The funeral occurred yesterday and the bodies were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

December 10, 1892 Page 10
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
A sad event, which occurred here last week, was the death of Mrs. Wm. Johnson, who died last Friday noon, after a short illness. The deceased was a young woman, of refined and amiable disposition, and beloved by all who knew her, for her kindness of heart and womanly qualities. The funeral services were held at the church by Rev. A. Brown, last Sunday morning. The remains were interred in the Mission Hill cemetery. She leaves a devoted husband, and two young children, to mourn her loss. Our heartfelt sympathy is extended to the husband, parents and relatives.

December 17, 1892 Page 1
Killed While Switching Cars.
Frank Condon, who formerly ran into the Soo as a brakesman, was killed last week while switching cars in the yards at Gladstone. His remains were taken through here last Saturday, on their way to Ottawa, Ont., for interment.

December 17, 1892 Page 1
Death of Capt. Burr Hursley.
Capt. Burr Hursley, of Marquette, a brother of Wayne, Jay and Ford Hursley, of this city, and well known here, died at Ann Arbor Monday. He had been a great sufferer for quite a long time and death came almost as a welcome relief. Capt. Burr Hursley was a good man and possessed the same sterling qualities that make his brothers so popular here. Capt. Jay Hursley was with him when he died. He was a member of Marquette Lodge No. 101, F & A.M. The remains were interred at Riverside.

December 17, 1892 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Thos. Bargh.
Mrs. Orpah Bargh, wife of Capt. Thos. Bargh, and sister of Mesdames J. A. Colwell, H. J. LaLonde and F. R. Price of this city, died at her home in Ishpeming on Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Trelease, Mrs. Thomas Trelease, Mrs. H. J. Lalonde, Judge Colwell and Fred R. Price left Tuesday to attend the funeral. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Trelease are still at Ishpeming, but the others returned Thursday. The death of Mrs. Bargh is a great blow to her husband and to her relatives.

December 17, 1892 Page 1
A Sad Death From Scarlet Fever.
Katherine, the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Euans, died at 10 o'clock yesterday morning of scarlet fever. The child had been sick for several weeks. The funeral will occur at 10 'clock this morning, and the little one will be laid to rest in Riverside. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community in the loss of their baby.

December 3, 1892 Page 2
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
Mrs. D. Barclay received the sad intelligence that two of her sister's children had died of diphtheria on Thanksgiving day in Williamsport, Pa.

December 17, 1892 Page 1
From Gay to Grave.
Oscar Massbacher's Grandfather Dies at a Banquet Board.
Oscar Massbacher returned Monday from Toledo, where he went to attend the golden wedding of his grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Roemer, but instead of which he attended a funeral. An elaborate banquet was in progress. Every living relative of the aged celebrants, to the number of forty, were seated around the outer edge of a table shaped like a horse shoe. There were prattling babes and gray-haired men. Grandpa Roemer, seemingly hale and hearty, had just finished making a model speech. He said that next to the day he took his wife it was the happiest moment of his life. "I am ready to die," the old man said, and sat down and immediately expired. A sensational scene from gay to grave followed. The banquet hall was turned into a room of mourning. It was a most unusual circumstance and the Toledo papers published columns about it.

December 17, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
Edward Pugh, a dissipated young Englishman, committed suicide at Iron Mountain. He took the pistol route.

December 17, 1892 Page 5
Superior. (Special Correspondence.)
Died, on Saturday, Dec. 10, at the residence of Rev. J. McGregor, Mrs. P. McNiven, mother of Mrs. McGregor, at the age of 81 years and 4 months. Her death was very sudden and unexpected, being in her usual health when the summons came. The community, as well as her family, will miss Grandma, as she was lovingly called by neighbours and children. On Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock a memorial service was held in the Congregational church, conducted by Rev. C. F. VanAuken, assisted by Rev. J. Crane, after which the remains were taken to Sault Ste. Marie, thence to Hamilton, Ont., for burial. Her son, J. C. Niven, accompanied the body there.

December 17, 1892 Page 5
Rosedale Items. (Special Correspondence.)
The little four-year-old boy of John Wear, died last Saturday afternoon of whooping cough. Rev. DeLong preached the funeral sermon Monday.

December 17, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
Freddie Frederickson, of Gladstone, broke through the ice while skating and was drowned.

December 17, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
Frank Derouin, of Escanaba, was killed by a train last spring and the courts have just awarded the widow $2,300 damages.

December 17, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
Geo. May, 21 years old, of Crystal Falls, fell 480 feet down the shaft of the Great Western mine to an untimely death last week. The young man was highly respected.

December 17, 1892 Page 12
J. W. Grady, who died Friday the 9th inst., at the home of his son-in-law, Jos. Hembroff, of Bruce, was 83 years of age and the oldest member of the Soo Baptist church. A large number of friends were present at the burial service, in which Rev. C. F. Bronson, Rev. Casper, of Donaldson and Rev. Rogers, of the Canadian Soo, participated.

December 24, 1892 Page 1
Sudden Death of Miss Emma Schultz.
Miss Emma Schultz, daughter of Mrs. Wm. Stribling, died Monday morning after a short illness. The funeral was held at St. James church Wednesday, Rev. P. T. Rowe's sermon being a most touching one, and the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery. By the death of Miss Schultz, which was unexpected, the city loses a most popular and charming young lady. She was a member of St. James church and of the King's Daughters and her good work will not soon be forgotten. A host of friends sympathize with sorrowing relatives in their bereavement. Mrs. Stribling desires to thank all the kind friends for their services in connection with Miss Schultz's sickness and death.

December 24, 1892 Page 2
Death of John C. Hope.
John C. Hope died last Saturday of fever. Funeral Services were held Monday, Rev. J. E. Whalen officiating. The remains were interred in the city cemetery under the auspices of the K. O. T. M., of which order the deceased was a member. A wife and eight children are left to mourn his loss. Mrs. Hope desires through THE NEWS to extend thanks to the many friends for their kind services rendered in her bereavement.

December 24, 1892 Page 2
Mr. and Mrs. Trelease, old residents of this city, came to the county on Tuesday to attend the funeral of their daughter Mrs. Thomas Bargh, which occurred at Ishpeming Wednesday.
Negaunee Herald.

December 24, 1892 Page 4
Death of Mrs. Bargh.
Two Comments of Home Papers Upon the Sad Occurrence
(Ishpemings Iron Ore)
The sad news of the death of Mrs. Thomas H. Bargh was announced in Ishpeming last Monday morning. Death occurred at Stoneville, where the family resided, and where Mr. Bargh is superintendent of the Saginaw mine. Mrs. Bargh had been considered as improving since the birth of twin boys November 29th, although the attending physician feared complications that might result from acute Bright's disease, which had developed. Saturday last a change for the worse was noticed and the patient grew rapidly worse till death ensued Monday morning. Mrs. Bargh was thirty-one years of age and is survived by Mr. Bargh and five children, all boys, a daughter having died a few years ago. The eldest is nine years of age. Her death is a crushing blow to Mr. Bargh, and he has received the sympathy of the entire community. Mrs. Bargh, whose maiden name was Trelease, formerly lived at Sault Ste. Marie, where her parents and other relatives still live. In 1881 she was married at Ishpeming and has resided here continually, where she has made many friends. The funeral held Wednesday afternoon at Grace church, of which Mrs. Bargh, was a member, and was conducted by Rev. Wm. Galpin. Mr. ad Mrs. Trelease, of the Soo, Mrs. Bargh's parents, attended the funeral and also Mrs. H. J. LaLonde, J. A. Colwell and Fred Price, of the same place. Mrs. L. A. Marcell, of Tower, Minn., and Mrs. W. N. Morse, of Minneapolis, sisters of Mrs. Bargh, and both formerly of Negaunee, were present. Other relatives from outside points were Miss Sedgwick, who is attending school at Kenosha, Wis., Joseph Bargh, of Ironwood, brother of T. H. Bargh, and Arthur Whiteley, of Wakefield.
(Death of Mrs. Bargh
Negaunee Herald.)
The death of Mrs. Thomas Bargh, which occurred at her residence in Stoneville, at an early hour Monday morning, was an event that brought sorrow to many hearts in our place. Mrs. Bargh, nee Orpha Trelease, spent much of her childhood in our city, and was known by those who followed her to womanhood as one of the most charming of women. Her death was sudden and proved a shock to the wide circle of her acquaintances. The funeral occurred at Ishpeming Wednesday afternoon and was attended by a large concourse of people. Deceased leaves a family of five boys, the oldest of whom is but nine years.

December 24, 1892 Page 12
Miss Matilda Gurnoe's Demise.
See also Dec. 17 P. 12
On Wednesday Miss Matilda Gurnoe, eldest daughter of John Gurnoe, died of neuralgia of the heart, with other complications. Miss Gurnoe was a well known lady, devoted to her family and to her church, St. Mary's of which she was the organist. Her death is mourned not only by relatives, but by a host of friends and acquaintances. The funeral occurred yesterday morning at St. Mary's church and the remains were escorted to their last resting place in the Catholic cemetery by a large concourse.

December 24, 1892 Page 12
See also Dec 17 p.12
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
Death has once more visited our town and taken away a loving mother. Last Tuesday evening Mrs McMahon expired, after a lingering illness, borne with the utmost resignation. The deceased had been suffering with a cancer for over a year and the best physicians of the Soo were consulted, but to no purpose. She was also sent to Ann Arbor for treatment and was there pronounced incurable. She leaves a loving husband and five children to mourn her loss. Her remains were taken to Alpena for interment on Thursday. We extend our sympathy to the mourners in their affliction.

December 31, 1892 Page 1
Death of an Old Resident.
George Merkley, of Hay Lake, aged 74 , and an old and respected resident, died Monday. The remains were interred in the Rosedale cemetery.

December 31, 1892 Page 1
Death of Little Fred Cady.
Freddie, aged nine months and two weeks, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. Cady, died Christmas morning at nine o'clock, of a complication of lung and bronchial troubles and general debility. The little one had been a great sufferer from birth and the angel of Yuletide brought him happiness in death. It was a sad Christmastide for the sorrowing parents and they have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. The remains were interred at Riverside Tuesday afternoon.

December 31, 1892 Page 3
Detour. (Special Correspondence.)
Humphrey Jones, an old and respected citizen of Detour, passed quietly away on Monday Dec. 26, with a disease, of the throat. Mr. Jones was born in County Termanoh, Ireland. Leaving there when 19 years old he came to the county of Victoria, Canada, from where he removed to Bruce county, settling at Ellengouan, where he leaves two brothers. He arrived in the United States in 1881, and settled in Detour, where he leaves a large circle of friends. In politics he was a republican and had been a member of the Orange order for over forty years.

December 31, 1892 Page 6
The State of Superior.
James Redfern, of Hermansville, fell from the top of a freight car and broke his neck.

December 31, 1892 Page 12
James Mackin, whose leg was broken a couple of weeks ago, died Wednesday night at the Arundle House, where he was being cared for by P. McEvoy.

January 7, 1893 Page 1
Albert Belrose, aged 12 years, living with his mother, Mrs. Sarah Belrose, at the west end, died on Saturday last and was buried Monday from the Tabernacle. The attending physicians, Drs. Harrison & Ross, were untiring in their attention, but the disease, inflammation and abscesses, proved fatal. The mother desires to express her gratitude for the many kindnesses shown in her hour of affliction.

January 7, 1893 Page 2
Death of Ex. Gov. Baldwin.
At 1 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, Henry P. Baldwin, ex-governor of Michigan and ex-senator fo the United States, died at his home in Detroit. His death was not unexpected by his friends, as he had been in poor health for a number of years. Senator Baldwin was nearly 79 years old at the time of his death. He was born in Massachasetts and came to Michigan in 1837, locating in Detroit, where he went into business. Entering state polictics in 1860, Mr. Baldwin soon became a prominent figure. He was state senator in 1861 and 1862 and during his term was chairman of the committe which had charge of the improvement of the St. Mary's Falls ship canal, then the principal public work of the state, and held other important positions during his term. He was elected govenor in 1868 and 1870 and by his energy and capability state affairs were splendidly advanced.

January 7, 1893 Page 2
Accidental Drowning of Wake Hubbell.
Wake Hubbell, of Wenton Place, Ohio, a travelling salesman well known to many Soo people, and the owner of considerable property in this city, was drowned Dec. 28th, near Vienna, Ala., while crossing the Tombigbee river. Mr. Hubbell had been travelling in the South for the firm of Robert Howe, Cincinnati, O., and was on his way from Mobile to Vienna with horses and buggy, accompanied by a negro driver. An attempt was made to ford the river, which was swollen by heavy rains, and the horses, buggy and contents were swept down the stream by the current and Mr. Hubbell met his death. The negro escaped. Mr. Hubbell's untime demise is deeply regretted by many here.

January 7, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of Daniel McKay, of Whitedale, near Manistique, was found last week burned to a crisp in the charred remains of what had once been his home. Threats had been made against his life and foul play is suspected.

January 14, 1893 Page 2
Little Idwal Francis Roberts, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Roberts, who died last Saturday morning, of congestion of the brain, was buried at Garden River Thursday.

January 14, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Lemuet Sherman, of Negaumee, fatally shot himself, while carelessly handling a revolver.

January 21, 1893 Page 1
Death of Ex President Hayes.
Ex-President Rutherford B. Hayes died at his home at Fremont, O., Tuesday night at 11 o'clock after a short illness. His funeral occurred at Fremont Thursday afternoon. The colors at the forts here hung at half-mast and the national salute was fired.

January 21, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John C. Swanson, of Menominee, was crushed to death last week by a falling cornice.

January 21, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Peter Norquoist, of Menominee, committed suicide at Ironwood last week. He shot himself through the head.
Janurary 21, 1893 Page 4
Alfred Lawson, of St. Ignace, was frozen to death last week while crossing the straits between Mackinac Island and Mackinac City.

January 21, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
E. C. Preston and H. H. Beaudry, Marquette trainmen, lost their lives in the Hotel St. Louis, Duluth, which was destroyed by fire last Friday.

January 21, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Dr. Melosche, resident physician of the Portage Entry stone quarries, was shot and killed by Erick Kangas, a Finlander. The murder was atrocious and entirely unprovoked.

January 21, 1893 Page 6
Drummond.(Special Correspondence.)
There is a great deal of sickness on the island. The grip is quite prevalent. Mrs. Parish and an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Fairchild recently died from the effects of this malady.

January 28, 1893 Page 1
Blaine Is Dead.
He Passed Away at Washington ....
Hon. James Gillespie Blaine, one of the greatest men ever produced by America or any other land, died at his Washington home yesterday forenoon at 11 o'clock.....
James Gillespie Blaine was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, January 31, 1830 and would have been 63 years old next Tuesday. He came of good revolutionary stock. His father was an educated gentleman and his grandfather was a colonel under Washington. ....

January 28, 1893 Page 2
Stevensburgh.(Special Correspondence.)
Owing to the negligence the correspondent failed to chronicle the death and sketch the life of John W. Grady, who died after a brief illness of a week at the residence of Jos. Hembroff, on December 10, at the ripe old age of 83. Mr. Grady was born in the province of Nova Scotia, Nov. 25, 1809. While in that country he followed the occupation of fishing and sailing which he carried on quite successfully. From there he went to Grey Co. Ont., near Leith, where he purchsed a farm and followed rural pursuits for thirty years. Getting old and infirm he bequeathed his farm to his son James and in 1885 came to the Soo, and lived with his daughter Mrs. Jos. Hembruff up to the time of his death. Mr. Grady intellectually was a very bright man and could converse on almost any topic fluently and was well informed on current events. He had been an earnest and devout christian for about thirty years. He leaves a family of twelve, scattered our different parts of North America, to mourn his loss. His remains were interred in Sand Hill cemetery, and many friends attended the funeral, showing him the last respect that is possible for man to show the death on this earth.

January 28, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Fred Peterson died from starvation in the Menominee county poor house last week. He refused to eat anything and fasted for sixteen days. Disappointment in love was the cause.

January 28, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
W. A. Burt, of Hurley, a former resident of St. Ignace, died at Hurley last week. Mr. Burt was a well known banker and was cashier of the First National bank of Hurley at the time of his death.

January 28, 1893 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Esta Lundborg, a domestic employed at the residence of Express Agent A. Neil, at Marquette, was so badly burned last week that she only lived a few hours. Her clothing was ignited from a lamp which was broken by the unfortunate girl falling down stairs.

January 28, 1893 Page 6
Stirlingville.(Special Correspondence.)
Our school has been closed by order of Health Officer Webster on account of an out break of deptheria at the residence of Joseph Everleigh. Three of the family have been carried off by the dreadful disease and another bright little girl is not expected to survive. The remainder of the family are all up and doing nicely. Mr. and Mrs. Everleigh have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad affliction.

January 28, 1893 Page 8
Death of Fireman Maurice Crowe.
Maurice Crowe, aged 24, a fireman on the South Shore line residing in this city died last Saturday of pneumonia after a short illness. The remains were taken to Marquette, where they were interred under the auspices of the B. of L. F. Mr. Crowe was an estimable young man. He had been married only a few months and his death is a sad blow to his young wife. Mrs. Crowe desires to express her heartfelt gretitude to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, the Duluth, South Shore & Alantic railway officials and to the many friends for aid and sympathy during her late affliction. The South Shore passenger engines are draped in mouning in memory of the late fireman Crowe.
Janauary 28, 1893 Page 8
Killed by the Cars.
Mark Bigger, son of George Biggar, of Sugar Island, was killed by the cars at Cisco last week. The unfortunated man was known by many in the city. The remains were interred in the Riverside cemetery Saturday.

February 4, 1893 Page 1
Death of Mr. J. S. Edwards.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gilray received a dispatch Wednesday announcing the death of Mrs. J. S. Edwards, of West Superior, who resided in this city about seven years ago. She was a sister of Mrs. Wm. Gilray, R. B. Burchill, J. S. Burchill and A. S. Burchill, of this city.

February 4, 1893 Page 8
A little child of Peter Rivers died Monday of croup and was laid to rest in the city cemetery Tuesday.

February 4, 1893 Page 8
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. David Ross died last Sunday and was buried Monday afternoon at Riverdale.

February 4, 1893 Page 8
Charlie, the three-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. William Machelle died Sunday last and was buried at Riverdale Monday afternoon.

February 11, 1893 Page 1
Death of a Lake Superior Pioneer.
Joseph V. Brown, who was many years ago editor of the Lake Superior Journal (now the Mining Journal of Marquette) at the Soo, died at his home in Conneaut, Ohio, last week at the ripe age of 76 years. Deceased was a graduate of Yale and was an unassuming man who had the credit of fine ability in the community in which he lived most of his life.

February 18, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Novak, shot and killed Steve Gabriel at Ishpeming last week. The shooting was done in self defense.

February 18, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Miss Agnes Primo, of Menominee, was struck by a runaway horse last week and received injuries which resulted in her death.

February 18, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
William Galbraith sr. an old resident of Crystall Falls, fell from the roof of a house Monday while shoveling snow and broke his neck. He died instantly.

February 18, 1893 Page 8
Death of William McKay.
William McKay, aged 48 years, died at his home at Hay Lake, Friday Feb. 10, after a linguering illness of two years, of consumption. The remains were interred in Rosedale cemetery Sunday afternoon. The widow and family and his brother, Donald McKay and family extend thanks to the many friends who so kindly offered their services in the sickness and death of their beloved one.

February 25, 1893 Page 1
The Grim Reaper.
Death of Nelson Ostrom, a Faithful Old Lock Employee.
The sufferings of Nelson Ostrom, the faithful old lock employee, who has been sick for so long, were ended by death Wednesday night at the Stewart boarding house, on River street. His remains were interred yesterday afternoon at the city cemetery, all the members of the lock force turning out in a body to pay their respect to the memory of their late comrade. An inventory of the effects of the deceased showed that he possessed $93.86 in cash, five watches- four silver and one gold- in addition to clothing etc. These articles will be taken care of until such time as they can be turned over to relatives, of whom not much is known, except that the deceased had two sisters in the old country. Nelson Ostrom, whose age is unknown, but who was thought to have been 65 to 70 years old, was of a very peculiar disposition. One of his eccentricities was a lack of confidence in the banks. It is related of him that several years ago he hid a sum of money, said to be $650, in the woods across the river, and on account of his failure to properly mark the spot was unable afterwards to find the money, which, so far as known, remains in its hiding place to this day.

February 25, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Patrick O'Connell, a prominent citizen of Iron Mountain, died last week of heart disease.

February 25, 1893 Page 8
The remains of Mrs. Allan Rains, wife of Supervisor Allen Rains, were laid to rest Monday in the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Rains was well known and highly respected lady. The Rains family returned Thursday to their home at Nebish.

March 4, 1893 Page 2
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
Mrs. Videon, of Dollar Settlement, died while visiting her daughter, Mrs. Jas. Teeple, at Bay Mills. The remains were interred in the Mission Cemetery Feb. 22nd.....

March 4, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph Hocking, a miner working in the Republic mine, was crushed by a fall of earth last week and instantly killed.

March 4, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Anthony Fassbender, for many years a brakeman on the D., S.S. & A., railway, fell under his train at Michigamme and was killed. He had been married but seventeen days.

March 11, 1893 Page 1
Funeral of the Late Mrs. N. L. Martin.
The funeral of the late Mrs. N. L. Martin occurred at the Presbyterian church Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. A large concourse of friends and acquaintances was in attendance. Members of K. O. T. M., of which order the bereaved husband was a member, attended in a body. The sermon was preached by Rev. G. W. Luther, the pastor, and the remains were laid to rest temporarily in the city cemetery by Undertaker Vanderhook.

March 11, 1893 Page 1
Strange and Sudden Death.
On Tuesday, shortly after dinner, Martha, aged 13 years, daughter of Mr. Grimmell, a farmer near Dafter, was suddenly seized with symptoms of choking, foamed at the mouth, and died in a few moments. She was in excellent health at the time and ate a hearty dinner. She was a lovely girl. Mr. Grimmell came to the city Wednesday for the coffin, and took back with him an older daughter who resides here.

March 11, 1893 Page 1
J. T. Williams Killed in Montana.
J. T. Williams, formerly of this city, who has for the past few years been working on a railroad near Bozeman, Mont., was accidently killed on Feb. 20, by falling from his engine. Every person who was acquainted with Mr. Williams will regret the sad fate which has befallen him and extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved wife and children. Mr. Williams worked for a number of years in the round house at this place and was highly reapected by all who knew him.

March 11, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. J. M. Saxton, of Harvey, Ill., and Geo. W. Martin, of Stevens Point, Wis., who were called here by the death of Mrs. N. L. Martin, will depart for their homes today. The two little motherless children have been placed in good hands. Mr. Martin will take home with him his baby niece Edith. The older child Lillian will find a home, temporarily at least, where the father can often see her, with Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sutton, who have generously offered to care for her a year in the hope of being allowed to adopt her at that time, as their own.

March 11, 1893 Page 2
Mrs. N. L. Martin.
Comments of the Florence (Wis) Mining News on Her Demise.
Lizzie, beloved wife of N. Leslie Martin, associate editer of the Sault Ste. Marie News, died at her home in that city at 3 o'clock Thursday morning, of double pneumonia, after an comparitively brief illness. Deceased was 25 -years of age, and leaves two beautiful little children aged 13 months and 2 ½ years, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Martin formerly resided in Florence. Leslie having been foreman of the Mining News office for a number of years. Mrs. Martin was formerly Lizzie Moore and was a member of the Florence Presbyterian chuch choir in 1887-8. She was the niece of Mrs. John M. Saxton, who lived here several years ago. The couple were married by Rev. H. P. Cory, at Sault Ste. Marie, May 2, 1888, and have resided there ever since their happy union. Mrs. Martin was a charming lady and a most devoted wife and mother. A large circle of warm friends in Florence extend their heartfelt sympathy and condolescence to the grief stricken husband in this hour of his great bereavement.

March 11, 1893 Page 3
Nebish Nuggets. (Special Correspondence)
John Brownlee, one of the pioneers of St. Joseph's Island, died Monday night.

March 11, 1893 Page 8
Gertie Fieldman, aged four years, died of scarlet fever Sunday and was buried in the city cemetery Wednesday. The funeral was public and a number of friends attended.

March 18, 1893 Page 2
Sugar Island (Special Correspondence)
Mr. Moffat, an old and respected resident of Sugar Island, died at the residence of her son, Thos. Moffat, Saturday last, at the age of 81 years, 6 months and 6 days. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. T. R. Easterday and the remains were interred in the island cemetery Monday.

March 18, 1893 Page 7
Mrs. Charles Ripley received a telegram this week, that announced the death of her brother Egie Ashmun, in California. Mr. Ashmun was an old Soo boy, but had resided in the far west for several years.

March 18, 1893 Page 8
An adopted child of Louis Sabin died yesterday morning.

March 25, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior
A Finn named Kangas was found dead on the railway tracks near the Blue mine. He had been decapitated by a passing train.

March 25, 1893 Page 6
Suicide at Cedarville. (Special Correspondence)
A strange case of suicide happened here last Monday.
A young swede named Frank Peterson arrived at his brother's place here two weeks ago, being in ill health. In a fit of despondency he took about two feet of rope and went into the woods a short distance from the house. He tied the line to a small cedar tree four feet above the snow, made a good loop in which he thrust his head and with his hands in his pockets knelt down and strangled himself to death. He was found a few hours after by his brother. An unbalanced mind undoubtedly caused him to commit the rash act.

April 8, 1893 Page 9
Attorney E. S. B. Sutton was called to Romeo early in the week by the death of his mother, who has been sick for a long time. Mr. Sutton has the sympathy of his many friends.

April 8, 1893 Page 9
William Chandler was called to Battle Creek Thursday by a telegram announcing the death of Charles Merritt, a favorite uncle.

April 8, 1893 Page 9
Mrs. Martin Schacht was called to Hancock Wednesday by the death of her mother, Mrs. Wybert.

April 8, 1893 Page 10
R. B. Smith died Thursday night after a short attack of inflammation of the bowels. The remains will probably be interred Sunday at Riverside. Mr. Smith was a brother-in-law of the Campbell brothers. A wife and five young children are left to mourn his loss.

April 15, 1893 Page 1
Death of Philanthropist George I. Seney.
George I. Seney, of New York, died last Saturday. Mr. Seney was a millionaire several times. He was largely interested in Chippewa county and was the chief owner of the big Chippewa county farm managed by E. C. Davidson. Seney, the well known town on the D.S.S. & A. was named after the noted New York philanthropist. Mr. Seney was about 70 at the time of his death.

April 15, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. Louisa St. Pierre, the aged mother of Paul and Napoleon St. Pierre, of this city, died Wednesday at her home near Montreal.

April 15, 1893 Page 2
Edward G. Ashmun.
A Brief Obituary From the Pen of an Old Friend of the Family.
An old friend of the Ashmund family has furnished THE NEWS the following sketch of Edward G. Ashmund, who died March 15, 1893 at Fresno, Cal.
Edward G. Ashmun, son of Judge Edward Ashmun, formerly of this city, was born in Sault Ste. Marie, March 31st, 1858 and was at the time of his death, sixteen days less than thirty-five years of age. Mr. Ashmun was brought up in this city, and the family, originally from New York state, were both there and here affiliated with the Presbyterian church Judge Samuel Ashmaun, E. G.'s grandfather and Jehudi Ashmun famous to colonization of Laberia, and first govenor of that county, were brothers. Edward G. Ashmun was educated in the common school of this city, and in his day, school district No. 1 not only embraced the whole village, but the whole township as well. Much of the time while he was a pupil the school was taught by Rev. T. R. Easterday, who for several years was the only protestant minister in the county of Chippewa. His instructions in the church, the Sunday school and the day school were received from that clergyman, by whom he was baptized. In a period of nearly thirty years the funerals of the grandfsther, father, mother, sister, nieces, nephews, and nearly all the marriages were conducted or solemnized by the one pastor who, on the 17th, at the hour Edward E. was buried in San Francisco, held memorial services with the relatives and friends in the old Ashmun homestead on Ridge street.
The family here knew of Egie's illness, but were ignorant of its serious character until the message of Charles Harris was received, announcing his death. Mr. Ashmun went west about ten years ago. He was for almost all the time since in the employ of one firm, by whom he was held in the highest esteem. Some two years ago he married Miss Anna Shultzberg of whom he was the most devoted of husbands. Mrs. Ashmun, with an infant daughter twelve days old at the fatheris death, are left in their loneliness.....

April 15, 1893 Page 2
Death of William White.
Wm. White died of pneumonia at his residence, near Portage avenue, on Wednesday evening last. Mr. White was born in England 43 years ago. He leaves a wife and one child, 4 years old. He has lived in this city for six years and was well liked by all who knew him. He joined the A. W. U. W., in March 1892. Consequently the family will receive from that organization $2000, the amount of insurance carried by every member of that order. The funeral will be held at the Tabernacle tomorrow at 1:30 p. M. And the remains will be interred under the auspices of the A. O. U. W.

April 15, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Julius Anderson, a Manistique Norwegian, suicided last week by partaking liberally of arsenic.

April 15, 1893 Page 9
H. M. Oren received a telegram Thursday, from Port Austin announcing the death of Mrs. Oren's brother's wife Mrs. W. H. Wallace. Mr. and Mrs. Oren left for Port Austin on Thursday evening train. Mrs. Wallace leaves a husband and five small children. Her death is a particularly sad one.

April 15, 1893 Page 10
Death of George Grose in California.
The Escondido, Cal. Times has this mention of the death of a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Grose, formerly of the Soo. George Grose, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Grose, died at the family residence northwest of town, Wednesday, March 23, 1893, aged nine years. The funeral services were held at the Catholic church Friday and a large procession of friends of the family followed the remains to the grave, in the Catholic cemetery.

April 15, 1893 Page 10
Death of James H. McGrory.
James H. McGrory died at St. Louis last week. He left the Soo for Hot Springs several months ago. On his way back he caught a cold and died at St. Louis. His brother John went after his remains.

April 22, 1893 Page 2
One Dago Stabs Another.
Another stabbing affray occurred in the Swede saloon, on Water street, Monday afternoon. Matti Toffoft, and Italian, ran the blade of a large pocket knife into the back of Miki Bornti, a fellow country man, inflicting a dangerous wound. They were engaged in a row with others. Bornti is in a precarious condition and may not recover. Officer McIntyre arrested Toffoti and the stabber is now in jail.

April 22, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. Stephen VanPatten, of Menominee, was instantly killed by being thrown headforemost from a wagon by a runaway team.

April 22, 1893 Page 6
Donaldson. (Special Correspondence)
Died.- On April 11th, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Londry. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of all who know them....

April 22, 1893 Page 9
Killed By A Corn Cure.
Death of Mechanical Superintendent Preston of the Canada Pacific Railway.
David Preston, the mechanical superintendent of the Canadian Pacific railway, died last week. The cause of his death is an unusual one. Some time ago he bought a solution for the purpose of curing his corns. He placed some of it on a bad corn. Soon after this, blood poisoning ensued and to save his life for the time being, it was necessary to amputate his foot. This, however, did not much improve his condition and after a few days it was found that his leg would also have to come off. The exhaustion from these operations caused his death. He was sixty-five years old and was one of the best known railway men in the country.

April 29, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A homesteader near Marquette, known as Paddy Pigeon, blew out the gas the other night in a room in the Bay View hotel, Marquette, and "He's up with the angels now."

April 29, 1893 Page 9
Death of Miss Ida Allen.
Miss Ida Allen, aged 21, daughter of Mrs. J. M. Adams, died suddenly of heart disease at 7 o'clock Saturday morning. The funeral occurred at the M. E. Church Monday afternoon, the Rev. J. E. Whalen, of this city, and the Rev. Duncan, of the Canadian Soo, officiating. The remains were interred at Riverside by Undertaker Vanderhook. Miss Allen was an accomplished young lady and beloved by all who knew her.

May 6, 1893 Page 1
Death of Mrs. H. D. Rains.
After a lingering illness from the dread disease consumption, Mrs. Howell D. Rains, wife of Alderman Rains, of the Fourth ward, quietly passed away at 11 o'clock last night. Mrs. Rains was born in the Soo and was the oldest daughter of Capt. Wm. Greenough. She was a loveable Christain and in her death a husband and four children sustain an inestimable loss. They have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their bereavement.

May 6, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Richard Varcoe, a miner and old resident of Ishpeming, fell down a shaft of the Lake Superior mine and was killed, last week.

May 6, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Darlington and James Cruley were drowned last Saturday while crossing the Manistique river on logs two miles north of Manistique.

May 6, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
George Lemmon, a baggageman on the Lake Superior limited train of the Sout Shore railway, got squeezed between a coach and a sleeper Sunday night while making a coupling, and died soon after from the injuries received.

May 6, 1893 Page 9
Mr. and Mrs. John Fleming last a bright child last Saturday. The interment was at Riverside Sunday.

May 6, 1893 Page 10
The death of Charles Rogers, a dredgeman for Carkin & Stickney, occurred Wednesday.

May 6, 1893 Page 10
D. J. Ranson received a letter from John c. Spry yesterday announcing the death of Fred Biel, lumber buyer for the Spry lumber Co. Mr. Biel often visited the Soo and was known as a genial warm hearted, sincere gentleman. He was an intimate friend of Mr. Ranson.

May 13, 1893 Page 1
Death of Jerry Ryan.
Jerry Ryan, a well known young man, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ryan, died yesterday morning at 8 o'clock. He was taken ill with pneumonia last December, which developed into consumption, from which he never recovered. The deceased was 21 years, 5 months and 10 days old. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 8 o'clock tomorrow morning.

May 13, 1893 Page 9
The funeral of John Mansfield, an old Chippewa county farmer, occurred Thursday.

May 13, 1893 Page 9
The father of Mrs. C. J. Johnson and Mrs. M. J. Magee, who was in the navy, dropped dead this week.

May 13, 1893 Page 10
Pine Grove Items.(Special Correspondence)
John Mansfield an old and respectable citizen of this place, died Tuesday the 9th, after a short illness. Mr. Mansfield was one of the pioneers of this county, coming here fourteen years ago and has helped to build this county to its present conditon.

May 13, 1893 Page 10
Thomas Roy Bye, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Bye, died on Tuesday evening. The remains were interred at Riverside cemetery Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Bye wish to thank their friends and nieghbours for helpful kindness extended.

May 20, 189 Page 3
Raber Ripples.(Special Correspondence)
Died on Friday last, in her eleventh year, Miss Sophia Oberle, eldest child and only daughter of Joseph Oberle, it is thought her trouble was typhoid pneumonia, but no doctor was in attendance on account of broken telephone lines. The sorrowning family have the hearfelt sympathy of the whole community.

May 20, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph Murphy, a Negaunee boy, fell from an ore car and was crushed to death under the wheels.

May 20, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Isaac B. Christie was drowned last week in the Metropolitan Lumber Co's mill pond at Stockville.

May 20, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
William Golden, brakesman, fell over the end of a box car at Houghton last Saturday and was instantly killed.

May 20, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jos. A. Vannier, one of Marquette's most prominent French-Canadian citizens, died last week of pnemonia. He was prominent in politics and was highly esteemed for many good qualities.

May 20, 1893 Page 9
Mr. and Mrs. Albert King, of Bay Mills, arrived in the city Thursday to attend the funeral of Mr. King's brother-in-law, Peter Bedard.

May 27, 1893 Page 1
Killed The Fireman.
Frank Niles Loses His Life in An Accident on the Soo Line
A serious accident occurred Tuesday on the Soo Line at Whitefish Hill, a short distance east of Rapid River, resulting in the death of Frank Niles, a fireman, of Gladstone. A freight was running in onto a siding, when the weight of the engine caused the roadbed, which was of sand, to give away, toppled the engine and several cars over and buried the fireman in the wreck.

May 27, 1893 Page 3
Nebish Nuggests. (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. McCarty are lamenting the loss of their infant son who died on the 15th inst. The remains were interred in the cemetery on St. Joseph's Island.

May 27, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Dan Murphy and George Smith were drowned in Portage Lake Saturday, owing to their reckless conduct while out boating.

May 27, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Little Frankie Ties, of Escanaba, was run over by a locomotive last week and instantly killed. He was crossing the track when the fatality occurred.

May 27, 1893 Page 10
Geo. Young, who lives in the country died Thursday, and was buried yesterday.

May 27, 1893 Page 10
Walter J., the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. E. Berier, died Satureday morning, of congestion of the brain, at the age of 2 years and 29 days. The funeral occurred Monday at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the city cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Bernier desire to thank their friends for their kind acts performed in their hour of trial.

June 3, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A. W. Graves, a dissolute character of Crystal Falls, shot and killed Schblaske, a local saloon keeper. Enmity had existed between the two men for some time.

June 3, 1893 Page 10
The infant son of Captain and Mrs. George Hursley died Thursday afternoon. The funeral occurred yesterday. Mr. and Mrs. Hursley have the sympathy of their friends in their bereavement.

June 17, 1893 Page 1
DROWNED IN FORD RIVER.
Oscar Lerou Leaves Bay Mills To go On A Drive And Loses His Life.
Moses Lerou, of LaFontaine, Simcoe county, Ontario, a brother of Jos. Lerou, of Bay Mills, and of Mrs. Fred Dufresne, of the Soo, was in the city this week attending to matters growning out of the drowning of his son Oscar, about two weeks ago, near Escanaba. Oscar Lerou was 19 years and five days old when he drowned. He came to the Soo a little over a year ago and went to work soon afterwards for the Hull & Munson Co., at Bay Mills. That he was frugal is proven by the fact that his father found $110, to his credit in the Soo Savings Bank; $21 at the Hall & Munson office; #15 and a trunk full of good clothes and a gold watch at an Escanaba hotel. Young Lerou left here to go on a Gord river drive. On the last day of May he was riding on a log with another driver and fell off. Coming up once, his companion could not rescue him and his body has not been recovered. The drowning took place 35 miles from the mouth of the stream and three miles above the Ford river dam. The father of the drowned man is a hard working farmer and was deeply affected by the sudden loss of his favorite son. He left for home Thursday after having secured all of his son's effects.

June 17, 1893 Page 1
Miss Ida Bloch, who was a trained nurse and was well known here, recently died at a sanitarium, at Palmyra, Wis,

June 17, 1893 Page 2
Sugar Island.(Special Correspondence.)
Ellen Illa, the five-year-old daughter of Mrs. Thomas S. Parr and grand daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Perry, of Sugar Island, died Thursday. The little one was born on Sugar Island June 17, five years ago, and will be buried there today, which is also June 17.

June 24, 1893 Page 1
Death of J. T. Whiting.
Found dead Thursday in a Tumble-Down Detroit Shanty J.
Tallman Whiting, the aged and well known vessel man, was found dead Thursday noon in a small shanty near the coal shed at the Detroit waterworks, Detroit, which he had entered to escape a rain shower. The discovery was made by a brick-mason, who entered the shed about 12:30 o'clock.
Mr. Whiting was over 70 years of age, and is supposed to have died of heart disease or apoplexy. He was general agent of the Lake Superior Transit Co., and agent of the Western Transit Co. and Anchor Line. Mr. Whiting once reseded at the Soo and is remembered by all the older citizens.

June 24, 1893 Page 1
The two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Herington died on Tuesday and was interred in the city cemetery.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Abraham Brami, of Ironwood, took a jay cure treatment there, and died last week.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. Thorsen, of Ishpeming, succumbed to the heat last week. He died a few hours after.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A. W. Graves, the slayer of Frank Scholbraske at Crystal Falls, will serve 15 years in prison for his crime.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
George Argall, a 13-year-old las of Ispheming, was drowned last Saturday morning while bathing in the Pent pond.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph Wertin, sr., father of Bishop Vertin, of the Catholic diosese, died at his home in Hancock on the 11th inst., aged 75 years. Mr. Wertin was a pioneer merchant of the Upper Peninsula.

June 24, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Julius Cherrick, of Menminee, while out hunting Sunday, was accidently shot through the head. He was prostrated by the heat and in falling to the ground his gun was discharged. His injury is fatal.

July 1, 1893 Page 1
Christopher the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Quillian, died last Monday.

July 1, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. Joseph Pigeon, who resided in the east end, died Tuesday of pneumonia. Her remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

July 1, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Emil Prittimaa, of Hancock, was drowned while bathing in the lake last week.

July 1, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Two Swedish miners named John Larson and Gust Johnston were killed by a cave-in at the Chapin mine last week.

July 1, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Zadra Vitore and August Hendrickson, two miners, fell 350 feet down a shaft of the Mansfield mine, near Crystal Falls, and were instantly killed.

July 1, 1893 Page 10
J. R. Ryan left yesterday for Cheboygan to attend the funeral of Mrs. James Moloney, who died Thursday. Mrs. Moloney was a sister-in-law of Alderman Moloney, of this city, who with his wife, will attend the funeral.

July 8, 1893 Page 2
His Fall Prove Fatal
Wm. Ritter, who was terribly injured Friday of last week, by falling into the new lock pit, died Wednesday. An inquest was held by Coroner Bacon and it was decided that no one was to blame for the accident. The unfortunate man's relatives at Toronto were notified by Hughes Bros. & Bangs and in compliance with their instructions the body was shipped to that place yesterday.

July 8, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jacob Miller, a cigar maker, suicided at Ontonagan last week by shooting himself through the head with a revolver. Domestic trouble caused the deed.

July 8, 1893 Page 9
Harry Archibald, the one month-old infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Simons, died Monday of inflammation of the lungs.

July 15, 1893 Page 1
TIRED OF LIFE.
Joseph McGirr Commits Suicide by Drowning
Driven to the Act by Trouble
Terrible Casualty Near Pickford Thursday Morning.
Two Men Killed By Lightning.
Sleeping in a tent near a Giant Tree, Which is Struck by the Fiery Bolt, They were Ushered into Eternity in an instant
Joseph McGirr, a well known resident of this city, committed suicide by drowning himself in the river at the Canadian Soo Thursday evening about 5 o'clock, while it is supposed in a fit of despondencey, brought about by business and private troubles. Mr. McGirr went across the river Thursday, sought the middle dock, took off his coat and vest, jumped into the water and was drowned. A resident on the other side, who witnessed the act, vainly attempted a rescue. He reported the matter. The body was soon recovered, brought to this side and taken to the Pacific House, near the depot, which is conducted by John McGirr, a brother of the deceased. In the pocket of the dead man was found a note saying in effect that his troubles had driven him crazy; that he was tired of life and had drowned himself. The deceased for a time, recently, was associated with Joseph Walker in the restaurant business, but lost money in enterprise, and this with other troubles, is supposed to have led him to end his life.... Mr. Girr was a brother-in-law of Gilbert Van Wyck. He leaves two sons, aged about 10 and 12 years. His wife died some years ago. The funeral will be conducted by the Rev. P. T. Rowe, M.A., at 2 o'clock to-day, at the Pacific Huse, and the remains will be interred at Riverside cemetery by Undertaker Vanderhook.

July 15, 1893 Page 1
STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.
Two men Killed Near Pickford During a Terrible Storm.
Two men named Currie and Adams were instantly killed by lightning early Thursday morning near Pickford, during the violent storm which visited this country at that time....

July 15, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Gray, of Iron Mountain, was drowned last week while in swimming.

July 15, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mascel Barchene, a homesteader, was run over and killed by the cars at Ewen last week. He was under the influence of liquor.

July 15, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Nelson, aged 50 years, was found dead in his bed at Carney, near Menominee, last week, with his skull crushed and marks of violence on his body. The supposed murderer is under arrest.

July 15, 1893 Page 8
An Old Resident Gone
Death of Mrs. W. C. Knox at Her Home in Soo Township.
Mrs. W. C. Knox, the estimable wife of W. C. Knox, died Friday of last week at the Knox residence, in Soo township, at the age of 57 years. Mrs. Knox was born near Toronto, Ont. She was left an orphan when quite young; married, [what did I leave out]??? her surviving over thirty-nine years ago and leaves ten children to mourn her loss. Five of the children are married, the eldest to W. H. Sweet, lighthouse keeper; others are Mrs. Gleason, Mrs. Haddow, and two sons, John and Sidney. The family moved to the Soo about twent-three years ago, and after prospecting around for some time, settled on their farm in Soo township over eighteen years ago..... She had been ailing for a long time and was conscious that only death would end her suffering which were very great, but she was resigned to the Master's will, knowing that to go and be with him would be far better. The funeral sermon was preached Sunday afternoon at the residence by the Rev. P. T. Rowe, M.A., and the remains were interred by Undertaker Vanderhook.....

July 15, 1893 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Jas. F. Moloney. (Cheboygan News)
Mrs. James F. Moloney died at her home last Thursday, after an illness of only eight days. Mrs. Moloney was 48 years of age, and for the past 17 years has been a resident of Cheboygan. She was married to James F. Moloney 20 years ago and leaves to mourn her, besides her husband, five children: Mary, Frank, Sylvester Joseph and James. The funeral took place Saturday morning from St. Mary's Church and was one of the biggest ever held in Cheboygan. Several relatives from Detroit and Sault Ste. Marie were in attendance.

July 22, 1893 Page 1
Ruined and Dead.
Lillian Saulter, of Mackinac Island, the Victim of a Brutal Soldier.
Lillian Saulter committed suicide at Mackinac Island Tuesday.
She left a letter stating she had been forcibly ruined by a private soldier named Wm. Badgley. The verdict of the coroner's jury was as folllows: "Suicide by poison, indirectly caused by one William Badgley, who as the evidence seemed to disclose, had committed a criminal assault upon her, the disgrace of which caused the said Lillian Saulter to take her own life." Badgley was given an examination before Justice Preston Thursday and was bound over. The penalty for criminal assault, with which he is charged is from fifteen years to life imprisonment. He ought to get the latter "and then have his head cut off."

July 22, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. Edward Bernier died Sunday morning of consumption. The funeral was held at St. Mary's Tuesday. Mrs. Bernier was an estimable lady.

July 29, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A Swedish farmer named Errickson was drowned in Gulliver Lake, near Manistique, last week.

July 29, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Martin Dunn, of Escanaba, fell beneath the wheels of on ore train on the dock and was killed, last week.

July 29, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Peter Tieson accidently shot his brother in the woods 29 miles from Ontonagon, last week, and the injured man died from the effects of blood poisoning before he was removed to a place where medical attention could be secured.

August 5, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Hayes, an ex-convict of the Marquette prison, was run over by an electric street car at Marquette Saturday night and killed.

August 5, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Thomas Hines, a young man 22 years of age, fell 70 feet down a shaft of the Salisbury mine, Ispheming, last Saturday night and killed.

August 5, 1893 Page 10
A child of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Bird, of Grand Marais, died there this week of scarlet fever and another is seriously ill with the same malady. Mr. and Mrs. Bird are well known in this city, and many friends sympathize with them in their sad bereavement.

August 12, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Bernard Reynolds fell off an engine in the Milwakee & Northern railway yards at Iron Mountain, Monday, and had both leys cut off. He died soon after.

August 12, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joe Vedeau, one of the pioneer settlers on the Menominee river, well known through the Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin as an expert woodsman and cruiser, recently died ar his home near Marinette. He was a character and one of the few remaining early French voyageurs.

August 12, 1893 Page 10
E. L. Stanley was called to Adrian early in the week by the dangerous sickness of his father. He telegraphed Mrs. Stanley Thursday the sad news that his father had died that day. Mr. Stanley is expected home Monday.

August 12, 1893 Page 10
Overton, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Speck, died Friday of last week and was buried at Riverside Sunday.

August 19, 1893 Page 1
A SOO ROMANCE.
Death of J. Logan Chipman Revives His Career Here.
MARRIED AN INDIAN PRINCESS.
Then He Civilized and Educated Her and was Happy.
The late Detroit Congressman Dedicated the Chippewa County court Hosue and was a Factor Here in the Early Days
Congressman J. Logan Chipman of Detroit, a brother-in-law of Edward and Louis Shawano, of this city, and John Roussain, of Sugar Island, died in Detroit at 7 o'clock Thursday morning, of hypostatic pnemonia. While Judge Chipman had been ailing for some time his death was not expected....
In 1851 he became engaged to a charming young lady in the Soo, a member of one of the first and best-to-do-families. They fell out in some way and the young lady bestowed her smiles on an officer at Fort Brady. This enraged Chipman and he almost at once sought the hand of Lizzie Shawano, the full blooded Indian daughter of the head chief of the Chippewa. The wooing was swift and they were wed. Lizzie is spoken of as a beautiful Indian girl. She left here with her gay young husband to go to Detroit attired in her Indian garb, with her hair hanging in a glossy plait down her back and her head covered with a government blanket. At first Chipman's refined mother and sisters were greatly shocked, but they sensibly made the best of the occasion and at once proceeded to civilize and educate the young princess, ala Pocahontas. When she came to the Soo in later years the Indian wife is spoken of as having been as fine a lady as the land afforded. Four children were born to this union and the marriage was a happy one. Then the Chippewa princess died. Of her children who still live Harry Chipman, the Detroit Lawyer, is the "John Randolph, of Roanoke." Another child, and the only daughter, married into the family of Buhl, the wealthy Detroit furrier. J. Logan Chipman mourned his wife for a time and then married again- a white woman.....
John Logan Chipman was born at Detroit, June 5, 1830, and was educated in the schools of that city and in the University of Michigan. He comes from a celebrated family, being the son of Judge Henry Chipman, a well-known and honoured name in Detroit history and a grandson of United States Judge and Senator Nathaniel Chipman, of Vermont. His mother was a South Carolinian, from whom he takes his middle name....

August 19, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Dr. George F. Perrin, an old and respected citizen of Escanaba, died last week.

August 19, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Bernie Reynolds, a fourteen-year-old boy of Iron Mountain, fell under the wheels of a train in the C., M. & St. P., railroad yards and received injuries from which he died soon after.

August 19, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A cold-blooded murder occurred at Carney, near Menominee, last week. The victim is supposed to be a printer named Arthur Jones. He was shot through the head and his assailant is unknown.

August 19, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph B. Drake, an inmate of the Ontonagon county poor house, locked himself up in the poor farm barn and set fire to it for the purpose of destroying himself. This he did afectually, as his charged remains were discovered after the fire.

August 19, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.

August Hessel, aged nine years, of the Chapin location, near Iron Mountain, was accidently burned to death last week. He set a tool house on fire with powder, which he was playing with and the structure being soaked with oil was rapidly consumed. The boy had crawled in through a window and was overcome by the heat before he could escape.

August 26, 1893 Page 1
STURGIS FOUND.
Body of the Missing Man Discovered in Hay Lake and Fully Identified.
Early Wednesday morning Coroner Bacon received a telephone message from Supt. French, of the Carkin & Stickney co's ship yard, that a floater had been found by Malcolm Smith, one of the company's dredgemen....The condition of the body was not bad as might be expected, considering that it had tossed about in the water for eight days..... The remains were taken to Undertaker Vanderhook's parlors and prepared for shipment to the home of the unfortunate young man at Sturge, where it was taken by Wm. Sturgis, father of the deceased Thursday night. The boat was found Thursday of last week three miles below where the body was discovered. .... The deceased was only 20 years old and was an Ann Arbor student and a member of the 1895 class.

August 26, 1893 Page 1
Sudden Death of a Young Lady.
A fifteen-year-old daughter of Frank Brown died suddenly Wednesday morning. She was as well as usual at breakfast time, but a few minutes before 9 o'clock she was taken sick and died in a short time. The funeral was held from St. Mary's cathedral Thursday morning.

August 26, 1893 Page 1
A Terrible Accident.
One man Killed and Three Others Injured at the New Methodist Church.
On Monday morning at 7:15, at the new Central Methodist church building, occurred an accident which resulted in the death of one man, the serious injury of another and the severe bruising of two others. Eight men were carrying a heavy stone wieghing 600 or 700 pounds, up an inclined scaffold. Through making a misstep or for some other unknown reason, Amos Healey, one of the rear men, suddenly fell to the floor, a distance of five or six feet. This caused the other men to drop the stone. Then three other men fell, all landing in a heap alongside of Healey. The stone was broken into three pieces by striking the scaffold through which it crashed onto the men below. The largest struck Healey across the back and crushed him....Healey died with the hour.

August 26, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ole Anderson, of Ispheming, was drowned last week while bathing in Deek Lake.

August 26, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Georgie Chaput, an idiotic young woman of 25, living near Gauthier's Spur, near Negaunee, attempted to light a kitchen fire last week and in doing so set fire to her clothes. Before the fire could be extinguished she was so badly burned that death resulted soon after.

August 26, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
St. Ignace was the scene of two accidents last week, one causing the death of a little girl and the depriving a young man of one of his legs. Little Maudie Barrett, in running down a hill toward a moving train was unable to stop in time and in the collision was injured so badly that death resulted in a few hours....

August 26, 1893 Page 10
Death of Miss Margaret Doench.
Margaret Elizabeth, the 16-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Doench, died Thursday morning, after a years illness. The funeral will occur at the Presbyterian church at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning. Rev. T. R. Easterday will officiate. The remains will be interred at Riverside, by Undertaker Vanderhook. Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Doench arrived yesterday from Detroit to attend the funeral.

September 2, 1893 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Wm. Bishop.
Mrs. Wm. Bishop, mother of Charles and Randolph Bishop, died at the later's residence Wednesday morning, at the advanced age of 72 years, after a short illness. Mrs. Bishop was a sincere Christian and was held in high esteem by all. She leaves a family of nine children. The funeral occurred Thursday and the remains were taken to Woodstock, Ont., for interment.

September 2, 1893 Page 10
On Tuesday last Alex Leavens found a body on the beach one mile above Sweet's Island. Coroner W. B. House on Wednesday swore in a jury and held an inquest. The jury found that the body was that of Isaac Gillard who drowned on or about July 24 by falling overboard from the schooner Ontario near Lime Island. The remains were buried at Detour. The unfortunate man's father Frank Gillard, lives at west Bay City.

September 9, 1893 Page 1
Fell Overboard and Was Drowned.
John Nelson, of Chicago, was drowned off Keweenaw Point Thursday by falling overboard from the barge Parana.

September 9, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Henay McGilbon of Menominee, fell from a raft of sawlogs in the Menominee river and was drowned last week.

September 16, 1893 Page 1
N. C. Morgan has received the sad news of the death of his father who resided in North Dokota.

September 16, 1893 Page 1
Willet Holt Killed.
The Bright son of Rev. Jos. Holt Accidently Shot
A distressing shooting accident Wednesday caused the death of Willie, the bright ten-year-old son of the Rev. J. W. Holt who resides 11 miles down the Hay Lake road. Willie and his brother started to go hunting. While crossing a brush fence the gun was discharged, the contents entering the unfortunate little fellow's brain. The boy was taken to the house and a message was hurriedly dispatched to the Soo for a physician. Drs. Bacon and Rundie hastened to respond, but death claimed its victim before their arrival. Mr. Holt was at Escanaba attending a meeting of the presbytery at the time of the accident. Rev. T. R. Easterday apprised him by telegraph of the awful affair. No blame whatever is attached to any one, as the elder brother was in the habit of using the gun. It was simply one of those unfortunate accidents that happen when least expected.

September 16, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Rudolph Kauth, aged 16 years, of Hancock, was drowned last week in Portage Lake, while bathing.

September 16, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John N. Hosking, employed in the Tamarack mine, Red Jacket, had his head blown off by a blast last week.

September 16, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of John Yungluth, a Marquette printer, was recently found near Morrellville, Pa. Indications are that he was murdered, as two bullet holes were found in his skull.

September 16, 1893 Page 7
A little son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Waterburry died Monday.

September 16, 1893 Page 7
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Mitchll died Tuesday.

September 16, 1893 Page 7
Wm. O'Leary, a sailor, died this week at the Marine hospital of heart disease.

September 23, 1893 Page 1
Untimely Demise of Mrs. V. H. Paradis.
Mrs. V. H. Paradis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Moran, and a most estimable lady, died last Saturday. The funeral was held at St. James church Monday afternoon and the remains were interred at Riverside. A few days before her untimely demise Mrs. Paradis gave birth to an infant which only lived a short time. She was an acomplished and charming lady and a favorite with all who knew her. Her departure is a terrible blow to her loving husband, parents and other relatives, who have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.

September 23, 1893 Page 2
Death of Mr. and Mrs. Managhan's Babe
(Special Correspondence)
the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Managhan of Schlesser, died Sept. 16th, aged one week. The remains were interred at Montrise cemetery Sept. 18, at 1:30 o'clock p.m. The bereaved parents have the hearfelt sympathy of the entire community in their sudden sorrow. The Rev. T. R. Easterday, of Sault Ste. Marie, preached the funeral sermon.

September 23, 1893 Page 2
William, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hursley, died last Saturday and was buried Tuesday at Riverside.

September 23, 1893 Page 2
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Cochran mourn the loss of one of their bright twin babies which died Tuesday of cholera infantum. The funeral occurred Wednesday. Their many friends sympatize with them in their bereavement.

September 23, 1893 Page 8
Death of Mrs. John J. Moore.
Mrs. John J. Moore died yesterday about noon of typhoid fever. The funeral will occur at St. James' church tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. The deceased was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. Ellis, and a most estimable lady.

September 30, 1893 Page 1
Laid to Rest at Riverside.
The funeral of Mrs. John J. Moore, who died Friday of last week, occurred last Sunday, Rev. P. T. Rowe officiated and the remains were interred at Riverside. A sorrowing husband and two bright little children are left desolate by the untimely death of Mrs. Moore, in addition to her sorrowing parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Ellix, and her sister, Mrs. Otto Supe, and one brother. Mrs. Moore was a most estimable lady and beloved by all who knew her.

September 30, 1893 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Henry Hoffenbecker and John McMahon, engineer and fireman respectively on the South Shore road, were drowned in the bay at Marquette Sunday moring while duck shooting. They were in a leaky skiff which filled with water, the men jumped into the water and before assistance could be rendered both perished.

September 30, 1893 Page 7
Michael Mahoney, a laborer who roomed in the Miller block, had a hemmorhage of the lungs Sunday night and died before medical aid could arrive. The remanis were interred at the expense of the county by Undertaker Vanderhook.

September 30, 1893 Page 8
DEATH of JOS. PAYMENT.
After a Relapse Typoid fever Carried Him Off
Yesterday Forenoon.
Joseph Payment, aged 28 years, died at the residence of his brother-in-law, E. J. Pink, yesterday morning at 10:15 o'clock. He had typhoid fever and suffered a relapse. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock, at St. Marys' church, and the remains will be interred in the Catholic cemetery at Payment, on Sugar Island, opposite Garden River. Jos. Paymetn was a steady young man and was employed on the locks. He belonged to the numerous Payment family, was a brother of Frank X. Payment, of the Fourth ward, a ste-son of Edward Lambert and a brother-in-law of Jos. Crushier. During his sickness of six weeks he received every attention at the residence of his brother-in-law E. J. Pink. His companions knew him to be a jolly good fellow and they will all mourn him and miss him.

September 30, 1893 Page 8
Thomas Tate, an old resident of Sugar Island, died Sunday afternoon last of heart disease. He was buried at Garden River cemetery Tuesday. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. T. R. Easterday. Members of the bereaved family desire to thank neighbours for kind services rendered in their affliction.

September 30, 1893 Page 8
P. J. Moore, late partner of J. B. Blain, of the Fashion saloon, who went to Denver, Col., a few weeks ago to regain health returned to his home in Barrie, Ont., Friday, Sept. 22, and died the same day. He was well known here and had many friends.

October 7, 1893 Page 1
Struck by a Soo Line Train.
Joseph Summerville and Ralph razer, of Cisco, on Tuesday filled up with whiskey, laid down on the railway soon after and the former is in a precarious condition.

October 7, 1893 Page 1
Susie, the loving daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Scott, died Thursday morning of typhoid fever. She had any number of friends, all of whom tender sympathy to those who sorrow. The funeral will occur this morning from St. Mary's church.

October 7, 1893 Page 1
Two Fisherman Drowned.
On Sunday the news reached the Soo, through a letter to Ainsworth & Ganley, of the drowning of two of their employees. George Johnson and Henry Shurtcliffe, at the firm's fishing grounds at Dog River.

October 14, 1893 Page 1
Excessive Drinking Caused His Death.
Chas. Mackie, a Finn, died at the Star saloon on Water street, Tuesday, under peculiar conditions. Coroner Bacon held an examination over his remains and the evidence produced led to the belief that excessive drinking had caused the man's death. He was buried at the expense of the county. The reports sent out to the daily papers that the man had been sandbagged were untrue.

October 14, 1893 Page 1
Two Fisherman Drowned.
Willard Carpenter and his brother-in-law, Edward Carpenter, fishermen, were drowned in last Saturday's gale, while going from Whitefish Point to Au Train. Their capsized boat was recovered by Capt. Frahm, of Life Saving Station No. 12 Sunday. The body of Willard Carpent was washed ashore at Deek Park Monday.

October 14, 1893 Page 4
Picford.
Rev. Mr. Elford, from Donalds, was in town the early part of the wee and conducted the burial service of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Smith, on Wednesday.
Few there are in this county who have had to undergo as much trouble and afliction as Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, of this neighbourhood. Monday morning they were brought to look upon the dead body of their eight weeks old child. Mr. Smith has been laid up the past few weeks with a fractured leg, and it seems that he has no end of trouble. Their infant was buried on Wednesdy. We extend them our heatfelt sympathy in their bereavement.

October 21, 1893 Page 1
His leg torn off and He Died.
George Marvin, a deck hand on the City of Duluth, who had one of his legs torn off by getting fouled in a line Tuesday, at the locks, died at the Marine hospital Thursday night at 7 o'clock.

October 21, 1893 Page 1
Were They Murdered:
Some Think the Carpenter Brother Were Not Drowned at All.
Last week it was reported that Edward and Willard Carpenter, Whitefish Point fisherman, were caught off Deer Park in the storm, their boat upset and both drowned. Although there is a widespread belief that Lake Superior never gives up its dead, because of the coldness of its waters, both have since been found on the sands of the shore. It is said that Willard had about $600 in his pockets but when his clothing was searched only $8 was found. Edward is said to have had about $100 and a gold watch, but neither money nor watch was found upon his person when searched.....

October 21, 1893 Page 9
The State of Superior.
Fred Parro, a well known Crystal Falls man was asphyxiated in the Security Hotel, Chicago last week. It is supposed he blew out the gas.

October 21, 1893 Page 9
The State of Superior.
Alfred Moore, 17 years of age, of Marquette, was drowned Saturday, during the terrific gale. With companions he was standing on the rocks west of the cove, watching the waves roll in. In calm weather he would have been twenty-five feet above the water. A monster wave swept over the place where the young man was standing and when it receded it carried him with it. A futile attempt to save his life was made by his companion who were a short distance from him on higher ground but he perished before their eyes.

October 21, 1893 Page 12
Mrs. John Bulley died of consumption at Sailer's Encampment Wednesday morning. She was well known in the Soo.

October 21, 1893 Page 12
Wm. Hamilton, who died rather suddenly here last week, left some property in New York. His only known relative is a sister in or near Rochester, England.

October 21, 1893 Page 12
Miss Kate Gaynor died at Fayetteville, N. Y., last week of typhoid fever. She was a sister of Mrs. A. M. Bangs, once visited in the Soo and was well known here.

October 21, 1893 Page 12
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs.A. Abbott died Thursday afternoon of inflammation of the bowels. The funeral occurred from their residence yesterday afternoon. The parents have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their bereavement.

October 21, 1893 Page 12
George Boehnlein, who was burned to death in the Harmonia Hall fire, Detroit, last Saturday night, was well known to the Soo drug trade. He was in the city only a week or so ago. Boehnlein was popular here and news of his death was received with deep regret.

October 28, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. Robert Hewell died at the Navin House Friday and was buried Sunday.

October 28, 1893 Page 3
Nebish Nuggets. (Special Correspondence)
It is with much sorrow that we announce the death of Mrs. John Bulley, who departed this life at the Nebish, Oct. 18th 1893. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one small boy to mourn her loss.

October 28, 1893 Page 12
On Tuesday Mrs. F. V. Flower and Mrs. E. H. Conway received by telegram the sad news of the death of their sister, Mrs. Jerome Campbell, at Smith's Creek, near Port Huron.

November 4, 1893 Page 1
Col. G. S. Jennings, a retired army officer, died at his residence at Detroit Wednesday under peculiar circumstances. Col. Jennings was quartermaster at Fort Brady for several years after the war and is well known to old residents at the Soo.

November 4, 1893 Page 4
Assassination of Harrison
The savage brutal and insane assination of Mayor Carter Harrison of Chicago, on Saturday evening last, was a shock to the nation.....

November 4, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior
Editor B. H. Smyth, of the Cheboygan News, died at his residence last week. He was highly esteemed by all.

November 4, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Henry Bangeman was caught on a shaft in Ludington, Wells, Van Schaicky co's sawmill, Menominee, last week, and one of his arms was torn from his body. He was otherwise injured and died soon after.

November 11, 1893 Page 1
Death of Malcolm McKerchie.
Malcolm McKerchie died at his home at Church's Landing, Sugar Island, at noon Wednesday. The deceased was 91 years old and came to the Soo 60 years ago. He was born in Scotland, and was in the employ of the Hudson Bay company for many years. On lived on Sugar Island since 1857. His remains were buried there yesterday. His son Benjamin is in the employ of P. M. Church & Co., of this city.

November 11, 1893 Page 1
Death of One of the Soo's Oldest Citizens
Mrs. Margaret Bodie, mother of Mrs. Frank Sobraro and Mrs. Amelia Hassell, died last evening. The deceased was 91 years of age and was one of the oldest soo residents, having lived here for 45 years. Mrs. Bodie was a good motherly old lady and her death well be a source of regret to all who knew her. She was buried in the Catholic cemetery Tuesday. The services were held at St. Mary's Cathedreal and the Rev. Father D. Donovan officiated.

November 11, 1893 Page 1
Kicked to Death.
John Nimi Receives Injuries that Prove Fatal
Assailed By An Unknown Man. ....
A fracas, which has since resulted in the death of one of the participants, occurred near the corner of Ridge and Magazine streets last Sunday morning. John Nimi, a Finn, aged 26 years, was so brutally kicked by unknown person or persons in the melee that he died at 8 o'clock Wednesday night, at Carlson's boarding house, at the corner of Magazine and Ridge streets..... The remains were taken in charge by Undertaker Vanderhook and Coroner Bacon was notified. A post morten examination of the body was made Thursday by Drs. Lang, McDonald and Bacon. It was found that a rupture of the bladder, as a result of the severe kicking received, was the cause of death....The unfortunate man was buried in the city cemetery Thursday. Nimi has a wife and four children living in Finland. He had been in this country two years.

November 11, 1893 Page 2
Pickford. (Special Correspondence).
Reuben Steele, who had been ill for the past year, the last two months being confined to his bed, quietly passed to his reward Nov. 3rd. He was a very great sufferer, but amidst all his conscious peace and hope of a blessed immortality and eternal live. The funeral service was held on Sunday. Rev. Wm. Maltas officiated and delivered a very able address which was full of hope and comfort. The aged mother, sisters and brothers of the departed have the sympathy of a large circle of friends. The pall-bearers were G. P. Taylor, Bert Cox, Fred Taylor, George and James Smith, Albert Rye.

November 11, 1893 Page 2
Pickford.
On Monday morning at 5 o'clock, death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. Smith, and took from them their youngest son. Although he was sickly, his death was entirely unexpected. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have the sympathy of the entire neighbourhood in their bereavement.

November 11, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
The body of a unknown man was recently found hanging to a tree near Bear Lake Creek near the shore of Lake Superior, in Ontonagon county. Is is supposed to be the remains of Thos. Flans, a miner, and the coroner's jury rendered a verdict of suicide.

November 18, 1893 Page 2
AN OLD CITIZEN GONE.
Death of James Rutherford Last Sunday Afternoon.
James Rutherford died at his residence on Kimball street at 2 o'clock last Sunday afternoon, of stomach trouble, at the age of 58 years. Up to a couple of months ago Mr. Rutherford was in the best of health, but in September had a severe sick spell from which he never recovered. Mr. Rutherford was one of the Soo's oldest and best known citizens. He held many offices of trust, such as village trustee, and was a member of the school board for several years. He preceded John cota as custodian of the city hall. He wasa member of th Masonic, Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows and Knights of Labor orders. He carried $3000 insurance in the Masonic association. Three children survive him. The funeral occurred from the residence Wednesday afternoon and was in charge of the Masonic society which was present in a body. The deceased was born in Scotland in 1835 and came to Michigan in 1860. He has lived on the Upper Peninsula for 33 years. THE NEWS extends its sympathy to the bereaved children.

November 18, 1893 Page 8
William, the five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, died on Tuesday last, at Pine Grove, after more than three week's sickness. The remains were laid to rest in the Pine Grove cemetery on Wednesday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Jones wish to thank their friends and neighbours who so kindly assisted them in their hour of trial.

November 25, 1893 Page 1
Sad Death of Mrs. C. J. Johnson.
On November 20th, at 8:30 o'clock a.m. at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Magee, Chandler Heights, occurred the sad death, from nervous prostration, of Mrs. Adelaide M., beloved wife of Clarence J. Johnson, at the age of 21 years. The remains were taken to Media, Pa., where the funeral was held Thursday afternoon. The heart-broken husband and relatives have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow.

November 25, 1893 Page 2
Chas. Andrews, proprietor of the Andrews Opera Co., which recently appeared at the Soo, was run over by a train at Morrison, Ill., and instantly killed, on Friday of last week.

November 25, 1893 Page 2
Detour. (Special Correspondence.)
We regret having to chronicle the sudden death of little Bertie, the only son of Dr. and Mrs. W. B. House, aged nearly three years,who "fell asleep" at 1:30 a.m., Nov. 20th,. At midnight the little dear was so tired that he could not find rest on earth.....
The funeral was held at 2 p.m. Nov 21st, Services were conducted by Rev. Jno. Murdock.....

November 25, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ora W. Doolittle, a pioneer of Marquette county, died at Ishpeming, aged 62 years, Wednesday, Nov. 14.

November 25, 1893 Page 4
One by one the great men of the nation are passing away. One of the latest to cross the dark river is Jeremiah M. Rush, ex-secretary of agriculture, ex-governor of Wisconsin and ex-member of congress, who died at 8:45 Tuesday morning at his country residence near Viroqua, Wis., after a severe illness, at the age of 63. Uncle Jerry rush, as he was familiarly called, was a jovial, good-hearted man and his death causes much sorrow throughout the nation.

November 25, 1893 Page 4
William McCarthy, aged 50 years, who had been an employee of the Quincy mine, Houghton, for 30 years, fell down a shaft of the mine last week and was killed.

December 2, 1893 Page 1
A Warrior Gone.
Sudden Death of Bluff, Brave, Big-Hearted Bill Newcomb Followed to Grave Wednesday
The Coffin Drawn on a Sleigh by a Favorite Driving Horse.
Funeral Conducted by Marcalus Post, G. A. R.
A shock was given the entire community last Saturday evening by the announcements of the sudden death of Wm. J. Newcomb, one of the county's oldest and best known residents, at his country home six miles from the city on the Hay Lake road. The surprise was all the greater because Mr. Newcomb, apparently in much improved health, had spent the day in the city, accompanied by Mrs. Newcomb. They called on a number of old friends and among others Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Blunk, with whom they took dinner. On their return home Mr. Newcomb ate a hearty supper arose from the table, and stepped into another room. Soon after this other member of the family heard him fall. They rushed in and found him to their horrow prostrate on the floor with life extin- A rupture of the heat, as the result of lung trouble, was the immediate cause of death, which must have been a trace of suffering, but a natural, peacful expression, which continued even until he was buried.
The funeral of Wm. J. Newcomb occurred from his Hay Lake farm house at 1 o'clcok Wednesday afternoon..... Wm. J. Newcomb had not long passed the fifty-first mile stone of life when so suddenly called hence. He was born, grew up and lived in Chippewa county all his life..... Mr. Newcomb was the father of fifteen children, all but five of whom survive. They are Frank, Charles, George, William, Frederick, Otto, emeline, Jennie, Lucy and Dora. George and Fred hold responsible positions on the steamer Pontiac. Mrs. Newcomb is a sister of Andrew Blank. The only surviving member, of the family from which Mrs. Newcomb descende is Mrs. R. L. Mitchell, a sister of the departed veteran.....

December 2, 1893 Page 1
Across the Dark River.
Arthur Crawford Enters That Bourne From Whence No One Returns.
The earthly career of Arthur Crawford, one of the city's bright and popular young men, ended Monday morning when he died from the effect of typhois fever.....The funeral occurred at the residence of Frank Perry, Wednesday at 10 o'clock. The Rev. P. T. Rowe, M.A., rector of St. James Church, of which the deceased was amember, officiated. A large concourse of friends was in attendance. The remains were laid to rest at Riverside with Masonic honors. Mr. Crawford was a cousin of Frank and R. O. Perry. Of near relatives he leaves a widowed mother, a brother and sisrter. His mother arrived Tuesday only to find her loving son is the cold embrace of death, which caused her to become heart-broken. Mr. Crawford was 32 years of age. He had lived in the Soo and vicinity for fifteen years.....

December 2, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Judge William D. Williams, of Marquette, died Wednesday evening at his residence. He was an able juurist, and well known throughout the Upper Peninsula.

December 2, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Relatives of Amabel Curott, Sr., who died at Muskegon last week, desire to hear from his sons, Daniel and Amabel Curott, Jr., who are supposed to reside some where in the Upper Peninsula.

December 2, 1893 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Alexander Tnos shot and instantly killed Deputy Sheriff Davidson Nov. 21, at Trout Creek....

December 9, 1893 Page 1
Demise of Mrs. Geo. Hill.
Mrs. Hill, wife of Yardmaster Geo. Hill, died Wednesday, afternoon of consumption, at the age of 22. She had been afflicted with the disease for some time. At the time of her marriage some few months ago, she was beyond medical aid.....

December 16, 1893 Page 1
Death of Little Roy Fleming.
Roy Fleming, the bright 7-year-old son of John Fleming, died last Saturday evening and was interred at the city cemetery Monday. The Rev. T. R. Easterday conducted the funeral service at the house. This is the third of five five children that Mr. and Mrs. Fleming have lost and they are deeply afflicted. They have the sympathy of the entire community.

December 16, 1893 Page 1
N. L. Martin received word this week of the death of his venerable father at Roadhouse, Ill. He was aged 81. Owing to the distance and delay in receiving the telegram, Mr. Martin could not reach Roodhouse in time for the funeral, so he did not go.

December 23, 1893 Page 1
Death of an Aged Resident.
Mrs. Ann McAleen, a resident of Rosedale, died suddenly Thursday at the age of 78 years. Mrs. McAleer was an old resident of this county. The funeral will be held at Rosedale today.

December 23, 1893 Page 2
Mrs. Partick Needham, died Sunday night from the effects of typhoid fever. A husband and four children are left to mourn her demise. The funeral occurred Tuesday from St. Mary's church.

December 30, 1893 Page 1
Death of Rev. W. T. Hicks.
Rev. W. H. Hicks, pastor of the Methodist church in the Canadian Soo, died at his home in that city Thursday of last week of heart failure. Rev. Hichs had saveral friends in this city who will be sorry to hear of his demise.

December 30, 1893 Page 1
Mrs. Trimm and a Son of Peter Smith Drowned Sunday Fatality Occurred at Detour.
Bodies Recouvered Tuesday By George Church and Tom Rice.
Detour Mich., Dec 25, 1893 Msr. Andrew Trimm, who was well known to many in the Soo, and who left there for Detour last spring that she might be with her husband who is in the employ of the Island Cedar Co., was drowned yesterday afternoon with an unknown man she had employed to take her from Drummond to Detour with a team of dogs.....

December 30, 1893
Charles E. Spencer, of Marquette who came frequently to the Soo and has many friends here, died of typhoid fever. Christmas night. He was in the prime of his life.

January 6, 1894 Page 1
He May Own Up.
.... The preliminary examination of Retia Paccaloni, charged with the murder of his wife on the night of Dec. 5, was begun before Justice Warner Tuesday afternoon.

January 6, 1894 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Anthony Wortman committed suicide by taking strychnine at Quinlan's boarding house, Manistique.

January 6, 1894 Page 7
Detour. (Special Correspondence.)
The funeral of Mrs. Andrew Trimm, who with Pedannoquet Smith, lost their life in the treacherous waters of St. Mary's river, Dec. 24, was held in the M. E. church at Detour on Thursday Dec 28, at 1 o'clock. The bereaved husband and Ettie, the only daughter have the sympathy of the people in their [paper torn].

January 13, 1894 Page 1
Geo. W. Brown.
His Funeral Will Occur Tomorrow Morning at 9:30 O'clock
The funeral of the late Geo. W. Brown will occur at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at the family residence. The Rev. Thos. R. Easterday will officiate and the remains will be laid to rest at Riverside under the auspicies of the Odd Fellow's faternity. The funeral was postponed from 9:30 a.m. yesterday on account of the blockade of the roads by Thursday's severe storm.
The death of Mr. Brown occurred at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday morning, after a short illness, though he had been in a feeble condition for a long time. Acute peritonitis was the immediate cause of death. He suffered much, but at the last passed away like one dropping into a natural sleep. Everything possible was done for Mr. Brown by friends and Dr. Taylor, though the latter himself was suffering with pnemonia.
Geo. W. Brown was born in Cornwall, Conn., April 5, 1825. When a young man he removed with his parents to Coldwater, Mich. At that place he studied law, was admitted to the bar and practised for several years. In 1858, he was elected a member of the state legislature. Soon after the expiration of his term he was appointed superintendent of the St. Mary's Falls canal at the Soo. He held this position for 4 years. He then returned to Calhoun county, where he practised his profession and served as prosecuting attorney. In 1868 he returned to the Soo, where he resided continuously until his death..... Mr. Brown was married in 1847. His life partner preceded him to the other world about 2 years ago. From their union resulted three children, all of whom survive. The are: Mrs. Dr. Nellie Beadle, Capt. Geo. LeRoy Brown and Mrs. F. M. Taylor. The latter with her husband reside here. Mrs. Dr. Beadle has arrived to attend the funeral, but Capt. Brown cannot reach here in time and is not expected to come.....

January 13, 1894 Page 2
J. T. Moore was called to Mohawkville, O., Monday by the death of his mother.

January 13, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Daniel McRae, engineer on the transfer steamer St. Ignace, committed suicide on the boat Sunday night, near Mackinaw City. He shot himself with a rifle. He was a heavry drinker and it is supposed he was temporarily deranged. He leaves a wife and children.

January 13, 1894 Page 7
The Canada Sault.
A Finn named Nankian was killed by a falling stone at the ship canal Tuesday. The stone struck him on the head, crushing at to a shapeless mass.

January 20, 1894 Page 1
Laid to Rest.
Geo. W. Brown [nothing that wasn't in the previous announcement]

January 20, 1894 Page 1
Another Loved One Gone.
Death Again Visits the Family of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Newton.
Florence, the bright 15-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Newton, died at her home on Court street, at 2 o'clock last Saturday afternoon. She had been an invalid for a year, but the immediate cause of death was typhoid fever. She was a lovable child and her demise will be greatly felt, not only by her family, but by her schoolmates, Sunday school associates and all who knew her. A year ago she was received with the realization of awakening in a new and better world. The funeral occurred from the Central Methodist church Monday afternoon. The Rev. C. M. Thompson, officiated. It is only a few weeks since Blanche, a loved member of Newton family, was called away by death. Mr. and Mrs. Newton and family have the sympathy of the community in their double bereavement.

January 20, 1894 Page 1
Death of Mrs. J. S. Allport.
Mrs. J. S. Allport died at Bay Mills Tuesday morning after a lingering illness of many years. Mrs. Allport was a noble Christian lady and her demise is a severe blow to her husband and family of five children. The funeral was held from her late residence Wednesday afternoon and the remains were temporaily interred at Bay Miss. They will be removed to Hamilton next spring. The bereaved family have the sympathy of friends.

January 20, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior

August Carlson, a young Swede, was killed last week by a falling tree in the woods near Pembine.

January 20, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Bigelow was run over and literally cut to pieces by a C., M. & St. P. Freight train at Sagola last week.

January 27, 1894 Page 1
Herbert Trempe, the only child of Mrs. McCabe, Ridge street west, died last Sunday of inflammation of the brain.

January 27, 1894 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Belva Brown.
Mrs. Belva A. Brown died at her home on Elizabeth street at 5 o'clock Wednesday morning. Mrs. Brown had been afflicted for a year with cancer. Her case was hopeless from the start. Last Monday she decided to undergo a surgical operation, which was successfully performed Tuesday afternoon by Drs. Lang, McDonald and Floyd. She knew her dissolution was only a question of a few weeks at best but with the cancer removed, might have prolonged life. This was not to be, and death claimed her. Mrs. Brown was 51 years of age and had resided in the city for several years. One son, E. E. Brown, survives her. Her remains were taken to Waterford, Pa. Thursday for interment.

January 27, 1894 Page 2
J. T. Moore returned early in the week from Ohio, where he was called by the death of his mother.

January 27, 1894 Page 8
Young Boy Killed.
Aberdeen, S.D. Jan, 15 - The 14-year-old son of William Spencer, living near Detroit postoffice, this county, was accidently killed by the discharge of a shotgun, the contents of which entered below his hip and penatrated to the back of his head.

February 3, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Jerry Le Duc was killed by a falling tree at Pleasant Grove, near Escanaba, last week.

February 3, 1894 Page 7
Canada Sault.
W. Bakka, a Finn, was killed at the ship canal last Saturday. He was engaged in excavating in the pit, when a large rock fell, stricking him on the left leg and cutting it off at the ankle. Death was caused by excessive hemorhage.

February 10, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. Peter Anderson, of Marquette, who had been mentally unbalanced for 10 years, was drowned last week in the lake in 3 feet of water and only about 500 feet away from her home.

February 10, 1894 Page 4
The Mackinac region is mourning the demise of Constance Fennimore Woolson, which occurred Jan 28, in Italy. She was a grandniece of the Americn novelist, James Fennimore Cooper, and the author of several brilliant novels, ....

February 10, 1894 Page 8
A young lady named Charlotte Grant, going to Canada, died on the train of consumption near Hermansville, Thursday.

February 10, 1894 Page 8
Arthur Fogarty, the 12-year-old grand child of W. H. Stribling died last Sunday morning of typhoid fever. The funeral occurred Monday.

February 17, 1894 Page 1
Mrs. G. E. C. Seaman was called to St. Clair Sunday by the death of her brother-in-law, Dr. W. R. Moore. Dr. Moore was one of St. Clairs energetic and well-to-do citizens. His death is a severe blow to the city in which he had been living for many years.

February 17, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Charles Archer was killed last week while unloading logs at Thayer's Lake, Keweenaw county.

February 17, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Onoffer, of Menominee, was killed last week by a rolling log in one of the camps near there.

February 17, 1894 Page 8
A 8 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. Collins died of pnemonia Saturday.

February 17, 1894 Page 8
James Meehan, a prominent resident of Bruce township died early in the week.

February 17, 1894 Page 8
Hugh Hogan, aged 23 years, died of consumption at the American house Monday morning. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery Wednesday.

February 24, 1894 Page 8
Alex Darrow, aged 38 years, died at his rooms, corner of Spruce avenue and Ashmun street, Wednesday, of inflammation of the lungs. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church yesterday morning.

February 24, 1894 Page 8
Mrs. R. G. McKay died of consumption Feb. 5, 1894, at her residence, 1613 Tower avenue, West Superior, Wis. Mrs. McKay was a niece of William Mackie, of Bruce township and was held in high esteem by all who knew her.

March 3, 1894 Page 1
Met An Untimely Death.
Joseph King, a well known farmer residing near Dafter, met an untimely death at the Alpena House, this city, Wednesday afternoon, by falling down stairs and breaking his neck. Mr. King leaves a wife and son. His remains were taken charge of by Undertaker Vanderhook. The funeral was held yesterday at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred at the Catholic cemetery.

March 3, 1894 Page 7
Iroquois. (Special Correspondence.)
We feel sorry to chronicle this week the death of little Johnny Teeple, of this place. The little fellow had been sick for some time and last Monday morning passed to his eternal home. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the whole neighbourhood.

March 3, 1894 Page 7
Canada Sault.
Mrs. Andrew Webb, the wife of the founder of Webbwood, passed away on Saturday night, aged 58.

March 3, 1894 Page 8
An infant of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Laramie died Sunday.

March 10, 1894 Page 1
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Eagle died Tuesday morning after a lingering illness. The little one was buried at Riverside Wednesday.

March 10, 1894 Page 2
Accident at the Ophir.
A Fall of Ground Killed 3 Men and Injures Others.
Three men were killed and several injured Monday at the Ophir mine, in which Abe Mitchell, of the Soo, is interested. The names of those killed are: Frank Pacey, James Hoath and Anthony Savage. The fatality was caused by a fall of ground in the 31 level, where most of the miners were at work. Coroner McCort, of Thessalon, assisted by Inspector of Mines Slaight, of St. Thomas, and J. J. Kehoe, crown attorney, will hold an inquest next week.

March 10, 1894 Page 2
Pine Rest. (Special Correspondence)
Mr. William Makie recently received the sad intelligence of the death of her nephew, W. VanIderstan, at Marquette.

March 10, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior
The 2-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Garvin, of Ewen, fell into a barrel of water which was sunk in the ground and not covered, last week, and was drowned.

March 10, 1894 Page 9
Canada Sault
Isak Maki, a Finn, died of typhoid fever last Sunday. He was buried Monday.

March 17, 1894 Page 1
Death of Wm. H. Redfern.
Wm. H. Redfern, son of James Redfern, died at his home at 5 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, aged 14 years, 9 months and 12 days. The deceased had been ill for 6 weeks, and hemorrhage from the nose caused his death. The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at 10 o'clock yesterday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Redfern have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

March 17, 1894 Page 1
Funeral of the late Wm. Sharpe, who died last Friday, was held at St. James' church Monday morning. Services were conducted by Rev. E. A. Vesey, of the Canadian Soo. A large concourse of friends were in attendance. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.

March 17, 1894 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Martha Shobbrook.
Mrs. Martha Shobbrook died at Stirlingville Thursday, aged 52 years. The deceased was the mother of Miss Minnie Shobbrook, who was recently employed in Peck's cafe. Undertaker Vanderhook has charge of the funeral, which will take place today. Mrs. Shobbrook was a woman highly respected by all who knew her.

March 17, 1894 Page 1
Wm. E. Sharpe, a former Soo boy is in the city. He was called here by the death of his father, the late Wm. Sharpe. Mr. Sharpe has been located in Johnstown, N.Y. for some time.

March 17, 1894 Page 2
Pickford Pointers
The wife of George Blair died Sunday last. The funeral took place Thursday, having been delayed to await the arrival of friends from Goderich, Ont. Mrs. Blair's death was caused by cardiac dilatation, wich was brought on by worry and anxiety caused by the sickness and death in the family during the winter. She leaves a loving husband and 2 children to mourn her loss. Mr. Blair is held in high esteem in this community and the heartfelt sympathy of many friends and acquaintances is extended to him in his severe hour of trial.

March 17, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Larson committed suicide near Menominee last week. He took the pistol route.

March 17, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Hanberg, living near Escanaba, committed suicide last week by shooting himself through the head.

March 17, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Mrs. Uriana, a Finn woman, of Hancock, recently wandered into the woods near there and was frozen to death. She was insane.

March 17, 1894 Page 6
John Palmer, the inventor of the railroad check system, died a few days ago in a little town in Michigan. He was a fiddler years ago and took charge of the hats and wraps of those who came to dancing parties. He gave numbered checks, for them and some railroad men who attended one of his dances appropriated the idea and in a little while the system was adopted all over the country.

March 17, 1894 Page 8
Neaseville. (Special Correspondence.)
Last Saturday night the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ford quietly passed away after a lingering illness.

March 24, 1894 Page 1
He Was Scalped.
Jno. Donohue Killed by Jumping from a Window.
He Suicided While Crazy
Was a "Jumper" and Tried it Once Before
The Dead Man Leaves a Wife and 1 Child Without Means of Support at Allendale, Ont.
(Special to THE NEWS)
Detour, March 20, 1894, - A distressing case of self-murder occurred here last Monday evening at 8 o'clock. It caused great excitement. John Donahue had been occupying a {room}? On the 3d floor of the Park hotel. On Monday evening, with no warning whatever, he smashed the window of his room and jumped out. In the fall of 40 feet he turned over twice and then alighted on his head on the sidewalk. Donahue was hastily picked up and was given medical attention at once. It was found that over half of his skull had been bared by the blow and the sight was a sickening one. The unfortunate man, who must have been temporarily deranged, died at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, without gaining consciousness. Donahue has a wife and child at Allendale, Ont. Dr. W. B. House, who is the coroner held an inquest Tuesday, and a verdict in accordance with the foregoing facts were rendered. The corpse was interred by Corner House. Our bright little town is being shocked by tragedies altogether too often.
Donahue worked in 1 of the camps of the Island Cedar Co. during the winter, and last summer worked for Hughes Bros. & Bangs on Drummond Island. He boarded at O'Briens boarding house, and jumped out of a second story window there. He was 31 years old.

March 24, 1894 Page 1
Geo. Dawson's Funeral Today.
The funeral of the late Geo. W. Dawson will occur at 10:30 o'clock this morning, instead of tomorrow, as announced in the account of his death.

March 24, 1894 Page 2
Killed a Clergyman.
Whittier, Cal., March 17, - A burglar entered the residence of Rev. Andrew Carson, a Methodist Clergyman, and Mr. Carson attacked the burglar with a poker. During the fight which ensued the clergyman received three bullet wounds from the burglar's pistol, one of which penetrated the minister's lung and will prove fatal.

March 24, 1894 Page 3
Kossuth is Dead.
The Once Noted Hungarian Patriot Dies at Turin in Exile and Poverty
Turin, March 22, Louis Kossuth died at 10:55 p.m. His end was extremely painful. He showed signs of consciousness to the last. He expired in the arms of his son, and died pressing the hand of the Hungarian deputy, Karoyli. The members of his family and a few intimate friends stood around the bedside of the expiring patriot. Nothing has yet been settled in regard to the details of the funeral. The municipal authorities of this city offered the family to allow the remains to be buried in the pantheon here.

March 24, 1894 Page 3
Mrs. John W. Noble Dead.
St. Louis, March 19. - Mrs. John W. Noble, wife of ex-President Harrison's secretary of the interior, died suddenly at her home this city.
The end of life came to her while standing in her dining room chatting with friends and waiting for General Noble, who had stepped from the room to call a carriage for a drive. The cause of her death was organic heart disease.

March 24, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Louis Curry, a former resident of Thompson, near Manistique, was found dead on the ice near Iron Mountain, recently.

March 24, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph Zulleoch fell from a tramway at Manistique Monday of last week and killed instantly. He had only arrived there one day previously from Germany.

March 24, 1894 Page 5
Rev. Charles Mackin died at Chicago. He was 84 years old and for 60 years had been a clergyman.

March 24, 1894 Page 5
Rev. Alanson T. Wood, a pioneer Presbyterian minister of Nebraska, dropped dead in an Omaha church Sunday.

March 24, 1894 Page 5
Emma Mangers, aged 19, a prominent young lady of Raymond, Ills. suicided Sunday by taking strychnine. No cause known.

March 24, 1894 Page 7
Fort Brady.
George M. Candu, son of Paymaster Candu, died last Saturday at the home of his father at Evanston, Ill. He was buried at Milwaukee.

March 31, 1894 Page 2
Elwood Moore, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. David Moore, died this week and was interred at the city cemetery Thursday.

March 31, 1894 Page 3
[Supplement]
Bay Mills.
Mary Melinda, the beloved daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Atkinson, died Monday of heart failure, at the age of 18. The funeral was held at the family residence and the remains were taken to the Soo and interred in the Riverside cemetery. The Rev. W. E. Brown officiated. A memorial service will be held at the church in the near future. Miss Atkinson was a beautiful young lady and possessed a true Christian character. Her untimely death is a great blow to the sorrowing family. The bereaved relatives desire to extend thanks to friends for the kind assistance rendered.

March 31, 1894 Page 5
The State of Superior.
James E. Dalliba, circuit court commissioner and one of the oldest attorneys of the Marquette bar, died at Marquette last week.

March 31, 1894 Page 5
The State of Superior.
Ed. Hyland, 22 years old, an oiler in the grand republic Mill at West Superior, fell into the converyor and was instantly killed. He was literally torn to pieces.

March 31, 1894 Page 6
Colonel Allen Sells, one of the original Sills Bros., of circus fame, died at his home in Topeka, aged 56.

March 31, 1894 Page 6
Frank Crittenden, nephew of ex-Governor Thomas T. Crittenden of Missouri, was accidently killed at Duarte, Cal.

March 31, 1894 Page 11
Mike's Spicy Missive.
At Neaseville early Monday morning the infant son of John Bennett died. It was buried from St. Mary's church.

March 31, 1894 Page 12
Jennie the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Marks, died Tuesday afternoon and was buried Wednesday.

April 7, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joe Burns, a boy who has lived at Florence for the past 12 years, was instantly killed in a Commonwealth butcher shop last week. He was fooling with a 250 pound meat cutter and accidently stepped into a cellar way. When falling he clutched the cutter, bringing it with him as he fell. The cutter was supplied with 6 sharp knives and he was literally cut in pieces.

April 7, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Mr. Wemyss McKenzie Simpson of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., who died at Old Point Comfort, Va., on the 31st of March, was, besides being one of the oldest residents in the Algoma district a representative man of a generation fast passing away. Mr. Simpson was born in London, Eng., on the 30th of March, 1824, and after a course of education at Eton he came to Canada early in 1841 as an apprentice to the Hudson Bay Company, in which his brother-in-law, Sir George Simpson, held a distinguished position. On his arrival Mr. Simpson was attached to the Hudson Bay offices at Lachine, whence he was afterwards drafted, in the spring of 1846, by way of the Ottawa river, Lakes Huron and Nipissing and of the St. Mary's river and Lake Superior, to Fort Garry. Here and at posts between the Red River and York factory, notably at Cumberland House, Norway House and Edmonton, he spent many years. It was during this period that trouble ensued when the Sixth British regiment and detachments of artillery and engineers occupied the territory. He was subsequently appointed to the charge of the Lake Huron district, with headquarters at La Cloch. It was during the later period that he married a daughter of the late Captain Ironside, at that time superintendent of the Northern Indian agency at Manitowaning. A year or two later he took charge of the old Hudson Bay fort at Sault Ste. Marie and remained there until, in 1864, he finally retired from the service. This fort was abandoned in 1869. Mr. Simpson, on retirement, acquired the land and built the house east of the town in which he resided for over a quarter of a century. It should be mentioned that on the creation of the Anglican missionery diocese of Algoma, with Bishop Fauquier as its first incumbent, Mr. Simpson gave a portion of the land so acquired for the See house and grounds where Bishophurst now stands. Mr. Simpson, on settling down at "Upton," a name given to his domicile from old country associations, became, of course, intimately connected not only with Sault society but also with its interests and needs. In 1866, after a sharp contest, he became, by a narrow majority, the first member for Algoma in the Dominion parliaments. Sir John Macdonald facetiously after the interests of his constituents during his tenure of office, and when he retired it was with respect and good wishes of political friends and opponents. He was never a very pronounced politician, and towards the end of his life, through travel and enlarged associations, his opinions underwent considerable, if not radical change. Mr. Simpson raised a very large family, 14 in all, of which 11 remain, some at the Sault and others in varius parts of the Dominon - one, we believe in the states. Two girls died young, and one in infancy. A son, Frederick Stanley a splended specimen of manhood, was drowned at the Saskatchewan falls in 1892 in attempting to rescue a Hudson Bay officer who was unable to swim and who, with his would be savior, was immersed by the upsetting of a canoe. Two other sons, Gerald and Scott, are in the Hudson Bay Company's service; two daughters, Mrs. James and Mrs. Garney, reside at Portage LaPrairie, Mr. Frank Simpson, the eldest son, holds a responsible position in connection with the great Ogilvie milling firm at Winnipeg. A daughter is married to Mr. Henry Plummer, collector of customs at the Sault, and another to Mr. Jos. Cozens, P.L.S. The youngest of the family, twins, residing at home, are Miss Edith and Mr. Algoma Simpson. The late Mr. Simpson was twice married, first in 1853 to Miss Annie Symington Ironside and the second time in 1888 to Miss Eliza Ironside, his deceased wife's sister. Mr. Simpson survived nearly all his immediate relatives in the old country. His brother, General S. Simpson, long a distinguished officer in the old East India Company's service died in 1889; 4 sisters pre-deceased him within the last 7 years, and only 2 relatives remain, both living in England. Another brother, John, also in the Hudson Bay service, died at Fort Coulonge on the Upper Ottawa, sometime in the sixties. Mr. Simpson, besides being the first members of parliament for Algoma, was appointed a colonel of milita in 1872, and in that capacity and as a commissioner he assisted the late Hon. Alex. Morris in negotiating a treaty with the Indian in the north - west for a surrender of their land. He was also for many years identified with the agricultural interests of the district as president of the Algoma Agricultural society. He was also a colonel in the Reserve Melitia of Algoma. Mr. Simpson was one of the last survivors of the old school of Hudson Bay officers which will soon be extinct. Confederation and the Canadian Pacific railway have changed the conditions and minimized the profits of the fur trade and a few if any of the company's officers can now hope to retire as Mr. Simpson did in 1864 with a handsome competency.
The Indians find cash purchasers for furs all along the line who trust them as the old company did of yore and the reign of the company except in very remote regions may be said to be extinct. For the rest it may be said that the late Mr. Simpson was the soul of geniality, and until stricken down by illness, the soul of hospitality. He was full of ancedotes, good at repartee, was well up in current and old time literature; so well up indeed, that it was difficult to make a quotation with which he was not throughly familiar, and at all times and under any circumstances it could be seen that he had never forgotten the traditions of an English gentleman. He had reached his 70th year on the day he died. For more than a quarter of a century his had been a daily familiar figure on our streets, and up to his last illness "Upton" had been renowned for over 20 years as the one really hospitable spot where residents and visitors might depend on really disenterested social intercourses. By his death a void will be created here which it may be difficult to fill within our generation.
The remains of the late Mr. Simpson did not arrive as expected, on Thursday and the funeral is deferred until Saturday, April 7. His remains were shipped by express from Old Comfort, Va., Saturday. The body did not arrive until last night and for 2 days it was lost. Those concerned did not know where it was. The funeral was postponed twice. The will bequeathed all money and property to his wife. The estate amounts to about $100,000.

April 7, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
The town got a genuine surprise on Tuesday when the intelligence was received that Capt. Skewes, the well known mining man of Echo Bay, had died in Mexico of an attack of pnemonia. Capt. Skewes had gone thither as an expert to report on a newly-discovered mine. The body was embalmed and is now on its way to the Sault for interment. Mrs. Skewes, who has for sometime been in a very delicate state of health, is almost heart broken over the unexpected calamity, and the hearts of a host of friends go out to her sore affliction. A later account says the body of Capt Skewes will not be permitted at present to leave Mexico.

April 7, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Jakob Jakison, a Finn, died of typhoid fever at Slabtown last Saturday. He was buried Sunday.

April 7, 1894 Page 10
The infant boy of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Trimble died Tuesday and wes buried Wednesday.

April 14, 1894 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Mott died Wednesday. The funeral was held Thursday. Mr. and mrs. Mott have the sympathy of their friends in their bereavement.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
George Duval, a colored waiter, was struck by an electric car at Minneapolis Thursday and died an hour later.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
Two children of Mr. and Mrs. Clark who reside near Blade Springs, Va., were burned to death during the temporary absence of their parents.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
James Stevens, incarcerated in the New Hampton, La. Jail for stealing a watch, committed suicide by drinking carbolic acid.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
Arthur Laverle, 28 years of age, son of a wealth Chicago liguier dealer, shot and killed his finance, Miss Emma Allen. He then turned the revolver on himself, inflicting a wound that may prove fatal.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
From Washington.
Ex-United States Senator Cattel of New Jersey is dead, aged 79.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
Ira Mayhew, well known business college educator and text book author, dropped dead at Detroit. He was 80 years old.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
Dr. Edward Cone Bissell, a professor in the McCormick Theological seminary Chicago, died from pnemonia. Interment will take place at the professor's home in West Hampton, Mass.

April 14, 1894 Page 3
Captain James Hughes, aged 84, dropped dead of heart disease at Uankton. He came to Yankton from Chicago in 1869, where he was a Lake Michigan captain for 30 years.

April 14, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
A very old citizen, Peter Denomee, died at his house 3 miles north of this town last Saturday, aged 103 years.

April 14, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Thos. LeMay, a Frenchman, who hails from Ottawa, was killed at the new ship canal Tuesday. He was struck by a falling stone, which broke his back and leg and crushed his skull. He was taken to Tremblay's boarding huse and only lived a short time.

April 14, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Andrew Trugo, a Finn, aged 38, was killed on the new ship canal work Monday. His death was the result of the breaking of a cable attached to a derrick. The cable tore off the top of his head and exposed his brain. He died a short time later.

April 14, 1894 Page 10
Col. Niles G. Parker, who at one time resided in the Soo, died at Escanaba this week.

April 21, 1894 Page 1
C. Y. Dixon was called to Niles this week by the death of his mother.

April 21, 1894 Page 2
A son of Mrs. Stibbins, of Bay Mills was killed at Nassay, N. H., last week. He was working for the Canadian Pacific railway at the time.

April 21, 1894 Page 3
A Happy Home Blighted.
The Angel of Death Calls Away Mrs. Samuel G. Carlton.
Jessie Webster Carlton, accountant for the Edison-Sault Electric Co., died at her home on Nolte street at 6 o'clock last Sunday morning of puerpal mania. She had been ill for about 10 days. She gave birth to a girl baby about 2 weeks ago. Mrs. Carlton was born at Guelph, Ont., 23 years ago and came to this city in 1877, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Webster. She was married Feb. 10, 1891. Two little girls, the oldest aged 2½ years, survive her, besides her loving husband. Mrs. Carlton was a lady of a great many good qualities, with sweet disposition and charming manners and was a general favorite with all who knew her. She was an active member of Arbutus Temple, No. 5, Pythian Sisters, and was about to join the Ladies of the Maccabees.
The funeral of Mrs. Carlton was held from the St. James church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Red Cross Lodge, No. 51, Knights of Pythias, of which Mr. Carlton is past chancellor, was present in a body, with the Uniformed Rank K. Of P., T. Rove, M.A., rector of St. James', assisted by the Rev. W. A. Mulligan. The choir, composed of Mrs. L.H. Conley, Miss Florida Lyon and Messrs. Fleming and Johnston sang "Nearer, My God, to Thee."....
Mrs. Carlton was a sister of William, John, Andrew, Jennie and Sarah Webster.

April 21, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Alfred Pirphey, a Marquette fisherman, was drowned while fishing through the ice in L'Anse bay this week.

April 21, 1894 Page 6
The father of Jas. and Miss Lydia Johnson, died at Meaford last week.

April 21, 1894 Page 10
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gordon died Tuesday night. The funeral occurred Thursday morning.

April 21, 1894 Page 10
Little Helen Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Johnson, was seriously ill this week with inflammation of the lungs.

April 28, 1894 Page 1
A Case of Diphtheria.
Donald McCallum Dies of the Dread Disease Last Monday
Donald McCallum died of diphtheria Monday afternoon at the residence of Mrs. J. Walker, on Ashmun alley. Mr. McCallum was a member of life saving station No. 10. About two weeks ago he came to the Soo after spending the winter with his parents near Montreal. He remained here for several days and then departed for his station. Soon after he reached his distination he complained of having a sore throat. He came to the Soo Saturday for medical treatment, but the disease was too far advanced and carried him off as stated. The remains were interred in the city cemetery. Mr. McCallum was an important witness in the Paccoloni murder trial here last winter. He was thought by some persons at that time to have had some knowledge of the murder of Mrs. Paccaloni, but no evidence was produced to show this. Such persons claim he has been pursued by the hand of fate. Mr. McCallum was a steady young man and held in high esteem by his associates. His untimely death emphasized the urgent need here of a hospital or pest house in which to care for such cases as this.

April 28, 1894 Page 1
Death of Fisherman Geo. Crain.
George Crain died at the Marine hospital Wednesday as the result of exposure caused by the capsizing of his fishing boat. He had been employed by Ainsworth & Ganley for several years. His remains were sent to Collingwood Thursday for interment.

April 28, 1894 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Bonno died Monday.

April 28, 1894 Page 4
Mrs. Wm. Doyle, of Menekaune, near Menominee, poured kerosene oil in the kitchen stove from a can, last week, and an explosion occurred which scattered the blazing oil on her clothing. Mrs. Cleary, a widowed sister went to her assistance, only to share her fate, as both women were burned to death.

April 28, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Robert Dory, conductor of a South Shore freight tram, met with a fatal accident at Nestoria last Friday afternoon. He was knocked down and horribly mangled by "shuntin" cars. He died Saturday at Marquette.

April 28, 1894 Page 8
The Death Record.
Ex-Governor James W. Thorkmorton of Texas is dead.
Ex-Judge Nelson Waterbury died at his home in New York Sunday.
George S. Harwood, a wealty manufacturer of Newton, Mass., died in Rome, Italy, aged 64 years.
Michael Boland, one of the celebrated triangle of the Clan-na-Gael, died at his home in Kansas City.
William McGarrahan, whose mining claim has been before congress so many years, died in Washington Tuesday.
Edward E. S. Eagle, a prominent business man and Catholic philanthropist, died after a protracted illness. He was born in Detroit in 1852.

April 28, 1894 Page 8
Foreign News.
Peter Price, the well known horse trainer of Newmarket, is dead.
The death is announced in London of William Todd, the widely known cotton spinner.

April 28, 1894 Page 11
Alfred Thurlby was called to his home in Iowa last Sunday by the death of his mother. He is expected to return today.

April 28, 1894 Page 11
Mrs. Robert Manning died last Saturday and was buried Tuesday afternoon at Riverside. Mrs. Manning was a highly respected lady.

April 28, 1894 Page 11
Frank Lalonde, of Cedar street, died Tuesday of consumption, and was buried on Thursday. Young Seraphine Lalonde, of the same family, is not expected to live.

May 5, 1894 Page 1
Sent A Shock.
The Sudden Death of Senator Stockbridge at Chicago.
Sooites as well as citizens throughout the state were shocked at the news that Senator Francis B. Stockbridge, of Michigan had died suddenly at the residence of his hephew, J. S. Houghteling at Chicago, Monday evening. Some weeks ago Senator and Mrs. Stockbridge went to Chicago from their home in Kalamazoo, Mich., intending to visit the California Mid-Winter Fair after spending a couple of days at the home of their nephew. The senator, however, was attacked by stomach and heart trouble and the trip was postponed. He was on the point of returning home when death called him hence. The remains were taken to his home at Kalamazoo for interment. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon.
Francis Brown Stockbridge was born at Bath, Me., April 9, 1826....

May 5, 1894 Page 1
Death of Charles Hutchinson.
Chas. Hutchinson, aged 23 years, died yesterday afternoon of consumption. He had been sick since early in December last, and was a patient sufferer. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Hutchinson, and at 1 time held a position in the Sault club rooms. He was a well known young man and had an army of friends who ministered tenderly to him during his last days. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 7 o'clock tomorrow morning.

May 5, 1894 Page 1
The infant child of Mr.and Mrs. Fred M. Sill died at Cheboygan on Friday of last week.

May 5, 1894 Page 1
The infant child of W. D. Athinson died at the residence of it's parents on Myra street, April 26.

May 5, 1894 Page 1
Hon C. H. Waterloo, father of Mrs. E. H. Conway and Mrs. F. V. Flower, died at his home in Port Huron Thursday. Mrs. Conway left yesterday for Port Huron to attend the funeral. Mrs. Flower was with her father at the time of his death.

May 5, 1894 Page 2
Criminal News.
John P. Flanagan of Thiel's Detective agency killed at Indian Valley, Ida., by a man he was attempting to arrest.
Rev. C. E. Butler, Episcopal Clergyman, was found hanging to the bedpost in his room at the Lockner House, Fort Maeade, Fla., where he boarded.
At Kiel, Wis., Mrs. Fred Billings hanged herself to a tree near her house. She was 50 years old. Her brother, John Otto, committed suicide in a similar manner a week ago.

May 5, 1894 Page 2
The Death Record.
Frank Halton, editor of the Washington Post, died from paralysis, Monday.
William Torrens McCullogh Torrins, the well known author and for a long time member of the house of commons is dead.
Ex-Judge William W. Farewell, on the superior court beach of Chicago for nine years, died of pnemonia. He was 77 years old.
Dr. Albert Day, famous for his successful treatment of inebriates, and who for the past 35 years has been identified with the Washington Home in Boston is dead, aged 73.

May 5, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A distressing accident occurred at the corby location near Bessemer, last week. John Guest, a miner, had been cleaning a revolver at home and it wouldn't work well. His wife picked it up and in working it a cartridge discharged and the bullet penetrated her husband's head, killing him instantly. Mrs. Guest went violently insane inside of 10 minutes, and died soon after. Both husband and wife were buried in the same grave. They were young and had a child 10 months old.

May 5, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Jane Augustine Shingwauk, widow of the late Chief Shingwauk, of the Garden River reserve, died on Tuesday and was buried yesterday. She was 86 years of age.

May 12, 1894 Page 1
Mrs. Isabel Douslin, of Rosedale, died Thursday and will be buried today by Undertaker Vanderhook at the city cemetery. She was 75 years of age and a highly respected lady.

May 12, 1894 Page 1
Accidently Shot Himself.
Wm. Gates Dies From a Wound Received While Hunting.
Wm. Gates, of Sugar Island, keeper of the Nebish and Canadian range lights, accidently shot himself Tuesday while hunting ducks. The unfortunate man died while being brought to the Soo on the barge Kimball. Coroner Bacon was called and from the evidence decided that the cause of death was accidental. The remains were taken charge of by Undertaker Vanderhook and were buried at Garden River Thursday. Mr. Gates was a German, about 45 years of age and was kighly respected. His wife is the daughter of Edward Perreault, a well known resident of Sugar Island.

May 12, 1894 Page 2
Victim of Consumption.
Death of G. L. Trempe Wednesday After a Lingering Illness.
Gustave L. Trempe died at his residence on Ridge street west, at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning of consumption, at the age ot 43 years and 7 months. For years Mr. Trempe had been more or less a sick man. He suffered from stomach troubles, which finally developed into consumption, and had not been for his great will power and staying qualities, he would have been dead two years ago. On last New Year's day he went to bed and from that day never left it. He was a most patient sufferer and was always found to be cheerful and entertaining when friends called upon him. Gustave L. Trempe was a son of the late Louis P. Trempe.... Mr. Trempe leaves a wife to whom he was wedded eight years ago. The funeral of Mr. Trempe took place at 9 o'clock yesterday morning from St. Mary's church, the Rev. Fr. Donovan officiating, and the remains were placed in the catholic cemetery....

May 12, 1894 Page 2
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. O'Donnell died Sunday of pneumonia. The little one was buried Tuesday.

May 12, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Harry Smith, of Menominee, was drowned in the Brule river last week.

May 12, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Elijah Sutton, committed suicide last week at Marquette by shooting himself through the head.

May 19, 1894 Page 1
Joseph Walker Drowned Tuesday.
Joseph Walker was drowned at the head of the rapids Tuesday morning. He was employed by Dunbar & Sullivan and was in charge of one of the dump scows. While unloading the scow it began to sink and he was washed overboard and drowned before he could be rescued. Mr. Walker's relatives live at Yale, Mich. He had been at work on the scow only a few days. The body of the unfortunate man has not yet been recovered.
Mary 19, 1894 Page 1
Dies at Ripe Old Age.
The Venerable W. B. Quigley Passes Away at Sedalla, Mo.
Capt. A. B. Roach received a telegram from John Quigley, at St. Louis, Mo., at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Mr. Quigley had been ailing for some years and the intelligence of his death was not unexpected. W. B. Quigley was well known in this city and county. He first came to this country in 1847, sailed up the river and also up St. Mary's rapids that year and was known as the southern adventurer. He spent the summer of 1849 at Whitefish Point. He left in the fall and returned again in 1865 and from that year he has spent every summer here and at Whitefish Point. At Whitefish Point he was interested with John Clark, his brother-in-law, in a big cranberry farm. Mr. Quigley was a remarkable man for his age. He was 83 at the time of his death and was an able and interesting conversationalist. Mr. Quigley left a big fortune. Only a few days before his death he sold his farm near St. Louis for $90,000. He was married twice and his second wife, whom he married 6 years ago, and who still lives, is the mother of Wm. Clark, of Whitefish Point. Mr. Quigley and Captain Roach were warm friends and the death of the venerable gentleman is not only a shock to the captain but to Mr. Quigley's relatives and host of friends.

May 19, 1894 Page 2
C. R. Smith died at Cheboygan last Saturday of consumption, at the age of 43 years. Mr. Smith was associated with his brother, W. S. Smith proprietors of the Park Hotel and Hotel Iroquois of this city. W. S. Smith attended the funeral which occurred in Cheboygan Monday.

May 19, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Walter Wilson, a 15-year-old Manistique boy, was drowned last week.

May 19, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior
Wm. Extrom, an Ishpeming miner, was killed by a cave-in at the Lake Angeline mine last week.

May 19, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Zaide Vizina, a homesteader, living four miles from Baraga, was shot and killed by an assassin last week. He was sitting alone in his house when the act was committed the shot being fired through the window. Smaule Masten, the supposed murderer, is under arrest.

May 19, 1894 Page 7
Unfortunate Events.
Edward and Charles Malloy, aged 17 and 14 respectively, were killed by an Erie engine near Hancock, N. Y.
Barney N. Curran, an old soldier, was run over and killed by a switch engine on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul crossing, at La Crosse.
Albert Boroweizik was found dead four miles east of Antigo Depot, Wis., with a Winchester rife under his body and a wound in his forehead, supposed to be accidental. He had been hunting.

May 19, 1894 Page 7
The Death Record.
J. Hadfield the Waukesha, Wis., millionaire and politician is dead.
Baron Vay de Vaja president of the Hungarian house of magnates,
The lord high sheriff of London died at San Antonio, Tex., of paralysis of the brain. He was en route to California.
Colonel Robert P. Dechert, ex-city comptroller and commander of the First brigade, National Guard of Pennsylvania, died at Philadelphia. He was 53 years of age.

May 19, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
A sad case of drowning occurred at the govenment dock shortly after noon Thursday. Wm. Daley, a man about 28 years of age, fell off the dock, and although he was fished out within a few minutes, could not be resusitated. It was learned from Richard Shaw that the man was an Irishman and hailed form Kingston, where his aunt, Mrs. Owen Kennedy, keeps the O.K. hotel. He was evidently a sailor. He was removed to the morgue and unless his relatives are heard from will be buried here at the town's expense.

May 19, 1894 Page 9
In Memorian.
Lines written on the death of Maggie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Lordson, who died May 4, 1894, at the age of 9 months and 22 days.... Stalwart, Mich. May 12, 1894.

May 19, 1894 Page 10
The infant child of W. Callahan died Wednesday morning.

June 2, 1894 Page 1
Saw a Spook.
It Plays Pranks at Point aux Pins Light House....
The finding of the remains last week of the late Henry Woods, the Point aux Pins light house keeper who had been mysteriously missing for more than a year, an account of which was published in THE NEWS last week. Revives more queer stories that were current subsequent to his desappearance. On the 5th of May last year Mr. Woods left his home in the Canadian Soo to go to Point aux Pins to take charge of his light there. He never reached his distination....
The finding of Mr. Wood's skeleton last week has partly cleared up the mystery, except as to the manner of his death. The remains were found near the mouth of Carp river, three miles from the Point aux Pins lighthous. It is now the generally accepted theory that he got lost and died of exposure and hunger.....
The funeral of Mr. Woods occurred at the Canadian Soo on Monday.....

June 2, 1894 Page 1
Sudden Death of First Engineer Robt. Winkler, of the Robert Holland-Marine Notes. ....
The steambarge Robert Holland, towing the schooners S. M. Stephenson and Fanny Neil, arrived in port at 9 o'clock yesterday morning from Ashland, bound for Chicago. The fleet's colors were flying at half mast, in respect to First Engineer Robert Winkler, of the Holland, who died on Lake Superior at 9 o'clock Thursday night, of hemorrhage of the lungs. Mr. Winkler was not well when the boat left Ashland. He stood his watch as usual until 8:30 o'clock Thursday night; when he was taken ill and before the second engineer could relieve him he breathed his last. The deceased was 41 years of age. He resided in Manistee, where a wife and daughter survive him. He was a member of the Marine Engineers Benevolent Association and had been on the Holland for three seasons. Mr. Winkler was a genial, jovial man and had many acquantances here. Undertaker Blake prepared the remains for transportation to Manistee, where they were taken yesterday afternoon by rail, by the second mate of the Holland. Coroner Bacon examined the remains and said there was no need of holding an inquest.

June 2, 1894 Page 3
The Death Record.
John Dooley died of smallpox at Dubuque, Ia.
Sir Francis Johnson, chief justice of the Canadian supreme court, is dead.
Valentine Blatz, the millionare Milwaukee brewer, died suddenly in St. Paul Saturday night.
Richard F. Briggs, on(e) of the foremost carriage manufacturers in New England, is dead, aged 58 years.
Hon. John Ambrose Graham, one of the best and most widely known men in Northern Indiana, is dead, aged 78.
Rev. Edward H. Gray, a Baptist clergyman, who was chaplin of the United States senate during Lincoln's administration died at Oakland, Cal. He was 80 years old.

June 2, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Richard Garland, a miner, fell down a shaft in the Quincy mine last week and was killed.

June 2, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John G. Johnson, one oth the pioneers of the Upper Peninsula, died at his home at Marquette last week.

June 2, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Svetish was drowned at Manistique last week while engaged in taking poles from the water and loading them on a raft.

June 9, 1984 Page 2
Death of Little Edith Everett.
Edith, The sweet 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. D. Everett, died Sunday morning. Of inflammation, of the bowels, at Elmwood,, the country home of her parents, near Rudyard. The little one was attached by the malady Saturday night and died before medical aid could be obtained. The funeral occurred in this city Tuesday at the Everett residence on Chandler Heights, now occupied by Mr. and Mrms. E. C. Davidson. The Rev. C. M. Thompson officiated, and the remains were laid to rest in the lot near the residence. Mr. and Mrs. Everett have the sympathy of their friends in their bereavement.

June 9, 1984 Page 3
Found Dead.
Last evening a person giving the name G. R. Thompson registered at Hunt's Hotel, and desired to be called in season to take the 12 o'clock p.m. train for Chicago. Being unable to awaken him, the room was entered by means of the ventilater over the door, when the gentleman was found to be dead. He was an advertising agent for Sulphur Bitters, which has an extensive sale. The coroner returned a verdict of death from heart disease. His body will be sent east immediately,-Cin, Commercial.

June 9, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
A man named John Riley committed suicide at St. Ignace by taking morphine.

June 16, 1894 Page 4
The Death Record.
Emil Huberkorl, once husband of actress Margaret Mather, died at Los Angeles, Cal., from consumption.
Mr. Allen Stanton, aged 87 years, died at St. Louis Friday. He was a cousin of the late Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's secretary of war.
Ex-Govenor Redman H. Price, of New Jersey, died at Haqelwood-on-Ramapo aged 78 years. He raised the stars and stripes on California soil.

June 16, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Parker was drowned on the Sturgeon River Lumber Co's drive at Chassell last week.

June 16, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
Great sympathy is felt for the family of Peter Falconer in the loss of their two children by congestion of the lungs. The funeral which took place on Monday was very largely attended.

June 23, 1894 Page 1
POOR OLD MAN.
Nearly a Centenarian and Then Shot Down
Took Him For A Burglar....
John Corrigan, an old and infirm man, 93 years of age, was shot above the heart shortly after 2 o'clock Friday morning, at the home of his daughter, Lizzie C. Corrigan, who resides on Ashmn, street, opposite W. J. Armstrong's grocery. The who fired the shot was Wesley D. Micks, a carpenter, aged about 38 years, who has boarded with the Corrigans for about five years. THE NEWS visited the scene of the shooting shortly after the old man died ....The Corrigans came from Barrie, Ont., eight years ago....

June 23, 1894 Page 2
John McIntyre, aged 67 years, died suddenly at the county poor house Wednesday of heart disease. He was buried in Riverside cemetery Thursday evening.

June 23, 1894 Page 2
Death of Elizabeth Tate LeSage.
Mrs. Elizabeth Tate LeSage, wife of Louis LeSage, of Sugar Island, died of lingering consumption, Friday of last week, at the age of 40 years. The funeral occurred Sunday from the M. E. church at Garden River. The Rev. T. R. Easterday officiated. At the close of the sermon it was repeated in the Ojibway language by interpreter Pines.

June 23, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Howard Squire, aged 27 years, was struck by an engine near Pembine and killed.

June 23, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Donald Sinclair, a mason who was engaged in making repairs on the exterior of the federal building at Marquette, last week, was precipitated to the ground b the breaking of a scaffold rope and received injuries which caused his death before he could be taken to the hospital. A fellow workman seized another rope as the structure fell and escaped unscathed.

June 23, 1894 Page 5
Mangled in a Mill.
Eau Claire, Wis., June 30.- In the Empire Lumber company's mill the foreman, John Wight, while soaping a belt under the mill, was caught by the arm and hurled to instant death. His body was horribly mangled.

June 23, 1894 Page 5
Criminal News.
Louis Callier of Ainsboro, Ills., was stabbed and fatally wounded by a boy named Trailer. Collier was fighting with Trailer's father.
At Arcola, Ills., Barney Van Dearen, agd 86 years, drank a pint of coal oil Wednesday night, from the effects of which he died Monday.

June 23, 1894 Page 9
Mrs. J. R. Miller, wife of a leading merchant of Leadville, Colo., and her two children were thrown down an embankment by a runaway while driving to Evergreen lakes. All three were fatally injured.

June 30, 1894 Page 2
Mrs. James Good, of Hancock, is visiting her sister, Mr. Martin Schacht, of this city. Mrs. Good was married in the Soo in 1855, but in 1856 moved to Lake Superior. Her first husband, Matin Effinger, enlisted in the Second Michigan Infantry in 1861, and was killed in the battle of Malvern Hill, Va., Jul 1, 1862

June 30, 1894 Page 3
Charles A. McCarthy Dead.
He Expires Suddenly at His Home in Detroit Last Sunday.
Charles A. McCarthy, a former resident of this city, and who removed to Detroit four years ago, died suddenly in that city last Sunday. Mr. McCarthy was one of the engineers on the St. Mary's Fall canal, and also occupied the position of assistant superintendent for three years, when he resigned and was succeeded by J. M. Hogarth four years ago. After leaving the Soo he accepted a position as engineer in the Detroit water works. He was well and favorably known here and the news of his sudden demise was a shock to his friends.

June 30, 1894 Page 3
Fort Brady Budget.
Daisy Brownson Clendenin, wife of Capt. Paul Clendenin, post surgeon of the U. S. army died suddenly at her home at Fort Brady, at 4 o'clock Wednesday, aged 22 years. Mrs. Clendenin was taken ill about a month ago. She lingered between life and death for several days, but for a week before her death was steadily improving and was considered as having passed the critical point when she was siezed with convulsions Wednesday afternoon and death soon resulted. Mrs. Clendenin was the daughter of Col. Henry Brownson, of Omaha, Neb., who was prominent in western railway circles before his death. She was married to Capt. Clendenin, at Los Angeles, Cal., five years ago and had resided in thi city since 1890. One daughter, a sweet child of four years old, survivies her, besides her bereaved husband. Mrs. Clendenin was popular in society and was loved and cherished in her home, especially by her two step daughters, who received a mother's tender care from her. Her death was a shock to all who knew her and her sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of the conmunity. The remains were prepared for shipment by Undertaker Blake and were taken to Omaha, for burial, Thursday.

June 30, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Edward Spry, a South Shore brakeman, was instantly killed last week at Nestova by falling under the cars while engaged in making a coupling.

June 30, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Milo Gibbs, a well-to-do farmer living at Cooks, Schoolcraft Co., committed suicide last week by shooting himself through the head with a rifle. No cause has been assigned for the rash act.

June 30, 1894 Page 5
Unfortunate Events.
A 3-year-old son of John Eberline, of Shawano, Wis., fell into the river and was drowned

June 30, 1894 Page 5
Unfortunate Events.
John Klunp, a farmer of Hudson, Ills., and his wife were killed at Normas, their wagon being struck by an Alton train.

June 30, 1894 Page 5
Unfortunate Events.
Mrs. William Edwards of Fairmont, Ills., tried to start a fire with kerosene. She is dead, her husband fatally burned and their home is in ashes.

June 30, 1894 Page 5
Unfortunate Events.
John Niepoaski and an unknown man were killed and two others injured by the falling of a hoisting bucket while at work on the drainage canal at Chicago.

July 7, 1894 Page 1
Death of Ex- Gov Winans.
Ex- Governor E. B. Winans, died at his home at Hamburg, Wednesday afternoon after an illness of one week, of pneumonia. He was governor of Michigan from 1890 to 1892. He was a good man.

July 7, 1894 Page 2
Mrs. May E. Chamberlain, widow of Dr. C. P. Chamberlain, of Canister, N. Y., and sister of Capt. W. P. Spaldng, of this city, died June 28. She was a well known resident here in former years.

July 7, 1894 Page 3
AN OLD RESIDENT GONE.
Chauncey Montgomery Called Away Monday by Grim Death
Chauncey Montgomery died at the residence of Mrs. G. L. Trempe, on Ridge Street, at 1:30 o'clock Monday afternoon, of heart and stomach trouble. He had been an invalid for several years, and for the last year was confined to the house. In the death of Chauncey Montgomery another old Sooite has been removed from the circle of the very few old inhabitants, which is fast growing smaller in Chippewa county. Mr. Montgomery was 67 years old He was unmarried. A brother Jas. A. Montgomery, who is superintendent of the Sandusky, O., Tool Co., and a sister, who resides in Providence, R. I. survive him. Chauncey Montgomery was as man who made many friends. He was a fluent and pleasant conversationalist and was well versed on all current events. He came here from Sandusky, O., in 1875, and purchased the Club House on Water street from Samuel Scott and conducted it until the fall of 1885. Then he sold out to Ford Hursley and retired from active business. He afterwards repurchased the Club House and owned it at the time of his death. He was elected presedent of the first Soo village councils and has held other public offices. The remains of Mr. Montgomery were sent to Sandusky on the Empire State Tuesday morning for interment Jas. Montgomery arrived from Sandusky Monday and accompained the remains to Ohio.

July 7, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Chas. Shugland fell into Portage Lake and was drowned last week.

July 7, 1894 Page 8
Unfortunate Events.
Miss Kate Jennisch was killed by lightning while crossing the street at Decorah, Is.
At San Franciso, Leon Smith, 13 years, was burned to death by the explosion of a kerosene lamp in his father's house.

July 14, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Fish, of Negaunee, committed suicide last week by sooting himself through the neck with a shot gun.

July 14,1894 Page 8
Drowned in the Canal.
T. J. Holland was drowned at an early hour Wednesday morning at the head of the canal. He was coming to the city from Ainsworth & Alexander's mill, where he had been employed for two months as bookkeeper. While almost opposite Light House Keeper Sweet's house he stumbled and fell foremost into the canal basin. He immediately sank. Several men were in the vicinity of the accident, but before assistance could arrive the man had drowned..... Mr. Holland was 26 years old. He came to this city a year ago from Calumet and was employed as bill clerk in the freight depot for six months. He has several relatives living in Dollar Bay, where his remains were sent for burial The drowning is believed to have been purely accidental.

July 14, 1894 Page 8
George Pond, a negro, charged with attempting to criminally assault a white woman, was hanged by a mob at Fulton, Miss.

July 14, 1894 Page 8
The Death Record.
Philip Crosby Tucker, a grand commander of the Scottish Pite of the Southern jourisdiction, died suddenly at Washington.
The once famous court violinist, Enrico Mast, has died in Rome. He was at one time a member of the well-known "Florentine Quartet."

July 14, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
A dispatch from Algoma Mills states that on the evening of July 7, a somewhat mysterious drowning accident occurred here. A little boy while crossing the river bridge near the C. P. R. station observed a man named Thomas Haggarty struggling in the water below, but before assistance could be rendered the man sank. Haggerty was about 35 years of age and leaves a widow. An inquest has been ordered.

July 14, 1894 Page 9
Canadian Sault.
R. Gillespie, a boarding house keeper at the new ship canal works, was drowned Tuesday. He went down to the bay to get a pail of water, took a fit, to which he was subject, fell into the river and drowned. He was buried Thursday.

July 21, 1894 Page 1
Andrew Parkinson Drowned.
Andrew Parkinson, of Richard's Landing, was drowned while crossing from Smith's wharf to Scarf's Point, on Bear Lake, last night. His body was recovered Wednesday and he was buried Thursday.

July 21, 1894 Page 1
TRIO OF FATALITIES.
Death of C. Preslan, W. A. Carlisle and Mr. S. Butterfield.
ALL THREE WERE DROWNED.
First Two Were Thrown Into The Canal From Their Wheels.
Their Sad Fate a Warning to Bicyclists who Recklessly Invite Similar Accidents.
The canal is swallowing up bicycle riders with a vengenance. The second victim this week is Clifford Prestan, who run off the pier at 6:40 o'clock yesterday morning and was drowned only a few hundred feet east of where W. A. Carlisle met a similar fate Wednesday. Clifford Preslan, a bright lad of 19 years, was on his way to work yesterday morning when the fatality occurred. He boarded at Mrs. Wm. McKay's, on Emeline street. At 6 o'clock he arose, had breakfast and left the house at 6:30 o'clock for his work in Dunbar & Sullivan's machine shop, where he had been empolyed for 18 months as firemen, under Foreman L. E. O'Mara. He was running along the north pier on his wheel. When at a point about 600 feet east of the draw bridge he went into the canal with the wheel. Nobody saw the accident but George Irwin, an employe of Dunbar & Sullivan, who arrive just in time to see the tips of his fingers disappear as he went to the bottom. A general alarm was given and Dunbar & Sullivan's entire force turned out. The work of dragging for the body, with grappling hooks, was kept up for several hours, during which time the bicycle and man's hat were recovered. Finally Diver Robert Kett was sent down of the unfortunate young man near where it sank. The deceased was a brother of George and Samuel Preslan, who are well Hay Lake. He was married and was popular with all the Dunbar & Sullivan forces and all who knew him. He was more familiarly known as "Roscoe," a nick name gaven him by the boy. He was a steady and industrious young man and his death is a terrible shock to his brothers, who arrived on the scene shortly after the accident.
Coroner Bacon viewed the body after it had been removed to Vanderhook's undertaking establishment. The remains were turned over to the brothers of the unfortunate young man. The funeral will be held from the residence of Wm. Albon, 61 Bingham avenue, at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon.

July 21, 1894 Page 1
A SHOCKING ACCIDENT.
The Drowning of W. A. Carlisle in the Canal Wednesday Morning.
One of the saddest cases of sudden death that ever occurred in the city was that of William A. Carlisle by drowning at the head of the ship canal at a few minutes before 11 o'clock Wednesday morning. Mr. Carlisle for two years had been employed as accountant for Dunbar & Sullivan, the dredge contractors. He was a brother in-law of H. T. Dunbar, of the above firm. Wednesday morning Mr. Carlisle left the firm's office, in THE NEWS building, to visit the dredges and shops of the firm to take the time of the several employes, as was his usual morning custom. After crossing the lock gates at the canal he mounted his bicycle and rode along the edge of the crib work next to the canal. All went well until a point near the International draw bridge was reached, when he struck some obstruction, which caused his wheel to take a sheer and without any warning he was thrown into the canal with his wheel. Mr. Carlisle could not swim. He came to the surface once. R. S. Carr and son, of St. Louis, Mo., who were near the spot fishing, ran to the drowning man's assistance, passed him a fish pole, which he grabbed and held onto, but despite the warning of Mr. Carr, who cautioned him to be still and await the arrival of assistance he attempted to climb up the frail rod, of which Mr. Carr was forced to let go. Mr. Carlisle then made an unsuccesful attempt to climb the pier, lost his hold and fell back into the water and sank to the bottom, where he remained for eight minutes before he was finally brought to the surface by grappling hooks and taken out by Sidney Kneff, an employee of Dunbar & Sulllivan, assisted by Sidney Knox and Joseph Crushier. Medical aid was summoned at once and in a very short time Drs. Lang, McDonald, Bacon and Taylor responded. All that medical aid and hard work by many willing friends could do was done, but the unfortunate man could not be resuscitated. The remains were turned over to Undertaker Blue, who prepared them for shipment to St. Catherines, Ont., where the were accompanied Thursday morning by H. T. Dunbar, Mrs. Dunbar and Mrs. Carlisle, wife of the deceased. W. A. Carlisle was born in St. Catherines 32 years ago. He had been married for several years, but had no children. His heart-broken wife and sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of the entire community. Mr. Carlisle was a genial, jovial gentlemen and commanded the respect of all who knew him.

July 21, 1894 Page 1
DROWNED AT DETOUR.
Montford S. Butterfield Meets a Watery Grave While Bathing.
A gloom has overcast the thriving village of Detour since Thursday night, when one of its most promising young men, Montford S. Butterfield, was drowned in the river while in bathing in company with A. F. Carroll bookkeeper for the Island Cedar Co. Just after supper the two men went down to the river to go in bathing. They walked out on the boom where they left their clothing. The water at that point is 20 feet deep. They had only been in the water for a short time, when Carroll heard Butterfield call for help. Not being a very good swimmer Mr. Carroll asked him what he wanted. The reply came from Butterfield, "For God's sake come to me; I am drowning." Carroll swam to the boom and although very weak himself, called loudly for help. His cries were heard by Alex McCullough, who ran to the place, took off his coat and shoes, jumped into the river and made for the drowning man. But before McCullough could be reached, he sank for the last time. A searching party, which numbered almost all of the male residents of Detour, turned out and recovered the body in about an hour. Montford S. Butterfield was 22 years old, unmarried, and three sisters and his aged father Samuel Butterfield who is ex supervisor of Detour township, survive him ....

July 21, 1894 Page 2
Neaseville. (Special Correspondence.)
Wm. Rowan, of Dafter, died at the residence of Hugh Harper, near there, on Tuesday. His sister had just arrived from Canada with the intention of taking him home with her. [kife]?? came to late. Mr. and Mrs. Harper deserve great praise for the care they have taen of the sick man.

July 21, 1894 Page 8
Miscellaneous News Items.
John Bilni, a farmer of Boyd, Wis., died of starvation. He was 56 years old, a miser and worth thousands of dollars.

July 21, 1894 Page 8
Miscellaneous News Items.
George Rox Graham, the veteran publisher and journalist, died at 3:30 p.m. of disease of the heart at the Orange, N. J. Memorial hospital.

July 21, 1894 Page 10
Death deprived Mr. and Mrs. John Cairns of their 13 months old daughter early in the week. She was a bright little child and her death is a terrible blow to her parents.

July 28, 1894 Page 1
Death of Jacob C. Schrader.
Jacob C. Schrader, age 33, of Olean, N.Y., died at the Lake View House Saturday last. The deceased was a blacksmith by trade and the eldest of ten children, only three of whom, one sister and two brothers remain. The sister Mrs. Henry Schame., arrived Sunday morning. The mother Mrs. Michael Smith, and all the family, were, and those yet left now are members of St. John's German Lutheran chuch of Olean. The deceased was buried from the Lake View House Monday at 3 o'clock. Rev. T. R. Easterday officiated, and used the Lutheran church service.

July 28, 1894 Page 1
Dropped Dead at Point aux Pins.
Mrs. Brown, wife of Customs Inspector Brown, of the Canadian Soo, suddenly dropped dead at Point aux Pins yesterday about noon. She was spending the day at the Point on the Episcopal Sunday school excursion. Her body was broght down on the Telegram and taken to her late home.

July 28, 1894 Page 1
A PIONEER GONE.
Frank Denoiyer Called to His Final Reward Sunday.
Death at a Ripe Old Age.
Over Three Score Years of His Life Spent in the Soo.
He was an Early Day Voyageur and One of the Oldest Residents of Chippewa.
Frank Denoiyer, who was one of the oldest citizens in Chippewa county, died at the residence of Jos. Campbell, on Portage avenue, east, last Sunday night at the age of 89 years. For several ears he had been a sufferor from asthma and throat trouble. This affliction, coupled with declining years, brought death on the day above mentioned. Mr. Denoiyer came to the Soo 63 years ago from Montreal, and was one of the early voyageurs who made the trip from Montreal over the great lakes in open sail boat, which was portaged around Niagara Falls, and requiring almost two months to make the journey. He was for years employed here as trapper for the Old American and Hudson Bay fur companies. The log house in which he lived here for 40 years, was built by him and one of the first ever put up in Chippewa county. This house was torn down last summer. It was located on what is now the Endress property on the north side of Portage avenue, east, of Sova street. The property was given by Mr. Denoiyer to his children years ago. He was twice married. His first wife was Harriet Bingaush, by whom several children were born. Only two of these are living at present- Mrs. Hudson, of this city, and a son, Baptiste, who resides in Duluth. Shortly after the death of his first wife Mr. Denoiyer married Mrs. Jennie Ermatinger, mother of Thomas, Charles, John, James, Alex. And Isabel Ermatinger. The latter is now the wife of Joseph Campbell. No children were born from his second wife. He owned 160 acres of farm land on Sugar Island. This on Mr. Denoiuers death was left to Chas. Ermatinger. Everything else was given to Mrs. Hudson, Mr. Denoiyer's daughter by his first wife. Mr. Denoiyer was cared for during the last eight years by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Campbell, Sr. who showed him every attention. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Tuesday morning and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery. The funeral was largely attended, especially by the older residents. The old settlers of Chippewa county are fast dying off. As one of these, an old man with one foot in the grave, said to THE NEWS this week, when speaking of Denoiyer, "Who will be next:?"

July 28, 1894 Page 2
The infant of Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Carroll of Detour, died Wednesday.

July 28, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Ed. Conley, of Watersmeet, suicided last week. He took the pistol route.

July 28, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
John Lius, 16 years old, was drowned in the bay at Escanaba while in bathing last week.

July 28, 1894 Page 4
Killed by Her Corset.
Cincinatti, July 23, - A Commercial Gazette special from New Castle, Ind., says: Mrs. George Lewis and Mrs. Frank Sheets were driving when their horse ran away, Mrs. Lewis jumped and broke her arm. Mrs. Sheets was thrown from the buggy, her corset broke and the stays were driven into her stomach, killing her.

July 28, 1894 Page 6
Detour. (Special Correspondence.)
The funeral of the late Monfford S. Butterfield, who was so suddenly taken from earth by drowning on Thursday evening of last week, took place on Saturday, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. It is safe to say that this was the largest funeral ever witnessed in the history of Detour. The esteem in which the deceased was held was clearly demonstrated. Business was suspended from 2 to 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The Islands Cedar Co's mill was also shut down during the afternoon. The funeral was in good management. It was in charge of E. J. Swartz. Service was held in the Presbyterian chuch.... The deceased was born on Drummond Island, in the year 1872. His three sisters, brother, mother and father, Samuel Butterfields, ex-supervisor of Detour township survive him.....

July 28, 1894 Page 6
Death of Frank Bettes.
He Expires Suddenly Last Saturday From Heart Disease.
Frank bettes dropped dead in J. A. Francis's yard, at the corner of Sova and Maple streets, about 7 o'clock last Saturday evening, of heart failure. Mr. Bettes left his home at 7 o'clock that evening in search of one of his pigs, which had strayed away. He found it in the Barbeau grove between Cedar street and Spruce avenue. Mr. Bettes started to drive the pig to his house on Spruce avenue. The animal became unruly, began to run, and after a hard chase was finally cornered by Mr. Bettes in Mr. France's yard. Just at this point, however, Mr. Bettes fell backward to the ground, and died within a few minutes. Coroner Bacon, who was summoned and viewed the body, did not consider an inquest necessary. He says death was the result of heart trouble. Frank Bettes was 48 years old. He had lived in the Soo for 15 years, and was well known and highly respected. A wife, two sons and two daughters survive him. The funeral was held from his late home Tuesday afternoon. The services were conducted by the Rev. T. R. Easterday, and the body was taken to Riverside cemetery for interment.
Among the relatives called here by the sad death of Mr. Bettes, were his brother, A. Bettes, of Newberry, his mother, Mrs. Wm. Bettes, and his niece, Miss Hellen Bettes, of Yale, Mich.

July 28, 1894 Page 7
Criminal News.
Denton J. Callahan, suicided at St. Paul by shooting himself through the heart. No cause for the deed is known.
Peter Davis, Dan Washington and Charles Ezell, all colored, were hanged on the same scaffold at the county jail at Montgomery, Ala.
C. L. Moore and wife, an aged couple living near Tiff City, Mo., were found dead in their house, both having been shot through the head. The object was probably robbery.

July 28, 1894 Page 7
The Death Record.
John A. Patterson, one of the best known Democrats and most prominent lawyers in Southwestern Iowa, is dead at his home in Creston.
Thomas H. Gorman, editor of the Ottawa (Ont.) Free Press. and widely known as a contributor to American magazines, is dead, aged 38.

July 28, 1894 Page 7
Unfortunate Events.
Duncan McTavish of Masonvill, Wis., aged 74, was kicked in the face by a horse, breaking his nose and frontal bone. His recovery is doubtful.
By the premature explosion of a blast in the Sally Waters mine, near Lead mine, Wis., John McKenno was killed and John McCuirk was fatally injured.
Edward Murphy, errand boy for a job printer at Duluth, Minn. Was found at the bottom of the elevtor shaft at the Spalding House in an unconscious condition. He was frightfully hurt and afterwards died of his injuries.

August 4, 1894 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Osler died Sunday of cholera infanum. The funeral occurred Tuesday.

August 4, 1894 Page 10
The Death Record.
Chauncey W. Wisner, a celebrated orator of Michigan, and for three terms state senator, died at Saginaw.
Captain Snyder, superintendent of poor for the city of Minneapolis, died Friday of consumption of the bowels.
Captain Allen Tindolph, president of the Second National bank of Vincennes, Ind., is dead. He was 52 years of age.
Mrs. James Pugh, a pioneer of Racine, Wis., and the first woman married in that city, is dead, aged 74 years.
Judge Moss, who for years was one of the most successful lawyer in central Indiana, died at Noblesville, aged 70 years.
Thomas S. Wright, attorney of the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific railway, died in New York, from a stroke of heat.
Gustavus S. Colton, a well known Kansas pioneer, one of the framers of the Leavenworth constitution, and a noted free soiler, is dead.
Ex- Congressman Thomas R. Horton of Fultonville, N. Y., is dead, aged 72. He served in congress, from the Eighteenth district of New York from 1855 to 1857

August 4, 1894 Page 10
Killed Three Men.
Ashland, Pa. Aug 1.- One of a nest of six boilers at Lehigh Valley colliery No. 4 exploded during the night, instantly killing one man and severely injuring three others, two of whom have since died. The dead are: John Miller, aged 45, of Girardville: John Lauback, aged 25, of Shenandoah: Darby Shields, aged 45, of Shenandoah.

August 4, 1894 Page 10
Criminal News.
Wallace Burt, a halfbreed Indian, who murdered an aged couple for whom he worked, was hanged at Doyleston, Pa.
Harrison Duncan, colored, who murdered a policeman in St. Louis Oct. 6, 1890, was hanged for the crime at Clayton, Mo.
Joe Craig, an ex-policeman at Los Angeles, killed his divorced wife and her father, mother and brother. He shot at himself, but only a flesh wound resulted.

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Canadian Sault.
The eldest son, nearly 13 years of age, of Symington Ironside, of the customs department, went down the C.P.R. track on Monday last in company with a son of Mr. Young, of Plummer & Young, fo the purpose of picking berries. Young Ironside was cautioned by his other before starting not to go near the water, but the day being oppresive, the boys, when in the vincinity of Topsail Island, decided on having a bath. Ironside, who was full of impulsiveness, got in ahead, speedily went out of his depth, and not being able to swim sunk in 10 feet of water, failing to reach a plank which his companion, who was unable to swim, pushed out to him. An alarm was soon given and the body recovered, but to late for resuscitation. Dr. Hunter, Mr. Lambert, Mr. Champion and others, rendered every possible assistance and all was done that could be done to restore animation but without avail. The body was brought to town by Allen Templeton and the funeral took place on Wednesday from St. Luke's....

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Canadian Sault.
The remains of Mrs. Brown, wife of William Brown, of the customs department, who, as stated in THE NEWS last week, died at Point aux Pins, while with an excursion party in connection with the St. Luke Episcopal church Sunday school, were interred on Sunday last at the Protestant cemetery. A service was held in the church and an impressive discourse was delivered by the Rev. Walter to a very large audience representative of every congregation in town.

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Death of Miss Justine Ojibway.
Miss Justine Ojibway died Sunday morning at 8:30 o'clock at the residence of Mr. Baptiste Lalonde, on Ridge street, of fever. She had been ill for several weeks. Miss Ojibway was the only daughter of the late chief Ojibway. She was 52 years of age and had been a seamstress all her life. She was employed at times as a nurse and considered an excellant hand around a sick room. She acquired some property during her life and owned a valuable piece of land on Ridge street west, which adjoins that owned by John McNaughton. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Wednesday morning and the remains were interred at the Catholic cemetery. Two brothers, Joseph and John, survive her.

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Death of Mrs. John Fennessy.
Mrs. Fennessy, wife of Capt. John Fennessy, died last Saturday mornng, at Whitefish Point, after a short illness. Drs. Lang and Dawson were sent for, but arrived too late to be of any service. The remains were brought down on the International and taken to the Canadian Soo and from there to Douglas, Ont., for interment. Mrs. Fennessy was a cousin of James Breen, of the Canadian Soo, an estimable lady. She had been married only a few months.

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Aggie Conway, the 4-year-old daughter of James Conway, of Loretto, Ont. Died at Lieut. W. O. Johnson's quarters, Fort Brady, yesterday afternoon.

August 4, 1894 Page 11
Herman F. Trede, of Detroit, secretary of the Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Co., died suddenly at Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday. The deceased was a nephew of John Doench, of this city. Mr. Trede was prominent in the A.O.U.W., was a thirty second degree Mason, a Kinghts Templar and a Mystic Shriner.

August 18, 1894 Page 1
The father of Drs. J.F. and J.I. Deadman, died at Alpena this week. The doctors attend his funeral.

August 18, 1894 Page 2
Dafter. (Special Correspondence.)
On Friday of last week Mr. and Mrs. David McKiddle were called to mourn the death of their infant child. The funeral servics were conducted Sunday by the Rev. J.B. Wilson. The remains were interred in the Donaldson cemetery. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the entire community.

August 25, 1894 Page 1
Death of Mrs. John Hickler.
Mrs. John Hickler, wife of Capt. Jno. Hickler, and mother of Alderman Henry Hickler and Thos. And John Hickler, Jr., died at her home in Buffalo, last Saturday. The sorrowing husband and sons, Henry and John, left at once for their home. Thos. F. Hickler, who was on his way to North Dakota to hunt prairie chickens, was notified by telegram and reached home in time to attend the funeral.

August 25, 1894 Page 11
Canadian Sault.
An old Cornishman named John Tregenza died at the Bruce last week, possessed of considerable property which he had acqired since the collapse of the copper mine. He made, it is said, a will, which is regarded as unjust to certain individuals, particularly to one relative who is employed on the Sault canal. The oldman developed in his latter days a very parsimonius spirit and to such an extent was this carried that, three days before his death, he went into the village to price coffins, so that he might be buried in the cheapest.

August 25, 1894 Page 11
Canadian Sault.
George Scott, an employee of Contractor Kennedy, who is putting in the hydralic piping at the new ship canal, was instantly killed on the work at noon Monday. He was at work on the top of the wall, pulling on a block and tackle, when he missed his hold and fell off backwards to the ground, 45 feet below. He landed in seven feet of water. Coroner Schirck examined the remains and pronounced death caused by drowning. Mr. Scott was 34 years old and had a wife and child in Owen Sound, where his remains were sent Tuesday for burial.

September 1, 1894 Page 2
S. G. Carlton on Monday received a telegram announcing the death of his little daughter, aged 5 months, at Creemore, Ont., where she had been in care of Mr. Carleton's mother, Mrs. M. A. Carlton, during the past month.

September 1, 1894 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Audette, of Cisco, died at the Fletcher house, Ashmun street, Tuesday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Audette were in the city on a visit, and the death of their loved one is a severe blow to them. The fuenral occurred from St. Mary's church Wednesday afternoon and the Catholic cemetery was the place of interment.

September 1, 1894 Page 3
Rosedale. (Special Correspondence.)
Mr. and Mrs. George Christy were called to mourn the loss of their six months old child, Thursday.

September 1, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Five-year-old Johnnie Sterbenz, of Red Jacket, was run over by a delivery wagon and killed last week.

September 1, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Joseph A. Marx, a cigarmaker of Menominee, was married on his death-bed last Sunday and died on Tuesday.

September 1, 1894 Page 11
Canadian Sault.
A man named Kelly was instantly killed while at work in the pit at the ship canal Monday. A large derrick bucket struck him on the head and crushed it to a jelly. He was unmarried and was about 26 years old. The funeral was held from the Catholic church Tuesday, and the remains were buried in the Catholic cemetery.

September 8, 1894 Page 7
Bay Mills. (Special Correspondence.)
Maud Nestle, little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Smith, died Friday of last week at the age of two years, one month and twelve days. Her death was caused by organic disease of the heart. She had been sick for five months. The remains were buried last Sunday at Lakeview cemetery, the Rev, W. E. Brown officiating. The funeral sermon will be preached at a later date.

September 8, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
Died at Elmbrook, in the township of Korah, on September 3, Ernest Wilson, only son of A. W. And Jennie Penhorwood, and grandson of Major Jos. Wilson, aged five weeks. Interment at Korah cemetery on Wednesday.

September 15, 1894 Page 1
A SUDDEN DEATH.
Mother of C. H. Spalding, of the Soo Expires Thursday at Ishpeming
Mrs. Achsah Spalding, widow of Capt. John Spalding, and mother of Chas. Spalding, of this city, died suddenly at Ishpeming, Thursday night. The remains will arrive here at 10:15 tomorrow morning. Funeral services will be held at St. James'church at 11 o'clock, following the morning service. The Rev. P. T. Rowe, M.A., will officiate, and the remains of Mrs. Spalding will be laid to rest at Riverside, beside those of her husband. Mrs. Geo. W. Hayden, Mrs. Chas. Fairbairn, Mrs. Dr. Geo. D. Beech, of Ishpeming and John L. Spalding, of Minnesota, children of Mrs. Spalding, are expected to arrive here in time to attend the funeral.

September 15, 1894 Page 3
Stirlingville. (Special Correspondence.)
John Arthur, infant son of James Murphy, of this place, died very suddenly Sept. 4. The remains were taken to the Soo for burial. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community.

September 15, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
James Cook, an employee of Kirby, Carpenter Co.'s brick mill at Menominee, was struck by a tent stake, which was thrown out of the mill by the carriage, last week, and was killed.

September 15, 1894 Page 8
FORT BRADY BUDGET.
Ray, the 6 months' old son of Corporal and Mrs. Ray VanAlstein, died Sunday morning of cholera infantum, after a brief illness. The funeral occurred Monday afternoon from the family residence on Fort street, the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

September 15, 1894 Page 10
CANADIAN SAULT.
The remains of Mrs. Caroline Louisa Wilson, who died in Toronto Saturday last after a lingering illness, arrived here by train Wednesday evening and were deposited of the family. Mrs. Wilson, who was the wife, and it may be said, until within the last few years, the life companion of Major Joseph Wilson, was known not only in the two Saults, but throughout the whole of Algoma. She was one of the most whole souled and charitable of women and a most enthusiastic church worker. Her funeral on Thursday was attended by a large number of friends of the deceased lady and her family. The pallbearers were William V. Abbott, Capt. George Burden, T.A.P.Towers, C. F.Farwell, Penhorwood, Sr., and Edward Biggings. Mrs. Wilson reposes in the beautiful cemetery in Korah, where two of her grandchildren are interred. It is understood to by the intention to remove the remains of Miss March, the aged aunt of Major Wilson, who died four years ago, from the cemetery below town to the Korah cemetery.

September 15, 1894 Page 10
Neasevill News.
We are sorry to have to mention the death of John H. Stewart, the man who was so seriously injured at Torrent's mill last week. He died last Saturday. His funeral was attended to by J. Vanderhook and the remains were at Riverside cemetery. Mr. Torrent came up from Muskegon and was at the funeral. Mr. Stewart came from Wyvale, Ont., was a steady, honest, industrious man and a general favorite with his fellow workmen. He leaves a widow and four young children to mourn his untimely death. He was about 37 years of age. His two brothers David and James, work at Ainsworth & Alexander's mill. Mr. Torrent will no doubt do the right thing with Mrs. Stewart and children.

September 22, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
Gassaway Ross a colored man, died Wednesday night a 6 o'clock, at the age of 84. Ross was a slave in the southern states before the war. He had lived in this town for 34 years. He was a cook by occupation and was an interesting old character. He leaves several children. The funeral was held from his late home yesterday afternoon.

September 22, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
William C. Noble, the 19-years-old son of Charles Noble, of Killarney, accidently shot himself while hunting near Little Current a few days ago. He only lived a few minutes.

September 22, 1894 Page 9
EAST MILLVILLE. (Special Correspondence.)
Editor News - Mike made a mistake last week which he would like to rectify. J. H. Stewart's remains were buried at the cemetery on Ryan's hill and not at Riverside, as stated. Also, Mr. Torrent was not at the funeral. I had been misinformed. The widow has received a very kind note from Mr Torrent, in which he expressed regret that the unfortunate accident had occurred at his mill and that he would be up in a few days and would call and see her.

September 29, 1894 Page 1
Joseph Houser, aged 45 years, employed as deckhand on the steambarge Continental, was instantly killed by falling into the steamer's hold, at Detour, early Wednesday morning. His body was brought here and turned over to Undertaker Blue, who shipped it to Houser's late home at Oak Harbour, O.

September 29, 1894 Page 2
BAY MILLS. (Special Correspondence.)
Mary, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oren Scribner, aged 7 months and 25 days, died very suddenly at her home at 4 o'clock Monday morning last. The funeral took place Wednesday, afternoon at the Methodist church. The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. W. E. Brown. A large number of sympathizing friends accompanied the sorrowing parents to Lake View cemetery, where the remains of the little one were gently laid to rest beneath a covering of flowers.

September 29, 1894 Page2
BAY MILLS. (Special Correspondence.)
Samuel, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Foster, aged 1 year, died at his home Sunday night last. The funeral took place on Wednesday at 10 o'clock. The funeral, sermon was preached in the church and the remains were interred in the Mission cemetery, Rev. W. E. Brown officiating.

September 29, 1894 Page 4
The State of Superior.
Frank Jacobs an old settler of Marquette, died last Saturday. He had lived in Marquette 35 years.

September 29, 1894 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith, of the Park, were called to Cheboygan Monday by the death of Mr. Smith's mother, Mrs. H. R. Smith. They accompanied her remains to Westfield, N. Y., for interment.

September 29, 1894 Page 8
Fort Brady Budget.
Private Herman May, formerly a member of Co. F, died in the hospital at Fort Sheridan of typhoid fever, Set. 18th. Private May was well liked by everybody and his death so unexpectedly is more than a blow to his friends.

September 29, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
The death recently of C. A. Dickson, editor and proprietor of the Thessalon Advocate has occassioned wide spread regret. Mr. Dickson, who belongs to and was married in Hamilton, had a varied journalistic experience, both as a practical printer and editor. He was never very strong and passed some time in Colorado, mainly for health's sake. He came to Thessalon about four years ago and for the past two years had wrestled with the dire malady, consumption, which finally caarried him off. He leaves a wife and one child. It is understood the Advocate, will be continued under local supervision.

September 29, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. M. McFadden died Tuesday night and was buried Thursday afternoon.
October 6, 1894 Page 1
Deid Among Strangers.
A Pathetic Incident That Occurred in the Soo Fish Week.
A sad case of death among strangers occurred in the Soo this week. Sunday morning just before train time, Dr. H. R. Floyd received a telagram to meet a sick woman at the train, with a hack, and take her to some house for medical attention. He obeyed the summons. With commendable kindness, Mrs. Floyd consented to care for the sick woman. Dr. Floyd found her in an unconcious condition. Everything possible was done for the unfortunate woman, but without avail. She died at 9:30 o'clock Sunday night regaining consciousness. The lady's name was Mrs. G. W. Pierson. She was on her way from her home at Elkham, Mont., to visit relatives at McBain, near Cadillac, Mich. She had been in poor health for several months. On the train her condition grew so bad that the trainmen thought best to bring her here for medical attention. With her was her infant, aged about 16 months. She had no baggage with her. It had been left at Duluth in her hurry to get on her way. The only way Dr. Floyd got trace of her home was by means of a box of pills which she possessed. Her husband, who was a civil engineer of Elkhart, Mont., was notified. He arrived yesterday. Mrs. Pierson's sister, Mrs. McBain, accompanied by her husband also arrived yesterday. The trio of sorrowing relatives took the remains of Mrs. Pierson to McBain for interment. Dr. Floyd says Mrs. Pierman's death was caused by uraema, from which she had been suffering for several months. The infant was tenderly cared for by Mrs. J. W. McMahon until it was taken away yesterday by relaties. The death of Mrs. Pierson was a pathetic and touching incident. The body was prepared for shipment by Undertaker Vanderhook.

October 6, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
Mrs. Wm. Dunseath, wife of C.P.R. employee here, was drowned in the river at Meaford last week. It was reported that she was in a state of despondency through ill health and that she made away with herself, but her friends here who knew her well and who knew how she interested herself in church and charitable work, deny this report. A coroner's inquest has been ordered and it is hoped the mystery will be elucidated. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one child. The remains will be interred in the family burying ground near Meaford. Mrs. Dunseath was a cousin of Mrs. J. W. McTavish and Miss Mina Clarke, of the Michigan, Soo.

October 6, 1894 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT.
Mrs. Butterfield, wife of G. S. Butterfield, jeweler, who was prematurily confined at the close of last week, died on Monday from pyemia, to the great regret of all her numerous friends. Mrs. Butterfield was a most talented and accomplished lady lived by her husband and respected by the whole community.

October 13, 1894 P 2
Soo Line Accient.
Several Persons Killed and Injured in a Wreck on the West End.
A bad railway accident occurred near Heafford Junction, on the Soo line Sunday. Some villain sawed the railroad bridge so that the engine, baggage car and sleeper fell through in a heap. Fireman Cottrall, of Minneapolis, who has a wife and two children, was killed.....

October 13, 1894 P 2
Mrs. Michael Grave, who was formerly Miss Phoebe Sylvester, died at her home near Payment on Monday. The funeral occurred Tuesday. The mother and a new born babe were interred in the same coffin.

October 13, 1894 P 3
Mr. and Mrs. Fleming's Loss
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fleming died of cholera infantum Monday morning, at the age of three and a half months. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon by the Rev. C.M.Thompson and the reamins of the little one were interred in the city cemetery.....

October 13, 1894 P 4
The State of Superior.
John Ravell, a farmer near Ironwood, attempted to thaw out a stick of dynamite in an oven in his home Monday. It exploded, instantly killing him and a five-year-old son. His wife and a six-year-old daughter received injuries from which they will die. One other member of the family was unhurt. The house was wrecked.

October 20, 1894 P 1
A Former Sooite Kills a Man.
Andrew White, who formerly lived at the Soo, but who has been running a house of ill repute at Rapid River, near Gladstone, shot and instantly killed Jesse Mercer at Rapid River Monday night. White was captured while attempting to escape. He is said to be a brother of Clarence White of the Soo.

October 20, 1894 P 6
The State of Superior.
Fred Sherman, of Menominee, fell from a tall telephone pole last Friday and died shortly after. He struck a nail which was sticking up in the sidewalk, and it penetrated his skull.

October 20, 1894 P- 11
Demise of Miss Nellie Healey.
Nellie, the 13-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Healey, died at the home of her parents on Ridge street, Sunday evening 10 o'clock, after a long illness. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock from the St. Mary's church and was largely attended. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

October 20, 1894 P- 12
John Miller died Tuesday as a result of a fall he sustained a week ago while at work on the new lock.

October 20, 1894 P- 12
The nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.I.Scribner, of Superior, died Thursday night. Her death is a sad blow to her parents. [large write up on Oct 27 page 5]

October 20, 1894 P- 12
Miss Jennie Curnoe, adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Shaw, died early Thurday morning. The remains will be interred this morning, at 9 o'clock. The Children of Mary Society, of which she was a much loved member, will conduct the funeral from St. Mary's church. Miss Gurnoe was 19 years of age and was born in the Soo.

October 22, 1894 P-27
Death of Wm. Gilray's Aunt.
Mrs. Robert Gilray died at her home Euphrasia, Ont., Oct 10, at the age of 78 years. The deceased was an aunt of Wm. Gilray, of this city, and had a circle of acquaintances here. The Markdale Standard of Oct. 18 published an extended notice of the deceased lady who was known as a ministering angel and never happier than when attending to the wants of the poor and needy in her neighbourhood.....

October 27, 1894 P- 11
Mrs. John H. Lascelles, sister of James Moran of this city, died at her home in Buffalo, Oct 5. The deceased was the wife of Assistant Cashier Lascelles, of the Marine Bank, of Buffalo, and was a most estimable lady.

October 27, 1894 P- 11
The dead body of Joseph Londry, a French woodsman, who was out with the Scranton party near Marquette recently, and got lost on his way home and died of hunger and exposure, was found in the wooods near Baraga Tuesday.

October 27, 1894 P- 12
Death of Chas. Haugh.
Chas. Haugh died at his home in Donaldson Monday evening from cancer of the stomach. Mr. Haugh was one of the oldest and most respected farmers in the county. The funeral was held Wednesday under the auspices of Donaldson Orange Lodge, No. 192.

November ??? 1894 P- 5
Superior. (Special Correspondence.)
Last Sabbath was a mournfull day for our neighbourhood. It was one on which the heavens opened its floodgates and earth succumbed to its falling torrents. Although the weather was so inclimate people were too sad to ----- its threatinings and in our Congregational church was assembled a large concours of people to pay their last tribute to little Georgie, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.L.Scribner, who was taken ill two weeks ago, and who on Friday morning of last week was released from her excruciating pains. Georgie was but 9 years old, but she was an exceptionally active worker in the interesting affairs of our place..... The funeral arragements were placed in the hands of J.M.Carter, her teacher. The pallbearers were six of her school mates.....

November 3, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
T. Jacques, of Iron Mountain, was killed by a falling tree in a lumber camp at Ewen last week.

November 3, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
Charles Ungstrum, of Negqunee, fell from an elevated track near the Millie mine last Friday and was killed.

November 3, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
Ray Brotherton, of Escanaba, 11 years old, accidently discharged a small pistol last week and the bullet entered the breast of his younger brother, Lee, inflicting a wound, which proved fatal in a few minutes.

November 3, 1894 P- 7
Stevensburg. (Special Correspondence)
It is with regret that we record the death of Neil Currie, which took place at his home at Stevensburg on the morning of Oct. 19, in the 72d year of his age. Mr. Currie had been ailing for some time, but his family entertained hopes of his recovery until about two weeks before his death. About that time he gegan to gradually sink. Although all tht care and medical skill could do was done for him, it was all in vain. Mr. Currie was a native of Scotland. He was born on the Island of Islay, in the year 1822, when 10 years old he emigrated to Canada with his parents. In 1879 he came to Chippewa county, where he continued to reside until the time of his death. Mr. Currie was known to his neighbours and acquaintances as a man of integrety and -- character. He manifested - patience during his entire illness. His death has cast a gloom over this neighbourhood as he was beloved and respected by all who knew him. Mr. Currie leaves a family of three sons and three daughters, who have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place on Sunday and his remains were followed to the Soo cemetery by a large concourse of friends, who assembled to do honor to all that was mortal of a kind friend and neighbour.

November 3, 1894 P- 8
CANADIAN SAULT.
P. C.Campbell was called to Mt. Pleasant last Sunday by the sudden death of his brother, D.J.Campbell. The deceased was an extensive lumberman and was a popular gentleman. Mr. Campbell returned Wednesday.

November 3, 1894 P- 11
Antoine Riehl Drowned.
He met his death in the Canal Monday Night.
Antoine Riehl, a Goulais Bay halfbreed, fell into the canal Monday night and was drowned. Riehl left some friends down town to go to his boat, which was moored at the head of the canal. Just how he happened to fall into the water is unknown. He was 43 years old and leaves a wife and eight children. Lighthouse Keeper Sweet grabbled for and recovered the body Tuesday morning. Undertaker Blue took charge of the remains which were sent to Goulais Bay Tuesday night.

November 10, 1894 P- 2
Joel W. McMahon.
The Community Shocked by His Unexpected Death.
Victory Turned To Gloom.
His Heart Failed Just as All Thought He Was Nearly Well.
One of Michigan's Best Citizens, a Devoted Husband, Loving Father, Noble Friend, Brilliant Lawyer and Good Man Goes Early to His Last Reward
"Mac" is dead.
The funeral ceremony will be held at the house at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon.
The Hon Joel W. McMahon died at his residence in this city on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Although he had been sick for three weeks his death was entirely unexpected. The announcement of his death plunged the entire community into the deepest gloom. It came close on the heels of a glorious victory. Repulicans who were saturated with elation and triumph lost all their joy at once and mourned from the heart "Mac", as he was lovingly called by all his friends, was chairman of the republican county committee....
The beginning of the illness which resulted in Mr. McMahon's death dates back four weeks ago, when he made several campaign speeches in Sanilac county where he lived all his life until he came to the Soo in February, 1887....
On July 27, 1871, Mr. McMahon and Miss Minerva Wheeler were married. They would have celebrated their silver wedding soon. To them have been born 12 children. A devoted wife and eight loving children survive. Of the children, the Misses Emma, Cora and Carrie have reached womanhood. Miss Emma is a valued teacher in the city schools. To his family Mr. McMahon was a perfect-father-loved and loving. His unexpected death is to them a bitter blow.
Joel W. McMahon was born in Sanilac county June 29, 1848..... His father was a brave soldier in the Mexican war. When little Joel was five years old his father was killed by a tree, under which he was camping in the woods, burning down and falling on him. The boy worked hard on a farm in the wilderness until he was 17 years old.....
The various orders will attend the funeral in a body, while the ceremony will be conducted by the Masonic blue lodge. The Rev. T.R.Easterday and the Rev. J.E.Whalen will officiate. The remains will be interred at Riverside cemetery.....

November 10, 1894 P- 2
Two Lives Lost.
Firemen Billings and Whiffen Burned to Death in the Crusader.
At 3 o'clock Tuesday morning the tug Crusader, which was tied up at Spry's dock at the Soo, was burned to the water's edge. Henry Billings, of this city, and Charles Whiffen, of Port Huron, firemen, were caught like rats in a trap, and perished in the flames. They were sleeping on the vessel. When the flames broke out they spread so rapidly that the unfortunate men were unable to escape from their sleeping quarters. Other members of the crew had narrow escapes from a similar fate. When the bodies of the unfortunate men were recovered they presented a sickening sight. The bodies were burned to a crisp, and the arms and legs had fallen off.....
The funeral of Henry Billings, one of the unfortunate firemen, was held at St. James church Wednesday afternoon. His remains were laid to rest in the Riverside cemetery. His untimely death is a great blow to his sorrowing relatives. The remains of Charles Whiffen, the other unfortunate, were shipped on Wednesday to Detroit, where his relatives reside. Undertaker Blake prepared the remains of both men for burial.

November 10, 1894 P- 5
The Angel of Death.
It Visits the Home of Thos. Hoynes and Removes a Loved One
Mrs. Thos. Hoynes died Wednesday morning at 9:45 o'clock, of dropsy, after a short illness. Her death is a great blow to the sorrowing husband and relatives. Mrs. Hoynes was 31 years of age. She possessed a pleasant, cheerful disposition, and was much loved by a large circle of friends. She was an active, earnest member of St. Mary's church. By her death Mr. Hoynes loses a devoted and loving wife. Mrs. Hoynes had resided here for five years. Her sisters, Mrs. C.W. Corner, of Pullman, Ill., and Miss Ella Thigh, of Montreal, arrived yesterday to attend the funeral. Another sister, Miss Emma Tighe, who has made her home with Mrs. Hoynes during the past year, is also present. The funeral will occur at St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock this morning and the remains will be laid to rest in the catholic cemetery. The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing relatives.

November 10, 1894 P- 11
Mrs. H. D. Johnston and little daughter Frances left for Montagne, Mich. On Thursday. She was called there to attend the funeral of her brother, W.H.Baker, who died at Kansas City.

November 10, 1894 P- 11
The Death of Little Claudie Bernier.
Claudie Rose, the 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Calixte Bernier, died Thursday evening of scarlet fever. The funeral will occur tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the house and the remains will be interred in the Catholic cemetery. She was a bright little child and her death is a sad blow to her loving relatives.

November 17, 1894 P- 2
Died Among Strangers.
Jennie Lee, a poor working girl, died at the residence of Dr. A.J.Campbell Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. On Nov. 1 she applied to Dr. Campbell for aid. She was ill and had no money or friends. He took her into his house and secured a nurse who constantly attended her. She was afflicted with severe cataleptic fits, which lasted three or four hours at a time. Dr. Rogers was called into consultation. Alex. Ross, chairman of the superintendent of the poor communicated with relatives of Miss Lee in Pembroke, Ont., and they sent money for the shipment of the body to that place. This was done Tuesday by Mr. Ross.

November 17, 1894 P- 7
The State of Superior.
The home of Alfred Lindstrum, of Chassell, was destroyed by fire last week, and two children aged one and three years were cremated.

November 17, 1894 P- 9
Canadian Sault.
It is with sorrow that THE NEWS is called upon to chronicle the death of one of this town's most estimable ladies. Mrs. W.H. Carney, the beloved wife of Sheriff Carney, of Algoma, which occurred Tuesday night. The deceased had been an invalid for some months, and her demise was not unexpected. She suffered a stroke of paralysis Sunday, from which she never regained consciousness. The sheriff and his family have the sympathy of their many friends in both Saults.

November 17, 1894 P- 9
Peter Ford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Ford, died at St. Mary's hospital, Marquette Tuesday night. The remains were brought here for burial.

November 17, 1894 P- 10
James Craig, well known in the Soo, died at Detroit Sunday.

November 17, 1894 P- 10
Intelligence was received here this week of the death at Alliance, Neb., of James Kennedy, son of Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Kennedy, who formerly lived here. He died of consumption.

November 24, 1894 P- 2
Demise of Miss Mary McGinn.
Miss Mary McGinn, of Kinross, died last Saturday afternoon. The remains were brought here for interment. Funeral services were held at the St. Mary's church Tuesday morning, and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery. Miss McGinn was an estimable young lady.

November 24, 1894 P- 10
Mrs. J. E. Lamentagne, Mrs. A. Corriveau and Fred Poliquin were called to St. Claire, Quebec, this week, by the death of their aged father.

December 1, 1894 P- 1
A Sad Affair.
Suicide of Stuart F. Howie at Little Rock, Ont.
That Through the Heard.
His Family Prostrated With Grief Over His Death.
Cause of Act Unknown.
He is believed to Have been Laboring Under Mental Aberration as who Result of Unsuccesful Business Plans
A great shock was given the community yesterday by the report that Stuart F. Howie, of this city, had committed suicide at Little Rock, Ark., yesterday morning Mrs. Howie received a telegram from one of the coroners of Little Rock yesterday afternoon announcing the suicide of her husband, and asking what to do with the body. Mrs. Howie was so grief stricken by the terrible news that it was feared for a time that it would drive her crazy. The telegram gave no details as to the manner of death. It stated, however, that Mr.Howie had left a written request to be buried at Little Rock. On October 21 R.S Gregg and Mrs. Howie left the Soo for Little Rock to figure, in the interest of Lipsett & Gregg, on a new fort which is to be built there this winter ....
A devoted wife and three bright children, a son and husband and father. The sympathy of the entire community is with them in their hour of trouble Mr. Howie's remains will probably arrive here next Monday. The funeral will probably be held Tuesday or Wednesday of next week. Announcements of the exact date will be made in the several churches tomorrow.
Mr. Howie was 46 years of age. He was born in Canada.....

December 1, 1894 P- 2
E.J. Penny was called to London, Ont early this week by the death of his father.

December 1, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
John Wodega, of L'Anse, was crushed to death by a log rolling on him in the woods last week.

December 1, 1894 P- 8
Canadian Sault.
Miss Annie McLean died at the home of her father, Constable A.B.McLean, last Saturday afternoon, of consumption, aged 17 years. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Rev. W.A.Duncan, of the Presbyterian church officiated.

December 8, 1894 P- 2
Thomas Howie and wife, of Marquette, were in the city this week in attendance upon the funeral of Mr. Howie's brother, the late S.F.Howie.

December 8, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
Paul Hohner, who was an inmate in the county jail at Red Jacket, charged with criminal relations with his daughter, committed suicide last Monday.

December 8, 1894 P- 6
The State of Superior.
John Tregloin shot and instantly killed Samuel Daniels at Iron Mountain Thandsgiving day.

December 8, 1894 P- 8
Canadian Sault.
Intelligence was received here this week of the death of W.O.Luscombe, which occurred last week in a Chicago hotel. It is said that his demise was occassioned by suffocation from escaping gas. Mr. Luscombe was one of the poineer settlers of the Sault and was widely known here. He had been a resident of Chicago for nearly three years.

December 8, 1894 P- 8
Canadian Sault.
Miss Annie McLean, who died last week was aged 21 years, 4 months and 11 days.

December 15, 1894 P- 1
Death of Clintie Sutton.
Judge and Mrs. E.S.B.Sutton were called to Davisburg, Mich., Wednesday by a telegram announcing the dangerous illness of the Judge's nephew Clintie Sutton, who died on Thursday. Clintie Sutton had visited his uncle here during the summer season for many years and was well known here. He was about 18 years of age. The cause of death was consumption. His many friends here will be grieved at the news of his untimely demise.

December 15, 1894 P- 1
Death of Mrs. Wm. Robinson.
Mrs. Wm. Robinson died at her home on Ashmun street last Sunday afternoon, of child birth. Mrs. Robinson was 30 years of age, was a member of the Congregational church, and an active worker in the Ladies Aid society of that church. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the Congregational church. The Rev. F.Bagnall conducted the services. The interment was at the city cemetery.

December 15, 1894 P- 1
Died of Heart Disease.
Philip Papson, an Old Resident, Suddenly Expires Saturday Evening.
Philip Rapson, a well Known milk man, and one of the oldest residents of the county, died suddenly last Saturday evening while engaged in milking his cows, at his residence near Ryan's brickyard. Disease of the heart was the cause of his sudden demise. The funeral occurred Monday afternoon at the M.E. church. The Rev. C.M.Thompson officiated and the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery. Philip Rapson was born May 24, 1824, near London, Eng. He came to America when 5 years old and settled in Wawanosh, Huron county, Ont., and lived there many years. He came to the Soo 15 years ago and had resided here ever since that time. He was the father of 14 children, eight boys and six girls. Nine of the children are still living. Mr. Rapson was formerly a member of the Methodist church of Canada. He united with the Central M.E. church of this city about one year ago. He was a quiet, sober, industrious man, and greatly beloved by his family, to whom his death is a severe blow.

December 15, 1894 P- 2
George Shimmel and Amos. F. Robinson, of Mancelona, brother-in-law and brother of the late Mrs. Wm. Robinson, attended Mrs. Robinson's funeral Tuesday.

December 15, 1894 P- 5
The State of Superior.
Two children named Mitchell were burned to death at Manistique last week. The children were in the house alone when the fire broke out and no assistance could reach them.

December 15, 1894 P- 7
Intelligence was received here late Wednesday afternoon of the death of Sir John Thompson, premier of the Dominon of Canada, who died suddenly at Windsor Castle, England, early that afternoon. He had been in poor health for some time previously, but had not been confined to his bed....
John Sparrow David Thompson was born in Halifax, N.S., Nov. 10, 1814. His father was a native of Watford, Ireland, for some time queen's printer, and subsequently superintendent of the money order system of Nova Scotia....

December 15, 1894 P- 11
Bay Mills.
The Rev. W. E. Brown last Sunday preached the memorial service of Mr. and Mrs.Warren's little girl, who was buried a week ago. It was an able effort.

December 22, 1894 P- 1
Are Doubly Bereaved.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Chandonnais lost two of their children one a two-year-old girl and the other a boy a few hours old, last Sunday. The funeral occurred at St. Mary's church on Tuesday, and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

December 22, 1894 P- 2
A Bright Little One Gone.
The bright six-year-old daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. W.E.Brown, of Bay Mills, died Monday morning. The little one had been sick since Friday with membraneous croup. The funeral services were conducted at the parsonage Bay Mills, by the Reb. C.M. Thompson on Wednesday. The remains were brought here and interred in Riverside cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have the sincere sympathy of all in their sad bereavement.

December 29, 1894 P- 3
Rosedale. (Special Correspondence.)
Mrs. Robert Farney passed from us Christmas Day to join that happy throng who are singing praises unto Him, who was born into this sinful world a Prince of Peace. She leaves a husband and four children. The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Congregational church Rosedale. Mr.Farney and family have the heartfelt sympathy of the whole cummunity.

January 5, 1895 Page 4
Casper Kahn, for the past 19 years keeper of the range lights on Grand Island died at Marquette last Sunday.

January 5, 1895 Page 5
Detour (Special Correspondence)
A fine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Goetz died last week of scarlet fever.

January 5, 1895 Page 5
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. Michael McGuire lost a little daughter last week by death.

January 5, 1895 Page 2
Death of Little Ignatius Roll
Ignatius, the 6-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Roll, died Sunday night of Bright's disease. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. Little Ignatius had always been apparently healthy and his death is a severe blow to the sorrowing relatives.

January 5, 1895 Page 7
Mrs. T. Arnold received word this week of the death of her mother at Orangeville, Ont.

January 12, 1895 Page 1
Death of Mrs. McMenemy
Mrs. McMenemy, aged about 65 years, died at her residence at the corner of Gros Cap avenue and Magazine street, last Saturday, of catarrh of the stomach. The deceased was a well known lady. She had conducted small fruit and candy stores about town for several years. She came here from St. Joseph's Island, where she has a husband and an adopted son. A sergeant at the fort by the name of Hubbard has taken possession of Mrs. McMenemy's store, claiming that he had married her some months ago. He will probably sell it out. The funeral of Mrs. McMenemy occurred from St. James church Monday.

January 12, 1895 Page 2
One of the Miamis
The Death of One of the Last of a Once Powerful Indian Family
Mrs. Jese Richards, a Miami Indian, daughter of Wa-ca-co-nah, one of the most conspicuous members of the tribe, died Thursday night in a miserable hovel on the Indian reservation in the southern part of this country, near Somerset. She was the last surviving member of the Wa-ca-co-nah family, influential in the Miami tribe back in the seventies. Wa-ca-co- nah, who was nearly 80 when he died, was of a religious turn, and as he was quite wealthy, having received large grants of lands from the government, he built a church at his own expense, conducting services himself for the benefit of the Miamis and the "poor whites' who hover about the Indian land. Sometime before his death the old man contracted debts and lost much of his property. His six children, each of whom received 100 acres of land from the government, attained their majority and took their real estate into their own hands, squandering it for gaudy clothing and articles for which they had no use and buying liquor in wholesale quantities. In 1880 Wa-ca-co-nah piled on the last straw when he undertook to build a gravel road from Treaty situation to his farm, four miles distant. The project was a failure, and the land, heavily mortgaged to Wabash capitalist, was sold, and the old brave died in 1881 of a broken heart. One by one the six children had mortgaged their farms to Wabash business men, who had sold them goods readily as long as their land was unencumbered, and who at each annual settlement secured the bills by taking a lien on the fertile farms.
Two year ago Mahala, who married Jesse Richards, was the remnant of the once powerful family. Both drank heavily of the worst whiskey money would buy, and when her property was dissipated Jesse deserted the woman, who sunk lower and lower in depravity until, in a little cabin in Waltz township. Thursday night, with scarcely enough clothing to keep her comfortable, the last of the Wa-ca-co-nahs perished miserably. At one time the Wa-ca-co-nahs held 1,000 acres of the most fertile lands in Wabash county. All of this has fallen into the hands of white men, and indeed there is very little of the magnificent farms with which the government endowed the Miamis remaining on the lands of the Indians, mortgage after mortgage having been foreclosed in the last ten years and the homes sold over the heads of the Indians. Comparitively few of the full bloods are left, and the children born of intermarriages are more degenerate than their ancestors - Wabach (Ind.) Dispatch.

January 12, 1895 Page 3
Miss Jessie Maynard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M.M. Maynard, who lived in the Soo until a year or so ago, died at her home at 278 Bridge street, Cleveland, Tuesday, of scarlet fever.

January 12, 1895 Page 5
Stalwart
Died, at Stalwart, on Dec. 29, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Barton also on New Year's day. Hazel, the little 8- year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Johnson. She died of scarletina. Two other children of Mr. Johnson are sick, but are recovering.

January 12, 1895 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
We regret to chronicle the death, after three months illness, of Miss Dia Miller, a highly respected young lady of our settlement, at the age of 17 years.

January 12, 1895 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
Last Wednesday week, Mrs. Robt. Gay died very suddenly being only ill for 12 hours. She was 43 years old.

January 19, 1895 Page 1
Death of Henry Myers
Henry Myers, aged 60 years, died at his home, corner of Hart and Easterday avenues, Thursday afternoon of bronchitis. Mr. Meyers came to the Soo eight years ago from Manistee and managed a sawmill at Cisco for several years. A wife and one daughter, Mrs. W.F. Lipsett, survive him. The funeral will be held from his late home at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

January 19, 1895 Page 7
CANADIAN SAULT
Mr. Alexander Findlay, of Echo Bay, died suddenly on Sunday evening last. It seems that he was in his ordinary health when his son left for church on Sunday night, and on his return was much surprised to find his father had expired. The deceased gentleman was an old settler and very highly respected by all who knew him.

January 19, 1895 Page 8
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Jim McDonald's little boy died Monday from scarlet fever. Jim doesn't care. He says he wishes it was the oldest girl Mollie. On Tuesday, when Dr. House called at his wretched dwelling, Jim fired him out of the place. Jim is a man and a quarter, the man went away and left the quarter. He says he'll presently kick them all out. It is an awful case. The man ought to be regulated with a large R.

January 26, 1895 Page 1
Irene, the 7-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hempstead, died Wednesday, of fever. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon.

January 26, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waif
John Anderson, a Swede carpenter, was killed instantly at the Chapin Mine, Iron Mountain, Tuesday morning. He was doing some repairing and accidently fell down a shaft a distance of 900 feet.

February 2, 1895 Page 1
Scarlet Fever in Raben and Detour Townships
Several deaths Have Already Occurred in That Vicinity .... The sympathy of the community at Detour have been especially moved in behalf of the family of James Whalen, in whose home two of the little ones, a brother and sister, aged respectively 9 and 11 years, died Jan 18, in the same bed, leaving four others sick with the same disease, one of them dangerously so....

February 2, 1895 Page 2
Death of Mrs. G. W. Hayden
Was a daughter of Capt. John Spalding and Formerly Lived Here
Mrs. George W. Hayden, nee Ida Spalding, died at her home in Ishpeming Monday night, of pneumonia, aged 38 years. Mrs. Hayden was ill for a week, and her death was not unexpected. The deceased was born in this city and was the daughter of Capt. and Mrs. John Spalding and a half-sister of Chas. H. Spalding. In 1875 she married Attorney Geo. W. Hayden, who then resided in Marquette, but afterwards moved to Ispeming. Besides her bereaved husband, three children, a girl and two boys survive her. Mrs. Hayden was a lady of happy disposition, charming presence and a social star. The funeral was held at Ispeming Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Spalding and the Rev. P. T. Rowe of this city ware in attendance.

February 2, 1895 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Died, of scarlet fever at Detour, Jan 14, 1895, James, the son of Mr. and Mrs. James McDonald, aged 5 years. At Cameron settlement, Detour township, Jan 18, 1895, Gertrude, aged 11, and Rueben aged 9 children of Mr. and Mrs. James Whalen.
At Gatesville, Jan 21, 1895, Louie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Miller, aged 5 years.

February 2, 1895 Page 5
Thos. White, of Deep River, was killed by a train last Saturday. Mr. White at one time represented the Sulphte Fiber Co. At the Canadian Soo, and was well known here. Mr. White was also some years ago U.S. Consul to Cairo, Egypt. He was the father of Miss Olive White, the actress who visited the Soo with the Van Cortland Co. A few years ago, and who is now winning laurels in the east.

February 2, 1895 Page 8
A 14-year-old son of James Sawyer, who resides on the Meridian road, died suddenly Thursday night. The funeral will be held this morning, and Sand Hill cemetery will be the place of interment.

February 9, 1895 Page 1
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Arnott died Thursday morning of inflammation of the stomach.

February 9, 1895 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Dalton at Detroit
Mrs. Mary Ann Dalton, wife of Abram Dalton, died in the Detroit house of correction early Wednesday morning, of consumption. Mrs. Dalton was sentenced to the above institution in February 1893, for six years, on a charge of murder. She shot and killed James Wice, who she claimed tried to force an entrance to her home which was located near the street railway car shed in the western part of the city. Mrs. Dalton's remains were brought here Thursday and the funeral occurred from St. Mary's church yesterday morning. The deceased was 61 years old.

February 9, 1895 Page 5
Demise of Senator J. W. Watts
Senator J. W. Watts, of Jackson, died Feb. 1, of pneumonia which was the result of a cold contracted while in the Soo recently with the committees on fisheries of the senate house ....

February 9, 1895 Page 5
Ransonville (Special Correspondence)
In memoriam of Edgar Sawyers son of James Sawyers, of Rosedale, who diec Feb. 1, 1895....(Poem)

February 16, 1895 Page 1
A Pioneer Gone
John M. Johnston Died on Thursday Morning
Lived To A Ripe Old Age
He Was Born in the Soo 79 Years Ago
Played a Prominent Part in the Early History of Chippewa County
John M. Johnston, died Thursday morning at 2 o'clock, at his home on Maple street, after an illness of three months. While the news of his death sent a shock to most every one it was not unexpected by his relatives. For three months he had ben a very sick man, as a result from rheumatism and a paralytic stroke, which occurred last Saturday. At his advanced age the family knew his only relief would come by death.
By the passing away of Mr. Johnston another of the old guard of pioneers of Chippewa county has gone to his great reward. He had resided in the Soo for almost 79 years, having been born in the house where E. S. Wheeler now resides, on the 12th day of October 1816. Mr. Johnston was one of the most popular Indian interpreters away back in the early days. He acted in that capacity for all of the Indian agents, and was the means of making several traties long before the old state lock was built. He had a wonderful memory, and had a faculty fof entertaining friends with stories of his early life. During the almost four score years of his life his reputation was spotless, and his memory will remain pure and sacred in the hearts and minds of many Sooites. He knew no enemies and acknowledged all as his friends. To mourn his loss are left a devoted wife and eight children, Spencer N., Anna M., Charlotte J., Mrs. T. C., Anthony, James L., Howard L., Henry G., and William M. The children were all present at his death bed with the exception of Spencer N., who is in Oregon, James L. who lives at Grand Rapid, Wis. And Mrs. T. C. Anthony and William, who are now at Detour. Owing to sickness Mrs. T. C. Anthony could not stand the journey to the Soo, before her father's death, but will arrive here tonight. The funeral will take place tomorrow at 1:30 o'clock p.m. Services will be held at the home and at Riverside cemetery, and will be conducted by the Rev. Frederick Bagnall, pastor of the Congregational church. The procession will leave the house at 2 o'clock p.m. A memorial service will be held Sunday evening at 7 o'clock at the Congregational church. The Rev. T. R. Easterday will speak of him as a citizen, Norman C. Morgan as a friend, and the Rev.Frederick Bagnall as a christian. Special selections of music will be given by the choir.
The family have the sumpathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

February 16, 1895 Page 1
John Grier, aged 24, died Thursday of pneumonia.

February 16, 1895 Page 1
Death of Harry McGregor
Hary, the seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McGregor, died Thursday night of membraneous croup. The little fellow had only been ill a day or so. Harry was their only child and the sorrying parents have the sympathy of the community in their bereavements. The funeral will he held from the Presbyterian church tomorrow at 2 o'clock p.m.

February 16, 1895 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
The little child of Fred and Mrs. Enghoffer died on Monday, the 11th inst. The sympathy of the people are with the bereaved one, and Mr. and Mrs. Tom Watson in their recent sorrow.

February 16, 1895 Page 3
Granny LaPoint, aged 97 years, passed to her long home and was buried on Sunday, the 10th inst.

February 16, 1895 Page 7
Mrs. John Olser, aged 79 years died suddenly Wednesday noon. The remains were taken to Barrie, Ont., Thursday for burial.

February 23, 1895 Page 2
Mrs. John Sutherland died at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Kirvan Tuesday noon, of heart disease, after an illness of a month. Undertaker Blue prepared the remains for shipment, and they were taken to Watertown, N.Y., for burial by her husband.

February 23, 1895 Page 2
The funeral of John Grier, who died at Sand Hill Thursday of last week, occurred last Saturday. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Grier who are will known in the county. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.

February 23, 1895 Page 4
Death of Emma McDonald
Emma, the bright five-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McDonald, died at 9:30 o'clock last Saturday morning of inflammation. The funeral was held Monday at which Rev. T. R. Easterday officiated. The little one was laid to rest at Riverside cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have the sumpathy of the community in their bereavement.

February 23, 1895 Page 7
.... John McDouall Johnston, who held in his own youngest child of John Johnston, who held in his own right the estate of Craig near Giants Causeway, county of Antrim, Ireland, and Osh-bo-gush-Ko-da-we-qua, only daughter of Chief Wau-bo- gieg. This Irish gentleman married at the old Mission, Apostle Island, and after living one or more years at LaPointe or Bayfield, he took up his residence at Sault Ste. Marie, more than a hundred years ago. The ancestor residence slide stands and is occupied by its present owner E. S. Wheeler and his family. The data at hand may not be entirely corredt but the writer believes that part of this residence was built in 1792 and that it is therefore the oldest house in the city. ....

February 23, 1895 Page 7
Frederick A. Douglass Dead
Frederick A. Douglass, the noted freedman and orator, dropped dead at his home in Washington Tuesday evening. His death which was due to heart failure, was entirely unexpected. As he had been enjoying the best of health. He was born in Turckabooe Tallson county, Maryland, in February, 1817. His mother was a negro slave and his father a white man. Mr. Douglass leave two sons and a daughter, the children of his first wife. His second wife was a white woman, survive him. His wealth is estimated at $200,000.

February 23, 1895 Page 8
Detour's Scarlet Fever Epidemic
Robert, the 2½-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bawson, of Detour, died at his home Tuesday of scarlet fever.

February 23, 1895 Page 8
Additional Canadian Sault
It is with deep regret that we chronicle the sudden death of Mrs. John Sutherland, wife of the master mechanic of the ship canal. The deceased lady had been ailing for some time with heart failure; and two weeks ago removed to the American Sault for treatment. On Tuesday morning Mr. Sutherland was summoned acros, the situation of his wife's health being considered critical, and shortly after his arrival Mrs. Sutherland expired. The remains were taken to Watertown N.Y., on Wednesday by C.P.R. train via Ottawa.

February 23, 1895 Page 8
Jacob Brown, one of the pioneers of the Upper Peninsula, died at Marquette last week. Mr. Brown was a resident of the Soo from 1849 until 1855.

March 2, 1895 Page 6
Death of Greg B. Dougall
New was received here by L.O.O.F. Lodge No. 123, of the death of Greg B. Dougall at West Superior, Thursday. He was a member of the local lodge. Mr. Dougall was with Frank Perry a number of years ago in the capacity of land looker. A brother of Mr. Dougall at Belleville, Ont., was notified of the sad event. Mr. Dougall was well known in the Soo.

March 2, 1895 Page 6
A Brilliant Newspaper Man Gone
Burke Waterloo, a brother of Mrs. E. H. Conway dropped dead in his room in the Southern Hotel, Chicago, last Sunday night. He had been ill for a week with la grippe, and was thought to be able to resume his work on the Chicago Herald, on which paper he had filled the position of assistant city editor for three years. He was one of the best newspaper men in Chicago, and had filled responsible positions on all the big dailies in that city. The deceased was 35 years old and leaves a wife. His remains were taken to Port Huron for burial.

March 2, 1895 Page 8
Joseph Walter Day, aged 13 months, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Day died last Sunday of membraneous croup.

March 2, 1895 Page 8
Albert Prenzlauer received the sad intelligence last Saturday, of the death of his mother, which occurred in Berlin, Germany, February 10. Mrs. Prenzlauer was nearly 84 years of age and had been a sufferer for a number of years.

March 9, 1895 Page 1
U. S. Persch, received a telegram yesterday announcing that his brother had been killed in Petoskey.

March 9, 1895 Page 1
Colonel Clendennin Dead
Colonel Clendennin U.S.A., of Galesburg, Ill., who served with distinction during the civil war, and was released from active service April 20, 1891, died Tuesday, aged 65 years. At the time of his retirement he was Colonel of the second U.S. Cavalry. He was one of the military commissions that tried conspirators who planned the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Colonel Clendennin was the father of Captain and assistant Surgeon Paul Clendennin, late of Fort Brady.

March 16, 1895 Page 1
Demise of Mrs. F. V. Flower
Mrs. F. V. Flower died at Port Huron last Saturday, after a long illness. Mrs. Flower was a sister of Mrs. E.H. Conway, and the latter left Monday to attend the obsequies. The deceased lived in the Soo for a number of years and a wide circle of friends regrets her death. She was an estimable Christian woman. A husband and daughter are left to mourn the loss of a loving wife and mother.

March 16, 1895 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
L-- in memory of little Jimmie McDonald who died Jan 14, 1895, aged 5 years.....

March 16, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
John Behoe, of Menominee was killed last Saturday while loading logs. A number of logs rolled on him.

March 16, 1895 Page 9
Wm. Cota found the missing will of Justine O'Jibway in an old trunk belonging to him, last Saturday. Miss O'Jibway died last summer. The will was drawn by C.S. Cushman in 1881, and at the time of Miss O'Jibway's death could not be found.

March 16, 1895 Page 10
The News received a letter yesterday from U.S. Peisch, who is in Petoskey, where he was called by the death of his brother, Wm. E. Peisch, who was killed last week while engaged in hauling logs. The deceased was unmarried and a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Peisch will return tomorrow.

March 23, 1895 Page 7
Fort Brady Budget
It is our sad duty to announce the death of Musician Albert Davis, late of Co. F., 19th infantry, on March 16, at 4 o'clock a.m. Musician Davis was on of the few old members of the 19th infantry who came with the command from Texas. Of a jovial, lively disposition, his presence will be greatly missed.

March 23, 1895 Page 9
Now at Rest
Robt. J. Kirk, a stone mason, died at his home on Minneapolis street Monday morning of Bright's disease. The deceased was 48 years old and a wife and two little sons survive him. The funeral was held from the Central M.E. church, Wednesday afternoon, at which Rev. C.M. Thompson officiated. The members of the Loyal Orange Lodge, under Master Joseph Black, attended in a body. As Mr. Kirk was an Orangeman, the family has had every want ministered to them in a true brotherly manner by the Orangemen of the city during their trouble. Mr. Kirk had been ill for many months previous to his demise. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

March 23, 1895 Page 10
West Holt, superintendent of the dining and sleeping car service of the Soo Line, died suddenly in Milwakee Wednesday night. Mr. Holt had a number of warm personal friends in this city.

March 23, 1895 Page 10
Wm. Quonce, a watchman on John Hickler's dredge No. 7 at Sailor's encampment, died Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock of consumption.

March 23, 1895 Page 10
Death of William Crane
He Succumbs to Dread Pnemonia After a Short Illness
The friends of Wm Crane received a shock when the News of his death was announced yesterday morning. He died at 3 o'clock at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. S. Dumond. Mr. Crane had been ill a little over a week with pnemonia. William Crane was 23 years of age. During a two years residence in the city, he made many friends. He was a machinest and was employed by Hickler Bros. He was an exemplary young man and died a Christain. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. and had the best care during his sickness. Mrs. Pheobe Crane, his mother, arrived in the city Wednesday afternoon. The remains were prepared for shipment by Undertaker Vanderhook, and after a service at the house were taken to the depot and forewarded to Owen Sound for burial. Members of the I.O.O.F. of this city accompanied the remains to the station.

March 23, 1895 Page 19
Wm. Sparling, who had been ill for several months at the Franklin house, died at 11 o'clock last night.

March 30, 1895 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
It is with much sorrow that we announce the death of John Zunce, who died March 3d, after an illness of six months with consumption. He leaves a young widow and one child to mourn his loss. Mr. Zunce was taking care of Contractor Hickler's dredges here this winter and had a host of friends here.

April 6, 1895 Page 1
Death of Edgar Morris
Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Morris Lose Theif Only Son
The angel of death crossed the threshold of the home of Mr. and Mrs. B.M. Morris Tuesday night and folded in his col embrace Edgar, their bright three-year-old son. Little Edgar was taken sick with pneumonia a week ago Tuesday, and despite all that skill, care and constant attention coul do, he succumbed to the malady. The funeral occurred from the house Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock and a large number of friends followed the remains to their earthly resting place in Riverside cemetery. Many floral offerings were make by sympathetic friends. The Rev. P. T. Rowe conducted the services. Mr. and Mrs. Morris have the sympathy of their many friends and acquaintances here and elsewhere in their breavement.

April 6, 1895 Page 8
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
Wm. Quonce died March 20, 1895, of consumption, aged 30 years, 1 month and 12 days. The funeral sermon was preached at Sailor's Encampment by the Rev. James Steele, pastor of the Ferguson Presbyterian church, on Friday, March 22, at 11 o'clock, after which his body was followed to its last resting place in Richard's Landing cemetery by his mourning wife Alice and little son Willie, attended by her brother and sister Mr. George and Miss Ada Vincent; both of Oscoda, Mich., and a large number of friends and neighbours. Mr. Quonce was a young man of exemplary habits, temperate and true, a loving husband and king father and firm friend and was honored and respected by all who knew him.
Mrs. Wm. Quonce desires to thank her friends and neighbours at Sailors Encampment, Mich., for their kindness to her in her most recent bereavement.

April 6, 1895 Page 9
John Baptiste McCoy
A Well Known Resident of Sugar Island Died Wednesday
John Baptiste McCoy, aged 73 years, died at Payment, Sugar Island, Wednesday, of dropsy of the heart. His remains were interred in the Sugar Island cemetery. He had lived on Sugar Island for 25 years. In his younger days he acted as mail carrier for the Hudson Bay Co. His route was from Hudson Bay to Puget Sound and he made one trip one way the year and back the next. In the death of Mr. McCoy Chippewa county loses one of its noted characters.

April 13, 1895 Page 1
A Tragic End
Capt. A. Ford Hursley Shoots Himself Through the Head
Shortly after 7 o'clock last Saturday night, Capt. A. Ford Hursley committed suicide in a room in the rear of the billiard parlor of the Park Hotel, by shooting himself through the head with a 38-calibre revolver....
Capt. A.F. Hursley waw 43 years of age at the time of his death. He was born in Jefferson Co., New York, and came to the Soo with his parents when he was 13 years old.... Mayor Jay Hursley, and Capt. Wayne Horsley, of the customs force are brothers of the deceased, who also leaves a wife and child and aged mother to lament the distressing termination of his life. His family are left in comfortable circumstances.
The funeral service were concluded by the Rev. P.T. Rowe, Monday afternoon, at the residence of Mayor Hursley, and were largely attended. Mr. Hursley was a mason in high standing, and members of that organization attended the obsequies in a body. His remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery. The flags were placed at half most on the court house, city hall and yacht Goodenough, in honour of the late Mr. Hursley.

April 13, 1895 Page 1
The funeral of the late George H. Old was held from the Central M.E.church Sunday afternoon. A large number of friends were in attendance. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.

April 13, 1895 Page 7
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. J. Fenwick died Sunday of croup. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Tuesday afternoon.

April 13, 1895 Page 10
Mrs. A. Cadotte was called away to Marquette to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. St. Louis, who died Thursday.

April 20, 1895 Page 6
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Mitchell died suddenly on Monday. The funeral was held on Wednesday. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow.

April 27, 1895 Page 1
Called to Her Reward
Death of Mrs. Mary Ann Anthony Last Saturday
By the death of Mary Ann Anthony, which occurred last Saturday evening, the city loses one of its oldest and most highly respected residents. Mrs. Anthony had been ill for some time with heat trouble, which was the immediately cause of her death. Mrs. Anthony was well known by all of the older residents of the city. She was a sterling Christian woman and possessed a warm place in the hearts of all with whom she was acquainted and her passing away is sincerely deplored by all. The funeral service were held in the Presbyterian church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Rev. T. R. Easterday delivered the funeral sermon and was assisted in conducting the services by the Rev. J. C. Carman. A large number followed the remains to Riverside cemetery.
Mrs. Mary Ann Anthony was born in Devonshire, England, August 15, 1826, and was consequently nearly 69 years of age at the time of her demise. She came to the Soo in 1857, with two children. Thomas and Archie, and joined her husband, who came over four years previously, and has resided in the city continuously since that time. Her husband Thomas C. Anthony, sr. Died here 13 years ago. The deceased leaves a son. Thomas C. Anthony, who is engaged in the merchandise and coal business at Detour, and a daughter, Mrs. R. D. Ashmun, of this city. Ex-Mayor E.C. Anthony, of Negaunee, who accompanied Mrs. Anthony when she came to this country, is her brother-in-law.

April 27, 1895 Page 2
James Burke is Dead
James Burke, the well known chimney sweep, constable and general hustler, is dead. He had been very ill for several weeks and death relieved his suffering Tuesday morning. He was an old Soo resident and was known by almost everybody. A wife and six children survive him. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Thursday morning, and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

April 27, 1895 Page 2
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
John Calbeck received telegram on the 25th stating that his mother had died very suddenly at her home in Staynor, Canada.

April 27, 1895 Page 9
Gone to Her Rest
Death of Mrs. Jane Waiskai, an Old Resident of the County
Mrs. Jane Waiskai died at her home at the Mission, Bay Mills, April 18, after a short illness, of lagrippe, aged 72 years. For 50 years the deceased had lived at the Mission and came there from Lac la Flambeau, Minnesota, where she was born. She was well known by the older residents of the country and was an interesting character. Several children and relatives survive her, who live in this county and elsewhere, among whom are sons and daughters, consisting of Peter, John, Edward, Andrew, Charles and Louis Waiskai, Mrs. Elize LeBranch and Mrs. Jane Cameron, of Bay Mills, and her brother and sisters, consisting of John, Simon and Eli Gurnoe, and Mrs. Wm. Shaw and Mrs. Wm. Meron, of this city and also a brother Lawrence, who resides near Edmonton, Northwest Territory. The funeral was held last Saturday, at which the Rev. Fr. Richards. S.J., officiated.

April 27, 1895 Page 10
Dafter (Special Correspondence)
The announcement of the death of Mrs. Crawn, on Monday morning, spread a veil of gloom over the community. Mrs. Crawn came to this county 10 years ago. All who knew her were friends. She had been afflicted for over a year and succeeded to the recent attack. The funeral services were conducted by the Rev. McCalmont. The remains were interred in the Sand Hill cemetery on Tuesday. Mrs. Crawn leaves a husband and one daughter to mourn her loss. They have the sympathy of the entire community.

May 4, 1895 Page 1
Dropped To Death
Mr. and Mrs. R.P.Foley Lose Their Little Daughter
Fell Over the Banisters
Was Precipitated a Distance of 23 Feet to the Office Floor
Terrible accident at the Park Hotel Thursday Morning, Which Resulted Fatally
One of the saddest accidents that has occurred in the city, for some time was that to sweet little Mary Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R..Foley, at the Park Hotel, at 11:2- o'clock Thursday morning. The child dashed to death by falling 22 feet, from the third story to the office floor. She only lived two hours, when death came, and calmly she passed to the great beyond. The fall caused concussion of the brain. Just how the accident happened is a mystery, as no one saw her fall. At 11 o'clock she was with her mother, in the family apartments on the third floor of the building.
She asked and was given permission by her mother to go to the office to see her papa. Only a few minutes after she fell head-foremost to the office floor within two feet of where, her father stood. She was picked up by Mr. Foley in an unconcious condition, in which state she remained until death came. Dr. B.D. Harison was summoned, but the little one was beyond medical aid. Little Margaret, as she was more familiarly known, was three years and 11 months old, was of a sweet disposition and bright and lively. ....
The funeral will be held from St. James church this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. The Rev. P.T. Rowe will officiate. The remains will be taken on the afternoon train to St. Ignace for interment. Hon. And Mrs. E. Sherwood and Miss Sherwood, parents and sister of Mrs. Foley, arrived by special train from St. Ignace Thursday night.

April 27, 1895 Page 9
Death of Guy H. Carleton
Another of the County's Pioneers Called to His Reward
One by the one the old settlers of Chippewa county are being called to their final rest..... About 3 o'clock Wednesday morning Mr. Carleton was awakened by his daughter, Miss Grace, and asked to go with her to the fire which was raging on Water street. Mr. Carleton, who was in his usual health, arose and dressed, and with Miss Grace went out of their house. Just west of the main Water street entrance of Chippewa House they were standing, looking at the fire when Miss Grace was startled by a fall beside her. Turning she saw the prostrate body of her father. With the aid of others near by, Mr. Carleton was helped to a standing posture.....
The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. The Rev. T. R. Easterday, assisted by the Rev. J. E. Bitting, officiated....
Guy E. Carleton was born in Bath, N. H. The Granite, state,, Nov 1, 1820, and was therefore 74 years and 6 months old to a day at the time of his death. With his parents, Mr. Carleton came to Michigan in 1830, and located at St. Clair.... Mr. Carleton's home life has been pleasant. Early in the 40's he was married to Miss Francis Hogue at st. Clair, who died a number of years afterwards. One son, from this marriage, R. H. Carleton, lives in Neosho, Mo. December 1, 1861, the deceased was united in marriage here to Miss Catherine Kemp, a sister of George and L.D.Kemp, of this city, who survives her husband. As a result of this marriage there were four children: a son, Louis, who was accidently killed 12 years ago, and three daughters, Miss Grace, Mrs. F. W. Rundle and Mrs. C.W.Given, all of whom reside here. A brother, H. C. Carleton also lives in the city. Two sisters, Mrs. Eliza Eldridge, of Cresco, Ia., and Mrs. Mary Cop, of Vernon, Mich., also survive their brother. His family are left in comfortable circumstances.

May 4, 1895 Page 2
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
Louis Bird, of Munising, well known here, where he formerly lived, died April 1, 1895, at the ate of 20 years. He was converted when 8 years of age and was as modest diligent young Christian.... The pastor conducted the funeral services and preached from these workes. 'Thine eyes shall see the king in his beauty they shall behold the land that is very far off.'

May 4, 1895 Page 3
Mr. and Mrs. H. vonSchon desire to express their deep gratitude for the kind expressions of sympathy and aid tendered them by many friends during the illness and death of their little son Conrad.

May 4, 1895 Page 4
The four months old baby boy of Mr and Mrs. Frank Ruehle died Monday afternoon of pneumonia, after a short illness. The funeral occurred Tuesday. The parents have the sympathy of many friends in their bereavement.
Mary 4, 1895 Page 9
Demise of Conrad vonSchon
Conrad, the little son of Mr. and Mrs H. vonSchon, died Sunday night, aged one year one year and 1 days, from inflammation. The little fellow had been ill but three days. The funeral occurred Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from the residence. The Rev. P. T. Rowe conducted the services. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends in the sorrow that has come to them.

May 4, 1895 Page 10
Little Bessie LeClear, the bright four year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis LeClear, died Wednesday morning. The funeral was held from St. James church Thursday afternoon.
Mary 4, 1895 Page 10
Mrs. Nelson Newhouse, died at her home in Donaldson Tuesday of pnuemonia. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Newhouse was a cousin of R. G. and A. L Ferguson, of this city.

May 11, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
John Derricks was killed last week while engaged in breaking a log jam in one of the tributaries of the Minominee river.

May 11, 1895 Page 10
Canadian Sault
On Saturday morning a man observed a body drifting past the government dock. He acquainted Mr. Templeton, custom house officer, of the occurrence. Both proceeded to have the body taken from the water, and it proved to be a man named Duffy, who had been working in Dunn's lumber camp during the winter. It is surmised that Duffy broke through the ice this spring. The body was buried shortly afterwards. The coroner Dr. Scherk, did not deem it necessary that any inquest should by held.

May 11, 1895 Page 11
Death of Edward C. Benson
Edward C. Benson, aged 30 years, died at Scott's boarding house Sunday afternoon, of pneumonia. The deceased had been ill for two weeks. He was employed as riveter by the Detroit Bridge and Iron Works on the gates of the new lock, and had been a faithful employee of the company for 15 years. The funeral was held Thursday. His remains were sent to his home in Detroit, where his parents reside. Mr.Benson was unmarried, short services were held at the place of his death, at which the Rev. Father Donovan officiated.

May 18, 1895 Page 1
Suicide of Sergt. Schmidt
He Shot Himself With a Rifle at Fort Brady Monday Morning
Early Monday morning First Sergeant Frederick Schmidt, of Co. D. Committed suicide at Ford Brady by shooting himself through the head with a rifle. The sergeant, who had been drinking for two days previously, received a reprimand from one of the officers, and was confined to his quarters Sunday. No other reason is known why he committed the fatal act, as he left no papers. Sergeant Schmidt was a native of Germany, and had served twelve and a half years in the United States army. He became a distinguished marksman in 1885. He was one of the best non commissioned officers in the fort, and had the good will of the officers and enlisted men. He was of a somewhat exciteable temperment. The funeral took place at noon Monday under the auspices of the Army and Navy Union, of which he was a member. The Soo city brass band was secured, and with the Fort Brady troops, acompanied the remains to Riverside cemetery.

May 18, 1895 Page 1
Has a Watery Grave
Drowning of Dennis Garvey at the Encampment Monday
Dennis Garvey, of Lindsey, Ont. employed on John Hickler's dredge at Sailor's Encampment, slipped off a mud scow Monday night and was drowned. He could not save himself on account of the strong current. The river was dragged all day Tuesday without success. Several members of the A.O.H., of which organization Garvey was a member, left, on the tug sprite Tuesday afternoon with a diver to make further search, which also proved unsuccessful.

May 18, 1895 Page 1
Death of Miss Matilda McMoran
Miss Matilda McMoran died Tuesday at her home on Superior street of consumption. The deceased had been ill for several months. She was a christian lady and lived by all who knew her. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon, the Rev. J. C. Carmain officiating.

May 18, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Gus Engstrom, aged 70, committed suicide at Skanee, last week.

May 18, 1895 Page 10
Canadian Sault
It is with much regret we chronicle the death of Helen, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spence, which occurred at the residence of her grandparents on Bay street. The deceased child by her amiable disposition endeared herself to everyone who became acquainted with her. She bore a lingering illness with remarkable patience and passed away on Saturday morning last. The funeral was held on Monday, the remains being taken from Capt. Burden's to St. Luke's church, where a very pathetic service was held, thence to the cemetery. The community extend to the parents their heartfelt sympathy in their bereavement .... {a poem}

May 25, 1895 Page 1
Death of Chas. C. Poe
Charles Carroll Poe. Son of Col. O. M. Poe, of Detroit, died suddenly in New York early last Saturday morning. The deceased was well known in the Soo. He held a position here in 1885 under the government ans inspector of dredge work, and hs united the city on numerous occasions since that time.
He was the possessor of marked ability and was held in the highest esteem by those who knew him. He was 31 years of age.

May 25, 1895 Page 1
Demise of F. R. Price's Father
Fred R. Price was called to Goderich, Ont., last Saturday by the serious illness of his father, Reese Price. Word was received Tuesday that Mr. Price had died at 5:30 o'clock on the morning of that day of stomach trouble. The funeral occurred Thursday. The deceased was 63 years of age and was one of the best known and most successful business men in Goderich.

May 25, 1895 Page 1
Death of Albert Weller
Albert Weller died Wednesday at West Superior, of appendicitis. The deceased was 34 years of age, and a wife and a three-weeks-old baby survive him. Mr. Weller was a member of Vermillion Tent, K.O.T.M., of Two Harbors, Minnesota, and the Maccabees will attend his funeral in a body. The funeral will be held from the residence of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Weller, Dawson street, at 2 o'clock this afternoon. The deceased was well known in the city.

May 25, 1895 Page 9
Rosedale (Special Correspondence)
the announcement of the death of Mrs. David Grier Sunday morning spread a veil of gloom over the community. Mrs. Grier and been afflicted with heart trouble for some time and succumbed to the recent attack of that disease after only a few days illness. Mrs. Grier came here with her husband 14 years ago, and all who knew her were here friends.

June 1, 1895 Page 1
Death of Walter Q. Gresham
Secretary of Slate Passed Peacefully Away Tuesday Morning
News was received here early Tuesday morning of the death of Walter Q. Gresham, secretary of slate, which occurred in Washington at 1"15 o'clock that morning..... Walter Quinton Gresham's life was a useful one. He was born in Harrison county, Indiana, March 17, 1832, ....

June 1, 1895 Page 2
Fort Brady Budget
Hardly two weeks had passed since the tragic death of First Sergt. Schmidt, Co. D. 19th infantry, till the post was thrown in a state of solemnity over the death of Private John Conlin, of Co. D. Private Conlin met his death by drowning Tuesday afternoon in a small lake at Camp Baldwin, near Rexford, Michigan. He procured a dug-out or canoe, had made a sail boat of it and was out toward the center of the lake when it capsized. He attempted to swim ashore but took a cramp and sank..... Wednesday morning at an early hour Capt. Guard accompanied be Sergt. Murphy and Private Mercia, went by train to Camp Baldwin and dragged the lake from a raft which they built and soon found the body. The funeral took place at 3 o'clock in the afternoon and his remains were interred with full military honours in Riverside cemetery. Services were held in St. Mary's church.....

June 1, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Abram Williams, aged 28, committed suicide lost week at AuTrain, by blowing out his brains with a rifle.

June 6, 1895 Page 8
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
We are sorry to report the death of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. John McDermid.

June 1, 1895 Page 12
The remains of S. Wells, who died at Pickford were taken to Wingham, Ont on Friday for burial.

June 8, 1895 Page 1
D. J. Garvey's Body Found
The body of D. J. Garvey, who was drowned from one of Hickler's scows at the Encampment three weeks ago, was recovered Thursday and brought to this city on the Sprite yesterday morning. The remains were taken to Undertaker Blakes's parlours and prepared for burial. The deceased was a promising young man of only 21 years. He was a member of the A.O.H. and popular with all who knew him. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock this morning. The A.O.H. will attend in a body. M. Garvey, a brother of the deceased of Lindsay, Ont., is in the city.

June 8, 1895 Page 4
Demise of Mary Penfold
Miss Mary Penfold, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Penfold, who live on Division street, died Sunday evening at 6 o'clock, after a short illness, aged 18 years and six months. Miss Penfold was to have been married on Wednesday to John Henderson, and had prepared all her wedding clothes. The funeral servies were held Tuesday afternoon, in the Central M. E. church, under the auspices of the Salvation Army, and were largely attended. Her remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery.

June 8, 1895 Page 6
Samuel P. Schuckers died recently at Wooster, O. He was a brother of J. W. Schuckers, private secretary of Salmon P. Chase, and brother -in-law of John H. Oberly, ex-civil service commissioner. ....

June 8, 1895 Page 11
Death of Mrs. Zoe Miniclier
Mrs. Zoe Miniclier died at her home on Ridge street Tuesday afternoon of paralysis of the brain, aged 63 years, after a short illness. For over 30 years she had been a resident of the Soo, and was one of the leading spirits in St. Mary's church of which she was a member. She was also an honoured member of St. Anne society. Eight children, Mrs. Ellen McHugh, St. Ignace; Louis, Charles, Napoleon, Oliver and Edward Miniclier and the Misses Jennie, Mamie and Zoe Miniclier, all of whom reside in the city, survive her. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Thursday morning and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery/

June 15, 1895 Page 1
Death of Archa E. Pease
Archa E. Pease, aged 14 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Pease, died of brain fever, with other complications, at 6:30 o'clock Thursday morning, at her home on Spruce avenue est. She had been ill for three weeks and no serious results were looked for until just before her death. Archa was a bright young lady of sweet and amiable disposition. At school she ws loved by all and was one of the brightest pupils in Miss Swartout's room. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock this morning., and the interment will be at the Catholic cemetery on the hill. The bereaved parents and family have the sympathy of the community.

June 15, 1895 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Howlett died this week of cholera infantum.

June 15, 1895 Page 2
Miss Minnie Smith, who had been the guest of Miss Bessie Seaman for ten days, received a telegram from Houghton yesterday which announced the death of her uncle, John Harris. Miss Smith and Mrs. Seaman left for Houghton last night. Mr. Harris was a well known commercial traveller and a warm personal friend of R.W. Peppard and P.T. McKinney.

June 15, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Louis DeMyer, a log drover, was drowned in the Paint river, near Crystal Falls, last week.

June 15, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Andrew Lind, jr., aged 18 years, was killed at the Quincy mine Saturday of last week by falling down a winze. The accident happened during his first day's work in the mine.

June 15, 1895 Page 12
She Dropped Dead
Sudden Demise of Mrs. Millie Elliott Tuesday Night
Mrs. Millie Elliot died suddenly in N.D. Morrish's drug store at 8 o'clock Tuesday night of congestion of the lungs. Mrs. Elliott was over 50 years of age, and was a well-known character here. For years she was engaged as a washerwoman and was a conspicuous figure about the business houses as scrub woman. She was laid to rest in the city cemetery Wednesday aftenoon.
Miss Emma Nason, of the Mission, cared for the remains. At Undertakers Vanderhook & Blake's establishment she washed and dressed the body, clothed it and paid all the funeral expenses. The Mission had charge of the funeral services. The work of Miss Nason is commendable.

June 15, 1895 Page 12
Death of Capt. Louis Tallion
Capt. Louis Tallion, master of the ferry Beckwith, died at 2 o'clock this morning, of typhoid pneumonia. Capt Tallion was born and raised in the Soo and was one of the best known masters on the river. A wife and four children survive him.

June 22, 1895 Page 5
Wolverine Waifs
George Ferguson of Saginaw, was killed by the cars last week.

June 22, 1895 Page 5
Wolverine Waifs
Charles Soderstrom, of Florence, Wis., was drowned in the Minominee river last week.

June 22, 1895 Page 9
The funeral of the late Captain Louis Tallion, of the ferry Beckwith, was held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Monday morning. The interment was at the Catholic cemetery and a large concourse of friends were in attendance.

June 22, 1895 Page 9
Pine Grove (Special Correnspondence)
James Hazzard was buried on Wednesday. A large number followed the remains to their last resting place.

June 22, 1895 Page 11
Death of James Hazzard
James Hazzard, aged 70 years, died at his home on the Mackinaw road Monday afternoon of Paralysis. The deceased was one of the best known farmers in Chippewa county. He was the father of Mrs. Frand Reid of the U.S. Engineers' office and besides Mrs. Reid seven children survive him. The funeral was held from his late residence Wednesday afternoon. The rev. T. R. Easterday officated.

June 29, 1895 Page 6
the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Henley, residents of the Soo several years ago, was drowned in the Paint River, at Atkinson, recently.

June 29, 1895 Page 9
Death of Mrs. Bertie Carpenter
Mrs. Bertie Carpenter, wife of A. D. Carpenter, died suddenly at her home on Ashmun street at 12:30 o'clock Monday afternoon, aged 26 years. The deceased had been ill for two weeks with rheumatism and the morning of her death was thought to have been greatly improved. The end came quickly, as the dread disease affected the heart. Mrs. Carpenter had lived in the Soo only a year. She was a hard working woman and had conducted the restaurant adjoining her husband's business place on Ashmun street. The remains were taken to her birthplace at Lansin on Tuesday afternoon for burial

July 6, 1895 Page 1
Delicate Surgical Operation
It Was Performed on Maurice Kylie Who died Thursday
Maurice Kylie, who fell some fifty feet into the new lock a week ago Thursday and sustained terrible injuries, died at the Commercial House at eight o'clock on the evening of the 4th. Dr. Ennis was fiest called to attend him and afterwards Drs. Harison & Wesbster. On Monday the latter performed the operation known as laparotomy which is opening and exploring the abdomen. They found an intestinal obstruction in the upper bowel due to an intussuception and extensive lacerations of the lower bowel, which had been terribly injured in the fall..... The remains were taken to Orillia, Ont. where his parents reside, for interment.

July 6, 1895 Page 11
Pine Grove (Special Correspondence)
James Parker, sr., died last Saturday and was buried Monday in the new Pine Grove cemetery. There was a lage funeral.

July 6, 1895 Page 12
Mrs. Edward Command died Tuesday of Comsumption.

July 6, 1895 Page 12
Mrs. S. Dumond was called to Toronto early in the week by the death of her mother.

July 13, 1895 Page 1
Death of Lieut.-Col. Jas. Henton
Word was received Sunday by W.B. Cady, announcing the death of his father-in-law, Lieut.-Col James Henton, at Fort Ringfold, Texas, on Saturday of last week. Col. Henton is well known at the Soo and was commanding officer at old Fort Brady five years ago. While here he ranked as captain. In 1891 he was made a major and in 1894 was promoted to lieutenant colonel. Two children, Mrs. W. B. Cady and J. Stanhope Henton, besides a loving and devoted wife survive him....

July 13, 1895 Page 2
Called To Her Reward
Unexpected Death of Mrs. Catherine Gabriel Sunday Afternoon
Mrs. Catherine Gabriel, widow of the late N. V. Gabriel, died at her resident on Court street last Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, after but a short illness. The immediate cause of her death was cholera morbus. Mrs. Gabriel had been in poor health for some time, suffering from heart trouble. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Sobraro, and was born here in March 1855, and consequently was a little over 40 years old at the time of her demise. The deceased was a prominent member of St. Mary's church and here death is universally regretted. She has always lived at the Soo. The funeral, which occurred Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from that church, was largely attended. The Rev. Frs Donovan and Baxter conduct services, after which the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on the hill. Undertaker Blake had charge of the funeral. The pallbearers were Seraphim LaLonde, Capt. Fred. Trempe, Capt., Wm. Greenough, John F. Moloney, Thos. Ryan and Capt. Thor. Ermatinger.
By the death of Mrs. Gabriel five children are rendered orphans three boys, George, Joseph and Victor, and two girls, Maggie and Agnes. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire, community in their sad affliction.

July 13, 1895 Page 2
The bright baby girl of Mr. and mrs. Robt. McGilvery died Wednesday. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church yesterday.

July 13, 1895 Page 2
The three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Neveau died Tuesday. The funeral occurred Wednesday from St. Mary's church.

July 13, 1895 Page 2
Mrs. O. M. Stafford departed Sunday for Ashland on the sad duty of attending the obsequies of her brother, who was drowned last week.

July 13, 1895 Page 2
The baby of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Lesway died Tuesday after a short illness. The funeral occurred from their residence Thursday afternoon. The Rev. C. M. Thompson officiated. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.

July 13, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Wm. Arnott, a log driver, was drowned last week in the Manistique river near Manistique.

July 13, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Joseph Mercier, a Frenchman, committed suicide by drowning himself at Manistique.

July 13, 1895 Page 12
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Died at Raber, July 3, little Annie, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Feighener. Little Annie was only sick four days. Her death was a terrible blow to her parents. Her age was 5 years and nine months and twenty-days. Mr. and Mrs. Feighener have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement.

July 20, 1895 Page 4
Canadian Sault
We regret to chronicle this week the death of the beloved wife of Wm. Dashney, who died on Monday after a few days sickness. The funeral, which took place on Thursday morning was a large one. The Catholic Order of Forresters turned out in a body as a token of respect for their bereaved brother.

July 20, 1895 Page 4
Canadian Sault
A German named Stabach was killed at the water power canal on Tuesday by being struck with a piece of casting, which was being unloaded for the machine shop of the Water Power Co.

July 20, 1895 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Sylvester Kinney, for many years publisher of the L'Anse Sentinel, was drowned in Green Bay, while with an excursion party, on Friday evening of last week. He was 42 years old. Mr. Kinney recently sold the L'Anse Sentinel and purchased the Green Bay Journal. He was well known in the western part of the Upper Peninsula.

July 20, 1895 Page 12
Rachel, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Clegg, of Pickford, died Wednesday of consumption, aged 18 years. The funeral occurred Wednesday. Mrs. C. W. Pickford, of this city attended the obsequies.

July 27, 1895 Page 1
J. P. O'Brien Passes Away
Death of an Old Soo Resident Yesterday Morning
Jeremiah P. O'Brien, one of the best known business men in the city, died at 8:50 o'clock yesterday morning at his home on Water street, of acute gastritis, after a short illness. He was taken ill last Saturday night and from the start Drs. Ennis and Rundle gave little hope of his recovery. Everyone knew the genial Mr. O'Brien and his death was a shock to the community. Jeremiah P. O'Brien was born in county Clare, Ireland, March 24, 1840. At the age of 17 he came to this country and first settled in New York, after which he lived in Chicago and came to the Soo in 1872.... Besides a wife, three children survive him. They are Mrs. Chas. Ahearn, Miss Anna and John O'Brien. The funeral will be held frm St. Mary's church at 9:30 o'clock Monday morning.

July 27, 1895 Page 1
Demise of Mrs. A. L. Barbeau
Mrs. Archange L. Barbeau, widow of the late Hon. P. B. Barbeau, died at her residence on Water street Monday morning at 6 o'clock. The deceased was 85 years of age. Mrs. Barbeau was one of the oldest residents in the city and had lived for 55 years in the house wherein she died. Two daughters, Mrs. J. P. Pendil, of Marquette, and Mrs. M. W. Scranton, of this city, besides nine grand children and six great grandchildren, survive her. She left consderable property.

July 27, 1895 Page 2
John Ley, who has been an inmate of the poor house for some time, died Monday His remains were buried in the city cemetery Wednesday.

July 27, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs

August Peterson was killed by a fall of ore at the Badger mine, Commonwealth, Wis., last week.

July 27, 1895 Page 7
The infant daughter of Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Deadman died Monday of cholera infantum. The funeral occurred Tuesday. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of their friends in the sorrow which has come to them.

July 27, 1895 Page 9
Canadian Sault
Death has been active to our midst again this week, Miss Agnes Allcock, eldest daughter of Lambert Allcock died on Monday after a few months illness. The other death was that of a promising young man, Denis J. O'Connor, brother-in-law of M. Christopher, the well known railroad conductor. He had been complaining for some time, but his illness only assumed a serious aspect a week ago. He died Tuesday evening. His remains were sent by train to Packenham for interment on Wednesday. Mr. O'Connor was a member of the cricket club. To the respective families. The News offers its sympathies in their deep bereavement.

July 27, 1895 Page 10
Death of Mrs. Robt. Sawyer
Another Esteemed Resident of Chipewa County Now at Rest.
Sarah, wife of Robert Sawyer, died at the family home near Sand Hill July 19, at 5 a.m., in her 78th year of her age. The deceased and her family are well known in this county, having resided here more than 16 years. Robert Sawyer and Miss Sarah Grier were married at Tyrone, Ireland, where they were born and reared, 55 years ago. They came to Canada as bride and groom and to Michigan 16 years ago. Eleven children, the youngest of whom is now 35 years of age, were born to them all of whom yet survive. Three live in Canada and eight in Chippewa county. Mrs. Sawyer was in the enjoyment of good health until July 4, when she was taken ill and the attending physician from the first gave no hope of recovery. Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer were members of the Presbyterian church at time of their marriage and this has been their continuous religious faith. The funeral occurred at 10 o'clock a.m. last Sunday from the residence. The Rev. T. R. Easterday, of this city, who was pastor of the Presbyterian church when they came to this country preached the funeral sermon. The churches of the entire community suspended their morning services and all the people attended. The Rev. McCalmont, resident pastor, took part in the service. The burial took place at Sand Hill cemetery.

July 27, 1895 Page 10
Mrs. Wm. Baggett, an elderly lady living at Pickford, walked 25 miles, between Hessel and Pickford, early in the week. She died the day after.

August 3, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
The three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hill of Norway, fell into a crock of boiling milk last week and was scalded so badly that she died soon after.

August 3, 1895 Page 4
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Quite a sad circumstance was that which occurred last Tuesday night. In a few sentences here is the story. A boy of 19, Andrew Hill, left his home in Finland recently. He came to Detour, where he boarded with Alex. Forsberg and worked in the mill. He was a grand worker and a good boy. He piled ties on the dock Tuesday. One fell from the top of the pile and struck him on the head and knocked him into the river. He sank the third time before help arrived. The boy was taken out and cared for by the physician who took charge of him. He was laid on a board in a wood shed dead uncared for half naked. Coffen made-should have been hiding the body of the poor boy from the sight of callers. The funeral was announced and the body was still out of coffin. What then? Oh! He's nothing, those people have no soul. Give the credit to the right parties.

August 3, 1895 Page 11
Obsequies of Mrs. A. L Barbeau
The funeral of the late Mr. A. L. Barbeau was held from the St. Mary's church at 10 o'clock last Saturday morning..... The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

August 3, 1895 Page 11
Death of Patrick Ryan
Patrick Ryan, aged 20 years, died Sunday at Drummond Island, of consumption. His remains wre brought to this city Monday night and taken to the residence of P. Lawless. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church Tuesday mornng and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

August 3, 1895 Page 12
J. P. O'Brien's funeral was hld Monday morning from St. Mary's church. It was one of the largest ever witnessed in the city. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

August 10, 1895 Page 1
The two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan died early Thursday morning.

August 10, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
John Ritter, of Florence, Wis., committed suicide last week. He blew out his brains with a rife.

August 17, 1895 Page 9
Pickford
Mr. Kelly, aged 94 years, died at the residence of Isaac Watson last Sunday. The funeral occurred Tuesday at 2 o'clock.

August 17, 1895 Page 9
A Loved One
In memory of Cleveland Roe, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Roe, who departed this life Aug 7, 1895, at 5 o'clock p.m. .... poem.

August 17, 1895 Page 9
Rosedale (Special Correspondence)
Our friends Mr. and Mrs. Mackie have had a severe trial in the sudden death of their son John. Tidings of his illness came Friday, Aug 2, followed the next day by the startling intelligence that he had died that morning, and that his body would be at the Soo on Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. At the time appointed Mr. and Mrs. Mackie went to the station and met their eldest son Thomas, with their daughter Maggie and her husband, who accompanied the remains. The Rev. T. R. Easterday preached the funeral sermon in the Presbyterian church, assisted ,in the service by the Rev. C.P. Bates. A crowded congregation of neighbours and friends showed sympathy with the bereaved, and a long procession followed to the cemetery on the hill. Mr. and Mrs. Mackie wish to express their thanks to their friends for help and kindness during this trying time.
The following notice regarding Mr. Mackie's death appeared in the Duluth Evening Herald Aug 1 "John Mackie died at St. Luke's hospital at 10 o'clock this morning. He was one of Daugherty & Upham's engineers and a brother to George and Tom Mackie. The latter is superintendent for Daugherty & Upham. The body of the deceased will be taken to the home of his parents at Sault Ste. Marie, this evening from Patterson & Co's undertaking room.

August 17, 1895 Page 11
Killed by a Fall
Antonio Rose, age 27 years, fell from a ladder on the mitre sill in the new lock to the bottom of the pit Tuesday, a distance of 25 feet and was so badly injured internally that he died Thursday at his boarding house, at 179 Ashmun street. The deceased leaves a widow and one child in Italy. The funeral was held yesterday from St. Mary's church.

August 24, 1895 Page 1
Death of J. T. Moore's Father
J. T. Moore received the sad intelligence by wire Thursday morning of the death of his father, Robert Moore, which occurred the previous night at Mohawk village, Ohio. He was in his 80th year and had been hale and hearty until six months ago, since which time his health steadily declined. He visited his son here a short time ago. Mr Moore was unable to attend the obsequies owing to stress of school matters which demanded his immediate attention.

August 31, 1895 Page 2
Jumped From the Bridge
Sad Fatality at Superior Early Thursday Morning
Lloyd Quick, a section hand at Superior, aged 19 years, was almost instantly killed Thursday morning at 8 o'clock by falling from the railway bridge, across Waiskai river to the bed a distance of 70 feet. The train was backing on the bridge preparatory to going into Bay Mills, and crossing the bridge. The heavy fog made it impossible to see the train, and doubtless thinking that they were in immediate danger of being run over by the train which could be plainly heard, the unfortunate man jumped from the head car and went over the bridge. His back was broken by the fall and he expired before medical attendance reached him. He had been working on the railroad but a short time.

August 31, 1895 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. James Murphy of Allenville, received a telegram from the Soo last Sunday, announcing the death of their little grand-daughter Nellie Hassett, who died Sunday morning at 8 o'clock. They left on the early train Monday to attend the funeral. Little Nellie was one year and ten days old. St.Ignace News.

September 7, 1895 Page 2
The infant girl of Mr. and Mrs. James T. Simonean died Thursday afternoon of cholera infantum. The funeral will occur from the house at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

September 7, 1895 Page 2
Mrs. Agnes Lavine, aged 85 years mother of Mrs. John McDonald died Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock at the residence of her daughter on Portage avenue. The funeral was held Tuesday.

September 7, 1895 Page 8
Death of Richard Benson
Aged father of Mrs. S. F. Howie (Fall, Crystall, N.D. Aug 28)
The subject of this sketch met with an accident at Minneapolis on the 13th of this month, which resulted in his death on the 23rd. Richard Benson was 85 years of age, and was on his way from Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., to Crystal when he met with the accident which cost him his life. Deceased was walking on the pavement and as he was in the act of stepping down some stone steps to a lower level, missed his footing and fell, striking his right temple on the curb below. He remained unconscious from that moment until his death, 11 days after. Mr. Benson was a native of Ireland having emigrated to Bruce County, Ont, in 1840. From there he came to Pembina County, North Dakota, in 1885, remained there four years and went to Ft. Saskatchewan in 1889. About a year ago Mrs. Benson died at their home. He leaves a family of four sons and two daughters living, the youngest daughter being dead. Those who survive him are James L. and John Benson, of Crystal, Richard jr. of Washington and Alex. of South Edmonton. The daughters are Mrs. Mary A. Howie of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and Mrs. Ralph Hulbert, of Ft. Saskatchewan. The family have the sympathy of many friends in this vicinity.

September 21, 1895 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Andrews died Monday of cholera infantum. The funeral was held Tuesday from St. Mary's Church.

September 21, 1895 Page 9
Canadian Sault
Mrs. W. H. Plummer and Mrs. Pt. Reid went to Bruce Mines last week to attend the funeral of the late Geo. Marks, Mrs. Reid's father.

September 21, 1895 Page 9
Canadian Sault
Mr. & Mrs. Charles McCall have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement, having lost their six month old child.

September 28, 1895 Page 1
The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lowe died yesterday morning.

September 28, 1895 Page 7
Six members of the local fire department, headed by chief Van Wyck, attended the funeral in a body of the late Walter Towers at the Canadian Soo Tuesday. Mr. Towers was a member of the Canadian Soo fire brigade.

September 28, 1895 Page 7
Bay Mill's (Special Correspondence)
The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. George Shearsmith's little boy took place Wednesday and was attended by many of our citizens. Mr. and Mrs. Shearsmith have our sympathy in their hour of trouble.

September 28, 1895 Page 7
Died in Australia
Mrs. Arthur Christie, who resided in the Soo 12 years ago died July 29, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. G. Paternoster, Berwick, Australia. She was 47 years of age. Her husband Arthur Christie, who is M. Berwick, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Christie, of Rosedale, this county.

September 28, 1895 Page 9
Canadian Sault
Walter son of Capt. T.A.P. Towers died at his home Sunday afternoon of lung trouble. The deceased contracted a cold early last spring which never left him. He was a young man of marked ability and his death will be mourned by all who knew him. The sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of the community. The funeral was held Tuesday, and his Lordship, the bishop of Algoma, preached the funeral sermon. The fire brigade, of which he was a member, attended in a body.

September 28, 1895 Page 10
Death of An Old Resident
John Lines died at his home on Carrie Street shortly after 11 o'clock Wednesday night, of typhoid pneumonia. He had been ill for 17 days and his end cam peacefully. Last spring Mr. Lines contracted a severe cold which developed into typhoid fever and he never fully recovered from the attack. The was nearly 49 years old and was born at Woolage, Ont. He came to the Soo in 1885 and was first employed by George Kemp on the dock. In 1893 he entered the employ of the two railroads as car repairer, which position he held until his death. -------A wife and two children survive him, besides three brothers, Nathan and William, who reside in the city, and Edward, a resident of Hanover, Ont, who arrived yesterday for the funeral. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the St. James church, and the Rev. P. T. Howe will officiate. The Orangeman will have charge of the funeral and the Odd Fellows will attend in a body.

October 5, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Wiafs
Fred Miller, an 8 year-old boy, was killed by the cars at Marinette last week.

October 5, 1895 Page 10
Death of J. M. Ross
The Well Known Encampment Landlord is no More
John M. Ross who has kept Ross' hotel at the Encampment for many years, died Wednesday afternoon at the Franklin House, after an illness of three weeks. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon from the Presbyterian church. Three children survive him. They are Mrs. Proctor, of Hersey and Miss Nellie and William, all of whom were with him at the time of his death. The deceased was well known in this city. John M. Ross came to this country in 1879, and bought out the store of J. B. Eddy on St. Joseph Island. Later he moved to the Encampment on the Canadian side. He was quite a character, having travelled during his early life in nearly every country on the globe. It was only occasionally that he would speak of his experiences. He was about 80 years old at the time of his death. Mr. Ross amassed a comfortable fortune and has left his family well provided for.

October 19, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
John Saladin, a brakeman on the St. Paul railway was run over by a switch-engine and instantly killed at Ontonagan last week.

October 19, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Prompted by jealousy William Smith of Houghton, aged sixty, one of the oldest citizens of the copper country, fatally shot his wife last week and then blew his own brains out with a revolver.

October 26, 1895 Page 10
Entered Into Rest
Death of Mrs. Chas. Van Horn at Bay Mills
Entered into the rest of paradise at Bay Mills, Mich., on Saturday, Oct. 19, 1895, at 1 o'clock a.m. Elizabeth, the beloved wife of Charles Van Horn. The announcement of the death of Mrs. Van Horn has brought sadness to many heart and cast gloom over the entire community. Typhoid fever set in five weeks before her death, and her constitution already enfeebled, and which at not time was rugged, proved unequal in the long struggle with the disease.------A resident of Bay Mills for 12 years or more. [ a long story of her religious life ] [It mention five children left but no names.]

November 2, 1895 Page 2
Death of E. M. Lacy
It was announced in The News last week that E.M.Lacy had been stricken with paralysis at his home at Mt. Clemens on Saturday word was received by Dr. C.J. Ennis that Mr. Lacy had died early that morning. Mr. Lacy was engaged in the drug business here for many years and his death is regretted by his many friends.

November 2, 1895 Page 3
Death of E. M. Sewell
E. M. Sewell, aged 18 years, die at his home on Ridge Street Monday afternoon of typhoid fever, after an illness of two weeks. He was taken sick at Goulais Bay and was brought here on Thursday of last week. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon. The deceased was a son of Mrs. J. R. Sewell and was an exemplary young man.

November 9, 1895 Page 1
Death of Lewis N. Herrington
Lewis N. Harrington died at his home on Spruce avenue west, at 5 o'clock yesterday morning, from a stroke of paralysis which he suffered 10 days previously. For 10 years he had been saddler in the harness shop of George Ryan and he Johnston Harness Company on Ashmun street. The deceased was 47 years of age, and a wife and three children survive him. The funeral services will be held at the Baptist Tabernacle tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. The friends and family will leave the house at 1:30 o'clock. The public is invited to the service at the church.

November 9, 1895 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Frank Shafer
Mrs. Frank Shafer, of Superior, who has been ill several weeks at 92 Court Street, of a complication of disease, died at 5 o'clock Wednesday morning, aged 35 years. The funeral was held from the residence of Harry Blake, at 9 o'clock yesterday morning. Mrs. Shafer was a patient sufferer. She was a most estimable lady and was highly respected in the community, in which she loved. Her husband, who is one of the county road commissioners, has the sympathy of a large circle of friends in his bereavement.

November 9, 1895 Page 9
CANADIAN SAULT
John McLean, a prosperous farmer and lumber jobber, of Goulais Bay, left his home several days ago for Goulais Bay Mission to get some drift timber. As he was running a lumber camp in the vicinity of Batchewana, there was no uneasiness felt at his home when he didn't return, as he was supposed to have gone to the camp. A few days afterwards his boat was found bottom side up on an island. They are looking for the body.

November 9, 1895 Page 9
Another supposed case of suicide occurred this week. The wife of Mr. Woods a paper maker, working for Mr. Clergue, and boarding at the Algonquin hotel, committed suicide by taking liquid poison, about 10 o'clock Thursday morning. Three doctors were in attendance, but were too late to save her life. An inquest was held yesterday. Mrs. Woods was a middle-aged lady and they were expected to move into their own house in a few days.

November 16, 1895 Page 1
Met Sudden Death
George Crowe Accidentlly Killed at Detour
Result of Carelessness
Was Stowing Railway Ties in a Vessel's Hold
The Mate Allowed a Tie to Pass in a Chute Without Warning the Workmen.
A fatality occurred at Detour Tuesday When George Crowe, who was stowing railway ties in the hold of the schooner Granger, was struck on the left temple by a small tie. He died at a late hour that night from concussion to the brain. It was claimed that the accident was the result of the carelessness of Fred Jackson, mate of the Granger.---- The deceased was 34 years old and came to Detour with his wife two months ago from Wingham, Ont. Mrs. Jas. McDonald, who lives at Detour is a sister of Mr. Crowe. John Crowe a brother arrived here Wednesday from Wingham. Fred Jackson was charged with manslaughter.

November 16, 1895 Page 1

May Be Drowned
Capt. Guy B. Gillet of the Manitou, is Missing
Was last Seen Monday It is supposed that his body lie in the Canal.

November 16, 1895 Page 8
Is He Drowned
Thos. A. Ryan Mysteriously Disappears from the Steamer Colorado.
It is supposed that Thos. A. Ryan, better known as "Tommy" Ryan, of the firm of Ryan & Martin, liquor dealers, has been drowned in Lake Superior. Mr. Ryan was returning from a trip to Duluth on the steamer Colorado, and on Friday night of last week he mysteriously disappeared from the vessel. He is supposed to have either accidently jumped overboard or to have intentionally jumped into the icy waters of the lake in order to end his life, Mr. Ryan was well known and had many friends in the Soo. He leaves a wife and three children.

November 16, 1895 Page 10
One of the twin baby girls of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Hembruff, of Dafter, died yesterday morning, of spinal meningitis.

November 16, 1895 Page 10
Mrs. John Lee died of consumption Tuesday morning, after a lingering illness of nearly three years. She was in destitute circumstances and by her death four small children are rendered orphans. Kind ladies of the Presbyterian Church and others, did all in there power to make her last hours on earth peaceful. The funeral occurred from the Presbyterian Church, Thursday.

November 23, 1895 Page 1
Burned to Death
Terrible Fate of the infant Child of a Neaseville Family
The home of Mr. and Mrs. John Cole, at Torrent's Mill, was totally destroyed by fire yesterday morning. A one-year-old child was burned to death. Mrs. Cole was visiting a neighbour at the time and had left the baby at home.

November 23, 1895 Page 19
Death of Mary Olive Adelaide Lalonde From Consumption
The angel of death lightly passed his hands over the fair brow of Olive Lalonde Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock and her spirit winged its flight to that bourne form whence no traveller e'er return. Mary Olive Adelaide Lalonde was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seraphim Lalonde, who are among the oldest and most highly respected resident of Sault Ste. Marie. Fourteen months ago Miss Olive was taken ill, but it was only a short time since that her disease, dreaded consumption, manifested itself----------was born here March 26, 1870, and was therefore nearly 26 years of age. At the time of her death, father and mother, her sisters, Mesdames C. H.Pease and Godfrey Deziel, and her brother H. J. and Wm. Lalonde were at her side.
The funeral obseques took place from St. Mary's Church Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock the Fr. D. Donovan officiating------J. E. Lalonde a brother of the deceased living in Ishpeming arrived in the city Tuesday morning to attend the funeral.

November 30, 1895 Page 3
Mr. and Mr. H. H. Taylor were robbed of their three-year-old daughter, Florence, Tuesday, by death from scarlet fever.

November 30, 1895 Page 9
Mr. and Mrs. John McDonald mourn the loss of an eight months-old child, which died Monday of scarlet fever.

November 30, 1895 Page 10
Death of Alex. N. Blair
Alex N. Blair, of Johnstone Creek, died Sunday night of liver trouble. The funeral occurred Tuesday form the Baptist Tabernacle, and the remains were interred in the city cemetery. The deceased was 53 years old and had resided in the Soo for 18 years.

December 7, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Mr. and Mrs. A. F. McGillis were terribly burned last week at Memominee by the explosion of a lamp. Mrs. McGillis' injuries proved fatal.

December 7, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
A stabbing affray occurred at Bessemer last week in which Matt Palandor, a Finlander, was slashed to death. Three suspects were under arrest.

December 7, 1895 Page 5
Death of H. E. Leland's Brother
H. E. Leland, of the Arlington Hotel, received intelligence last week of the death of his brother, W. H. Leland, at San Francisco. His death was the result of a surgical operation. He was a suffer of cancer at the base of the tongue. An Oakland paper of recent date says: W. H. Leland was born in Chester, Maine, August 18, 18(3)7, where he resided on a farm until he was 18, and then went into the mercantile business. In 1867 he went to Minnesota, where he was in business until he came west in 1881. Like all the Leland family he was the builder and proprietor of several hotels in various sections, which bear the family name. He served two terms as county commissioner in Minnesota and held other minor offices.

December 14, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
John A. Anderson, a miner, employed by the Cleveland Cliffs Co. at Ishpeming received fatal injuries at that mine last week.

December 14, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Thomas Dunstan, a miner, employed at the Lake Angeline Mines, Ishpeming, was instantly killed last week by a fall of ground.

December 14, 1895 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Three boys broke through the ice in the river at Menominee Saturday while skating and one of them, Elmer Thorill, was drowned.

December 14, 1895 Page 10
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. William [correction on Dec 21 stating it was George not Wm] Jones departed this life on the night of the 7th inst. and was buried on the 10th instant, in the mission cemetery. Mrs. Jones took typhoid fever about two weeks ago. Being 66 years of age, the strain was more than a week constitution could bear. Mr. & Mrs. Jones came here 11 years ago from Canada. Mrs. Jones was a very industrious woman, a dutiful wife, a kind mother and a very obliging neighbour. Mr. Jones and family have the sympathy of the entire neighbourhood.

December 14, 1895 Page 12
Thomas Orchard died suddenly at his home in McDonald township, near Echo Bay, Ont., Sunday night. Three of his daughters, the Misses Maria L., Emily and Tillie, are well known in the city and have the sympathy of many friends. The first named was the only one able to go to the bereaved home, the others being convalescent from serious illness.

December 28, 1895 Page 11
Dafter (Special Correspondence)
It is our painful duty to chronicle the death of the other twin baby of Jos. Hembroff. It died last Sunday morning and was buried last Tuesday at Donaldson. The parents have the sympathy of the whole community.

December 28, 1895 Page 11
Mrs. James Burke died on Monday night. She leaves several small children in destitute circumstances.

Sat January 4, 1896 Page 1
Met Sudden Death
John Freedom Went Under the Ice at Detour
The Party was Crossing from Drummond to St. Joseph's Island to Spend Christmas.
John Freedom a man who has been in the employ of the Island Cedar Cr., on Drummond Island, was drowned on Tuesday morning of last week, when crossing on the ice with two companions to St. Joseph's Island, where they expected to spend Christmas.
The three men John Freedom, George and Samuel Bolt, left Drummond Island for St. Joseph's Island, where the two Bolt's lived and where Freedom had relatives. They started to cross on the ice, a distance of about 10 miles, and after going some distance found the ice very poor. About noon the ice was so treacherous that they feared to return over the same ice that would scarcely hold them-----
Mr. Freedom was about 21 years of age and his home was in Coleman, Mich.

Sat January 4, 1896 Page 2
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Benjamin Robinson, an old settler of this section, died at his residence near Gatesville, Sunday morning. The deceased by hard work had made himself a comfortable home. The funeral rites were conducted from his late residence on Monday. Elder Clark officiated.

Sat January 11, 1896 Page 2
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Bell left Thursday morning for Mitchell, Ont, on a telegraphic summons which announced the death of Mrs. Bell's mother, Mrs. Copper, who died suddenly there early Thursday morning. Mrs. Copper visited this city last summer and has many acquaintances who will be pained to learn of her death.

Sat January 11, 1896 Page 10
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Blair lost an 18 months' old child by death from fever, Sunday.

Sat January 18, 1896 Page2
The three children of Mr. and Mrs. D. Beacam of Pickford were stricken down with diptheria last week, and one of them died. The other are recovering.

Sat January 18, 1896 Page 9
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Castle L. Newell, one of Detour's oldest and best known business men, died suddenly at his home Saturday morning. The cause of death was hemorrhage of the lungs. The funeral took place Monday at 2 p.m. the service being conducted by Rev. Clark at the Presbyterian church. The deceased was buried with G.A.R. honours. The funeral was largely attended, Mr. C.L. Newell, and family of Detour, deserve through rendered during their bereavement.

Sat January 18, 1896 Page 10
John A. Miller returned yesterday from Detour where he was called by the death of his brother-in-law, C.L. Newell.

Sat January 25, 1896 Page 7
George A. Metzger, father of Victor E. Metzger, died at his home in Lacrosse, Wis., Sunday. Mr. Metzger attended the funeral. The deceased was one of the pioneers in Lacrosse.

Sat January 25, 1896 Page 8
E. J. Penny returned Wednesday from London, Ont, where he was called by the death of his mother last week.

Sat January 25, 1896 Page 10
Drank Cold Water and Died
Moyees Mannedo Bawkawk, an Indian living at the Pe-ah-be-tas-sing settlement on Sugar Island, died last week aged 50 years. His death was caused by drinking a large quantity of cold water, while he was in a heated condition from work. Bawaka was an interesting character. He accidentally shot himself 15 years ago, and a round was afflicted from which but few men could recover, as a charge shot and the ramrod of a gun penetrated his breast. About five months after the accident a piece of the rod, five inches long, was extracted from his back. His recovery was almost miraculous, but he was hale and hearty up to the time of his death.

Sat February 1, 1896 Page 1
Angel of Death
It again blights the Home of Mr. and Mrs,. C. H. Pease
Death again entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Pease yesterday, and took from them their loving and beloved daughter, Mayme A., aged 19 years. Only last June, Archia, another daughter, was taken from them by fever, and since her death, the elder sister who had consumption failed rapidly, until the end came at 7:30 o'clock yesterday morning. For over four months she was confined to her bed, and was a most patient sufferer. She was conscious to the last, and was fully resigned to her fate. Mayme was a member of the high school graduating class and was to have graduated next summer. She had a sweet disposition and her death will be deeply deplored by her wide circle of friends. To the family who are called upon within a year to bear the loss of two of its members, who were just blossoming into sweet womanhood, the blow is most severe. They have the sincere sympathy of the entire community. The funeral will be held next Monday morning;, at the Pease residence on Spruce avenue east, at 9 o'clock. The Catholic cemetery will be the place of interment.

Feb 1 1896 Page 1
Miss Mary Garbe died at Pickford, Tuesday. The funeral occurred there Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

Feb 1, 1896 Page 3
Pine Grove (Special Correspondence)
Thomas Fagan, one of the Groves's oldest and best known citizens, died after a long illness on Monday morning. The funeral took place Tuesday at 2 o'clock p. m. The services being conducted by the Rev. Snellgrove at the Congregational church. The funeral was largely attended. Mrs. Thos. Fagan and family. of the Grove, desire through The News to extend thanks to the many friends for kind services rendered during their late sorrow.


Feb 1, 1896 Page 9
Thomas Moffatt, aged 85 years, died at the county house last Saturday. He had been an inmate of the house for 9 years, and during that period became totally blind. The funeral was held from St. James' church Monday and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Feb 8, 1896 Page 1
Funeral of Mayme A. Pease
The funeral of the late Mayme A. Pease was held from St, Mary's church at 9 o'clock Monday morning. The pallbearers were A. D.Trempe, Gilbert F. Moore, Chas. DeHate, J. Ematinger, James Moran Jr. and L. P. Cook. Every seat in the church was filled and the services were solemn and impressive. The remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.

Feb 8, 1896 Page 7
THOMAS FAGAN
He Died January 27 at the Ripe Old Age of 86
Thomas Fagin was born in Down county, Ireland, where he was married and his oldest child was born,. In 1848 he came to America, settled in Boomingville, Canada, where he, in that new country struggled through life peculiar to the early settlers of that day. There he raised a large family, all of whom still live in. In 1879 he moved to Pine Grove, Chippewa county, Michigan, at which place he resided until his death, which took place Jan. 27, 1896. Father Fagin had been an invalid for the past 15 years and a great sufferer. We have visited his home frequently for the past year. We gave often prayed with the family and always found him very quiet and much pleased to meet us. In him was always found an excellent spirit.-----He leaves a wife and ten children to mourn the loss of a most excellent father and a kind husband, who for 86 years has lived and we trust made the very best of life's battle. The writer preached the funeral sermon to a large audience from the words found in Amos 4:12m after which we marched to the new Pine Grove cemetery, where we laid his body to await the final resurrection at the last day.
A. H. Snelgrove, Congregational Pastor

Feb 8, 1896 Page 8
Miss Bessie Hadrick died at her home in Nagaunee on Friday of last week of consumption. The deceased was a sister of Miss Mary F. Hadrick, who is stenographer in the office of State Game Warden Osborn., but who has for several weeks been attending her sister. The funeral was held in Marquette, Monday,.

Feb 8, 1896 Page 9
Detour (Special Correspondence )
One of Mr. and Mrs. Angus McLeod's twins, a child nearly two years old, was buried on Tuesday.

Feb 15, 1896 Page 1
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Plant mourn the loss of their daughter Barbara, who died Sunday of pleurisy.

Feb 15, 1896 Page 2
Suicide by Poison
Poor Unfortunate Christine Nelson Ends Her Life of Shame
"Death by her own hand" was the verdict of Coroner Bacon after examing into the matter of the death of Christine Nelson-Davis, who expired shortly after 2 o'clock Sunday morning, in a house at the west end. Christine Nelson, as she was more widely known, was one of those "poor unfortunates" who had seen better days, but through a disappointment in love had allowed herself to drift into the depths of shame. Two years or so ago she married a soldier at Fort Brady whose name was Davis. One child was born to them. Davis died last summer, and since his death she allowed herself to sink into even deeper degradation than before. Last Saturday night she attended a bowery dance on Water street, and while there it is said she became somewhat intoxicated. On her way home she bought a quantity of morphine, which she took.--------
She left a note "Well, Scully, dear, this is my last word to you. I will die for you, dear. You have quit me for good. I hope you will better yourself. Good-bye, love."
Just who "Scully, dear" is, is not known. The funeral was held from Vanderhook's undertaking establishment Tuesday aftgernoon. The Rev. Geo. Shorter, of the mission, officiated, and the remains of the unfortunate woman were intered in the city cemetery.

Feb 15, 1896 Page 7
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Gordon died last Saturday of croup. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon.

February 22, 1896 Page 9
A nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Goldman died Tuesday morning of scarlet fever. Three other members of the family are also sick with the same disease. The family is in destitute circumstances.

February 22, 1896 Page 9
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
On Saturday, Feb. 15, occurred the death of Clarence Charles Wilfred, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Losie, aged 11 months and 2 weeks. He had been ailing for some weeks past, yet his sudden death was a surprise to many. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Henry J. Purdue, from the church of the Epiphany on Monday last and the remains were interred in Mission Hill. Mr. and Mrs. Losie have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.

February 22, 1896 Page 10
Mrs. James Scanlon, aged 19 years, died at her home at Bay Mills, Tuesday morning, after a three week's illness. The deceased was the daughter of M. Brazel, of Superior. The husband has the sympathy of many friends in his bereavement.

February 29, 1896 Page 1
Was Seven Years Old.
and Frederick Stradley Gave a Birthday Party Tuesday
Frederic, the bright little son of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Stradley was seven years old. Tuesday.

February 29, 1896 Page 1
Met an Untimely Fate
Death of James Heaney from Exposure and Suffocation
James Heaney, of Pickford, met with sudden death near Donaldson Tuesday, morning.

February 29, 1896 Page 7
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
Hattie the beloved wife of James Scanlon, departed the life on Tuesday morning of last week, after a brief illness.

February 29, 1896 Page 8
Death of Wm. M. Miller
Wm. A. Miller died at Pasadena, Cal., on Friday of last week of quick consumption. The deceased was the son of W. H. Miller of Bay City, and at one time was employed as an accountant for the Ferguson Hardware C. in the city. The funeral was held in Bay City, Tuesday. Mr. Miller was an exemplary young man and had bright prospects for the future.

February 29, 1806 Page 9
Christopher Clarke an Aged Meaford Man Whose Death is widely Mourned.
Last week Mrs. J. W. McTavish and Mrs. N. L. Martin received the sad intelligence of the death of their aged uncle, Christopher Clarke, near Meaford, Ont. Feb. 12, Other relatives of Mr. Clarke are Sarah A. Rae, bookkeeper for Thomas Hopkins, of this city and Wm. Dunseath, of the Canadian, Soo. Concerning the deceased, who was a highly respected and prosperous farmer, the Meaford monitor of Feb 12 says:
Mr. Christopher Clarke, of Eupharsia, died at his residence there on Wednesday morning, after a very distressing and painful illness of some months, at the age of 70 years. About a year ago Mr. Clarke moved with his wife and daughter to Meaford, taking up his residence on Nelson street top of Layton's Hill, having purchased the home there from his son-in-law, Mr. Wm. Dunseath. Mr. Clarke had been in rather poor health since the fall of 1894. The sad death of Mrs. Dunseath, his daughter, was a severe blow from which it appears he never fully recovered. Latterly his mind became unhinged, which was a source of extreme anxiety to his family. Deceased was an honest, kindly citizen and neighbour: social and obliging in disposition. He leaves a wife and six children–four sons and two daughter's–two daughters having predeceased their father. Mr. Clarke came from Ireland to Canada in 1842. He, with the rest of his father's family resided some time in Toronto. They moved to Euphrasia 47 years ago. Two years later Christopher was married to Mary Grier, who survives him and who has been to him a faithful partner in life. Deceased belonged to the English church. He was conservative in politics. He was a successful farmer and leaves his family in good circumstances. The funeral took place today—Friday—to St. James' cemetery, Euphrasia, where the remains will be interred in the family plot.

Saturday, February 29, 1896 Page 10
Mr. and Mrs. J.P.Lauchlan, of Spruce avenue, west, are the parents of a little girl, which arrived Saturday.

February 29, 1896 Page 10
Miss Mary Payment died at her home on Sugar Island Wednesday, of consumption, at the age of 19. Jas. Payment, brother of the deceased, was in the city Wednesday on his way to the Island to attend the obsequies.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 1
Canadian Soo Suicide
Frank W. Brown Shoots Himself Through the Heart.
F. W. Brown, town and township collector of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. committed suicide by shooting himself through the heart, shortly after 6 o'clock Wednesday night, in his office on Queen street. The post- mortem developed the fact that two bullets had pierced the heart, and that one bullet had gone astray, making three shots in all. The body was not found until almost 8 o'clock. It was decided not to hold any inquest and the body was taken to the home of the deceased. Just what caused Mr. Brown to commit the rash act is a mystery to his friends, as he seemed in his usual happy mood all day Wednesday. He was a sober and industrious man, Mr. Brown's honesty was never questioned. He had lived in the Canadian Soo for many years and was 33 years old. He was the son of Customs Inspector Brown and leaves a widow and three children. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 2
Nellie Carr, a notorious character gave birth to a male child at the county jail Wednesday. The baby only lived a few hours.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 3
He Was a Soo Pioneer
John B. Parault, Who Died At Dayton, Minn., Feb 22.
John B. Parault, of Dayton, Minn., died Feb 22 at the age of about 90. Mr. Parault was a pioneer of the Soo. He located here in 1848 and remained until 1856, when he moved to Dayton. Mr. Parault was an uncle of the Bernier brothers of this city. He was employed as a carpenter on the old state lock when it was being built. One of his sons is A. F. Parault, professor in Stanford university of California, who lived in the Soo for nearly a year in 1887. Last year the deceased celebrated the 50th anniversary of his marriage. He was one of those who "stayed home" when the vote on the location of the capital of Minnesota was taken. Mr. Parault leaves a wife, three sons, two daughters, 10 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
At Escanaba last week Alex Morrison, working on a ore dock, fell 52 feet and was killed.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 4
At Ironwood last week Mike Savant was convicted of manslaughter for killing Matt Bellanden Nov. 25, 1895.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 4
A carriage containing Alderman Louis Johnson, of Menominee, Mich., his 12 year-old son and five friends of Mr. Johnson, was struck by a Chicago & Northwestern train Sunday at a grade crossing. The boy was killed and the five men were seriously injured.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 7
Dotour (Special Correspondence)
It was with sadness that the news of James Heaney's death was received last Wednesday. Mr. Heaney made Detour his home before he moved to Pickford.

Saturday, March 7, 1896 Page 9
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. McDonald mourn the loss of their infant child, which died Monday and was buried on the following day.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 2
A number of people from this side attended the funeral of Mrs. Alex. McKinnon at the Canadian Soo, Friday of last week.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 2
Edward Myers, formerly a passenger conductor on the Soo Line, with headquarters here, was accidently killed at Hudson, Wis. recently.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 3
The-eighth-months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Godfrey, died last Saturday and was buried Wednesday.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 3
Dennis Healey died of pneumonia at Campbell's boarding house Sunday. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church, Tuesday.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 3
Mrs. R. B. Holmes on Wednesday received a telegram announcing the sudden death of her sister, Mrs. J. F. Smith of Tara, Ont.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 7
Superior (Special Correspondence)
Freddie, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen, of Superior, died after a few days illness. The funeral service were held in the home, conducted by the Rev. H. Brotherton, assisted by the Rev. J.McGregor, the former pastor. Freddie was a bright little boy 18 months old. One more little child has gone before to be with Jesus: broken upon earth: one more link in heaven.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 8
Fort Brady Budget
An infant child of Private Bradford, of Company B, and wife, died at their home, on Spruce Street last Tuesday. The funeral was held from the home on Wednesday. Friends extend their sympathies to the bereaved parents.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 8
Died from Effects of Burns
Dora, the little daughter of James Gordon, died yesterday from being badly burned Wednesday at the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Fagan, seven miles out on the Bay Mills road. Her clothes caught fire from the stove. In trying to save the child Mrs. Fagan was also severely burned.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 8
Mrs. Betsey Seaman
Death of an Aged and Beloved Resident of Drummond Island.
At the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. E. Fairchild, on Monday, March 2, 1896, at 3 o'Clock p.m. Betsey Seaman departed this life at the age of 15 years. "Grandma Seaman" as she was familiarly called, has crossed the dark river from which there is no return---- We say Grandma Seaman, because she was called grandma by grandchildren, great grandchildren and friends and seemed like one to all children. The funeral was held at the M. E. church on Thursday, March 5, and was conducted by Revs. G.D. Strickland, of Drummond and T. R. Easterday, of the Soo. The remains were followed to the grave by many friends and relatives. Even the Indians came with tears to take a last look at her whom they had known and loved so long. She was laid to rest by the side of her husband Murray Seaman, in a lovely spot selected by him before his death, 33 years ago. Grandma Seaman was not a christian in the later years of her life, but she did not die in great agony of mind, being a great lover of life and it's joys, she had a dread of entering the dark unknown. Even when she was a christian and church member she did not believe in the endless punishment taught, but thought there would be a heaven for all, so why should she fear. She leaves 10 children to mourn her loss-five sons and five daughters. All were present at the funeral except two daughters, Mrs. Ludow Hill, of Wonecoe, Wis., and Mrs. J. D. Hill, of Chicago.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 8
Death of Will McElroy
Will McElroy, who was chief clerk of the Park Hotel, here last summer, died at the home of his parents, in St. Ignace on Friday of last week. The cause of death was consumption. Mr. McElroy made many friends during his residence in the Soo who will regret to learn of his untimely death. He was 23 years of age.

Saturday, March 14, 1896 Page 10
Post Mortem Held on the Body of F. W. Brown
Frank W. Brown, who was found dead in his office in the Canadian Soo, on Wednesday night of last week, may have been murdered. ----------------

Thursday, March 21, 1896 Part 2 Page 12
Stalwart (Special Correspondence)
Again has the hand of death withdrawn from amongst us one of our esteemed and beloved neighbours, Mrs. Wm. Clark, who departed this life on Thursday morning of last week, having been ill only about 30 hours. She leaves a husband and five children. The case is a sad one because Mr. Clark has been unable to work for two months or more and it is feared that he will soon follow his beloved wife whose untimely death, is a great blow to him.

Thursday, March 21, 1896 Part 2 Page 12
Mrs. Kelly, who has been living with her son, Jos. Kelly, of Fairview, died on Friday morning. She was buried in the cemetery near Pickford. Rev. Gadingham, of that place, preached the funeral sermon.

Thursday, March 28, 1896 Page 2
John McArthur, an old and respected resident, died at his home on Ashmun street Wednesday morning.

Thursday, March 28, 1896 Page 2
Angel of Death's Third Visit
For the third time within a year, the angel of death has entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Peace. On Monday afternoon, Olive, their bright 7 year-old daughter, died of measles, after a short illness. The funeral took place Wednesday morning from St. Mary's Church. The Rev. fr. Connolly officiated. The pall bearers were: Harry and Guy Kemp, Ed Lacy and Henry Gowan. The bereaved family has the sympathy of the entire community in its affliction.

Thursday, March 28, 1896 Page 5
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
Mary Ann, wife of the late Sergeant Kelley, of Goderich, Ont, died at Fairview, Pickford township, March 12, at the ripe old age of 88 years and five months. Mrs. Kelly, who survived her husband six years and four months, leaves one daughter and two sons to mourn her loss, Mrs. Robert Campbell, Sr., of Pickford township, Michigan; Jacob Miles Kelley of Manitoba, Northwest territory, and Joseph W. Kelley of Pickford, Michigan. The deceased was born in Dublin, Ireland and spent her early life in the store of her father, who was a merchant in her native town. She was there wedded to Sergeant Kelley, of the Third Light Dragoons and emigrated to Canada about 43 years ago. She spent the last six years of her long life in Chippewa County and died at the residence of her youngest son, Joseph W. Kelley. A large circle of acquaintances mourn her loss.

Thursday, March 28, 1896 Page 6
Wolverine Waifs
Mrs. Frank Bray was burned to death in her home, which was destroyed by fire, at Baraga, last week.

Saturday April 4, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Daniel McDonald, brother of Dr. A. McDonald died near Toronto last week. Dr. McDonald was on his way to see his brother when death occurred.

Saturday April 4, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Neeseville, (Special Correspondence)
Robert Grey, of Sterlingville, lost a little child on Saturday by diptheria.

Saturday April 4, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Called to His Reward
Death of Capt. Thos. M. Ermatinger, a Soo Pioneer
Capt. Thos. M. Ermatinger died at this home at 66 Carrie Street shortly after 9 o'clock Sunday morning. Another familiar figure has disappeared. Another home has been saddened by the death of it's head, and the community has lost one of its oldest residents and an upright man. Year after year, one or more of the pioneers of Sault Ste. Marie pass from this live to that dark bourne from whence no travelor ever returns ---- Capt. Thomas McKee Ermatinger was born in this city January 19th 1831, and was therefore 65 years of age----- In 1853 he married Miss Mary Cook ------ An aged wife and four sons, Lawrence, William, Henry and Joseph survive him.
The funeral was held Tuesday morning from St. Mary's Church.----- The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday April 4, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Are Doubly Bereaved:
Angel of Death Blight the Home of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Haller
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Haller were doubly bereaved this week. First their only daughter, Lucille, 4 years old, was carried away Tuesday afternoon by the angel of death. On Wednesday evening the unwelcome visitor appeared again and took their baby boy Gerald. Measles of a virulent type was the cause of the death. The little ones were sick only a short time. The funeral took place at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon. The remains of the two little ones, in separate caskets, were conveyed to the cemetery in the same hearse. Mr. and Mrs. Haller have the sympathy of the community in their double bereavement.

Saturday, April 4, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Detour(Special Correspondence)
On Monday, the 22nd inst. W. D. Newll, an uncle of Miner Newell, died at his home in Flushing, Mich., of cancer. From 1870 to 1882 Mr. Newell lived here and on the island. Deceased leaves a wife and five children.

Saturday April 11 1896 Part 1 Page 6
Death of James Taylor
Another Old Resident of the Soo Goes th His Reward
James Taylor died at his home on Cedar Street on Easter morning, in his eightieth year. The deceased was born in Dublin, Ireland and was the son of Richard Taylor, who, with his wife, died while Mr. Taylor was a youth. Their orphaned children were cared for and educated by their uncle and guardian, Frank Taylor, who lived in Liverpool, England. There were seven of them, four brothers, Edmund, Robert, William and James, and three sisters, Anna, Gertrude and Mary. James was educated in the city of his birth, graduating from Trinity college at the early age of twenty. Shortly after this he came to America and began a successful seafaring life, rising quickly to the command of a merchant ship. He sailed for 20 years, making voyages to most every southern port of the old and new world. At the same time his older brother Edmund was master of an East India merchant ship. When the roving disposition was satisfied he came to this village and having accumulated some money he engaged in business, building what was for many years the best store on Water street. About three years thereafter he quietly settled down on a farm by the riverside not far from Garden River, but on the Amercian side. Here he married a wife and reared a family and lived happily for several years.----
There was born to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor five children, three daughters all of whom are living, and two sons, who did not survive their infancy. One daughter is married and there are five grandchildren living and one with the angels. -----
The funeral was conducted at the Presbyterian Church by the pastor Rev. C. P. Bates at 2p.m. Tuesday----- Many friends followed the remains to Riverside. —

Saturday April 11 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Demise of Mrs. James Goulding
Mrs. James Goulding, aged 52, died Wednesday afternoon, at her home on Brown street, after a brief illness. Her sudden death is a sad blow to the sorrowing members of the family, who are: Mr. Goulding, two daughters, Mrs. Gilbert Armstrong and Mrs. F. Jones, and a son Wm. Goulding. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from St. James' Church. The Rev. C. M. Westlake officiated.

Saturday April 18 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Drowned in the Canal
Victor Hendrickson, a Stranger, Met Death There Yesterday
Another case of drowning occurred at the upper entrance to the new lock, at the canal, shortly after 1 o'clock yesterday morning. David Thomas and John Brown who were in that vicinity when the accident occurred heard the man's cries for help, but were unable to reach him in time----- he was identified as a Finn named Victor Hendrickson, aged 34 years.—Jacob Johnson, one of the dean mans friends called at Vanderhook's shortly after the arrival of the body, and said he wanted to get $2.50 which he had loaned the dead man Thursday night. He was told by one of the attendants that death released a man from all monetary obligations, and he left.

Saturday April 25 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Death of Mrs. D. Ellis
A Malignant Cancer Cuts Short the Life of an Old Resident
Mrs. David Ellis died at her home on Ferris street at 3 o'Clock yesterday afternoon after an illness of 8 months. The cause of death was a cancer. She had been a patient sufferer from the ailment and was fully resigned to her fate. Mrs. Ellis was born in the county of Peel, Ontario, on the 12th of April, 1841, and came to this city 23 years ago. Besides her husband, who is a faithful member of the police force and truant officer, a daughter Mrs. Otto Supe, and a son, Albert survive her. Mrs. Ellis is a member of the Methodist Church, ---- The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 o'clock from the house and at 2:30 o'clock from the Central M. E. church. The place of interment will be at Riverside. A brother James Wiggins is expected to arrive from Inglewood today to attend the obseques.

Saturday April 25 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Robert C., the two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Martin died last Sunday of scarlet fever and was buried in the city cemetery on Sunday.

Saturday April 25 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Rosedale
It is our solemn duty this week to chronicle the death of Frank Roberts, who died at St. Thomas, Mo. on Monday last, where he was undergoing treatment for lung trouble. His remains were brought home for burial. The funeral took place Friday at 11 o'clock from Mount Zion church and was largely attended. Mr. Roberts was highly esteemed young man and a former school teacher of Chippewa county.----

Saturday April 25 1896 Part 2 Page 12
Wm. Chandler returned Sunday from Miami, Ind. where he attended the funeral obsequies of Wesley Haynes, step- father of Mrs. Chandler and H. M. Oren. The demise of Mr. Haynes is deeply regretted by numerous Soo friends.

Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Death of John Pringle's Father
The Teeswater News and Bruce Recorder, of April 2, contained an extended notice of the death of William Pringle, father of John Pringle a prosperous farmer of this county, which occurred March 25. Mr. Pringle died at his home in Culross, county of Bruce, Ont., and was one of the most highly respected residents of that place, and one of the oldest magistrates in the county.

Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Died at a Ripe Old Age
The Rev. John Hartford, known to everybody as "John the Baptist", died Wednesday, at the residence of his son, Wm. Hartford, at the ripe old age of 85. The funeral took place at the Central M. E. church on Thursday and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Funeral of Mrs. D. Ellis
The funeral of the late Mrs. David Ellis occurred from the Central M. E. Church Sunday afternoon. A large number of friends were present, and the floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. The Rev. C. M. Thompson officiated. The remains were interred at Riverside.

Saturday May 9, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverines Waifs
George Hoffman and August Erickson, employed at the Pabst mine, Ironwood, were blown to pieces by a premature blast of grand powder, Tuesday of last week.


Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Death of John Pringle's Father
The Teeswater News and Bruce Recorder, of April 2, contained an extended notice of the death of William Pringle, father of John Pringle a prosperous farmer of this county, which occurred March 25. Mr. Pringle died at his home in Culross, county of Bruce, Ont., and was one of the most highly respected residents of that place, and one of the oldest magistrates in the county.

Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Died at a Ripe Old Age
The Rev. John Hartford, known to everybody as "John the Baptist", died Wednesday, at the residence of his son, Wm. Hartford, at the ripe old age of 85. The funeral took place at the Central M. E. church on Thursday and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday May 2, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Funeral of Mrs. D. Ellis
The funeral of the late Mrs. David Ellis occurred from the Central M. E. Church Sunday afternoon. A large number of friends were present, and the floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. The Rev. C. M. Thompson officiated. The remains were interred at Riverside.

Saturday May 9, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverines Waifs
George Hoffman and August Erickson, employed at the Pabst mine, Ironwood, were blown to pieces by a premature blast of grand powder, Tuesday of last week.

Saturday May 9, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverines Waifs
Capt. Thos. Ball, who was serving his second term as sheriff of Iron county, died of heart trouble at Crystal Falls on Tuesday of last week. Mr. Ball had been a resident of the Upper Peninsula for the past twenty-six years and had long been a prominent figure in mining and republican political circles of that section.----

Saturday May 9, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Full of Years
Death of Mrs. Isabel Burchell Wednesday Afternoon
Mrs. Isabel Burchell, aged 84 years, died at the home of her son, Abram Burchell, at 3 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, after an illness of only a few days. For many years she resided with her son, and had been a resident of this county for 20 years. The deceased was an active member of the M. E. church and was a sincere Christian. Four daughters and three sons survive her. They are Mesdames J. Agar, Hay Lake, Fannie McAleer, Thessalon: Wm. Gilray, of this city; Maggie Bowerman, Meaford; Messers Robt. H. of Rosedale, Abram of this city, and Jospeh Burchell of Virginia, Minn. Mrs. Bowereman and Joseph Burchell arrived in the city yesterday to attend the funeral, which was held from the Central M. E. church yesterday afternoon

Saturday May 16, 1896 Part 1 Page 6
Canadian Sault
Alex. Boyd, one of the carpenters employed by the Pulp and Paper Co., was accidentally drowned on Saturday afternoon last by falling into the river from the tug Jessie, upon which he was working at the time. ------ The deceased was a nephew of W. Boyd, of the Queen's hotel.
The funeral to the late Alex Boyd took place Tuesday morning and was largely attended. The deceased was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him.

Saturday May 16, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Neaseville (Special Correspondence)
It is the sad duty of your correspondent to chronicle the death of Miss Elsie Peterman, the 14-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Peterman, of Neaseville. She had been slightly indisposed for the last week, but her illness was not considered serious until Saturday evening, when medical aid was called in. Death put an end to her sufferings at 5 o'clock Sunday morning. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the whole community in their trouble.

Saturday May 16, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Soo friends of C. W. Caley, of Bay Mills, were pained this week, to learn of the death of John Caley, his father, at Bay Mills, Tuesday morning. Mr. Caley was ?1 years of age. The funeral occurred yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Saturday May 16, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Peter Megnonup, an Indian of Bark River, near Escanaba, was shot and killed by Charles Anderson, last week.

Saturday May 16, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Sad Death of Mrs. Pickett
Victim of Saturday Morning's Fire Expired That Noon
Mrs. Arthur Pickett, who was burned so badly in last Saturday's fire, died at the residence of Geo. Comb at noon the same day. She did not regain consciousness after being taken to Mr. Comb's house. The unfortunate woman was literally cooked and suffered untold agony. Mrs. Pickett was preparing her breakfast over a small oil stove which was on a table, when she was undoubtedly seized by epileptic convulsions, to which she was subject. In falling to the floor the presumption is that she grasped the stove, the oil flowing out when it struck the floor and started the fire. The death of Mrs. Pickett was terrible and deplorable. Her husband, who was 16 miles out in the country, arrived home a few minutes after her death. The deceased was 33 years old and was a lady of refinement and education. She was a member of St. James church, from which place the funeral was held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon.

Saturday May 30, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
A young Finn girl named Sophia Dahl was killed in Gladstone on Sunday while going through under a train of cars. She has a sister living on Ridge street west.

Saturday May 30, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Vear Irene, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Halloche, of Arlington street, died Thursday morning.

Saturday June 6, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Demise of Mrs. Lourena Martin
N. L. Martin of The News, this week received the sad announcement of the death on Monday of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Lourena Martin, wife of John W. Martin, at her home in Roodhouse, Ill., after a lingering illness. Mrs. Martin was a noble Christian woman and died at the age of 53 years, after a useful well spent life.

Saturday June 6, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Mrs. Jos. Taylor jr died Monday at Escanaba. Her husband, who is first mate on the City of Grand Rapids was summoned to her death bed from Marquette.

Saturday June 6, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cappucilli died Tuesday of inflammation. The funeral was held Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church.

Saturday June 13, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Mrs. Samuel Stafford died early Wednesday morning, from a cancer. She had been an invalid for years. The funeral took place from the Catholic church yesterday morning.

Saturday June 13, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Miss Eliza McNamara, of Menominee, committed suicide last week by taking strychine.

Saturday June 13, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Jeanne, infant son, of Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Jones died Tuesday of scarlet fever. The funeral occurred at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

Saturday June 13, 1896 Part 1 Page 6
Died While Eating
Frank Ernest, aged 31 years, mate of the schooner Nelson, died suddenly at 6:10 o'clock Thursday evening, while his boat was near Detour. He was eating supper at the time. The body was put ashore at Detour and coroner House found that death was the result of appoplexy. The deceased was a member of Shebogan, Wis. lodge I.O.O.F. The remains were sent to Detroit for interment, where a wife survives him.

Saturday June 20, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Across The Dark River.
Death of Mrs. Chas. J. Linke Last Monday Evening
Mrs. Chas. J. Linke was a most estimable woman. Her death is a sudden blow to her husband and children–Joseph A. Linke, Charles Linke, Mrs. Adam Haller, Mrs. Gus Supe, and two unmarried daughters. Funeral services were held at St. Mary's church, Wednesday, the Rev. Fr. Torangeau officiating. At the earnest request of Mrs. Linke, her remains were conveyed in a sail boat to Garden River, Ont., and laid to rest beside those of her parents, brothers and sisters. The following acted as pallbearers. At the Soo- Frank Lessard, Francis Sobraro, Wm. Shaw, John Gurnoe, S. LaLonde, Antoine Fisher: at Garden River- Frank Clark, John Pine, Peter Ashwaigwan, J. Carodass, John Cadette, J. R. Tegash.

Saturday June 20, 1896 Part 2 Page 10
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
A report has reached here that Mr. Thomas Jones an aged and respected resident of St. Joseph's Island, near Tenby Bay, committed suicide by taking poison on the 11th inst. No cause is assigned for the act, but it is believed that poverty is the reason. He leaves an aged widow and a daughter, Mrs. Benjamin Fuller. Mr. Jones was quite a character. He came directly to St. Joe from England many years ago, having been a ship carpenter and at one time a building inspector for the Cunard line. He was nearly 80 years old.

Saturday June 27, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Gabriel Mattson, a Swede, was run over Monday morning at Escanaba, by a train on the Chicago & Northwestern railroads and his head cut off.

Saturday June 27, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Joseph Bowman, of Cleveland, mate on the tur C. D. Benham, died suddenly in his bed at 3 o'clock yesterday morning, of heart disease, aged 52 years. The body was removed to Vanderhook's and will be sent to Cleveland tomorrow.

Saturday June 27, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Death of J. W. Crippen
Jared W. Crippen died at the residence of his daughter in Duluth last Saturday, aged 75 years. He left the Soo about a month ago, and for the past two years had been employed as a clerk in the Perry and Arlington hotels. Mr. Crippen was one of the oldest railroad conductors in the northwest and was employed for years on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul road. The remains were taken to Milwaukee where the funeral was held Tuesday under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity, of which he was a member in high standing.

Saturday July 4, 1896 Page 1 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
On Monday last W. J. Mitchell, bookkeeper for the Detour Lumber and Cedar Co. was taken suddenly ill with neuralgia in the head and died at 8 o'clock the same evening. The funeral was held from the M. E. church at 3 p.m. Wednesday.

Saturday July 4, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Miss Lottie Stevenson died at Lime Island June 20 after a long illness. The funeral took place from her father's residence at Raber. Robert Crichton conducted the services and Thos. Mitchell, Geo. A. Watson, Henry P. Hossack and Anthony Burke acted as pallbearers.

Saturday July 11, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Death of Mrs. A. Guililard
Mrs. Antony Guililiard, wife of Soo Township's treasurer, died at her home on Ferris road, at 11 o'clock last Saturday morning of puerperal [of or to do with childbirth] convulsions, aged 35 years. The deceased was highly respected and loved by everyone who knew her. She was a Christian and will be greatly missed. Besides her husband, a son 9 years old survives her. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Monday morning and in the funeral procession were 150 conveyances.

Saturday July 11, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Stalwart (Special Correspondence)
We feel sad to have to chronicle the death of Andrew Sims, sr. who die July 3. He was one of the oldest settlers in Stalwart. Mr. Sims was a good christian man and will be greatly missed here. Rev. Walker, of Pickford preached the funeral sermon. There were two hundred people at the funeral to pay their respects to the friend that had gone, and to comfort those who were called upon to mourn. Ed. Sims was in Stalwart from Milwaukie to attend the burial of his father. He returned home on Monday.

Saturday July 11, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Miss Lena George, a sister of Mrs. McComb, of this city died at her home at Port Elgin, Ont., July 4. Owing to the illness of Mrs. Comb, she was unable to attend the funeral. Her mother, Mrs. Wm. George, will arrive here next week.

Saturday July 11, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Mrs. T. E. Goodbourne was called to Port Sanilac, Mich., last week by the death of her father, Dr. G. W. Hawke.

Saturday July 11, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Welmer, died suddenly Monday morning. The sorrowing parents, have the sympathy of many friends.

Saturday July 18, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
On Sunday the body of John McMurray, of St. Joseph's Island, was found in the water at the government dock in the Canadian Soo. It is supposed Mr. McMurray, who had been missing since the night of July 3, accidently fell off the dock and was drowned.

Saturday July 18, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Thomas Arthur, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brown died Tuesday morning of scarlet fever.

Saturday July 18, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Fort Brady Budget
An infant daughter of Corporal and Mrs. O'Brien, of F. Company was buried a few days since. Friends extend their sympathy to the bereaved parents.

Saturday July 18, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Mrs. Jessie Sutherland dropped dead of heart disease at her home, at 11 o'clock Monday morning.

Saturday July 25, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Died Among Strangers
A sad death occurred in the waiting room at the Union depot Sunday night, when Florence Sullivan, aged 18 months, died of pneumonia. The mother was on her way from New York to Butte, Montana with three children. Mrs. Sullivan said the child was ill when they left New York, and grew steadily worse. The mother had no money and the body was turned over to the superintendent of the poor, who had it buried in Riverside cemetery. Mrs. Sullivan was grief stricken, and when told that the corpse could not be taken with her she almost went frantic.

Saturday July 25, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Wolverine Waifs
John Barnett, of Negaunee, and Henry Belloumeur, of Manistique, were burned so badly by molten slag at the Gladstone furnace last week that they died shortly afterward.

Saturday August 1, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Alice McDonald, age 5 years, died of diphtheria Tuesday. This is the second death in Mr. McDonald's family, from diptheria, inside of a week. He has the sympathy of the whole town in his sudden bereavements.

Saturday August 1, 1896 Part 1 Page 9
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
The death of another of Norman McDonald's little daughter's with diphtheria at Detour is reported.

Saturday August 8, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Olive, the 12-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Osborn, of the Mackinac road, died Sunday morning at 7 o'clock, of appendicitus, after an illness of two weeks. The funeral took place at 2 o'clock at the Pine Grove Congregational church. The Rev. T. F. Easterday officiated and the interment was made in the Pine Grove cemetery. The deceased was a bright young lady and the oldest child.

Saturday August 8, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
The boy twin born at the Mission Home on Geo. Washington's birthday died Thursday of cholera infantum and will be buried this afternoon. The child had been adopted by Miss Nason.

Saturday August 8, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Death of Chas. H. Crane
Injuries Sustained by a Fall Last Week Prove Fatal
Chas. H. Crane died at his rooms in the Newton block at 6:45 o'clock yesterday morning, of internal injuries which he received by falling from the arch at the corner of Ashmun street and Spruce avenue, shortly after 6 o'clock on Thursday evening of last week, --------- Chas. H. Crane was born at Scotland, Ont., 53 years ago. He was unmarried and came to the Soo 12 years ago. -------- His remains will be taken to Leamington, Ont. Three sisters survive the deceased, two of whom, Mesdames McCuban and Marten, of Leamington, were at his death-bed. His uncle H. S. Crane, was also present during hs illness and death.

Saturday August 8, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
An infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Martin died Thursday morning of inflammation of the bowels, and was buried yesterday in the city cemetery.

Saturday August 15, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Drowned At Agawa
Sad Fate of E. S. Enoch, a Bright Young Man of Bay Mills
A sad case of drowning occurred at the Agawa river, on the north shore of Lake Superior at 5:25 o'clock Sunday afternoon last, when Edwin S. Enoch, of Bay Mills, lost his life. ------------ The body was recovered Tuesday and brought here on the Telegram Thursday and taken to Blue's undertaking parlors.------ He had been employed as bill clerk in the office of the Hall & Munson Co., at Bay Mills, since October last.

Saturday August 15, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
John Vallie Drowned
John Vallie, second engineer on Hickler's dredge No. 7, met death by drowning at the Emcampment shortly after 8 o'clock Sunday night. The body was recovered Monday morning by a diver, and brought to the undertaking parlou of M. Blue, in this city. Mr. Vallie was 41 years of age and had resided in the Soo for 10 years. The funeral was held from St. James church Wednesday afternoon and the remains wee interred in Riverside cemetery. A widow and adopted son survive him.

Saturday August 15, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Thankful to Friends
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Quack desire to express through The News their heartfelt appreciation to the kind friends and neighbours who did everything possible for them during the illness and death of their son, Richard, who died at Pine Grove, this county, July 25, of consumption, aged 21.

Saturday August 15, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Mrs. John Norton sr. received telegraphic intelligence last night of the death of her brother, Thos. Fisher, at Calumet by sunstroke.

Saturday August 22, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wilding died on Wednesday after a lingering illness, and was buried from St. James church yesterday.

Saturday August 29, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Miss Lea Roberts, whose home was near Toledo, O., died yesterday morning at the residence of Mrs. A. M. Reynolds, on Court street. Miss Roberts who has been spending the summer in the city for her health was accompanied by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Roberts, who were with her at the time of her death. The stricken parents left yesterday with the remains for their home in Ohio.

Saturday August 29, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Mrs. H. G. Waite, formerly a resident of the Soo, died at her home in Grand Rapids, August 15th.

Saturday September 5, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Killed By Dynamite
Sad Death of George Jones at Thurlow, Pa. Monday
A charge of dynamite exploded prematurely on one of Dunbar & Sullivan's dredges at Thurlow, Pa. instantly killing George Jones, and seriously injuring Sidney Neff, who however will recover.------
Mrs. Jones lives in this city and received intelligence of her bereavement Tuesday.
The deceased was considered an expert in preparing dynamite charges, and it had been his occupation for years with Dunbar & Sullivan. -----

Saturday September 5, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Death of John Cotta
Another Pioneer of the Soo Joins the Silent Majority
Jno. Cotta, one of the Soo's pioneers, died Sunday afternoon at his home on Ashmun street, of consumption, after an illness of four months. The deceased was 64 years of age and was well and favourably known. In his youth he entered the employ of A. Gayer and was with him for 33 years. Mr. Cotta was last engaged as janitor of the city jail, which position he occupied for 3 years. A wife and three grown children survive him. The funeral was held Thursday morning from St. Mary's church.

Saturday September 5, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
An Old Resident Gone
Death of Simon P. Gurnoe, For 71 Years a Resident of the Soo.
Simon P. Gurnoe died Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Shaw, Ridge street west. Since early spring he had been sick, and last Saturday was stricken with inflammation of the bowels, which caused his death at the hour above stated. Simon P. Gurnoe was born in this city Sept. 15th, 1825 and would have been 71 years old this month. He had never been any farther away from the county then the Canadian Soo, and was one of its oldest residents. He was single and was of a quiet and retiring disposition. His life was an exemplary one. Two sisters, Mesdames Wm. Shaw and Wm. Miron, and one brother, John Gurnoe, survive him. The funeral was held yesterday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary's church.

Saturday September 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Ethel, the 2-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Erastus Fleming, died at Pickford last Saturday of inflamation

Saturday September 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 6
Stalwart (Special Correspondence)
It is our sad duty to chronicle the death of Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Watchorn, who was buried Wednesday Sept. 2 at Stalwart cemetery. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Magahay. The deceased was aged 13 years, 10 months and 7 days and during her short sojourn in this world made many friends and few enemies.

Saturday September 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Geo. M. Danskon, brother of Mrs. Dr. H. R. Floyd, died early in the week in California. Mrs. Floyd left to attend the funeral in Morengo, La.

Saturday September 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hall died on Wednesday and was buried Thursday. A second son is also quite sick.

Saturday September 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Capt. Hoyt is Dead
Capt. Geo. S. Hoyt died Thursday morning at Helena, Mont.. He ownd the Democrat block in this city. He also had charge of the construction of near Fort Brady.

Saturday September 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. McCarron died Saturday.

Saturday September 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Mary Dwyer
James Strachan received word yesterday of the death of Mrs. Strachan's mother, Mrs. Mary Dwyer, at Ypsilanti, Thursday. Mrs. Strachan was at her mother's bedside when she passed away.

Saturday October 3, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
James Harris, a miner, was killed at the Millie mine, Iron Mountain, last week, by the premature discharge of a blast.

Saturday October 10, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Suicide by Drowning
Track Biron of the Canadian Soo, committed suicide Saturday night by jumping into the canal near Magazine street. The body was recovered by Sam Stafford Sunday morning. An inquest was held and the jury decided that it was a case of suicide.

Saturday October 10, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Henry Riske was burned to death in a fire at the Allonez mine, near Hancock, last week.

Saturday October 10, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Geo. C. Shelden of Houghton, who was shot Thursday of last week, by Felix Delmonte, a discharged coachman, died the following day. A few days before the tragedy Mr. Sheldon and Delmonte was discharged and afterwards arrested. Pending a trial, the enemies met and Mr. Sheldon was killed in the encounter. Delmonte immediately afterwards jumped off a bridge and was drowned. The funeral of Mr. Sheldon was largely attended. The deceased was a veteran of the civil war, and a brother of Hon. Carlos D. Sheldon, republican candidate for congress. -----

Saturday October 10, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Death of Mrs. Ellen McCracken
Mrs. Ellen McCracken died at the residence of her son, William McCrachen on Ashmun street, last Friday, at the ripe age of 76 years. She was born in England, and emigrated to Canada with her parents when six years old. She came to this city 11 years ago, and most of the time since has made her home with her son, at whose home she died. -----She was the mother of a large family, a woman of good disposition and a noble character. The funeral occurred Sunday afternoon, and was conducted, at the Central M. E. church.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Robert Lowe
Mrs. Robert Lowe died at her home on Maple street last night at 8 o'clock. She had been ill for several weeks. Mrs. Lowe came to the Soo 17 years ago with her husband, who still survives her. Mrs. Lowe was a Christian, had a kindly disposition which endeared her to all who knew her, and her death is deeply deplored by many. Besides her husband, she leaves a family of nine children, the youngest 27 years old, all of whom reside here except two. Deceased was 67 years of age. The funeral will occur from St. Mary's church 9 o'clock Monday morning.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
He Dropped Dead
F. O. Squire suddenly, expired at the Alpena House shortly after 6 o'clock last night. The cause of death was appoplexy. Squire was 40 years old and was a draughtsman by trade. He had lived in the city for two years and came originally from Alpena. On the body was found a letter from Mrs. Annie Frechette, of Munising, $8.83 in cash, and other small articles. The body is now at Blue's undertaking establishment. Coroner Bacon viewed the body, and decided that he came to his death from natural causes.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Mrs. Wm. Ames, who resided on the Seymour road, near the Knox, schoolhouse, died Tuesday night of inflammation of the lungs, after a brief illness.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Geo.Irwin, who was so badly gored by a bull about two weeks ago, died Tuesday night as the result of his injuries. Mr. Irwin had been a respected resident of Chippewa county for many years.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Maud the 13-year old daughter of the late Robert Lindsay, died at the residence of her brother Robert Lindsay on Augusta street last Sunday morning, after a brief illness of scarlet fever. The interment took place Sunday afternoon at the city cemetery.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Wm. Ireland, an Old and Respected Resident, Wednesday.
On Wednesday afternoon Wm. Ireland, proprietor of the Marquette House, passed across the Dark River, after an illness of only a week with typhoid pneumonia. The funeral took place from the Congregational church yesterday afternoon and the remains were interred in the Riverside cemetery. Mr. Ireland was a native of Cornwall, Eng. and was 48 years old. He had resided in the Soo for 17 years, and had acquired a large amount of property. A wife and four daughters are left to mourn his loss. Mr. Ireland's death is deeply mourned by not only his family, but by a large circle of friends.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Demise of J. D. LeBlanc
J. D. LeBlanc, proprietor of the Lake View House, died at 9 o'clock, Monday night, at the age of 48, after a long illness. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church Thursday morning. The C. M. B. A. of which society Mr. LeBlanc was a member, attended in a body. A large cortege followed the remains to the Catholic cemetery for interment. The death of Mr. LeBlanc is a great shock to his sorrowing wife, and his daughter Mrs. James Simoneau and his large circle of friends. Mr. Leblanc had resided in the Soo for about 8 years and was well known and popular.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Canadian Sault
The cashier of the bank at Sherbourne, Minnesota, who was shot in cold blood the other day by two robbers who escaped on bicycles, was a son of Alex. Thorburn, who lives on his farm near Gore Bay, on the Manitoulin Island, where other relatives reside. Deceased went to Minnesota three years ago, accompanied by his sister and being a well-educated, upright and enterprising young man, soon found himself rising in the esteem and confidence of his employers. Before leaving Canada he graduated from the Collegiate Institute at Owen Sound, and spent a year or two teaching school at Thessalon. He was about 28 years of age when he lost his life at the hands of the bank robbers. A later dispatch states that both of the robbers were afterwards captured and one shot.

Saturday October 17, 1896 Part 2 Page 9
Canadian Sault
The mother of Joachim and Charles Biron is dead. She was 105 years of age and was born at Lonque Pointe near Duluth, in Lake Superior in 1791. For the last ten years deceased, who had lived alternately with her two sons, has been totally blind. Her funeral took place on Sunday last to the Roman Catholic cemetery, and was very largely attended.

Saturday October 24, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Willie Butterfield, aged 8 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alva Butterfield, died at his home in Detour yesterday after several week's illness. Undertaker Blue has charge of the funeral.

Saturday October 31, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Willie Butterfield, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Alva Butterfield, died last Friday morning of Bright's disease. All earthly assistance was rendered without avail. The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church, Rev. Clark officiating. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community.

Saturday October 31, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Gone To Her Reward
Untimely Demise of Mrs. E. H. Conway at Detroit Thursday.
On Thursday morning the sad intelligence reached Soo friends that Mrs. E. H. Conway had died at 4:20 that morning at Harper hospital, Detroit, whether she had been taken last week by Dr. Conway to undergo an operation in the hope of saving her life. She had been sick so long, however, that her vitality was too low to withstand the operation, and death came.---- Joe the only son of Dr. Conway and the late Mrs. Conway, was summoned by telegraph Wednesday to Detroit, but arrived too late to see his mother alive. Mr. and Mrs. V. R. Conway departed Thursday for Port Huron to join the bereaved husband and son and to attend the last sad obsequies over the departed. The funeral will take place at 7 o'clock this afternoon at Port Huron and the remains will be laid to rest beside those of relatives, who have gone before.
Mrs. Conway was 42 years of age. She had resided in the Soo for about 10 years. -----

Saturday October 31, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Jno. Wood, aged 80 years, died at his home in Donaldson last Wednesday. Mr. Wood was one of the pioneer's of Chippewa county and was of its most respected citizens. The funeral occurred Thursday, and was well attended.

Saturday November 14, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
The death of Robert Osow-o-mick last week at his brother's home, near Pine river, north of Mackinaw Island, of consumption, removes from Drummond one of our best citzens, and one of the best of that fast fading race, the Otchippewa Indians.

Saturday November 14, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
Attorney M. F. McDonald was called to Brockport, N.Y., Tuesday, by the death of his sister, Miss Belle McDonald, of typhoid fever. Miss McDonald resided in the Soo in 1895 and was well known here.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 1
Demise of Mrs. Ellen Campbell
Mrs. Ellen Campbell mother of A. M. Campbell, died from heart failure Saturday morning, at the residence of her son on Bingham avenue. The deceased was 74 years old, and arrived here there weeks ago from Collingwood, Ont, to visit her son. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from St. Jame's church, and the remains were interred at Riverside. Chas. Campbell, another son of the deceased arrived Monday from Collingwood to be present at the obseques.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Murray, of Easterday avenue, died Tuesday morning from croup. The funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Death of F. R. Hulburt
F. R. Hulburt, the well known lumberman, who had been engaged in the lumber business at Hulbert, six miles east of Soo Junction, this county, for several years, died last Saturday, aged 61 years. He had been a sufferer from Bright's disease, but appendicitus was the immediate cause of death. Mr. Hulbert was a gentleman of rare business ability, an able writer, and a highly entertaining conversationalist. The funeral was held on Mackinac Island Tuesday and the Rev. F. Baynall, pastor of the Congregational Church of this city, and an old friend of the family conducted the services. Mr. Hulburt had many friends in the Soo.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Cappucilli
Mrs. Frank Cappucilli, wife of the well known Ashman street merchant died Monday night of typhoid fever. She had been ill for one week. The deceased was 42 years old. Besides her husband, one child survives her. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Wednesday morning and the remains were interred in the catholic cemetery.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Death of W. H. Fodey
W. H. Fodey, aged 42 years, died at his home at Dafter, Wednesday afternoon, of typhoid fever. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock this morning.

Saturday November 21, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Wolverine Waifs
Nelo Sundean, a swede, met a peculiar death at the mill of the Sturgeon River Company at Chassel, Monday. While assisting in skidding a log on a chain carriage he fell in an epileptic fit across the log. He was carried to the circular saw and his body cut in two. He was unmarried.

Saturday November 28, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Lewis Morrison, a young man of Ironwood, committed suicide last week by shooting himself.

Saturday November 28, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Mesnard died Monday night. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon from St. Mary's church.

Saturday December 5, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Died of Heart Disease
C. B. Petrie Expires Suddenly Last Monday Morning
Monday morning, C. B. Petrie, proprietor of the Eureka billard parlors, dropped dead on the steps of the residence of Mrs. Grace Trempe, Ridge street, where he roomed. Coroner Bacon, after as investigation, decided that death was caused by organic heart trouble. Mr. Petrie was 43 years old. Early last summer he came to the Soo from Brainard, Minn. Shortly after his arrival here he discovered that he possessed hypnotic powers. He gained considerably notoriety through his amuteur performances. He was to have given an entertainment at Bay Mills on the evening of the day on which he died. After the inquest the body was taken to Vanderhook's undertaking parlour and according to a request, of the deceased made some time before his death it was kept until there was no doubt of his death. Mrs. Julia A. Pardee, sister of the deceased and her daughter, arrived Wednesday night to attend the funeral.

Saturday December 5, 1896 Part 1 Page 3
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
Mr. Martin, a respected citizens of Stirlingville, died last Saturday Nov. 28.

Saturday December 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 2
Died in Jerusalem
Father of Mrs. B. Blumrosen Passed Away Nov. 27
Mrs. B. Blumrosen received the sad intelligence Sunday by cable from Jerusalem, Palestine, that her father, R. Wolf Goldstein, had died in that far off land Nov. 27. Mr. Goldstein was 72 years of age and one of the oldest business man in London, England, being actively engaged as a jeweller and silversmith until six years ago when his wife died. Broken hearted over the loss of his beloved help-meet Mr. Goldstein closed out his business and started for the Holy Land, in which country he remained until called away. Moses a son, was his companion the last few years, and was at his death bed. Five children survive: and they are widely scattered on the glove. One of them, S. A. Goldstein is chief rabbi in at Auckland, New Zealand, two daughters are in Sydney, Australia, and another: Mrs. H. Blumrosen, resides in this city.

Saturday December 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Death of an Old Resident
Eusebe LaRocque, aged 43 years, died at his home on Ridge street at midnight Wednesday, of pneumonia. The deceased had been ill for 10 days. For 15 years he had been employed as head painter at St. Mary's Falls canal. A wife and two children survive him. The funeral was held at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, from St. Mary's church.

Saturday December 12, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
Russell, the twenty-two month's old child of Mr. and Mrs. Patterson, died of acute bronchitis, on Sunday morning at 9 o'clock at the family residence on Ridge street. The remains were taken to Bruce Mines, Ontario for burial on Monday.

Saturday December 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 4
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Sutton died at Brimley, Wednesday.

Saturday December 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
Death of John W. Ross
Passed to Eternal Rest After a Prolonged Illness
John W. Ross died at his home at the corner of Court and Ann streets, shortly after 6 o'clock Sunday morning, aged 28 years. For several months he had been a sufferer from liver and kidney trouble, and his demise was not unexpected. A year ago "Jack" Ross was the finest speciman of physical manhood in the soo. He was an athlete of considerable reputation. He came to the Soo in 1883. He was a member of the first city police force and made an exemplary officer. He was associated with his brother, Alex., in the management of the Chippewa House for three years, until the time of the fire in August, which destroyed the hotel. The funeral was held Tuesday morning from the First Presbyterian church at 9 o'clock. The services were conducted by the Rev. C. B. Bates and prayer offered by the Rev. T. R. Easterday. --------- The body was taken to Chatsworth, Ont. for interment. Mrs. Christine Ross, his mother, and Miss Anna and Alex., sister and brother of the deceased, accompanied, the remains to Chatsworth. Undertaker Blue had charge of the funeral.

Saturday December 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
The funeral of the late R. Krienbring was held from the Central M. E. church Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Odd Fellows attended in a body as did also a delegation of 10 of the working men of Dunbar & Sullivan, by which firm the deceased was employed for the past seven years.

Saturday December 19, 1896 Part 1 Page 5
The 18-months old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. O'Brien died Thursday morning after an illness of only 24 hours. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church yesterday afternoon.

Saturday December 26, 1896 Part 1 Page 7
Canadian Soo
Mrs. David Rouleau, nee Miron, who had been ill for a long while, died on Monday evening of last week. The funeral took place on Thursday morning. --------

Saturday December 26, 1896 Part 1 Page 8
The infant child of Mrs. Stanaway died Friday night of last week of a bronchial infection.

Saturday, January 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Death of Capt. Nick Taylor
Capt. Nick Taylor died last midnight, at his home on Ridge street, west, after an illness of only four days with pneumonia. The deceased was 29 years of age and was born in the Soo. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Monday morning. Capt. Taylor was a well known river pilot, and sailed as mate of the steamer City of Green Bay last season.

Saturday, January 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
An Old Resident Gone
John Cody, an old and respected resident of the Soo, died of pnemonia Sunday morning at 8 o'clock, at his residence on Ashmun street. He was ill only a few days. Mr. Cody was 77 years old at the time of his death. He was born in the county of Carlo, Ireland, April 18, 1820, when he came to the Soo. He was engaged in farming seven miles from the city until 1890, when he moved with his family to the city. Mr. Cody was hale and hearty up to the time of his fatal illness, and his demise was a shock to the community. His wife, also afflicted with pneumonia, will recover. His loving helpmate and ten children, all of whom were present when he breathed his last, mourn the loss of a king and affectionate husban and father. The children are: Mesdames B. McEvoy, Jas. McEvoy, Jas. R. Ryan, N. Millen: Misses Margaret, Minnie and Ella: Messrs: Lorenzo, George, and John. Mrs. Jane Walker, a sister, and Andrew, a brother, who reside here, were also at the house when he died. Of the family of ten brothers and sisters there are now four living—Peter, James, Andrew and Jane. Mr. Cody was attended during his illness and at his death by Rev. Father McDonald and was conscious to the last moment. The funeral occurred from St. Mary's church Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock and was very largely attended, there being over 65 carriages in the funeral cortege. The remains were laid to rest in the catholic cemetery.

Saturday, January 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
The mother of Joseph and N. Steffens died last week at Amherstburg, Ont. The Messers Steffens who were present during her sickness, are expected home tomorrow.

Saturday, January 9, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Death of a Stranger
Died at Emergency Hospital After an illness of 12 Hours
Geo. Brookman, a Hollander, aged 47 years, died at Emergency Hospital at 7 o'clock Thursday night, after an illness of 12 hours, from hemmorrhage of the bowels. Brookman, who was a stranger in the city, and who had resided in the Canadian Soo for a short time, was discovered in a shed at the freight depot at 7 o'clock Thursday morning by Wm. Conlin, an employee of the Soo South shore Lines. The man was in agony and complained of a severe pain in the stomach. He said he had no friends, and Superintendent J. H. McDonald, of the board of the poor commissions was summoned, and took County Pysician Dr. V. A. Hart with him to the depot. Mr. McDonald had Brookman sent to the hospital. Coroner Bacon viewed the body and decided that death was due to natural causes. The body was turned over the Undertaker Vanderhook who will consign it to a pauper's grave today.

Saturday, January 9, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Moses Payment, late of Sugar Island, aged 17 years, succumbed to consumption on Sunday evening. He was buried Tuesday morning in the Island cemetery at 9 o'clock.

Saturday, January 9, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
We are sorry to here of the death of John Douton, of Cedarville, which occurred Dec. 29.

Saturday, January 9, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
A former Sooite Killed
Richard Boutyette, who resided in the Soo a few years ago, was killed by the cars at Springfield, Mass., Monday. While here he kept books for C. W. Given, and resided in the Fourth Ward. An invalid wife and daughter survive him. He was taken to Bay City for burial.

Saturday, January 9, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Clarence J. Johnson, who came to the Soo in 1889, and opened an architect's office, died last week in North Carolina. Mr. Johnson was employed by the government here ans drew the plans and superintended the building of the Fort Brady edifices. He leaves a daughter, four years old who has been cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Magee since the death of Mrs. Johnson in November 1893. The latter was a sister of Mrs. Magee.

Saturday, January 16, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Pinegrove (Special Correspondence)
The infant son of James Parker died last week after a short illness.

Saturday, January 16, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Pinegrove (Special Correspondence)
The infant son of Daniel Doran died last week of pnemonia.
Saturday, January 16, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Pickford (Special Correspondence )
Chester, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Steele, died on Jan. 8. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the entire community.

Saturday, January 16, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Grier died Jan 7. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of many friends.

Saturday, January 16, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. McDonald died on Jan 10 at the age of 92. She died full of hope of a bright eternity.

Saturday, January 23, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
An Old Resident Gone
Death of James Webster Sunday After a Brief Illness
Another old resident of the Soo was called away Sunday morning, when James Webster succumed to an illness of a fortnight's duration. Mr. Webster came to the Soo in 1877 with his family, from Hamilton, Ont. He was a carpenter and builder by occupation, and was actively engaged in that work until a short time prior to his demise. Mr. Webster was born in Scotland in 1831, and was therefore 66 years of age. Mr. Webster settled in Huron county, Ont, in 1854, remaining there until his departure for this city. The deceased had the friendship and respect death was a block to the community. A wife, five daugthers and four sons mourn his loss of a kind husband and father. The children are Mrs. Wm. J. Neiterfield, of Spokane Falls, Wash., Mrs. Robert Given, of Goderich, Ont., the Misses Jean, Sarah and Ellen Webster, and William, John, Andrew and George of this city. The funeral took place from the family residence on Cedar street Tuesday afternoon. Rev. C. P. Bates and T. R. Easterday officiating. The deceased was a member of the Presbyterian church. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside.------.

Saturday, January 23, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Goehle's six weeks old baby took place Monday afternoon at two o'clock. The services were conducted by the Rev. C. M. Westlake.

Saturday, January 23, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Rueben Winora, the three-months-old child of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Parker, died on Tuesday, and was buried Wednesday in the city cemetery.

Saturday, January 23, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Canadian Sault
Great sympathy is expressed for Capt. John Sullivan and family in the irreparable loss they have sustained in the death of Mrs. Sullivan after undergoing an operation at their old home in St. Catharines. Mrs. Sullivan had not been long at the Sault but during her sojourn had endeared herself to all with whom she had been brought in contacts. She died at the early age of 46, leaving a disczol to husband and six children. Capt. Sullivan has been favorably known on the lakes for 30 years and now occupies an important position in connection with the crown timber department on Ontario.

Saturday, January 23, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
The infant son of Wm. P. Stehlefirp, Stireaville, died on Jan, of inflammation.

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
George Grisbrook, a business man of Cheboygan, fell off an ice boat while out sailing with a friend last week and was killed.

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wm. E. Williams, aged 42 years died at his home on Ashmun street at midnight Tuesday, after a week's illness of pneumonia. He was a stone mason by trade. A widow and five children are left in straightened circumstances. The funeral was held yesterday.

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gallagher were called to Quebec, Wednesday, by the death of Mrs. Gallagher's brother, Miles Howe.

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
A Touching Tribute
It is Paid to the Memory of Miss Amy Clegg
Miss Amy Clegg, died at the residence of her father, W. H. Clegg, on Court street Sunday morning, January 24, at 1:30 o'clock. Had she lived three days longer she would have completed her 21st year.------------

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Dennis, of Pine Grove, which died Monday, was buried Tuesday. The Rev. F. Bagnall of this city, officiated.

Saturday, January 30, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
The Demise of Miss Amy Clegg
Miss Amy Clegg died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Clegg, 108 Court street early Sunday morning. She had been an invalid for some time. Miss Clegg was 21 years of age. The funeral services were conducted at the Central M. E. church by the Rev. C. M. Thompson, Tuesday afternoon. The interment was at Riverside.

Saturday, February 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
A Large Funeral
Mrs. Gallagher's Brother Interred at Quebec Sunday
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gallagher returned Tuesday from Quebec, whither they were called last week by the death of Mrs. Gallagher's brother, Miles Howe. The following account of the funeral, taken from the Quebec Telegraph, is reprinted by request:
The funeral of the late Mr. Miles Howe, which took place yesterday afternoon from St. Patrick's church was one of the largest seen in Quebec for a very long time. Among those present were Alderman Reynolds, Boisvert, and Q. C. Drs. Ahern, Delaney, ------- The chief mourners were Dr. J. C. Howe, son of the deceased, his nephew Mr. J. P. Nolan and
Messrs. J.J. Gallagher, of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. and P. Nolan, his brother's-in-law. --------------------------- Rev. Father Maloney assisted b Rev. Fathers, Anderson and Bonin conducted the solemn services of the dead------------

Saturday, February 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Death of Mrs. D. McKillop
Mrs. Duncan McKillop died at her residence on Hart avenue early Monday morning after a lingering illness from lung trouble. She was 28 years and 3 months old. The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon and the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery.

Saturday, February 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Bessie Hecox Called Away
Succumbed to a Brief Illness on Sunday Afternoon
Bessie Beryl, the bright 11-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hecox's was called away to a better land by the angel of death Sunday afternoon. Little Bessie was stricken with congestion of the brain Friday of last week and despite all that earthy care could do, steadily grew worse, until death gently relieved her of the suffering and she fell sweetly asleep.------- -------------
the last rites took place at the Congregational church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, the Rev. Bagnall conducting services-----A large number accompanied the remains to their resting place at Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, February 13, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Mrs. Sophia Edwards Death
She Hand Been a Resident of the Soo For 85 Years
In the death of Mrs. Sophia Edwards, which took place Monday night after a three-days illness of pneumonia, the Soo loses one of its oldest residents. Mrs. Edwards was born in this city April 1, 1812, and was therefore nearly 85 years of age. She was a daughter of Louis Johnston, and a niece of the late John McD. Johnston. Mrs. Edwards memory was a remarkable one. ------- Three children survive her, Capt. E.N. Edwards, Mrs. Jos. Rouleau and Miss Maria Edwards. The funerals took place Thursday morning from St. Mary's church. The remains being laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday, February 13, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Bert Brule died on Sunday morning at the home of his parents, on Cedar street, after a long illness, of consumption. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock.

Saturday, February 13, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Stalwart (Special Correspondence)
The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Johnson died of pheumonia on Monday morning at 9 o'clock. She had been ill for some days. Rev. Magahey preached the funeral sermon.

Saturday, February 13, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Thank Their Friends
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Brule, through THE NEWS desire to express their heart felt appreciation of the many acts of kindness of which they were the recipients during the illness and death of their son, Gilbert, who died Sunday of consumption.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hempstead died Tuesday after a short illness. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Neebish Island (Special Correspondence)
William Arbach was struck in the head by a limb from a falling tree the other day and was fatally injured. He lingered for several hours before he died. He was unmarried and lived on a homestead. He was buried at Richard's Landing by friends.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
James Charles, of Bay Mills, stable boss for the Hal & Munson Cr. died at Brimley Thursday night, of pneumonia. The funeral will occur tomorrow afternoon. Undertaker Vanderhook will have charge of it.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Death of Adam Oliver (Communication)
Adam Oliver died of pneumonia at the residence of Mrs. Wm. Bates, Brimley, on Wednesday evening of last week after a few days illness. Oliver, as he was usually called was for some years ban boss, and otherwise emplyed at Bay Mills after which he took charge for some year's of D. J. Ransom's farm on the Pickford road. He was buried in the Missions Hieght's cemetery on the 4th.--------------- He used to speak of a brother on the Scotch borders near Carlisle and relatives near Abbotsford, Perthshire.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Died of Heart Failure
W. H. Miron, a well known carpenter and builder, and an old resident of the city, died Tuesday morning of heart trouble, aged 70 years. He was buried from St. Mary's church yesterday morning. A wife and four children, Mrs. J. J. Veyet, Miss Hattied Miron and H. V. and L. F. Miron, survive him.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Death of Mrs. Joseph Rouleau
On Monday evening Mrs. Alice J. wive of Capt. Joseph Rouleau, died, after an illness of six days, of pneumonia. Mrs. Rouleau contracted the fatal disease while caring for her mother, Mrs. Sophia Edwards, who died just a week before her Mrs. Rouleau expired. Mrs. Rouleau died at the residence of her mother. She was 44 eyars old. A peculiar coincidence regarding her death was that she died at the same age as he sister, Mrs. Allan Rains, who passed away four years ago. Mrs. Rouleau had resided here for many years. She leaves a husband and five children, Laurian, Joseph, Bertha, Alice and Marion. The funeral was held Thursday morning at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community.

Saturday, February 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Robert Harley died Saturday morning, of consumption. Funeral services were conducted from the Catholic church Monday at noon.

Saturday, February 27, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Russell, of Bingham avenue, died Thursday. The funeral occurred yesterday afternoon, the Rev. C.P. Bates, officiated.

Saturday, February 27, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Mrs. Wm. Foley, of Pine street, died yesterday afternoon, aged 64 years. The funeral services will be conducted from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Monday morning.

Saturday, February 27, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Alex. Armour died Wednesday at the Mission between 11 and 12 o'clock and was buried from the Mission Home Thursday afternoon at one o'clock at Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, February 27, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. John Lapoint lost a fine boy 14 months old last week. Death was caused by inflamation of the brain.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Dominic Reghatti and Mathew Mattson were buried by a cave-in at the Newport mine, Ironwood last week.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
John Adams the well known deputy warden of the Marquette branch prison, died suddenly on Wednesday of last week, while sitting in a chair conversing with friends.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. V. R. Conway were called to Preston, Ont., Tuesday by the death of Mrs. Conway's father, J. W. Martin.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Eben Green, of Court street, has been bereaved by the death of his father, Josiah Green, of Troy, N.Y., who died at the ripe age of 83 years. Mr. Green received the sad intelligence last Saturday but was unable to attend the obsequies because of ill health.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Jno. Sullivan, of Pine Grove, died at that place Sunday morning after a long illness, at the age of 54 years. Mr. Sullivan is well known and highly respected farmer and leaves a widow and two children. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Tuesday morning.

Saturday, March 13, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Martin Brennan, a stonemason, who resided here for five or six years, died at his home at North Bay, Tuesday morning.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
G. F. Van Wyck received the sad intelligence Sunday that his aged mother had died in Meaford, Ont. It was impossible for Mr. Van Wyck to get there in time to attend the obseques.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Demise of Duncan McIntosh
Duncan McIntosh died at his home on Myra street, Sunday afternoon, of pnemonia. He was ill but a brief time. The funeral occurred Tuesday afternoon from the residence, Rev. J. C. Carmon, officiating. Mrs. C. Y. Dixon and Wm. McIntosh, daughter and son of the deceased, arrived from Detroit a few hours before he died. Mr. McIntosh had resided in the Soo for many years and was a blacksmith by occupation. He was highly respected by all who knew him.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
We are sorry to chronicle the death on the 2nd. inst. of Mr. Edwin Seamon's little daughter Flora. Rev. C. P. Strickland conducted the funeral services at the M. E. church on the 4th. A very large number attended. It is just a year since "Grandma" Seaman's funeral.

Saturday, March 6, 1897 Part 1 Page
Memorial Services
They were held at the Mission in Honor of Alex. Armour
The King's Daughters and Sons held an appropriate and very interesting memorial service for their Mission worker, Alexander Armour was born in Scotland 43 years ago last August. Four brothers and four sisters survive him in Scotland. Part of his life he spent in England, where he married and where he was several years ago and then to the Soo about four year's ago.-------------- He leaves a wife and one son to mourn his loss.----------

Saturday, April 20, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Ruth, the little three-year-ole daughter of Mrs. C. H. Pease, died after a short illness of brain fever, on Wednesday evening. The funeral took place from St. Mary's church Friday morning.

Saturday, April 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
The funeral of the late Mrs. Chas. Kennel was held from the Presbyterian church Wednesday afternoon, under the direction of L. O. T. M., of which she was a member. Mrs. Kennel was a sister of Fred and Jno Campbell, of this city, and resided in Bay Mills.

Saturday, April 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Mrs. Lawrence Ryan died Wednesday morning, at her home on Peck street, after a three months illness of consumption. Mrs. Ryan was the wife of Laurence Ryan, foreman for Hughes Bros. & Bangs and was only 26 years of age. She leaves three children. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church yesterday morning.

Saturday, April 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
A Good Citizen Gone
John Montgomery, of Pickford Died Monday of Pneumonia
John V. Montgomery, of Pickford died at his home, last Monday after a short illness of pneumonia, aged 37 years. The funeral occurred at Pickford Wednesday afternoon and was one of the largest ever held in the locality. The remains were interred in the Pickford cemetery. John Montgomery came to Chippewa county about 18 years ago, and the greater part of his life was spent in teaching---------------

Saturday, April 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Alfred Poliquin
Mrs. Alfred M. Poliquin died Sunday morning, age 18 years, of consumption. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lalonde, and had been married two years. The funeral occurred Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church, and was largely attended. Rev. J. J. Connolly conducted the impressive ceremonies.

Saturday, April 17, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
The wife of W. A. Stowell, formerly connected with the old Water Power and Land company, died Saturday at Lacrosse, Wis.

Saturday, April 17, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Joseph Duket, of Bay Mills, died at his home at the Bay, Friday afternoon of last week of pneumonia. He was one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of that place.

Saturday, April 17, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Jos. Eagle received a telegram Wednesday announcing that his sister-in-law, Mrs. Samuel Eagle, had died that morning in Meaford, Ont., Mrs. Eagle was a sister of J. H. McDonald, of this city.

Saturday, April 17, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Detour (Special Corresponce)
Miss Fannie Still died last Friday of consumption, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Thos. Watson. Her untimely death greatly saddened the community, for she was barely 16 years old and was a favorite with all. The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, at the Presbyterian church, Rev. S. L. Clark being assisted in the sad rites by Rev. Charles A. Foss. The interment took place at the local cemetery.

Saturday, April 17, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Killed By the Cars
A distressing accident occurred on the Soo Line on Sunday night, causing the death of a child. When the train was a little distance past Russell, a station west of Manistique, a little girl was noticed sitting on the train. The engine struck her, fracturing her skull. Just as she was picked up two men arrived who had been out searching for her, she having wandered away. Her name was discovered to be Della LaLonde. She had been with her parents visiting at Russell. The child was taken on the train to Gladstone and died about 11 o'clock. The parents were notified and came to Gladstone. A beautiful white casket was given by the Soo Line officials as a mark of there sympathy. The remains were taken to Garden Bay for burial.

Saturday, April 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Death of Peter Campbell
Peter Campbell, aged 67 years, died at his home on Dawson street Sunday afternoon, after an illness of two weeks of pneumonia. In his death the Soo loses one of its old and respected citizens. The deceased had resided in Chippewa county for a score or more years. An aged wife survives him and his children, among whom are Mesdames George Comb, H. E. Westlake, Stillwell, and Miss Margarite Campbell of this city and Mrs. L. B. Lockwood of Manistique. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from his late home and the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery.

Saturday, April 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Rouleau died Saturday after a short illness. The funeral was held Monday from St. Mary's church.

Saturday, April 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
A young lumberman Jas. Beacham, who had been employed at the Perry lumber camps in the vicinity of Garden River, died after a brief illness, of brain fever, at the residence of Mrs. Sproule: on Sunday night. He had been removed to Mrs. Sproule's Saturday in order to receive constant attention. His mother, who resides at Deep river, arrived shortly before he died and took the body to her home for interment on Wednesday.

Saturday, April 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Miss Engleheart's Brother
Miss Nellie Englehart, of this city, left Thursday of last week, for Saginaw, to attend the funeral of her brother, Jesse Engleheart. Mr. Engleheart had just returned from Georgia where he had been with the hope of regaining his health. He died of consumption four days after his return. He leaves behind a wife, and a little daughter, Ruth, aged two years. Mr. Engleheart was one of the leading young men of his city and was one time county clerk. Many will mourn his loss.

Saturday, May 1, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Christine Bounekessel died at Bessemer Sunday, aged 99 years. She had the unique distinction of being married 18 times, the last time only enjouing wedded bliss six months. She was one of the best known women in the northern part of the Upper Peninsula.

Saturday, May 1, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Detour (Special Correspondence)
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Jukko died Monday and was buried on Tuesday.

Saturday, May 1, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Stalwart (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Wm. J. Banks, an esteemed resident of this place, died Wednesday evening of last week after a short illness. The deceased was 33 years and 5 months of age and leaves behind a husband and six children to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and loving mother. The remains were laid to rest in Stalwart cemetery, the last sad rites being performed by the Rev. Maltas. The bereaved family have the sincere sympathy of many friends in their afflication

Saturday, May 8, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Chas. Trueblood, a farmer residing at Pine Ridge, near Escanaba, was run into by a Chicago & Northwestern locomotive Monday and injured so severely that he died the following morning. He did not regain consciousness up to the time of his death.

Saturday, May 8, 1897 Part 1 Page 7
Antoine Fisher is Dead
Another of the Soo's old resident passed to the great beyond at 9 o'clock Tuesday night, when Antoine Fisher, aged 61 years, died from a stroke of paralysis, at his home on Eureka street. For many years Mr. Fisher sailed in the lakes in the capacity of engineer. For serveral seasons past he was on the steamlighter Mentoer. He was wellknown and highly respected by his acquaintances. He was the father of twelve children, five of whom survive him. Louis, John, Joseph, Mrs. Thos. Molly and Miss Barbara. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church yesterday morning, and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday, May 8, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Clark died Saturday. The funeral occurred Monday from the home and the interment was in the city cemetery.

Saturday, May 15, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
George Coles, father of Mrs. E. C. Hambleton, died at Marquette Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, and was buried there yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Hambleton has been in Marquette the past two weeks in attendance upon her father who was ill for some time.

Saturday, May 15, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Capt. Henry G. Johnston Succumbed to Paralysis Tuesday
Capt. Henry G. Johnston, who had been a paralytic sufferer for two years died at his home on Maple street Tuesday morning. He was at work in the garden at the time and fell dead white planting potatoes. The deceased was a son of the late John McD. Johnston, and has resided in the Soo all of his life. For years he was engaged in sailing and held master's papers. A wife and four children survive him. The funeral was held from his late home Thursday afternoon. The Revs. J. C. Carman, T. R. Easterday and F. C. Bagnall, officiting. The palbearers were, Capts. S. H. Ashmun, Jos. Tebo, Jno. Ermantinger, Alex. Day, T. Trempe and Peter Jacobs.

Saturday, May 15, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Geo. Freeborn
Geo. Freeborn died at his home in Donaldson at 5 o'clock yesterday morning after a prolonged illness from rheumatism of the heart. The deceased was on of the oldest and best known farmers in the county. At the time of his death he was 66 years old and has resided in the county for 15 years. A wife and six children survive him, William, Robert, Herbert, Edward and Lyman and Miss Emma who is employed as a operator in the local telephone office. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from his late residence. The Rev. D. Casler will officiate.

Saturday, May 22, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Drowned Near the Shingwauk
Andrew Stacey, an inmate of the Shingwauk Home, Canadian Soo, whose mother resides on this side lost his life Wednesday noon by drowning in the river, a short distance below the home. Young Stacey and a companion were on a raft, and the former accidently fell off into the icy waters. Help was soon at hand, and the body was gotten out within five minute after the accident. Life had flown. The boy was 15 years of age.

Saturday, May 29, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
A royal wedding took place at the Little Channel, Cockburn Island, between a prince of the house of Wahgoash and a princess of the house of Baywah. It was attended by about all the Indians of this vicinity and was a notable celebration

Saturday, May 29, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Miss Mary Corcoran, of Escanaba met death on Saturday of last week by swallowing a hat pin.

Saturday, May 29, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Mrs. A. D. Petit, of Hancock, wife of the Publisher of the Progress, committed suicide by hanging last week. Mrs. Petit had been ill for some time and ended her life, while temporarily insane. In his bereavement Mr. Petit has the sympathy of hundreds of friends throughout Michigan.

Saturday, May 29, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Death of Alfred E. Dean, an Old Resident of Chippewa County.
Alfred E. Dean died at his home at 265 Court street Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, aged 61 years. The direct cause of Mr. Dean's death was the amputation of his right leg above the knee at noon that day. The operation was undertaken as a dernier resort to save his life. Mr. Dean had the little toe of his right foot frostbitten last winter and gangrene set in. Under the hypnotic influence of Prof. Fontana an operation was then performed and the offendiing member amputated. The course of the disease, however, was not stopped and later his foot was taken off. This also proved unavailing and the fatal operation was rendered imperative.
Alfred E. Dean was born in Whitechurch, Ont., and 13 years ago located in Chippewa county with his family—Besides his wife, nine children survive him, W. J., W. S., Oscar, Henry, Jacob, Miss Sarah, Mesdames Jno. Comb, Jas. Sweeney, and Thos. King. All of the family reside here with the exception of Mrs. Sweeney, who arrived Wednesday from Chicago to attend the obsequies. The funeral was held at the Central M. E. church at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon. Rev. C.M. Thompson officiating. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, May 15, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Geo. Freeborn
Geo. Freeborn died at his home in Donaldson at 5 o'clock yesterday morning after a prolonged illness from rheumatism of the heart. The deceased was on of the oldest and best known farmers in the county. At the time of his death he was 66 years old and has resided in the county for 15 years. A wife and six children survive him, William, Robert, Herbert, Edward and Lyman and Miss Emma who is employed as a operator in the local telephone office. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from his late residence. The Rev. D. Casler will officiate

Saturday, May 29, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Mrs. C. S. Riche died at Aitken, South Carolina on Tuesday of last week, after a lingering illness from consumption. Mrs. Riche has many friends in the Soo who will be pained to learn of her demise.

Saturday, June 5, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
The Child Died a Natural Death
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Crowfut died suddenly Thursday morning. The funeral was to have been held early the same afternoon, but the health officer refused the issue the necessary permit, upon the solicitation of neighbours who thought an investigation should be made of the circumstances surrounding the child's death. It was alleged that death was caused by neglect of the parents. The obsequies were deferred until the prosecuting attorney had satisfied himself that the death was due to natural causes. The funeral took place yesterday morning.

Saturday, June 5, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Child Burned to Death
The two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Burns, of Cedar street, was fatally burned Monday while playing in the backyard of its home. A bonfire had been started to burn up some rubbish and the high winds blew sparks onto the child's clothing. Before help arrived the little boy was frightfully burned, death resulting Tuesday noon. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Wednesday afternoon, and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery..

Saturday, June 5, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Frank, the 12-year-old son of Mrs. Martell died suddenly last Saturday and was buried on Monday.

Saturday, June 5, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Geo. M. Dewey, died at his home in Owosso on Thursday of last week. He had been in ill health for several months. Mr. Dewey was the father of Edmund O. Dewey, the editor and proprietor of the Owosso Times.

Saturday, June 12, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Stuart Bereft
Janet Lucille, the bright 11-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Stuart, died Thursday morning of capilliary bronchitis. The funeral will be at 2:30 tomorrow afternoon from the family residence on Ashmun street. Mr. and Mrs. Stuart have the sincere sympathy of many friends in the deep bereavement that has fallen them.

Saturday, June 12, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Mrs. L. J. DeCoteau's Death
It Occurred Yesterday Morning After a Long Illness
Mrs. Louis J. Decouteau, who had resided in this city almost continuously since 1865, died at her residence on Spruce avenue, at 7 o'clock yesterday morning, aged 52 years. The deceased had been ill during the past five months and death had been expected for some time. A husband and daughter, Miss Anna, and Capt. J. B. Mendor, a brother, survive her. Mrs. Decoteau possessed many kindly qualities, and her death is deplored by a large circle of friends. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Monday morning.

Saturday, June 19, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Body of John R. Dundas Found in the Chandler-Dunbar Canal.
A case of supposed suicide was discovered at the Chandler-Dunbar water power canal shortly after 7 o'clock yesterday morning when Joseph Root, who resides near the powerhouse, saw the body of a man in the bottom of the canal in 10 feet of water. Coroner Bacon and Sheriff McNaughton were notified and went to the spot and had the body taken out of the water. Unon examination it was found that the man had died from drowning alone, as no marks of violence were found upon the body. The unfortunate man was about 28 years old, 5 feet 8 inches in height. ( 3 letters were found on the body).-----------

Saturday, June 12, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Gideon Hood Dead
Word was received Thursday from Ora Grand, Cal. announcing the death of Gideon Hood, late of this city. Mr. Hood met his death by being blown to pieces by a boiler explosion. He has several children in the Soo, Mesdames S. H. Ashmun, Wm. Medill, Fred Stibbs, O. I. Millar and James Hood.

Saturday, June 12, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
The funeral of Mrs. L. J. DeCoteau took place Saturday morning from St. Mary's church. It was largely attended.

Saturday, June 12, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Anna Pierce, better known as "Irish" Anna, a well known Hurley character, was murdered in a Salon in that city Saturday night. Her murderer escaped and is unknown.

Saturday, June 19, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
A young man named Courts was killed at the Encampment Monday night by a runaway team.

Saturday, June 26, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Miss Lena Summers, sister of Mrs. Frank D. Stevens, died suddenly at Los Angels, Cal., Thursday, of heart trouble. Miss Summers was 28 years old and was a teacher in the public schools of that city.

Saturday, June 26, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Mary F. Smith aged 21 years died at her home in L'Anse early Sunday morning. The deceased was wel known in this city and was a niece of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. C. Seaman. Mrs. Seamon left for L'Anse Monday to attend the funeral.

Saturday, June 26, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Samuel Ogawomick died Monday at 8 p.m. of consumption. She was a bright young woman of considerable education, having been a pupil of the "Wawanosh Homes".

Saturday, June 26, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Anderson were so unfortunate to lose their baby, Gladys, who was buried Friday of last week.

Saturday, June 19, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Robert A. Hawkins, the son of Supervisor Hawkins, of Whitefish Point, died Tuesday at the Franklin House, of Bright's deserve. The body was taken to Grand Island on the Green Bay Thursday morning for interment. The many who are acquainted with Mr. Hawkins condole with him.

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Beduhn
She Had Been a Resident of the Soo 24 Years.
Mrs. Wilhelmine Beduhn, who fell from the second story window of Mrs. A. Brown's house early Tuesday morning while in a delerious condition and sustained internal injuries, died at 6:30 o'clock last night. Mrs. Beduhn had been ill with a severe cold, which last Sunday developed symptoms of pnemonia. The deceased was born in Germany and was 85 years old. She came to the Soo 24 years ago. Four children survive her, Mesdames Augusta Brown, M. Reidy, L. Metzger and W. H. Stribbling. The funeral will by held from the Presbyterian church at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. The Rev. T. R. Easterday will officiate.

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Death of Mrs. L. Lauzon
After a lingering illness, of consumption, Mrs. Harriet Lauzon, wife of Lucian Lauzon, of this city, breather her last early Monday morning. Mrs. Lauzon had lived the 48 years of her life in this city and was an energetic member of the Roman Catholic church. She leaves four children and a host of friends to mourn her loss. The funeral, which was very largely attended, occurred from St. Mary's church Wednesday morning. The interment was in Catholic cemetery.

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
W. A. Rudell received a telegram Tuesday announcing the death of his niece, Miss Allie Rudell, that day at Hespeler, Ont.

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
David Smith was shot at Iron River Sunday by Mrs. E. N. Lengly. Smith, with two other men tried to force an entrance to Mrs. Lengly's home, and made indecent proposals to her whereupon she shot Smith dead.

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Mrs. C. E. C. Seaman returned yesterday from L'Anse, where she attended the funeral of her niece, the late Mary Smith.-- ---

Saturday, July 3, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
A sad accident happened at East Burnt Island Monday about 8 a.m. Mr. and Mrs. Cooley's little three-year-old son Elmer was drowned. His habit was to run to meet his father when coming in from lifting and inquire about the fish. He did this as usual this time and in some way fell off the little dock. The water was not very deep and he had apparently crept toward the shore and was found about 20 minutes after he fell in close to the beach in about a foot of water. -------

Saturday, July 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
S. Jefferson, of Bruce township, died Tuesday at the age of 70 years. Mr. Jefferson was the father of Mrs. Andrew Arnott, of this city.

Saturday, July 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Frank Early, aged 27, who took paris green at Escanaba on Friday, June 18, with suicidal intent, died July 1.

Saturday, July 10, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Drowned at Bay Mills
While Henry Crowley was in swimming in the bay at Bay Mills Sunday morning he was seized with cramps and was drowned before assistance could be rendered. His body was recovered Wednesday night and taken to Canada Sault for burial. Young Crowley was 18 years old and an orphan. He was working for the Hall & Munson co.

Saturday, July 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Found Dead in Bed
All Alone, Joseph Riter Expires of Heart Failure Saturday Night.
Joseph Riter, aged 25 years, was found dead in bed, at his home on Spruce avenue west, shortly after 6 o'clock Monday evening, by Henry Sheridan, who went into the house to call on Mr. Riter. For the past two months Mrs. Riter and children have been visiting Mrs. Riter's mother at Clinton, Ont. and during that period Mr. Riter lived alone on the first floor of the house.--------- Mr. Riter came to the Soo two years ago and opened a liquor store with his brother-in-law George Miller.------------ The funeral was held yesterday and the body was interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, July 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
James Riley's Sudden and Unexpected Summon
He Died of Appoplexy
Another sudden death occurred in this city Thursday night. The victim of the unexpected call from the angel of death on that occasion was James Riley, bartender of the Sherman House, Portage avenue west, of which James O'Brien is proprietor. At 10 o'clock Thursday night the body of Mr. Riley was discovered by Peter O'Toole and Frank O'Donnell, guest at the Sherman House. The body was found in the basement of the hotel, in a sitting posture, with his head fallen forward in a corner of the room.------ Mr. Riley was 29 years of age. He had lived in this city for seven or eight years. He was married but on account of his additions to liqour at that time, there was family trouble, and Mrs. Riley finally got a divorce. She is now said to be living in Detroit -------- Mr. Riley's relatives live at Carleton Place, Ont. They have been notified and it is probable that the remains will be shipped to that place for interment.---

Saturday, July 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Dropped Dead In His Room
Battle Creek, Mich., July 19- Edwards G. Woodlin, one of the best known colored young men of this city, dropped dead this morning. He was employed at the Commercial House. He was called this morning as usual at 4 o'clock. Not appearing at 5 o'clock his room was visited, and he was found dead upon the floor. He had got up dressed and partly opened the door to come out of his room. Heart disease was the verdict of the jury.-----

Saturday, July 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
The funeral of the unfortunate George Doan, who was killed by an electric shock Friday night, took place at the Central M. E. church Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, July 24, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Edward Hines formerly on inmate of the county poorhouse, who was sent to the Newberry hospital about two months age, died at that institution Thursday night.

Saturday, August 7, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Rosedale (Special Correspondence)
Rev. Casler preached the funeral sermon of George Travis, a young man aged about 22 years of Barbeau.

Saturday, August 7, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
The 2 month-old-bay daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John TenEyck succumbed to cholera infantum Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

Saturday, August 7, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lafever mourn the loss of their infant son, who died Tuesday morning of cholera infantum. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church.

Saturday, August 7, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Dr. T. N. Rogers' father died at Crystal City, Manitoba, last week. Dr. Rogers was present during his father's illness and attended the obsequies.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Mr. and Mrs. Increase Mather, mourn the loss of their infant daughter, who died Wednesday afternoon.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Mrs. M. Lippett died at her home on William street, Monday, of pulmonary phthises. The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon from the residence and the remains were interred in the city cemetery by Undertaker Vanderhook.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
John Gardner, nephew of F. M. Roll, of this city died of appendicitus Sunday, at Detroit.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Mrs. C. B. Robinson gave birth to a stillborn child last evening. Mrs. Robinson is not seriously ill.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
The venerable Enoch Ellis, father of the late E. W. Ellis, of the Soo, died at his home, Glen's Falls, N. Y. this week.

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Out of the Wrong Bottle
Dr. Hunter Took a Dose of Carbolic Acid and Died
The residents of the two Soo's were shocked beyond measure Sunday, when it became generally known that Dr. Hunter, of the Canadian Soo, had suddenly died that morning from the effects of a dose of carbolic acid which he had taken by mistake at 3 o'clock in the morning. Dr. Hunter was called up to attend a patient at the Grand View Hotel. He visited him and went immediately across the street to his brother's branch drug store to make up a prescription. The doctor had about three weeks been suffering from an internal trouble for which he had been taking occasional doses of aromatic spirit of amonia with a few drops of chlordyne.------- no sooner had he swallowed the fatal dose than he discovered his mistake. He said "My God", what have I done and called upon the assistant, Mr. Blaine, for an emetic which was immediately presented to him, but, to late, as the throat had closed. He went out to the sidewalk and sat down on the edge of it, where he died a few minutes later in the arms of his faithful attendant, Richard Pringle.----------------- The remains were accompanied to the late doctor's home at Clarksburg, near Meaford, where he was finally interred yesterday, by his sorrowing mother Mrs. George Hunter ------

Saturday, August 14, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
Death of Wm. C. Shunk
Wm. C. Shunk, an old respected resident of the county, died at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon, at his home on the Hay Lake road, at the age of 64. He leaves a wife and eight children. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. McGillvray, at the family residence, Tuesday afternoon and the remains were interred at Riverside.

Saturday, August 21, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
The father of Mrs. Capt. E. D. Smith of Fort Brady, died of apoplexity Friday night; at the depot at Stanford, Conn., while about to board a train for the Soo to visit his daughter.

Saturday, August 21, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Campbell's infant son died yesterday morning of cholera infantum.

Saturday, August 21, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. E. Esler died Tuesday and was buried Wednesday afternoon. Rev. C. A. Foss, officiated.

Saturday, August 28, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Among those from Bay Mills who attended the funeral of Mrs. W. K. Parsille were Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Poultney, Mrs. J. Gibraith et.

Saturday, August 28, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Mr. and Mrs. David Thomas mourn the loss of their bright little son, Joel Darr, who succumbed to cholera infantum at an early hour yesterday morning. The bereaved parents have the profound sympathy of many friends. The child was 13 months old. The funeral will be held at the family residence on Cedar street at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon.

Saturday, September 4, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Died of Paralysis
David Brigham died of paralysis Wednesday afternoon, at the residence of H. L. Newton. The body will be shipped today to Rockford, Ill., Mr. Brigham's former home, for interment. Mrs. Myrtle L. Miller, daughter of Mr. Brigham, who arrived yesterday from New York, will accompany the remains.

Saturday, September 4, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Another Pioneer Gone
Louis Metzger Called Across the Dark River Yesterday.
Louis Metzger, on of the Soo's pioneer citizen's passed away at 2 o'clock yesterday morning at his residence on Water street. His health had been failing for some months, but the immediate cause of death was apoplexy. The funeral, which will take place at the Presbyterian church at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow, will be conducted by the Rev. T. R. Easterday, and the remains will be interred in the city cemetery. Louis Metzger was born at Hilbourn, Wartzenberg, Germany, Dec. 29, 1839. He came to the United States in 1865, joined the army and served for three years. After his discharge from the army he lived at St. Louis, Peoria and Detroit. In 1870 he moved to the Soo. A year later he started a grocery and bakery and has been in business here constantly since that time, in one way or another. He owned some very valuable property in this city. Mr. Metzger leaves a wife, a son Henry F., and a daughter Miss Emma A., to mourn his loss.----

Saturday, September 4, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Dual Drowning Accident
Miss Bessie Millen and Frank Stewart Met Their Death Near Massey
A sad accident occurred on Spanish river last Saturday afternoon, when Miss Bessie Millen, the 14-year-old daughter of T. G. Millen, who is related to the Codys, of this city, by marriage, was drowned, as was also Frank Stewart, of Marquette. T. G. Millen had a narrow escape from sharing their fate. The three were in a canvas boat in the river near Massey, when their craft collapsed. Mr. Miller was entangled in the boat, but was gotten safely ashore by Mr. Stewart, who was an expert swimmer. He returned but two late, for Miss Millen, who had gone down, and his heroic attempt to save her cost Mr. Stewart his life. His body was taken through Monday to Marquette for burial. Miss Millen's body was recovered. T. G. Millen has been engaged with Alger Smith Co., for years and is well known here.

Saturday, September 4, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Wolverine Waifs
Five Finns were drowned at Gladstone Monday by the capsizing of a sailboat. Their names are: Gus Erickson, John Fandl, Gus Anderson, John Hanson, and Hulp Erickson. Three of the bodies have been recovered.

Saturday, September 11, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
THE DEATH RECORD
Unusually Large Number of Cases of Mortality This Week
[] The funeral of the late Louis Metzger, an account of whose death appeared in THE NEWS last week, was held at the Presbyterian church, Sunday afternoon. Rev. T. R. Easterday, an old friend and former paster of the deceased, officiated. -----the remains to their last resting place the city cemetery.
[] Annie Farnquist, daughter of Mr. and mrs. Amel Farnquist, of Neaseville, died yesterday afternoon. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at the family residence and the remains will be interred in the city cemetery.
[] Annie, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Hayden, of Rudyard, who died Monday, was buried at the Catholic cemetery, this city, Tuesday.
[] Victoria, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Lovenski, died Tuesday and was buried Wednesday at the Catholic cemetery.
[] Dennis Shannahan, of Bay Mills, who died on Thursday of last week, was buried at the Catholic cemetery, this city, Saturday.
[] Timothy Crowley, aged 70 who died Friday of last week, was interred at the Catholic cemetery Saturday.

Saturday, September 11, 1897 Part 1 Page 3
Stirlingville (Special Correspondence)
Captain Wm. P. Stirling last week received word of the death of his father, Archibald Stirling, of Balder Creek, California, who leaves a loving wife and six childen to mourn the loss of husband and father. He was an old settler in the Soo river. He had many friends in the Soo and along the Soo river who will be sorry to hear of his death.

Saturday, September 18, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Mrs. M. J. Kent, of Hart avenue, was 63 years of age Tuesday, and that evening she was pleasantly surprised by a number of friends who took possession of her home.

Saturday, September 18, 1897 Part 1 Page 4
Mrs. Ida Nusbaun, sister of Louis Desenberg, died last week at her home at Lawton, Mich.

Saturday, September 18, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Angel of Death Summons Augustine Gager and Several Others
[]Augustine Giguere, more familiarly known as Augustine Gager, a pioneer of the Soo and one of the most influential French citizens, was summoned by the Angel of death Tuesday morning. The funeral ws held Thursday morning at St. Mary's church and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.
Mr. Gager was born at Ste. Anne de Beaupre, Quebec, 74 years ago. He located at the Soo in 1854, and resided here continuously until his death. For the first two years of his residence here Mr. Gager acted as warehouse man for the Chippewa Portage company. In 1856 Mr. Gager embarked in the grocery business, which he continued in one place or another,until August 1896, when the building accupied by him on Water street was destroyed in the big fire. Mr. Gager who was fast growing feeble as a result of old age, then went to live with the family of the late John Cota, with whom he continued to reside until his demise. Mr. Gager acquired considerable property here. He leaves three brothers and two sisters, who reside in Quebec. Mr. Gager was never married ----
[] Lizzie Shawano, age 32 and daughter of Chief Shawano, died Friday of last week, at the home of her father on Sugar Island. On Saturday the remains were conveyed to the Soo in a canoe, followed by the relatives and friends in similar conveyances.
The funeral procession of canoes, as it came up the river, formed an interesting spectacle. At the head of Little Rapids the remains were taken charge of by Undertaker Ryan & Co., and conveyed to St. Mary's church, where funeral services were held. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.
[] The funeral of Annie, the 17-year-old daughter of Emil Farnquist, of Neaseville, who died Friday of last week, of consumption, was held Sunday afternoon at the Baptist church, at Neaseville. The remains were interred in the city cemetery. The pallbearers were: Nellie Tregenza, Nora DeClare, Mamie Canio, Effie McLay, Mary McLay and Tim Coleman. Mr. Farnquist desires to thank his friends for the kind services in his bereavement.
[] Loretta, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Brown, who died Friday of last week, was buried Sunday at the Catholic cemetery. Funeral services were held at St. Mary's church.
[] Jessie H., the 7-months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Miller, of Gros Cap avenue, who died Saturday, was buried Sunday at the Pine Grove cemetery.

Saturday, September 25, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
An Old Settler Passes Away
Richard McConkey, of Pickford who had been a resident of the county for 18 years, died at his farm Wednesday afternoon. A wife and seven children all of whom are of adult age, survive him. Mr. McConkey was an enterprising farmer, a good neighbour, and his demise is mourned by a wide circle of friends. The funeral will be held to-day.

Saturday, September 25, 1897 Part 1 Page 5
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Most all the Indians, including Joseph Mezutug, from St. Ignace are dragging for the body of John Ozawomic, who was drowned last week. He has not been found yet.

Saturday, September 25, 1897 Part 1 Page 6
Mrs. A. M. Comb was called to Port Elgin, Ont., Wednesday, by the death of her brother, Walter George. Mr. George visited Mrs. Comb here about a month ago.

Saturday, October 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 1
Sad Fatality At St. Clair
Young Wife and Baby Burned to Death Wednesday
Louis Heythaler, the second-engineer of the City of New York, which discharged a cargo of hard coal at the Union dock this week, received telegraphic intelligence that his wife was seriously ill at St. Clair. Later it developed that his two- month-old babe had been burned to a crisp and his wife so severly burned that she died before he reached home. The sad case has the appearance of murder and suicide.----- Mr. and Mrs. Heythaler had been married but a year, and had lived happily together. The husband and wife had parted Sunday when M. Heythaler left for the Soo on his boat.

Saturday, October 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Wolverine Waifs
Peter Pascoe, ex-state senator and judge of probate of Marquette county, died Monday, at the age of 66.

Saturday, October 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 2
Wolverine Waifs
Victor Anderson shot and killed his mother and himself at Whitedale near Manistique, Saturday.

Saturday, October 2, 1897 Part 1 Page 8
J. D. Beaudrie died last Tuesday and was buried Thursday morning from St. Mary's church. The remains were interred in the catholic cemetery on the hill.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 1
DEATH OF JOHN B. LEMIEUX
Unexpectedly Summond to Cross the Dark River Thursday
The many friends and acquaintances of John Baptiste LeMieux were inexpressibly shocked by the news of his death, which occurred at his home at Neaseville at 8 o'clock Thursday morning, after an illness of but a few hours. The cause of death was cerebral apoplexy. Mr. LeMieux had been apparently in good health until stricken Tuesday evening by his fatal malady, and but few of his friends were aware of his illness. Although Mr. Le Mieux was 74 years of age he did not appear to be older than 60, and was hale and hearty. The deceased had been a resident of the city for several years coming here as manager for John Torrent, which position he filled for Mr. Ducey, the present owner of the mill, at the time of his death. -----He leaves a daughter and son, who lived with him, to mourn his demise. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. C. P. Bates at the residence yesterday afternoon, after which the remains were taken to Muskegon, the former home of the deceased, for interment.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 1
Sidney Somes' Death
The Fell From a Scoffield and Died Almott Immediately
Sidney Somes, a former resident of the Soo, but lately of Newberry, was killed last Saturday by falling from a scaffold while painting one of the new hospital buildings. The body of Mr. Somes was brought to the Soo Monday and was taken to the home of Mrs. Somes parents' Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Campbell, Easterday avenue, where the funeral was held in the afternoon. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 1
Mrs. J. H. Ruehle is Dead
The many friends of Mrs. John H. Ruehle, who formerly resided here, will bee pained to learn that she died Wednesday at Detroit, while undergoing a surgical operationl Mrs. Ruehle had been an invalid for years. The funeral was held yesterday and was conducted by the Rev. C. M. Thompson.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 1
Death of Daniel Doran
Daniel Doran, one of the county's well known farmers, died at his home in Soo township Thursday morning, of Bright's disease. He leaves a wife and children. Mr. Doran has been a resident of Chippewa county for many years, and his demise is deplored by many. The funeral will take place from St. Mary's church at 10 o'clock, this morning.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 5
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Wallace, of Minneapolis street, died Tuesday of cholera infantum, and was buried Thursday.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 5
One of the twin baby boys of Mr. and Mrs. John Quinn died Wednesday evening of cholera infantum. The other baby is quiet ill.

Saturday, October 9, 1897 Page 6
An infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. E. King died Sunday afternoon of cholera infantum. The funeral was held Monday and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, October 23, 1897 Page 1
Died of Blood Poisoning
James Roberts Expires on a Train Enroute to His Home Here
James Roberts, a resident of the Soo, died on a train near Brimley, Thursday evening, where en route from Grand Marais to this city. Death was caused by blood-poisoning, resulting from a wound in Mr. Robert's knee, which he cut with an axe some weeks ago while working in a lumber camp, near Grand Marais. His brother Charles was with him at the time of his death. On the arrival of the train the body was taken charge off by Ryan & Co., and prepared for burial. The deceased was 24 years old. He was formerly in business here in the firm of Lane & Roberts and was well known. Among relatives who reside here are two brothers Charles and Isaac, and a sister, Mrs. Alex. Roberts. The funeral will be held at the Central M. E. church this afternoon, and the remains will be interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, October 23, 1897 Page 2
Met Sudden Death
H. C. Morrison was accidently shot in the back, Saturday afternoon,about 4 o'clock, on a trail near the Munoscong river, and expired within three minutes afterwards. The dead man with Wm. Hartford and Hugh Ross, both of this city, left Thursday for a week's duck hunt on the Munoscong. The reached the river Friday night. The next morning they went up the river for supplies hunting en route. They got provisions at the home of a settler and after dinner started out to return to their camp near the mouth of the stream. When the accident occurred the three men were walking single file on a trail, Hartford being in the lead, Morrison following him and Ross being about 12 feet behind the latter. The men were gaily chatting when the casualty occurred which snuffed the life out of one of their number in almost the twinkling of an eye. Morrison was going through a thicket which had grown up in the trail. He parted the bushes with one had and turning his head said, "Look out, Hugh" evidently intending to warn him that the bushes were about to fly back. Ross who had been carrying his gun on his shoulder, thereupon took it down and carried it with one hand, the muzzle pointing in front of him. The change had hardly been made when the gun went off, pouring a deadly charge of buckshot into Morrison's back. The wounded man groaned and staggered and fell to the earth. He did not utter a word. Death was almost instantaneous. ------------- Morrison left a wife and daughter in straightened circumstances.
Mr. Morrison who had resided in the Soo for almost four years, was 40 years old and a native of Ireland. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. F. Bagnall, at the Congregational church, Tuesday and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, October 23, 1897 Page 8
Death of F. M. Van Liew's Father
Evander S. Van Liew, a well known resident of Bay City, died Friday of last week. The deceased was the father of F. M. Van Liew, a salesman of the Ferguson Hardware, Co. Ltd. who has been laid up with rheumatism for several weeks in a hospital at St. Louis, Mich.

Saturday, November 13, 1897 Page 1
Another Pioneer Gone
Death of Mrs. Catherine Day Last Monday Evening
Mrs. Catherine Day, a pioneer of the Soo died Monday evening at her home on Spruce avenue west at the age of 70 years. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Thursday morning, and the remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery, ---- Seven children are left to mourn the loss of a loving mother. The are: Mrs. Jacob Yeager, of Lead City, S. D.; Mrs. John Burtenshaw, of Woonsocket, R. I.; Mrs Louis G. Bernier, Mrs. Wm. Thomas, and Miss Jennie, Alexander and Henry Day, of this city.

Saturday, November 13, 1897 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Michael Carlson, a swithchman, was run over and killed by the cars at Escanaba last week.

Saturday, November 13, 1897 Page 8
Mrs. Isaiah Faulkner, who resided on the McKnight road, died Saturday of Bright's disease. The remains were shipped to her home in Callan, Ont., Monday morning.

Saturday, November 20, 1897 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
The wife of George C. Newett, mineral statistician of Michigan and editor of the Iron Ore, of Ispeming, died Nov. 12 of appendicitus. She was 41 years of age and is survived by her husband and five children.

Saturday, November 20, 1897 Page 5
John C. Ennis, brother of Dr. C. J. Ennis, of this city, died last month at his home in Dublin, Ireland. Mr. Ennis was a solution and one of the most highly respected citizens of that place.

Saturday, November 20, 1897 Page 5
Mrs. Agnes Johnston departed Thursday for West Superior where she will be united in marriage next Monday with Albert E. Donaldson, of St. Paul, who was a resident of the Soo some years ago.

Saturday, November 20, 1897 Page 5
The Death Record
A number of prominent residents Summoned to the Great Beyond
John Muir, who has for some years, been living with his daughter, Mrs. James House, near Rosedale, received the summons of death Tuesdaay evening without warning, and in a few moments passed away peacefully and without a struggle. Mrs. Muir was born in Lannington, Lanarkshire, Scotland, Nov. 15, 1819, which makes his age 78 years and a day. He came to Canada at 30 years of age, settling at Thornhill, near Toronto where he remained 24 years. Then he moved to St. Vincent, near Meaford, Ont., and after 18 years came to Michigan six years ago. He was married to Eliza McAleer, whom he survived only since the 18th of March last. His only child was Mrs. House, who survives him. He was a member of the Presbyterian church in Canada, but did not unite with the church here. Until about three years ago he enjoyed the best of health. The funeral services, which were well attended by friends and neighbours, were conducted by Rev. J. K. MacGillivray, pastor at large, at Mount Zion church, on Thursday afternoon, and the remains were interred in the Rosedale cemetery.
[] Joseph A. Greenough died Tuesday evening at the home of his parents on Spruce avenue, east, of consumption. The deceased was the eldest son of Capt. and Mrs. Wm. Greenough. He was 29 years of age. The funeral occurred yesterday morning at 10 o'clock, from St. Mary's church, and the remains were laid to rest in the family lot in the Catholic cemetery.-----------
[] J. D. Lewis, proprietor of the depot lunch counter, died early Sunday morning, of paralysis. The funeral which was under the auspices of the Soo Rapids Camp, No. 20, Woodman of the World, took pace at the Central M. E. church Monday afternoon. The Rev. A. W. Stalker officiated. The remains were shipped to Octavias, Neb., for interment and were accompanied by the sorrowing wife. Mr. Lewis, who had been a resident of the Soo for about two years, was a highly respected citizen.----

Saturday, November 20, 1897 Page 7
Elm Grove (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Isaiah Fauner died last Saturday night. She was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lundy. Husband and parents have the sympathy of friends and neighbours. The remains were taken for interment to Sand Hill, Ontario, her home previous to moving here. Mr. Fauner and Mr and Mrs. Lundy desire to thank the many friends for their attention during their bereavement.
[] M. Synegar and Mrs. Gilvroy were joined in the holy bonds of Matrimony last Wednesday evening. We all joined in wishing them a happy future. The young men say the enjoyed the charivaire.

Saturday, November 27, 1897 Page 1
Death of Alfred Thurlby
It Occurred at His Home in Marquette Monday
Soo friends of Capt. Alfred Thurlby of Marquette, were shocked this week by the intelligence of his death, which occurred Monday at his home in Marquette. The funeral was held Wednesday. Capt. Thurlby was a veteran of the civil war, and was known to many people here.--------

Saturday, November 27, 1897 Page 1
Death of Mrs. John Corrigan
Mrs. John Corriagan died Thursday morning at 8:20 o'clock at her residence, on Cedar street, of Bright's disease, after an illness of three years. The deceased was 35 years of age and leaves a husband and two children. The funeral took place at 9 o'clock this morning from St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. ------------------

Saturday, December 4, 1897 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. John Ten Eyck, jr., mourn the loss of their infant son, Clinton, who died Sunday evening. The funeral which occurred Tuesday, was conducted by the Rev. T. R. Easterday. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 1
Death of Mrs. T. N. Rogers
Her Spirit Winged Its Flight to Realms Above Last Evening.
The many friends of Mrs. T. N. Rogers will be expressibly grieved to learn of her death, which occurred at 8:30 o'clock last night, at the family residence, at the corner of Spruce avenue and Kimball street. Mrs. Rogers was the wife of Dr. T. N. Rogers and the daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. T. R. Easterday. She was born in this city, on Portage avenue east, 32 years ago this month. --------Mrs. Rogers was united in marriage Oct 21, 1891, and from the union three children were born, two of whom, both boys, survive. Mrs. Rogers suffered an attack of spinal meningitis about 20 years ago, since which time she has been more or less of an invalid, but her sufferings were born uncomplaining. -----------

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 1
Death of Dora Leora Newcomb After a Brief Illness
Dora Leora, the 14-year old daughter of Mrs. Wm. Newcomb, passed peacefully into eternal sleep Tuesday morning at 3 o'clock, after a fortnight's illness. Typhoid fever and complications were the cause of death, which was not expected to ensue until within a brief time before it intervened, ------The funeral was from the family home Wednesday morning ---- The services was conducted by Rev. C. P. Bates, who was assisted by Rev. J. E. Bitting.-------The remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 1
Called by Death Angel
Viola, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Beaudry, was called away by the angel of death, Tuesday morning, at the home of her parents on the Hay Lake road. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Wednesday and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 2
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Joseph St. Germain died Saturday, Nov. 27 at 2 o'clock a.m. Joe as he was familiarly called, was a repesentitive Indian. His father was one of the old time "medicine men" or conjurors, but Joe, early in his life adopted the white man's ways and was a white man to all intents and a good citizen. Your correspondent was well acquainted with the older St. Germain and was a chum of Joe's in many a trip exploring and hunting for game and gold. When the Rev. Mr. Fitch was Indian agent we were appointed patrol to prevent the introduction of whiskey at the payments, which for a few years at that time were held on Sugar Island at Church's Landing, and we were both present at the council when Mr. Fitch confirmed the title to the little Island in the Soo rapids to the lod Chief Shaw-wa-no.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
C. L. Smyth, of the Cheboygan News mourns the loss of his beloved mother, Mrs. Cecelia Smyth, who died last week at the ripe old age of nearly 75 years. Mr. Smyth has the sympathy of his many newspaper and other friends throughout the state.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Arthur Gaudette, a switchman, was runover and killed by the cars at Gladstone last week.

Saturday, December 11, 1897 Page 8
Death of Malcolm MacKay
An Aged and Respected Resident Called to the Great Beyond
Malcolm MacKay, who died at the ripe old age of 75 years, Wednesday, at the residence of his son-in-law, Jas. C. Hardie, was buried yesterday in Evergreen cemetery. The services were conducted at the residence by Rev. C. P. Bates, the pastor, and Rev. J. K. MacGillivray, a former pastor and intimate friend of the deceased. Mr. McKay was a native of Lewis, Scotland, and emigrated to Canada in 1852, settling in the county of Bruce, where he remained until he moved to Tarbutt, Algoma, in 1894, and later to this city. He belonged to the Presbyterian church of which he was a life long, consistent member, representing the old Highland Scotch type of faith and practice. ----------- His wife and eleven children survive him. His children are Mrs. J. Law and Mrs. A. H. Muir, Chicago: Mrs. James C. Hardie, Mrs. D. O. McLellan and Mrs. Ed. Stack, of this city; also Mary Belle, Rachel, John C., Murdock M., an Malcolm, the latter three living in Buffalo, N. Y.

Saturday, December 18, 1897 Page 5
Mrs. Maria Atkins, an Old Resident, Passed Away Monday
Mrs. Maria Atkins died at 8 o'clock Monday evening, of heart failure, after a lingering illness. Mrs. Atkins was 70 years of age at the time of her death and had been a resident of Chippewa county 22 years, 12 of wich she spent in the city. ------ ---Mrs. Atkins left six children, Mrs. A. Bamstead, Meaford, Ont., Robert, Owen Sound; Charles, Duluth; Mrs. Alex Ross and Henry and John Atkins, of this city. The funeral took place from the Central M. E. church Wednesday morning under the auspices of the Ivy Lodge.---- The services were conducted by Rev. A. W. Stalker assisted by Rev. David Casler, of the Rosedale M. E. church. The internment was in Mount Zion cemetery.

Saturday, December 18, 1897 Page 5
The funeral service of the late Mrs. T. N. Rogers took place at the family home Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and were conducted by Rev. A. W. Stalker, of the Central M. E. church. ----------- The cortage which followed the remains to their resting place in the city cemetery was a large one.
Death of Mrs. Mary Lessard
Mrs. Mar Lessard, aged 64, died Monday afternoon at the home of her son, Jerry Lessard, on Portage avenue. The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery. Mrs. Lessard had resided in this city as follows: Mrs. Daniel Marten, Mrs. Zoe Payment, Mrs. Louis Beaudrie, Mrs. Trembley, Eli, Frank and Jennie Lessard.

Saturday, December 18, 1897 Page 6
Francis E. Prendergast, who will be remembered by many Sooites died at his home in Redlands, Cal, Dec 7, at the age of 56 years.

Saturday, December 18, 1897 Page 6
Tone (Special Correspondence)
James Curry, died Monday night, at his home, of consumption; after a long illness

Saturday, December 18, 1897 Page 7
Mrs. George Morris, of Dafter, died Monday morning at her home of heart failure. Mrs. Morris was in the city the latter part of last week and her death was entirely unexpected. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry McNabb, well known residents of the county, and a most estimated woman. The funeral was held Wednesday morning and was largely attended.

Saturday, December 25, 1897 Page 1
Drowned At Bachewaung
Frank Gerum Met Death While Crossing The Bay
Frank Gerum whose home is near North Bay, Ont., was drowned Sunday while crossing on the ice in Bachewaung bay. Gerum was in the employ of the Niagara Falls Paper Co. at its pulp camps back of Bachewaung, and when the accident occurred was on his way to the Canadian Sault, where he was to have been united in marriage to Miss Holmberg, of that city, Wednesday. The body was recovered and conveyed to the Sault Thursday.

Saturday, December 25, 1897 Page 6
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Moore lost their infant child by death Wednesday. The funeral occurred Thursday.

Saturday 1, January 1898 Page 1
Called To The Great Beyound
Mrs. E. E. Winget Released From Her Sufferings by Death
Mrs. E. E. Winget was called to the great beyond Sunday afternoon after a long illness of paralysis and a compilation of diseases. Mrs. Wingett was the wife of E. E. Wingett who was connected with the Troy laundery and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Scriber, formerly of Brimley, but for the last several years residing in Spokane, Wash. It is expected that Mrs. Scriber will arrive today to attend the funeral which will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Congregational church.

Saturday January 8, 1898 Page 7
Brimley (Special Correspondence)
Robert Wynn, son of James Wynn, passed away Monday morning of this week. He had been feeble for a long time, and he knew he could never get well, yet his end came suddenly and unexpectedly. The funeral was held on Wednesday at his late home. —

Saturday January 8, 1898 Page 7
Brimley (Special Correspondence)
Relatives and friends of Mrs. Ethel Winget, who reside in this place, went to the Soo on Monday to attend her funeral. Her home had been in Brimley from a little child until her married life and she had formed close friendships here. —

Saturday January 8, 1898 Page 8
William, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lowe, of Spruce street died Monday. The funeral was held Tuesday from St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday January 8, 1898 Page 8
The funeral of the late Mrs. E. E. Winget took place Monday afternoon at the Congregational church. The Rev. F. Bagnall assisted by Rev. J. E. Bitting, conducted the services. A large concourse of friends and relatives was in attendance.

Saturday January 15, 1898 Page 6
Fort Brady
Private Edmund S. Myers, company H, died during the drill exercises Monday morning, from angina pectoris or heart stroke. The funeral took place at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. The battalion turned out in full and a firing squad, consisting of eight men, escorted the remains to Riverside cemetery. ----

Saturday January 22, 1898 Page 1
A Fatal Fall
Wm. J. Oliver Walks into the Lock Pit
He Was Instantly Killed
The Unfortunate Man Was En Route to His Home at the Canadian Soo via the International Bridge When Death Overtook Him.
William J. Oliver fof the Canadian Soo fell from the wall of the westend lock at about 11 o'clock Thurday night and was instantly killed. He struck head foremost on the ice, 25 feet below - - - The body will be taken to Carleton Place, Ont. where the wife and family of the deceased reside. Three of his sons are employed on the Canadian Pacific railway.

Saturday January 22, 1898 Page 1
Death Angel Calls
Dr and Mrs. J. F. Deadman mourn the loss of Russel Alger, one of their triplet boys, aged 6 months. The little one was called away Saturday. The funeral was held at the family residence on Court street, Monday. Rev. A. W. Stalker officiated and the remains were interred at Riverside.

Saturday January 22, 1898 Page 8
Called to the Beyond
Mrs. Margaret Reid Dies at Ripe Old Age of 84
Mrs. Margaret Reid and aged resident of Barbeau settlement succumbed to death last Monday at the ripe old age of 84. She was born in Ireland, county of Caven, and came to Canada in 1833. Her parents settling in Derby township Grey county, Ont. She was married twice, first to Thomas Holton, in 1849, by whom she had two sons, Francis and Nathaniel. The former moved to Little Rock, Ark., many years ago, and the latter is a farmer in Barbeau. Some years after Mr. Holden's death she married to Wm. Reid, whom she survived 13 years. By this latter union four children were born to her, three whom survive, William John, Mrs. B. Kirkpatrick and Mrs. John Trickey. The Ried family moved here in — Mrs. Reid lived with her son William John, until her death. The funeral took place last Wednesday and was largely attended, the Rev. J. K. MacGillvray conducted service at the home and at the grave at Rosedale cemetery.

Saturday January 29, 1898 Page 5
Death of Mrs. E. E. Ferguson's Father
Mrs. E. E. Ferguson received the sad intelligency Saturday of the death of her father, Nathan Van Norman, who died the night before. His home was in Brockway, near Port Huron. Mr. Van Norman's fatal illness was brought on by close confinement while serving as a juror. Mrs. Ferguson departed Monday morning to attend the obsequies. She is expected home to-day.

Saturday January 29, 1898 Page 6
W. H. Paul an old resident of the Soo, died at Grace Hospital, Detroit of pnemonia, Jan 14.

Saturday February 5, 1898 Page 3
Brimley (Sprecial Correspondence)
Amy Mason, aged 13, daughter of Silas Mason, passed away Thursday morning Feb. 3. She had been ill with pneumonia for four weeks. It has been just six weeks since. Mr. Mason lost his only son, Clarence.

Saturday February 5, 1898 Page 5
Miss Annie McCauley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James McCauley of Ashmund street, died Saturday of plummonary phthisis, at the age of 22 years. The funeral was held at the family residence Monday afternoon and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday February 5, 1898 Page 5
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Thoenen were called to Ithaca, Mich., Monday by the death of Mr. Thoenen's father. Mr. Thoenen was with his father a week ago Monday and at that time he was in apparently good health. His death which came suddenly and unexpectedly is a severe shock to the sorrowing relatives.

Saturday February 12th 1898 Page 1
Lost For Ten Days
Terrible Experience of Two Men on the Ice
Geo. Avos Dies Thursday
Patrick Barry, His Companion Not Expected to Survive
They Lost Their Way in a Blizzard While Crossing to Cockburn Island Jan 20
George Avis and Patrick Barry had a terrible experience which lasted 10 days and during which they suffered all the imaginable pains of cold and hunger, on a small island eight miles from Thessalon and as a result of the hardships they endured. George Avis died Thursday and his companion may not recover.
Mr Avis formerly resided here and is well known. He was a brother-in-law of Owen Daily and a son -in-law of Mrs. Barney Doyle.-----------Mr. and Mrs. Owen Dailey and Mrs. B. Doyle returned home yesterday from Thessalon, where they attended the funeral of Mr. Avis.

Saturday February 19th 1898 Page 1
Killed at Corinne
Brother of Mrs. J. Fleming Met Death there Yesterday
Mrs. Jeremiah Fleming received the sad intelligence by wire yesterday that her brother James Webb, had been accidently killed in the employ of Boyce Robinson & Co. and in the last letter received from him by Mrs. Fleming a few days ago, he stated that he was then engaged in loading lumber. No details of the accident were known yesterday. – He was 24 years of age. Mr Webb's body will be brought here this morning and taken to his home in Tuscola for burial.

Saturday February 19th 1898 Page 1
Death of Whalen Jennings Deadman
Whalen Jennnings infant son of Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Deadman, died Wednesday afternoon. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon and the remains were interred at Riverside. The deceased was one of triplets born less than a year ago and is the second one that has been called away by death.

Saturday February 19th 1898 Page 1
Brimley (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Betsey Brown of Whitefish Point, dropped dead Monday morning of heart failure, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. James Smith, of this place. The remains were interred in the Mission cemetery Wednesday.

Saturday February 19th 1898 Page 1
A. S. Case received a telegram from London, Ont, Wednesday announcing the death of his sister Mrs. John Glenn.

Saturday February 26th 1898 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. John Carmeron, aged 58 years, died Thursday Feb. 12, after a long illness of cancer of the stomach. The funeral was held in the Presbyterian church Sunday. Rev. Maltas of Stalwart and Rev. Clarke, officiated. Many friends sympathze with the family.

Saturday February 26th 1898 Page 5
Mr. and Mrs. L. McLean, who reside on Easterday avenue received telegraphic intelligence yesterday that their daughter Mrs. Geo. Preston, had died that morning at Cleveland where she resided with her husband. Mr. and Mrs. Preston formerly lived here. The remains will be sent here for interment.

Saturday March 12th 1898 Page 1
Gone to Her Reward
Death of Almira Jennie Newcomb on Thursday
Almira Jennie Newcomb passed to her eternal rest Thursday noon, at her home on the Hay Lake road, after a lingering illness from dreaded consumption. Jennie as she was best known to her friends had been an uncomplaining sufferer for many weary months and death came as a sweet release. She was the daughter of Mrs. Dora Newcomb and was born in the Soo Dec 14, 1876. Jennie was therefore a trifle over 22 years of age.– – – more poignant because of the death, but a few months ago another daughter Dora.
The funeral was held from the house yesterday afternoon at 1 o'clock, the interment being at Riverside cemetery. The Rev. C. P. Bates assisted by the Revs. T. R. Easterday and J. E. Bitting, conducted the services. – — —

Saturday March 12th 1898 Page 2
Henry Hanburg, a brother of Mrs. John F. Moloney and a former resident of this city, died at Marquette last week.

Saturday March 12th 1898 Page 2
Zelner the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lines, died Friday of pneumonia and was buried Saturday at Riverside.

Saturday March 12th 1898 Page 2
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
The funeral of B. Thompson took place Wednesday at 1 o'clock p.m. From the M. E. church and the remains were interred at the Mission cemetery.

Saturday March 19th 1898 Page 1
Death of Robert McAleer
Robert McAleer died of consumption yesterday morning at 2:30 o'clock, at the residence of his aunt, Mrs. M. Cameron, 307 Spruce avenue, west. The decesed was 19 years of age and well known here, He had been employed for some time at the Leader, and lately W. F. Ferguson & Co. The funeral will occur from the Baptist Tabernacle tomorrow afternoon at 1 o'clock.

Saturday March 19th 1898 Page 1
A TRIPLE TRAGEDY
Wm. Lathwell Shoots Wife, Paramour and Himself
Former Sooite Crime
Mrs. Lathwell Dies From Her Wounds
A Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Piquette and Had Lived Here Until Two Months Ago
A terrible tragedy was enacted at Niagara Falls last Monday, in which people well known here were the participants. Wm. Lathwell, in a moment of insane rage, shot and fatally wounded his wife and a woman named Mrs. Toomey, who was his paramour, and himself. Mrs. Lathwell is dead, and her body will reachthe Soo today for burial. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mars. Antoine Piquette, old residents of the Soo, and has three sisters and two brothers in the city. The ill fated woman married Lathwell two years ago this winter, when he was the proprietor of a barber shop at the Canadian Soo. The following summer Lathwell worked in a barber shop under Condolon's shoe store, and is remembered by many here - - - - - [quite a story] continues.

Saturday March 26th 1898 Page 2
The remains of Mrs. Wm. Lathwell who was murdered by her husband at Niagara Falls, arrived here Saturday. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery

Saturday March 26th 1898 Page 8
Died at a ripe old age
Mrs. Mary A. Kimball, ages 73, died Sunday at Whitefish Point and was buried Tuesday. The deceased was the mother of Capt. Chas. Kimball, keeper of Whitefish Point light.

Saturday April 2nd 1898 Page 6
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
An Indian by the name of Jacko or David Thomas was found dead Wednesday morning near the road through the old Boyle & Roach quarry. He was known to have been drinking the day before, but it is believed to have died of heart failure.

Saturday April 2nd 1898 Page 6
Miss Etta Potter was called to Goderich, Ont., Sunday, by a telegram announcng the death of her sister.

Saturday April 2nd 1898 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Flora McKay
Mrs. Flora McKay died at her home on Hay Lke, last Saturday morning, after a brief illness, aged 45 years. The deceased left a family of seven children to mourn the loss of a kind and devoted mother. The relatives and family of the deceased desire to extend sincere thanks, to the many kind friends who so willingly rendered services to them in their sad bereavement.

Saturday April 9th 1898 Page 1
Death of Robert Durnion
He Expired Monday Evening After a Lingering Illness
Robert B. Durnion, who has been the popular landlord of the Arlington, is no more, having died last Monday afternoon, of cirrhosis of the liver. Mr. Durnion had been confined to his room for several weeks and his death was not expected. The remains were taken to his former home in Kincardine, Ont., Tuesday morning. Members of the Masonic and Loyal Orance lodges, headed by the Soo City brass band, escorted the remains to the depot from the Arlington Hotel, where a brief funeral service was conducted by the Rev. C. P. Bates. Mr. Durnion had been a resident of this city for about three years and was held in the highest respect. He leaves a father, Robert D. Durnion, sr., a wife, and four sons, Richard E. Robert G, William and John, all of whom reside here,- - - Mrs. Durion, Mrs. D. M. Mackenzie and J. N. Priester accompanied the body.

Saturday April 9th 1898 Page 4
Emil Mercier Cornell, an adopted infant of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Bellair, died early yesterday morning, aged eleven months.

Saturday April 9th 1898 Page 8
Death of Mrs. Joseph Lowe
Mrs. Joseph Lowe died last night at her home on Spruce avenue, west. Four months ago Mrs. Lowe suffered an attack of pneumonia which developed into consumption and death had been expected for some time. The deceased was 22 years of age and leaves a husband, to whom she was a loving and devoted wife for eight years. A sister, Mrs. Crossley of Flesherton, Ont., was with her during her illness and death. The funeral services will take place at St. Mary's church Monday morning.

Saturday April 16th 1898 Page 8
Met Death in the Canal
Peter Johnson, a Swede, employed as a machinist by the Algoma Iron Works, Canadian Soo, was drowned in St. Mary's Falls canal, near the International bridge Saturday night. - - - -. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday April 16th 1898 Page 8
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Howe, of William street, mourn the loss of an infant child by death Tuesday morning. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday April 23rd 1898 Page 6
Antoine LaFrenier, aged 58, died Saturday at his home at Neaseville. The funeral was held Monday at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the catholic cemetery.

Saturday April 23rd 1898 Page 6
Miss Nellie Ingleheart, aged 17, died of consumption at her home on Ridge street, Tuesday. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church yesterday morning and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday April 30th 1898 Page 3
Iroquois (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Jane Haynes, the beloved wife of Robert Haynes, died April 17, at the age of 53 years, 8 months and 28 days. Mrs. Haynes was and estimable woman and her death is a severe blow to her sorrowing relatives, to whom the sympathy of the community are extended.

Saturday April 30th 1898 Page 6
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
The three weeks old infant of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Smith died last week. The funeral was held Friday.

Saturday May 7th 1898 Page 4
Alex Trudo died Saturday morning of consumption. He was 40 years of age and an old resident of the city. The funeral was held Monday morning from St. Mary's church.

Saturday May 7th 1898 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
John Cody's infant daughter, Marguerite, 7 months old, died Thursday night, to the great grief of her parents and sympathetic friends. She was buried at Sunnyside, Canada, Sunday afternoon. Rev. Father Gagnieu, s. j. officiating.

Saturday May 7th 1898 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
The sympathy of this community is extended to the family of John Robinson, from the after effects of a bad case of measels. Kenny died last Thursday.

Saturday May 14th 1898 Page 3
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. David Fisher died Sunday, and was buried Tuesday. The funeral was from St. Mary's church.

Saturday May 14th 1898 Page 3
Gur D. Welton, was called to Detroit Thursday by the sad news that his father, E. B. Welton, had suddenly died there that morning.

Saturday May 14th 1898 Page 8
Death of Mrs. J. J. Gardner
It Occurred Yesterday Morning at Detroit

Mayor P. C.Kelliher received the sad intelligence yesterday morning, from his wife the Mrs. John J. Gardner her mother, had died early in the morning in Detroit. Mrs. Gardner had been a resident of the Soo for 20 years prior to 1896, since which she had make Detroit her home. Mr. Gardner was about 56 years of age. The deceased had benn ill for several months, and a short time before her demise had been a patient in Grace hospital in which a daughter, Miss Maggie is a trained nurse. Mrs. Gardner was an earnest Christian and an active member of St. Mary's church during her residence here. Besides her husband, who was with her at the time of her death Mrs. Gardner leaves four daughters, Mrs. P. C. Keliher, of this city and the Misses Maggie, Sarah and Dollie, and a son John, jr. All of the family except the last named were at the bedside of their mother when the angel of death called.
The remains will arrive here on the 12:20 train Monday and will be taken direct to St Mary's church, where the service will be held. the interment will be in the Catholic cemetery on the hill.

Saturday May 21st 1898 Page 4
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Smith of Pickford, were recently bereaved by the death of their beloved son, Nelson.

Saturday May 21st 1898 Page 5
A Babe Smothered to Death
The four-day old boy baby of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cameron, who reside near the corner of Portage avenue and Sara street was found dead in bed by the babe's mother, when she awoke Thursday morning. Death was caused by suffocation. It is supposed the child was smothered by the bed clothes sometime during the night.

Saturday June 4th 1898 Page 1
TWO MEN DROWNED
Thos. Drew and Robt. Madden Fill Watery Graves at Batchewaung
Thos. Drew of Novar, Ont., and Robt. Madden, whose place of residence is unknown were drowned in Batchewaung bay during the heavy sqaull Wednesday. The men were crossing from Batchewaung Island to the dock in a canoe, which was upset by the wind. The accident was witnessed by Capt. Thos. Ganley of the tug Sawyer, which went to rescue, but the men were not reached in time. The bodies have not been recovered. Both of the unfortunates were employees of the Niagara Falls Paper Co. Mr. Drew being the clerk.- - -.

Saturday June 4th 1898 Page 4
Lulu, the 14-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Eagle, of Hay Lake, died Sunday night. The funeral took place Tuesday and the remains were interred in the Riverside cemetery.

Saturday June 11th 1898 Page 6
An infant son of Sergt. and Mrs. E. Anderson died Monday and was buried Tuesday.

Saturday June 25th 1898 Page 1
Death of Eddie Prenzlauer
It Occurred at Detroit, Sunday After a Surgical Operation
Edwin Joseph, the 10-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Prenzlauer died at St. Mary's hospital, Detroit, Monday and was buried there Wednesday. Mrs. Prenzlauer were visiting relatives at Detroit, and Edwin was taken ill. His complaint was diagnosed as appendicitus

Saturday June 25th 1898 Page 5
The 3-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Owen Daly, Spruce street, west, died Wednesday.

Saturday June 25th 1898 Page 5
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Jane Carey died at the home of her son, Joseph Carey, after a brief illness saturday morning June 17 in her 75th year. She was a native of Ireland and moved with her husband to Raber township in 1892. She leaves a aged husband and seven children. Mrs. T. C. Spence, Mrs. Owen Crisp, Joseph and John all of Raber township. The funeral occurred from the home Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in the Lytle cemetery. The funeral sermon will be preached by Rev. Maltas in the Gatesville Presbyterian church, Sunday, June 26. The family has the sympathy of the entire community in its affliction.

Saturday June 25th 1898 Page 6
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Tate are mourning the loss of their 2-year-old daughter who died of convulsions Sunday. The funeral occurred Tuesday.

Saturday June 25th 1898 Page 6
John Vaughan, of Emmetsburgh,La., son of Mr. and Mrs. James Vaughan, of this city, arrived here Tuesday from Flint, where he had taken his young wife for burial, Mrs. Vaughan, died on the 15th. Mr. Vaughan has the sympathy of many friends here in his bereavement.

Saturday July 2nd 1898 Page 6
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. Geo Leach died at her home June 23, of dropsy after an illness of sixteen months, in her 59th year. She was a native of Liverpool, Eng., and moved with her husband and family to Raber township in 1886. She leaves a large family, the youngest thirteen years of age. The funeral was from the Stalwart Presbyterian church, Saturday and the remains were interred in Stalwart.

Saturday July 2nd 1898 Page 6
The funeral services of the late Mrs. Carey were held in the Gatesville Presbyterian church Sunday.

Saturday July 7th 1898 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
We are sorry to announce the death of Timothy Flynn, who died July 2 after a long and painful illness, which he bore with patient resignation. His malady was dyspepsia. The remains were buried at St. Joseph's Island on July 3. Rev. Father Gagnier officiated at the services. There was quite a large attendance at the funeral. Mr. Flynn leaves a wife and three children, two sons and one daughter to mourn his loss.

Saturday July 7th 1898 Page 5
Manilla, the four-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Brown, died Thursday noon of cholera infantum. The funeral occurred at 1 p.m. yesterday from the family residence and the remains were interred in the Riverside cemetery. Mr. Brown is with the Soo-Yukon company en route to Alaska.

Saturday July 16th 1898 Page 1
Death of Miss Anna Varcoe
Miss Anna Varcoe died yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock, at the residence of her cousin, John Elliott, after a lingering illness. She was 17 years of age. A brother and two sisters reside here. The funeral will be held from the Baptist church tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock.

Saturday July 16th 1898 Page 1
Death of J. P. McConnell
John P. McConnell, for many years a resident of the Soo died Sunday at his residence on Brown street, aged 53 years. He leaves a wife and family. The funeral was from St. Mary's church, Tuesday.

Saturday July 16th 1898 Page 6
Mrs. B. Desenberg and Mrs. A. Prenzlauer were called to Cleveland Sunday by the serious illness of their father, M. Joseph. Mr. Joseph died Tuesday.

Saturday July 23rd 1898 Page 1
Death of Samuel Bailey
Samuel Bailey, a brother of Thos. Bailey, of the Hall & Munson Co. died at Bay Mills Thursday, of paralysis, at the age of 46. Mr. Bailey came from his home at Montreal to Bay Mills, several months ago, for the benefit of his health. The remains will be brought to the Soo this morning and the funeral will be held from St. James' church at 12:30. Mrs. Bailey, widow of the deceased and child, are expected to arrive from Montreal in time for the funeral.

Saturday July 23rd 1898 Page 8
Capt. John Drum Killed
Among the regular army officers whose death before
SANTIAGO has been confirmed is Capt. John Drum of the Tenth U.S. Infantry. Capt. Drum was stationed at Old Fort Brady at one time, serving five years as post commissary and quartermaster and had many friends here.

Saturday July 30th 1898 Page 1
Little Bessie Eagle Called Away
Bessie, the bright three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Eagle, of 924 Ashmun street, died Wednesday morning of typhoid pneumonia. The funeral was held, from the family residence Thursday afternoon by the Rev. A. W. Stalker, and the remains were interred in the city cemetery. - - -

Saturday July 30th 1898 Page 8
James Luckhurst Expires Suddenly Wednesday Evening
James Luckhurst died suddenly Wednesday evening, on the steps of J. C. Manning's residence on Bingham avenue, where he sat down to rest. He had arrived here that evening from Sarnia, in company with his 14-year-old son. The coroner and undertaker were summoned. The body was prepared for shipment and was sent to Sarnia for interment. The son was heart broken at the death of his father and manifested his grief by pitiful cries of "my poor dad, my great dad". Mr. Luckhurst was well known in the Soo, where he spent the summer for many years. He was generally called "Teapot Jimmie" from the fact that in an orchestra of which he was the manage he played an instrument that resemble a teapot.

Saturday July 30th 1898 Page 8
Drowned Near Point Aux Pins
A man by the name of Wilson and his daughter, of the Canadian Soo, were drowned Wednesday near Point aux Pins. The little girl fell overboard from the boat in which they were sailing. The father jumped out to rescue her and both perished before assistance arrived.

Saturday August 13th 1898 Page 3
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Thomas an invalid son of Arthur and the late Jane Carey, died at the home of Josey Carey, Aug 4. The remains were interred Friday beside those of his mother in the Lyttle cemetery.

Saturday August 27th 1898 Page 2
Grace the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Parker, died Tuesday of cholera infantum.

Saturday August 27th 1898 Page 7
G. L. Armstrong this week received the sad intelligence of the death of his mother Mrs. Charles Armstrong, at Durham, Eng, Aug 1, in her 68th year.

Saturday August 27th 1898 Page 8
Death of Richar Common
He Expired at Harper Hospital, Detroit last Tuesday. Soo relatives and friends of Richard Common were greatly shocked upon receiving the news of his death, which occurred Tuesday morning in Harper's Hospital, Detroit. Mr. Common had been a sufferer from a compilation of diseases for several years, but since two years ago, when he submitted to an operation he had enjoyed the best of health. - - - The funeral will occurred this afternoon and will be attended by Mrs. William Ruehle, sr. mother-in-law of the deceased and his brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Morrish and Jos. Ripley, of this city. - - - -

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 4
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Nicholson died yesterday.

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 4
Mr. and Mrs. Dan McCoy, of Payment had the misfortune last week to lose their twin boys by death.

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 4
Death of John Bottrell
John Bottrell, driver for P. C. Kelther, after a short illness, died yesterday morning, of inflammation of the bowels. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the M. E.church. Interment in the Riverside cemetery. Mr. Bottrell leaves a wife to mourn his loss.

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 5
Hazel, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Belanger died Sunday of pnemonia. The funeral was held yesterday from St. Mary's church.

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 7
Frank, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lalonde, died Monday. The funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon from St. Mary's church.

Saturday September 10th 1898 Page 1
Military Funeral of the Late Archie T. Trempe
Sketch of the First Brave Soo Soldier Boy to Sacrifice His Life
The funeral of the late Archie Trempe a private in Co. G Thirty-fourth Michigan Volunteers and the Soo's first martyr in the service of Uncle Sam, was held at the armoury at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon - - - The sermon was preached by Rev. C. P. Bates, assisted by Rev. T. R. Easterday. - - - - - -

Saturday September 3rd 1898 Page 5
An 11-months old child of Mr. and Mrs. John Hall of Maple street died last night. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's at 1:30 tomorrow afternoon.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 1
A Fatal Accident
Gibson Pratt, the bright 2½-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Pratt, of the Canadian Soo, fell headfootmost onto a pointed nail Monday. The nail was sticking up in a walk and perforated the unfortunate child's forehead, inflicting a wound that resulted fatally Wednesday. The funeral occurred yesterday afternoon.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 2
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
The death recently of Mrs. Alexander Seymour of Detour, daughter of Norrise LaPoint, of Pentagahissing is greatly regretted by her many friends and relativs on Drummond. - - - She leaves a large family to mourn her.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 2
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. Earl's infant daughter died last week of cholera infantum.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 2
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Jospeh Jacko died last Saturday at the Petagannissing. As the family was very poor he was buried at public expense.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 3
Chas. Noble, father of Alfred Noble, the well known civil engineer, died at Northville yesterday.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 5
Miss Ellen Fletcher daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walker Fletcher of Donaldson died of gastric fever, aged 22 years. The funeral was held from the residence yesterday morning. The Donaldson cemetery received the remains.

Saturday September 17th 1898 Page 5
Mrs. Emery Clarke, a sister-in-law of C. G. Clarke, of this city, died suddenly of paralysis at her home in Trenton, Ont., yesterday.

Saturday September 24th 1898 Page 5
Death of Capt. Jos. Tebo
Capt. Joseph Tebo of the tug Cheney, died suddenly and unexpectedly on that boat about 6 o'clock Monday morning. Going on board the tug during the night Capt. Tebo slipped and fell into the river. He was rescued by Wm. Moss, also an employee on the Cheney and placed on board, a physician was summoned. About 5 o'clock the captain asked to be taken home but before a carriage could be obtained for that purpose he expired. He leaves a wife, a mother, two brothers and three sisters. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Wednesday morning, an the remains were interred in the hill cemetery.

Saturday October 1st 1898 Page 3
The fifteen-months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Eli Lessard died Tuesday. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon from St. Mary's church.

Saturday October 1st 1898 Page 3
Jos. McDonald died at Marquette House, Wednesday afternoon of consumption, at the age of 22 years. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. McDonald, of Trout Lake, were with him when he died.

Saturday October 1st 1898 Page 3
Mrs. Gordon Wilson, of Chebogan, Miss Corbiere, of Chicago, and Mr. Corbiere, of Toronto, arrived in the city Wednesday to attend the funeral of their brother Wm. Corbiere, who was drowned on the Monifor.

Saturday October 15th 1898 Page 5
The adopted infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Neil O'Donnell died Tuesday. The funeral occurred Wednesday from St. Mary's church.

Saturday October 15th 1898 Page 5
The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Mitchell died Monday. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Wednesday afternoon.

Saturday October 22nd 1898 Page 1
Alex. McDougall Dead
Was Taken Ill On the Way to the Alaskan Gold Fields
News was received this week of the death of Angus McDougall by A. B. McDonald of the Franklin House, who received a letter without date written by Thos. Laundry detailing the circumstances. Mr. McDougall had been ill for three weeks, and died on Old Indian Trail, about 120 miles from Graham Post, in Northwestern Canada. He was buried by his companions, Thos. Laundry and Thos. Hopkins, with whom he left the Soo for the Alaskan gold region last April. Mr. McDougall's death must have taken place about a month ago.
Alex McDougall was 35 years of age and had been a resident of the Soo for 12 years. He was a popular gentleman and many friends here will sincerely mourn his death. He was a brother of Mrs. A. B. McDonald and John McDougall, both of this city.

Saturday October 22nd 1898 Page 1
Death of Hugh Morrison
A Respected Settler of the County Gone to his Reward
Hugh Morrison, one of the old settlers of the county, died Tuesday at the home of his sister, Mrs. Geo. Christie, at Rosedale. He was 75 years of age. Mr. Morrison was born in Ireland and when a young man located near Gorrie, Ont. He came to this county 20 years ago, and has been a well known and highly respected citizen. He leaves three daughters and a son to mourn his demise. Mrs. John Turner and Lindsay Morrison, of the Soo: Mrs. George Christie, Rosedale, and Mrs. James Turner, Harriston, Ont. The funeral was from the Rosedale Congregational church Thursday. The Rev. Wm. Johnston, St. James' Episcopal church, conducted the services.

Saturday October 22nd 1898 Page 1
Death of Frederick Lake
Frederick Lake died Tuesday night at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Lake, on Bingham avenue, of hemorrhage. The deceased was 25 years of age, was the junior member of James Lake & Son, who conduct a grocery on Bingham avenue, and was an exemplary young man. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. C. P. Bates at the family residence Thursday afternoon and the remains were interred in the city cemetery.

Saturday October 22nd 1898 Page 6
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Mrs Susan Lytle, wife of William Lytle, died Oct 9, at her home at the age of 83 years. Mrs. Lylte was born in Ireland in 1815 and moved to Canada shortly after her marriage. She came to Chippewa about 18 years ago. She leaves a family of four sons and three daughtesr, Mrs. T. H. Spence, Mrs. Wm. Formen, Mrs. Richardson, Thomas and Lyle, both of Canada, and William and John Lytle both of this place. The remains were laid to rest in the Rosmont Cemetery. The bereaved husband and family have the sympathy of their many friends. The Rev. Mr. Stillwell preached the funeral sermon.

Saturday October 22nd 1898 Page 6
Raber (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Crawford lost one of their twins, aged 3 months. The remains were laid to rest in the Stalwart cemetery. The Rev. Mr. Clark preached the funeral service.

Saturday October 29th 1898 Page 1
Death of Harry Nicoll
Harry Nicoll died suddenly Wednesday morning, while being removed from the Union Hotel to the Marine hospital. He had been ill since his arrival, Sunday from Grand Marais, where he had been employed by the U. S. Fish Commission. Mr. Nicoll was a brother of Capt. Frank Nicoll of the tug Annie Clark and was formerly employed by Ainsworth & Ganley. The body was taken to Collingwood Thursday for burial.

Saturday October 29th 1898 Page 5
Miss Bridget Mansfield aged 28 died at the house of her parents near Dafter, Monday afternoon, after a long illness. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning from St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

Saturday October 29th 1898 Page 5
James McKierman, of Court street, mourns the death of his venerable father, James McKierman, sr., who passed away recently, at the ripe old age of 81 years, at his home near Eganville, Ont. The deceased was one of the most highly respected residents in that section of Ontario.

Saturday October 29th 1898 Page 8
Prominent Marquette Citizen Dies
Judge Thomas Woods, one of the pioneers of Marquette and city recorder for 12 years, died yesterday morning.

Saturday November 5th 1898 Page 4
Death of Miss Maria L. Orchard
Miss Maria L. Orchard, who has for 19 years been housekeeper in the family of Rev. and Mrs. T. R. Easterday, died Tuesday afternoon, at the Easterday residence, on Kimball street. The funeral was held Thursday morning from the Easterday home. The Rev. A. W. Stalker conducted services. Miss Orchard was born in Ontario, but had resided in the Soo for over 20 years. She had been in poor health since early spring.

Saturday November 5th 1898 Page 5
Death of Eli Gurnoe
Eli Gurnoe, another of Chippewa county's pioneers, passed away Thursday night at 11 o'clock, after a lingering illness, at the residence of his brother-in-law, W. S. Shaw, on Ridge street. Mr. Gurnoe was 64 years old and was born in this city. He was a brother of John Gurnoe and Mrs. Wm. Shaw, of this ciy, and Mrs. Wm. Myron of Bay Mills. The funeral was held this morning at 8 o'clock from St. Mary's church, and the remains were laid to rest at the Catholic cemetery. Mr. Gurnoe was twice married both of his wives preceding him to the vast beyond.

Saturday November 5th 1898 Page 9
Death of a Pioneer
Mrs. Margaret Cadotte Boucher, wife of John Boucher, died Tuesday morning at her home on Maple street. The funeral was held from St. Mary's church Thursday morning. Mr. Boucher was one of the Soo's pioneers having resided here for 65 years.

Saturday November 5th 1898 Page 9
DeLisle Elbert, the five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Allan Fanjoy, died of membranous croup Saturday night. The funeral occured Monday afternoon, Rev. J. H. Sowerby, officiating.

Saturday November 5th 1898 Page 9
W. C. Sutherland was called to Glencoe, Ont, Saturday by the death of his father, Rev. W. R. Sutherland.

Saturday November 12th 1898 Page 8
Water Power Canal Employee Run Over By a Train
Harvey Stewart, a brakemon on one of the water power excavation trains, was fatally injured Monday evening about 8 o'clock. He was signaling the engineer of his train when the train backed and he was thrown across to the adjoining track. A train coming from the opposite direction passed over him, crushing him under the firebox, bruising him considerably. He was taken to the Harison-Townsend hospital, where he died at midnight in great agony from internal injuries. The remains were taken to Vanderhook's undertaking rooms and shipped Wednesday to his former home at Windham Centre, Ont.

Saturday November 19th 1898 Page 3
Mrs. James Pattenger died at the home of Mrs. J. Steinaway, Bingham avenue, Sunday afternoon, after a short illness. The remains were sent to Grindstone City, Mich., for interment.

Saturday November 19th 1898 Page 5
Death of Philip Smith
Philip Smith, aged 63, died Saturday night at the American House, after a long illness with dropsy. Mr. Smith had been in the employ of John Hickler, and later of Bros. The body was shipped Monday afternoon to friends in Binghampton, N. Y. for interment.

Saturday November 19th 1898 Page 5
Mrs. Angeline Lataur, daughter of the late Joseph St. Germain, died Friday, the 11th inst. Her death was not unexpected, as she had been sick for a very long time. Her husband, two sons and a little daughter mourn her loss.

Saturday December 17th 1898 Page 1
Tug Swain Destroyed by Fire and W. J. Sylvester Lost His Life
The death by burning of Wm. John Sylvester a brother of Clement Sylvester, of this city and the sinking of the tug Swain, marked the closing chapter of accidents on St. Mary's river for the season at 4 o'clock this morning. - - -

Saturday December 17th 1898 Page 1
Almost a Centenarian
Mrs. Rachel Clegg, mother of Mrs. C. W. Pickford, died at the Pickford home on Court street Wednesday morning, at the age of 93 years. Mrs. Clegg had suffered an extended illness and death had been momentarily expected for some time. Mrs. Clegg had resided here for two years, and prior thereto had lived in Gorrie, Ont. for 35 years. She was born in Ireland. Three daughters and four sons survive Mrs. Clegg. Those residing in this county are Mrs. C. W. Pickford of this city, Mrs. Alex Crawford, of this city and W.H.Clegg, of this city. The other daughter Mrs. J. Mooney of Hamilton, Ont. was here to attend the obsequies. The funeral was from the Central M. E. church Thursday afternoon, and was largely attended. The interment was at the Riverside cemetery.

Saturday December 17th 1898 Page 6
The three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Armstrong died Tuesday morning. The funeral was held from St. James church Wednesday afternoon and interment was made in the Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday December 31st 1898 Page 1
Mrs. Frank B. Atwood at Rest
Well Known Soo Lady Died Thursday After a Brief Illness.
Mrs. Effie Wade Atwood, wife of Frank B. Atwood, died Thursday morning at 3 o'clock at the family residence on Bingham avenue. News of the death of Mrs. Atwood came as a shock to the community. Last week she gave birth to a boy baby and death resulted from an extremely weak physical condition. Mrs. Atwood was born near Brookville, Pa., Aug 31, 1861, and had been a resident of the Soo for many years. She was a member of the Methodist church.- - - She was married in August 1895, to Frank B. Atwood, who with an infant son survives her. Mrs. Atwood was a sister of Mrs. Geo. Kemp, the Misses Lina and Anna Heichchold and Harry W. Heichhold, all of whom reside here. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 1 o'clock from the residence of George Kemp, west Portage avenue. The interment will be at Riverside.

Saturday December 31st 1898 Page 2
JAMES CALBECK KILLED
Fell From the Bay Mills Railway Trestle Christmas Eve
James Calbeck, a lumberman employed by the Hall & Munson Co., died at his home in Bay Mills, 12 o'clock Saturday night as a result of a fall from the railroad trestle across Waiskai Bay. Calbeck had been working in one of the company's camps and with Alex Alford, was on his way home to spend Christmas. The shortest route between Brimley and Bay Mills is over the trestle and the two men started across this about 8 o'clock. - - - They were less than half way across when they lost their footing an fell to the ice below. Alford sustained no serious injuries but Calbeck chilled by the water and stunned by the fall, was helpless. - - - the injured man was taken to his home in Bay Mills where he died without regaining consciousness. He leaves a wife and child. The funeral occurred Tuesday from the Church of Ephiphany, Bay Mills, under the auspices of the I.O.F. of which he was a member. The remains were brought to this city and interred in the Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday December 31st 1898 Page 3
Gatesville (Special Correspondence)
Wm. Patterson and family left hastily for Pickford, Monday after learning of the death of their niece Rosie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Kirkbride, formerly of this place. - - -

Saturday December 31st 1898 Page 7
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
The people of Pickford were shocked to learn of the death of Rosa A. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Kirkbride which occurred Sunday night at 12 o'clock, resulting from an attack of appendicitus. The deceased was seventeen years of age. The funeral services were held Wednesday from the Presbyterian church of which the deceased was a member and were conducted by Rev. S. L. Clark, assisted by Rev. H. Magahey.

Saturday, January 7th 1899 Page 8
Funeral of Mrs. F. B. Atwood
The funeral of the late Mrs. Frank B. Atwood was held Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the residence of George Kemp, Portage avenue west. The services were conducted by the Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, of the Central M. E. church - - - - Riverside cemetery was the place of interment. Undertaker Ryan had charge of the funeral.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 1
B. BLUMROSEN'S FATHER
He Died Wednesday Afternoon at His Home at Detroit
On Thursday afternoon B. Blumrosen received a telegram informing of the dangerous illness of his father at Detroit. The news came to late for Mr. Blumrosen to catch the afternoon train. Accordingly he chartered an engine to take him to Soo Junction, where he joined his brother, M. Blumrosen, and together they journeyed to Detroit, arriving there two hours after their father's death. - - -
The deceased, Samuel Blumrosen, passed away at his home 157 East Montcalm street, Detroit, Wednesday, at 4 o'clock p.m. He was well known in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Mr. Blumrosen was born in the city of Suwaliki, Russia, in 1840, and came to Alpena in this state when he was a young man. From there he removed to Detroit, where he has made his home eversince. He leaves a widow, and four children, Moses Blumrosen, of Manistique, B. Blumrosen of Sault Ste. Marie, Mrs. L. Rosenthal, of Manistique and Miss Hattie Blumrosen, of Detroit.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 3
Robert B. Durnion, father of the late R. B. Durnion, of the Arlington Hotel, died Tuesday morning, aged 76 years. Mr. Durnion had been in failing health for som time.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 3
Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Carney had the misfortune to lose their 6-months old daughter last Saturday, after a brief illness. The funeral occurred Monday, from St. Mary;'s church.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 5
Mrs. Margaret Thibault died Saturday of inflammatory rheumatism, aged 84 years. She had lived in the Soo nearly all her life.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 5
Joseph Cole, whose home was at Ironmountain, died at the Bay City House, Monday, after an illness of four weeks of typhoid refer. Mr. Cole had been an engineer in the canal contract. The remains were taken Tuesday afternoon to Iron Mountain for burial.

Saturday, January 14th 1899 Page 7
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Campbell died Saturday morning.

Saturday, January 21st 1899 Page 2
Died of Heart Disease
Neil McDougall died suddenly of heart disease at the Hotel Belvidere, Monday afternoon. The funeral which took place Tuesday afternoon, from the residence of his brother D. McDougall, on Seymour street, was conducted by the Rev. C.P.Bates. The deceased was 51 years old. For some time past he had resided with his brother in this city. He leaves no family.

Saturday, January 21st 1899 Page 3
Alf. Richards was called to Hebron, Neb., early in the week by the death of his father, Capt. J. W. Richards.

Saturday, January 21st 1899 Page 3
A cablegram received by relatives here announced the death of Fred Mitchell, brother of W. F. Mitchell of this city, at Johannesburgh, South Africa, last Thursday. Deceased had been a resident of Marquette, and went to Africa with his brother Abe about two years ago.

Saturday, January 21st 1899 Page 8
Death of Lillian Beatrice Mitchell
Lillian Beatrice, the sweet 8-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Mitchell, of East Portage avenue, died Monday noon after nearly three weeks suffering. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. C. P. Bates, at the family residence, Wednesday, afternoon.

Saturday, February 4th 1899 Page 1
Death of Dr. W. L. Williams' Father
Dr. W. L. Williams arrived home yesterday, from Orillia, Ont. He was called to that place last Sunday by a telegram announcing the dangerous illness of his father, Rev. Thomas Williams, who lived only a couple of days after the arrival of his son. The deceased was a prominent minister of the Methodist church and his life was one of goodness and usefulness.

Saturday, February 4th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Woodhall
Mrs. Alfred Woodhall died at her home on Dawson street at 4:30 o'clock, yeaterday afternoon from the effects of a cold. Mrs. Woodhall is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. McDougall, and leaves a husband and two children, the youngest a little over two weeks old.

Saturday, February 4th 1899 Page 1
Demise of J. M. Lenhoff
B. M. Morris, who returned Saturday from a business trip to Detroit, Bay City and Saginaw, was called to the latter place Monday by the death of his father-in-law, J. M. Lenhoff. Mrs. Morries was in attendance at her father's bedside for sometime previous to his death. Mr. Lenhoff was 60 years of age. He was in business at Saginaw for many years until about 1885, when he retired - - -.

Saturday, February 4th 1899 Page 1
Death of Jacob Silberman
Mrs. Abe Prenzlauer was called to Detroit, Monday by the death of her father, Jacob Silberman, who expired that day at the age of 79 years. - - -

Saturday, February 11th 1899 Page 1
Thos. Dougan, a woodsman, was struck by a falling tree near Hulbert crossing on the South Shore road, Thursday morning and received injuries from which he died within two hours after the accident - - -. The remains were brought to this city yesterday, taken to Ryan & Co's undertaking rooms and prepared for shipment to his home in Stayner, Ont., where he has a family. He was 40 years of age.

Saturday, February 18th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Frank White
Mrs. Frank White, whose husband is the proprietor of the Alpena House, died yesterday morning at 4 0'clock, of pneumonia. Mrs. White was seized with the dread malady Monday. -------- was in her 36th year and was born in Hamilton, Ont., ------- two ? children — are rendered motherless by her death - –. The funeral will be from the Central M. E. church tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, and the interment at Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, February 18th 1899 Page 8
Mr. Frank Lalonde died last evening at 8 o'clock.

Saturday, February 25th 1899 Page 1
Drank Medicine and Died
Jos. Gingrass, of Brimley, died suddenly Tuesday, as the result of taking an overdose of medicine. The preparation had been put up for another who had been suffering from excessive drinking. A teaspoonful was the dose, but Gingrass took the entire bottle at once. Coroner Bacon held an inquest and found death due to the carelessness of the deceased.

Saturday, February 25th 1899 Page 1
Death of Hugh Ryan
Hugh Ryan, the well known contractor who built the Canadian Soo ship canal, died Feb. 13 at his home at Toronto, Ont., at the age of 67. In addition to building hundreds of miles of railway throughout Canada, he also did much work of this kind in Michigan, Illinois, Kentucky and Maine.

Saturday, February 25th 1899 Page 1
Another Pioneer Gone
Mrs. Deborah Hursley Called Away Monday by Angel of Death
Mrs. Deborah Hursley, aged 89, and a pioneer of the Soo, died Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. E. Bitting, on Kimball street. The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon at the Billing residence. The Revs. T. R. Easterday and C. P. Bates conducted the service and the remains were laid to rest in Riverside. - - Mrs. Hursley leaves, besides other relatives three sons and one daughter to mourn her loss: Merrill Hursley of New York, Wayne Hursley of this city, Jay Hursley, now in Rampart City, Alaska and Mrs. J. E. Bitting, of this city. The late Ford Hursley was also her son.

Saturday, February 25th 1899 Page 2
Iroquois (Special Correspondence)
John Erixson's five year old daughter died Monday. The remains were interred at VanLuven's cemetery.

Saturday, February 25th 1899 Page 6
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
Late Tuesday evening Napoleon Forrest while out driving in Brimley found Joe Shangraw, overcome by drink lying on the road between the county bridge and the railroad. He picked him up but before he could get any medical assistance he died. He had been living in Brimley for several years.

Saturday, March 4th 1899 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Rt. Rev. John Vertin, bishop of the Catholic diocese of Marquette and Sault Ste. Marie, died Monday at Marquette, at the age of 55 years. The funeral was held at Marquette yesterday and was largely attended. Bishop Vertin was placed in charge of this diocese in 1878. - - - -.

Saturday, March 4th 1899 Page 6
Rosedale (Special Correspondence)
Miss Anna Christie, aged 39 died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Christie, Feb 24, after a long illness. The funeral services were conducted by the Rev. L. D. Blandford, in the Congregational church at 2 o'clock Sunday and the remains were interred in the Rosedale cemetery.

Saturday, March 11th 1899 Page 4
THE DEATH ANGEL
It Calls a Number of People Across the Dark River
Simon C. Temple, one of the oldests residents of this county died Monday, at his home in Iroquois, from a complication of diseases. The deceased was 81 years of age and had been for the greatest part of that time a resident of that place. A large family is left to mourn his loss. The funeral occurred Wednesday and the remains were interred at Iroquois.
[] Mrs. Elizabeth Cummins, aged 21, wife of E.T.Cummins died Saturday after a short illness, of the grip. A husband and infant child are left to mourn her loss. The funeral occurred at Riverside cemetery.
[] Mrs. Mary Ann LaChapple aged 31, wife of Chas. LaChapple, died Sunday at her residence, corner of Pine and Peck streets, of pneumonia. The remains were taken Monday to Barried, Ont., her former home for interment.
[] The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Bishop, of Iroquois died yesterday morning. The funeral will take place today from the Catholic church at Bay Mills and the remains will be interred in Mission Ridge cemetery. Undertaker Jas. R. Ryan left yesterday for Iroquois to direct the funeral arrangement.
[] A young man by the name of Carry, aged 21 years, died yesterday morning at Bay Mills, after a lingering illness of consumption. The remains will be interred tomorrow in Mission Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, March 11th 1899 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Dr. Geo. J. Northrup, of Marquette, died Wednesday, at Boston, of pneumonia, after a brief illness. Dr. Northrup departed last week for the east and on the journey contracted the fatal malady. The remains are enroute to Marquette for internment. Dr. Northrup was one of Upper Peninsula's best known and popular citzens. He was 60 years of age. He was a surgeon of the 19th infantry during the civil war. - -

Saturday, March 11th 1899 Page 5
Death of Dr. A. J. Campbell
A dispatch from Victoria states that Dr. A. J. Campbell, died at Skagway. Dr. Campbell left the Soo almost three years ago to act as assistant to Rt. Rev. P. T. Rowe, bishop of Alaska. Some months ago he gave up that position and entered upon the practice of his profession at Skagway. - - - -.

Saturday, March 11th 1899 Page 6
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
The venerable Simon C. Teeple, a resident of Dollar Settlement for many years, departed this life, near the midnight hour of last Monday night. He had been in failing health since last fall. Mr. Teeple was 81 years of age. He was born in Northern Ohio, on the Old Western Reserve, and left home for this northern country when still in his teens. For some reason all communication with his relatives was early broken off and they had lost all trace of him until a few years ago, when by mere chance, some of his friends learned of his whereabouts and correspondence ensued. Which was soon followed by a visit from several of his father's family - - - - He was the father of eight children; Mrs. Wm. Waiskai and Geo. Teeple, of Bay Mills, Jno. Teeple, Joe Teeple and Mrs. Parish, living in Dollar Settlement, Mrs. Ritzen, on the Canadian side, Mrs. Silas Mason, of Brimley, Thomas Teeple, who died at L'Anse last August, and Sophie Teeple, who died many years ago. The burial took place in the Mission Ridge cemetery. Rev. John McGregor, of Brimley conducted the services.

Saturday, March 18th 1899 Page 4
Mrs. Thos. Dynes died at 4:30 yesterday afternoon at her home on Hursley street.

Saturday, March 18th 1899 Page 5
Death of J. E. Lamontagne
A Progressive Citizen Gone to His Last Resting Place
Joseph Eustache Lamontagne, one of the Soo's enterprising and public spirited citizens died Sunday morning after a brief illness of more than a year of consumption. Mr. Lamontagne was born at Ste. Claire, Dorchester county, Quebec, Sept 20, 1857. For five years previous to his coming to the Soo, he was deputy register of deeds in his native county. He came here 14 years ago and accepted a position in the general store of Sevald & Pease, on Water street. - - - Besides his wife, Mr. Lamontagne leaves a sister, Mrs. Archille Couveau, and a brother J. A. Lomontagne, to mourn hhis loss. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning from St. Mary Church - - -. The remains were escorted to their resting place at Maple Ridge cemetery. - - -.

Saturday, March 18th 1899 Page 7
Burned to Death
Agnes Meehan, of Donaldson, Meets a Horrible Death
Agnes, the 8-year-old daughter of John Meehan, of Donaldson, died Saturday after fifteen hours of terrible suffering from burns received the night before. Her clothing caught fire from a flickering flame of a lamp which she was carrying and which had no chimney. - - - The funeral occurred Tuesday at Donaldson where the remains were interred.

Saturday, March 18th 1899 Page 7
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
George Cary, a brother of Mrs. Geo. Ballinger, died of consumption at the later's residence in this place, on Friday of last week. He was 21 years of age and came from Buffalo last fall. Funeral service was held in the Mission church on last Sunday afternoon Rev. Frank B. Stafford preached a fitting sermon for the occasion. The burial took place in Mission Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, March 18th 1899 Page 7
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
The infant child of Jas. Lawlessness of Brimley died on Wednesday.

Saturday, March 25th 1899 Page 1
THE GRIM REAPER
Several Death in the Soo and Vicinity This Week
[] Mrs. Eleanor Tate, aged 75, a resident of Sugar Island, died Saturday morning from a complication of diseases. Six children, Mrs. David Armstron, and Sarah Tate and Messrs John, David, Will and George Tate all of this city, are left to mourn her loss. The funeral occurred Sunday from the home, and the remains were interred in Garden River.
[] Mrs. Thomas Russell, of 335 Lyons street, died Thursday morning of inflammatory rheumatism after a three weeks illness, at the age of 31 years. A husband and four children are left to mourn her loss. Mr. Russell is engineer on the tug Peter Gorman. The funeral will be held at the Presbyterian church tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The procession will leave the house at 2 o'clock for the church. All friends are invited.
[] Mrs. Mary Jane McKay, wife of Andrew C. McKay, of Dafter, died Sunday after a short illness, of typhoid fever. The remains were brought to this city Tuesday and transferred to Soo, Ont. for interment in the family burying ground.
[] The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kelly, of Minneapolis street died Sunday. The funeral occurred Monday from the Catholic church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, March 25th 1899 Page 3
Detour (Special Correspondence)
Miss Sarah Hartley, daughter of our veteran, Robert Hartly, died of consumption at her home on Saturday. This is the third death from consumption at this place within two weeks.

Saturday, March 25th 1899 Page 5
A telegram was received yesterday from Robert Jacobs of Ruhling, Texas, a brother of Louis Jacobs of this city announcing the death, in Poland Wednesday, of their mother, Mrs. Jacobs.

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 2
Bay Mills (Special Correspondence)
Amelia Labranch, aged 23, died at the resident of her parents in Bay Mills, on Monday morning of a complication of heart and lung troubles. Her sickness dates from a visit to Grand Marais, last New Year's holidays, where she was taken down with pneumonia. After she recovered sufficently she came home but was soon taken down again and gradually grew worse. She knew that she must go for a day or two before she died, and urged her friends not to feel, saying that she was going to rest. Burial took place in the Brimley cemetery on Wednesday morning. Father Rottol came up from the Soo to conduct the services.

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 4
Met an Untimely Death
Mrs. Martin McNeeley Convinced That Her Husband is No More
Mrs. Martin McNeeley of 213 Ferris street, this city is convinced that the unknown man who was reported in THE NEWS last week as having been frozen to death in the Laird river region, is her husband - - - - [a long writeup]

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 4
Death of Mrs. Samuel L. Perry
Mrs. Perry, the beloved wife of Samuel Louis Perry, died at the home of H.H.Perry, on Sugar Island, Tuesday, after a brief illness at the age of 19 years. A husband and infant daughter are left to mourn her loss. Mrs. Perry was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gay, formerly of Neebish Island. Mrs. Perry was a faithful member of the Roman catholic church.

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 4
Death of Mrs. Vanderburg
Mrs. Marion Vanderburg, aged 67 years, died Sunday, at her residence on Hart avenue, after a lingering illness of consumption. The funeral occurred Wednesday from the Free Methodist church and the remains were interred in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 5
Died of Heart Failure
Jas. Morris, a boarder at the Hotel Belvidere, died suddenly Thursday night in the hotel of heart failure. The remains were taken in charge by Undertaker Vanderhook, and were interred yesterday afternoon in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 1st 1899 Page 8
Demis of Miss Laura Cameron
Miss Laura Cameron aged 22 years, died Monday at the house of her mother, Mrs. Thos. Cameron, after a brief illness of consumption. The funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon from the First Baptist church and the remains were interred in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, April 8th 1899Page 1
Death of John Ernest
John Ernest, aged 49, died yesterday morning at his home on Hart avenue, after a three months illness. A wife and seven children are left to mourn his loss. The funeral was held this morning from St. Mary's church, under the auspices of the St. Jean Baptiste Society, assisted by friends of the deceased. The remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Louisa Johnson
Mrs. Louisa Johnson, aged 29, wife of Andrew Johnson, of Neaseville, died Saturday, after a lingering illness, of pneumonia. The funeral occurred Monday afternoon from the Congregational church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 1
Funeral of Mrs. S. L. Perry
The funeral of Mrs. Samuel L. Perry, of Sugar Island, took place on Friday of last week, the interment being at Garden River. The funeral was one of the largely attended of any heretofore occurring there. None of Mrs. Perry's sisters were present.

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 1
A Pioneer Passes Away
Mrs. A. B. Roach Now at Rest After a Long Illness
Fanny Ellen Roach, wife of Capt. Ashbell B. Roach, and one of the pioneers of Sault Ste. Marie, died early Monday morning at the family residence on Peck street, aged 57 years. The demise of Mrs. Roach was not unexpected as she had been quite ill for several months and an invalid for years. The cause of death was a complication of stomach troubles, culminating in heart failure. - - - - Mrs. Roach was born in England Dec. 17, 1841, and came to the Soo with her husband 34 years ago. - - - Mrs. Roach was a member of the Episcopal church and had been a factor in the church work of the Soo from the time it was a nere hamlet. Her death is deeply mourned by all of the older residents of the Soo. Mrs. Roache is survived by a husband and five children, Mrs. Frank L. Higgins, Miss Louise Roach, Fred W., Frank H. and Floyd Roach.
The funeral was from St. James' church Wednesday afternoon, and was largely attended. The interment was at Riverside - - - -

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Jas. McFadden
Passed Away Sunday Morning After a Short Illness
Mrs. Mary J. McFadden, wife of James McFadden, one of the city, prominent lumberman, died Sunday morning at her home on Maple street, after a short illness. During her illness Mrs. McFadden was attended by her mother, Mrs. Seymour of Ottawa, and her two sisters, Mrs. McLane of Ottawa, and Mrs. Gravell, of Renfrew, Ont., who arrived here last Thursday. The deceased leaves a husband and two children to mourn her loss. The remains were taken Monday to Renfrew, Ont., her former home, for interment. Mrs. McFadden had been a resident of this city for the past two years. - - - -

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 3
Laura, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McPhee, died Tuesday. The funeral occurred the some day from the Central M. E. church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 4
Louis Smith of Gaylord, a member of Co. G. Thirty-fourth Michigan, was in the city Thursday to attend the funeral of the late Fred J. Turner.

Saturday, April 8th 1899 Page 6
Frederick J. Turner, of Co. G. Gone to His Last Resting Place
Frederick J. Turner, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Turner of Williams street died Tuesday noon at the home of his parents, after a short illness with diabetes - - - Mr. Turner was a but a boy 18 years of age in his country's service - - The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon from St. James' church, - - The remains were escorted to their last resting place in Riverside cemetery by the members of Co. G. - - - -

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 2
Death of Samuel Chinaut
Expired Monday Night From Effects of a Paralytic Stroke
Samuel Chinault died about 9 o'clock Monday night form the effects of a paralytic stroke received Saturday morning. Paralysis attacked the lower portion of his body first, but rapidly spread to all parts soon rendering action and speech impossible. The deceased was 40 years of age and had been a resident of this city for the past 13 years. He was a sergeant in Co. B. Nineteenth Infantry, but resigned his position on the expiration of his term of enlistment. A wife and two little girls are left to mourn his loss. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon from the First Baptist church, under the auspices of the Knights of the Maccabees, and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 2
Death of Mrs. Anna Williams
Mrs. Anna William, the beloved wife of Jabez Williams factor of the Hudson's Bay Co's post at Michipicoten, died on Saturday, April 8, at Michipicoten. The many friends of Mr. Williams extend their sincere sympathy in his bereavement.

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 4
Sterling Citizen Gone
Arthur B. Cracknell Expires Suddenly Thursday Morning
Arthur B. Cracknell one of the city's most representative businsess men, died suddenly about 9 o'clock Thursday morning, at the family residence in the Cracknell block on East Portage avenue. The deceased had been in ill health for the past two years. - - - [a long write up]
He died in her arms 'wife's'
Mr. Cracknell was born in Warwickshire, Eng, May 4, 1860. In 1879, attracted by many advantages offered by this country to one of his energetic nature, he crossed the Atlantic and for two years took up his abode in Canada. Two years later he determined to try his fortune in the northern land, and came to this city May 6, 1881. - - - -
Mr. Cracknell was married Sept 29, 1881 to Miss Sarah J. Hickenbottom, of Manitoulin Island. One child, a daughter, May, of 14 years, has blessed their union. - - Miss Kate Cracknell, a sister lives at Boston Neck, R. I., T J. Cracknell a brother, lives in this city.. C. H. Cracknell lives in the Canadian Soo, and G. F. Cracknell, the third brother is at present residing in St. Paul. - - -
The funeral will occurr Sunday afternoon under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias. The remains will be interred in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 4
J. H. Bang At Rest
Old and Well Known Citizen of the Soo Died Sunday
Sault Ste. Marie has lost another old and highly esteemed citizen in the death of J. H. Bange, who expired at an early hour Sunday morning. Mr. Bange was 72 years of age, and had been more of less an invalid nearly a year. Mr. Bange was born in Germany and came to this country in 1858. He located in the Soo with his family 12 years ago. - - - Mr. Bange is survived by his wife, two daughters, the Misses Vera and Ella, of this city, and son Carl of Detroit, who arrived Monday with his wife. - - - The last rites took place Tuesday - - - The remains were taken to the family plot in Riverside for interment.

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 4
Death of W. C. Frederick
Another Company G. hero Answered the Final Call Sunday
Corporal William Cyrus Frederick, the sixth member of C. G. to answer the last call, died Sunday afternoon at the family residence, at 247 West Ridge street. - - - The funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon from the Methodist church, Rev. J. E. Bitting and Rev. F. Bagnall of the Congregational church officiating. - - - Mr. Frederick was 21 years of age. - - -

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 4
Death of Mrs. Wm. Hamilton
Died of Heart Disease Wednesday Morning after a short Illness
Mrs. Sarah R. Hamilton, wife of Wm. Hamilton of Pine street, died at 7 o'clock Wednesday morning from heart trouble - - - - The deceased was 63 years of age and leaves a husband and six children to mourn her loss. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon from the Episcopal church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 15th 1899 Page 4
Miss Lizzie Robinson of this city died at White Lake, Ont., Monday. She was a sister of Mrs. D. McGregor, and an aunt of Mrs. Geo. Larke, of the Soo. Mrs. Larke and Mr. McGregor departed for White Lake Tuesday.

Saturday, April 22nd 1899 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
A sad suicide was committed Tuesday Morning at Menominie
Mrs. Chas. Peterson, a woman about 30 years of age, the wife of a kind husband and mother of two small children cut her throat from, ear to ear with a bread knife, severing the windpipe and esophagus. Three doctors worked on her nearly four hours but could not save her life. The woman had been in a diseased state of mind ever since the birth of a babe last fall.

Saturday, April 22nd 1899 Page 7
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
The writer learns with regret of the death of Mrs. A. Roach
Mr. and Mrs. Roach are old time friends

Saturday, April 22nd 1899 Page 1
Sault Ste. Marie News Supplement Number 16
ANOTHER PIONEER GONE
Demise of David Miller Last Sunday Evening
Another Soo Pioneer passed away Sunday evening when David Miller, a well known and prosperous citizen, was called to the great beyond by the angel of death. Mr. Miller had reached the ripe old age of 77 years. Up to two years ago, when he had always enjoyed splendid health. With his wife he had spent the winter at Los Angeles, Cal., with Mrs. Miller's daughter, Mrs. L. G. Jackson. They returned home about a month ago. About two weeks aftr their return Mr. Miller was compelled to take to his bed, from which he never rose again. He peacefully passed away Sunday evening at 7 o'clock, at his residence on Ashmun street. General decline was the cause of his demise. The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon from the Central M. E. church. It was conducted by J. Vanderhook and was under the auspices of Sault Ste. Marie L. O. O. No 174, of the which order the diseased was a member. The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. A. W. Stalker, assisted by Rev. T. R. Easterday. The remains were placed in the Miller vault of this city.
Mr. Miller was born at Armagh, Ireland, in 1822, moved to Meaford, Ont, with his parents, when a boy. He was first married at that place in 1844. In 1882 he moved with his family to the Soo, where he has since resided. Two years after his location here his first wife died. He was afterwards united in marriage with Mrs. Isma Sermon, who survives him. - - -
Of the children born by Mr. Miller's first wife, six survive as follow's Mrs. R. A. Johnson, Mrs. Geo. Webster, and Mrs. Mary Stinson, of the Soo, James Miller of the Canadian Soo, Joseph of Rat Portage, Ont., and John of Maquette.
Mr. Miller left no will.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Margaret Stevenson
Mrs. Margaret Stevenson, mother of Miss Lillie Stevenson of this city, and a sister of Mrs. Adam Ferguson, died Thursday at her home in Baraga. Miss Stevenson was at Baraga at the time of her mother's death. Mrs. Ferguson departed yesterday afternoon to attend the funeral.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 2
Death of Stephen Jelleneau
Stephen Jelleneau, father of Mrs. Wm. Myers, of this city, died last Friday evening at his residence in the Canadian Soo, from neuraligia and kindred diseases. Mrs. Myers attended the funeral which occurred Monday from the Catholic church.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 3
Elmer, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jones of West Ridge street died Thursday of pneumonia. The remains were interred yesterday in the city cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 3
A new born child of Mr. and Mrs. Dolor Montpetit died Thursday and was buried Friday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 3
The infant boy of Mrs. John F. Bottrell, of South Ashmun street, died Wednesday night. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon from the Central M. E. church and the remains were interred in the Hill cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
At A Ripe Old Age
Passing Away of Edward Alford Trelease, a Soo Pioneer
Edward Alfrod Trelease, for more than 35 years a resident of Sault Ste. Marie, died at the family home on Douglas street Thursday morning at 2 o'clock. In his death Chippewa county loses one of the oldest and most highly respected of its pioneers, a man who came here when the whites numbered a mere handful among the aborgines. The immediate cause of death was paralysis, with which Mr. Trelease was stricken Monday. - - - - his wife survives him. - - -
The surviving children, Mrs. John A. Colwell, Mrs. Henry J. Lalonde and Mrs. Fred R. Price, of the Soo, Mrs. L. A. Marsell, of Hancock, and Mrs. W. M. Morse, of Minniapolis, wee all at his bedside when he passed away.
The deceased was born in Botingy, Cornwalll, England, Sept. 13, 1825, and was therefore in his 74th year. He came to America in July 1848, landing at Quebec with his brothers Thomas and William. From Quebec, he went to Bruce Mines and there in Sept. 28, 1849, was joined in wedlock, to Naomi Osborne. In June 1851, Mr. and Mrs. Trelease came to Sault Ste. Marie and here, with his brother Thomas, Mr. Trelease engaged in the hotel business. - - -
The funeral will be held from St. James' church at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon and the remains taken to Riverside for interment. - - -

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
Death of Mrs. Shunk
Expired of Heart Disease Sunday Morning After a Week's Illness
Mrs. Sarah Ann Shunk, one of the county's oldest pioneers, died Sunday morning, at the family residence on the Hay Lake road. Heart disease was the immediate cause of her death. The deceased was 58 years of age, and leaves the following children to mourn her lass, Mrs. John Shephered, Mrs. Thos. Lackey, and Miss Tillie Shunk and Messrs. Simon, Robert, Jacob, William and Abe Shunk. Rev. C. L. Lamberston conducted the funeral services Monday afternoon and the remains wee interred in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
Death of Wm. Chandler's Mother
Friends of Representitive Wm. Chandler, of the Soo, will pe pained to hear of the demise of his mother, Mrs. Jane N. Chandler, whose death is announced in the Cheboygan Tribune, as follows:
Mrs. Jane N. Chandler, mother of Merritt and William, died at the home of her son Merritt, at Onaway, at 1- p.m. Tuesday, aged 85 or 86 years. The deceased and her husband, who died some years ago, resided in our city some time with Merrill and is kindly remembered by many, all of whom will sympathize with the bereaved relatives. The remains left Onawaaay Thursday on the D. & M. railroad for Lenawee county, to be laid to rest beside those of her late husband.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
Died of Consumption
J. E. Burnas, a inmate of the Marine hospital, in Ridge street, died Saturday afternoon, after a lingering illness, of consumption. The funeral occurred Sunday afternoon from the hospital and the remains wre interred in Maple Ridge cemetery. Rev. C. P. Bates preached the funeral sermon.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
The infant child of Joseph Tesstalia of Water street, died Wednesday. The funeral occurred the same day and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 4
John Micheau, one of the oldest Indians of the county, died at his home on East Portage avenue Thursday night after a lingering illness.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 5
Death of Mrs. John McKee
Passed Away Wednesday Morning After A Short Illness
Mrs. Eleanor McKee, wife of John McKee, died shortly after 6 o'clock Wednesday morning, at the family residence on Douglas street. Spinal trouble is given as the cause of her death. Mrs. McKee was 50 years of age, and leaves a husband and three children, the Misses Maud and Nora McKee and son Frank to mourn her loss. The deceased had been in ill health for some time, but her sudden death came as an unexpected shock to her sorrowing family. Mrs. McKee had been a resident of this city for over 19 years, coming here with her husband from Rosedale, in 1880. During her residence here she had been an active member of the Congregational church, and was recognized as one of her church's staunchest advocates.
The funeral occurred yesterday afternoon from the house. The remains were interred in Riverside cemetery. - - - Mrs. Neil McKinnop, wife of Supervisor McKennon, of Rosedal and a sister of the deceased, was in the city this week to attend the funeral.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 5
Death of Patrick Quinian
Patrick Quinian an aged resident of Bruce township died Wednesday, of Bright's disease. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, at Donaldson, and the remains were interred in the village cemetery.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
Thos. Johnson, of Richard's Landing, St. Joseph Island, died at his home Sunday morning, April 23. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the Methodist church, and was conducted by the I.O.F. of which society the deceased was a member. He leaves a wife and seven children.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 7
Schlesser (Special Correspondence)
Chippewa county lost an old, an highly respected resident in the death of Mrs. Catherine Baker, which occurred at her home here, April 13. Her death is mourned by many friends. Mrs. Baker was born in Shcwartzenbor, Germany, Nov 12, 1820, and was therefore in her 79th year. She survived three husbands, the first of whom she wedded in Germany, as a widow she came to Ontario in 1853, and there married George Schiesser, who subsequently died, and in 1868 became the wife of Leonard Baker, who also passed away. Five children mourn her loss, Mrs. George Hart, Mrs. Hugh Managham, Schiesser: Mrs. Alex Flood, Neaseville: Miss Elizabeth Schlesser, Traverse City, and John Schlesser, of the Soo. Mrs. Baker had been a resident of Chippewa county since 1883. The funeral occurred April 16, the remains being interred in Mount Rose cemetery, Schiesser.

Saturday, April 29th 1899 Page 9
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Saboo buried their infant child in the Mission church cemetery last Sunday morning.

Saturday, May 6th 1899 Page 1
Body of Peter Goetz was Found Wednesday
Had Been Missing Since Monday When He Went Fishing
The body of Peter Goetz, proprietor of the Clifton House on West Spruce avenue, was found Wednesday afternoon, floating in the river near Bell's Point on the Canadian side, by George Belleau, one of the residents of that vicinity. Mr. Goetz had been reported missing since Monday but no serious fears concerning his safety were entertained by his wife or family although Mrs. Goetz was perturbed over his absence. Wednesday afternoon Gustave Mueller, an intimate friend of Mr. Goetz, learned that a body was found down the river and that it had not been identified. In view of the unwonted absence of Mr. Goetz, he thought it likely that it might be that of his friend.
Thursday morning Mr. Mueller and Joseph Goetz, a brother of the deceased, left for Bell's Point in a sailboat to make an investigation. On arriving there in the afternoon they found the remains had already been interred in an old cemetery in that vicinity. The gentleman insisted on the body being disinterred and in spite of the remonstrances of Belleau and a constable, there wishes were complied with: When the body was brought to the survace it was readily identified as that of Mr. Goetz. The remains were brought to the Soo, the same day and taken to Ryan's morgue for an examination, and afterwards transferred to the family home, where they now lay. - - - - [a long story]
Mr. Goetz was born at Little Germany, Canada, Nov 16, 1867. About 22 years ago he moved with his family to Gatesville, and after a short residence he decided to move to DeTour and embarked in business for himself. In 1886 he came to this city and opened a hotel in West Portage avenue - - - Mr. Goetz was married in 1887 to Miss Catherine Renner, of the Canadian Soo. Four children have blessed this union. Besides a wife and family, a father and mother living in DeTour and several brothers & sisters living in different parts of the states, are left to mourn his loss.
The funeral services will be held Monday, and the remains will be interred in Maple Ridge cemetery. Mrs. Goetz, mother of the deceased, accompanined by her son George, arrived yesterday to attend the funeral, Mrs. John Stratton, of Baragua and Mrs. Ed. Clarke, of West Branch two sisters of the deceased, together with a brother Matthew, of Walkerton, Ont., are expected to arrive in the city today to attend the obsequies. - - - -

Saturday, May 6th 1899 Page 8
Death of William Lee
William Lee, a fisherman of the Tahquamenon Bay district, died Sunday morning at the American House, after a short illness of pneumonia. The deceased was 55 years old and well known to Sooites. The funeral service was held Monday at St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge Cemetery.

Saturday, May 13th 1899 Page 1
Died of Heart Failure
F. H. Marks, a prominent lumberman and mine owner of Thessalon and well known in this city was found dead in his bed at a Sudbury hotel, Tuesday morning. Death was due to heart failure. His untimely demise is sincerely mourned by many Soo friends. Mr. Marks was a brother of Miss M. L. Marks, who was employed by THE NEWS several years ago. Mr. Marks remains were interred in Marksville Thursday.
Saturday, May 13th 1899 Page 1
Died of Pneumonia
The 1-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Campbell died Thursday of pnemonia. The funeral service was held yesterday afternoon at the house and the remains were interred at Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, May 13th 1899 Page 4
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee's little boy, who was taken to DeTour for treatment, died, of pneumonia soon after his arrival there.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 1
A SUDDEN DEATH
Hugh McMillan, a Guest at the hotel Superior, Expires Wednesday Night.
Hugh McMillan a guest of the Hotel Superior died about 7 o'clock Wednesday night, after a week's illness, of inflammatory rheumatism. Mr. McMillan arrived here May 7, from Penetanguishene, Ont., to accept a position with L.E.O'Mara, but was taken sick shortly after his arrival, with erysipelas, the latter disease finally developed into acute inflammatory rheumatism. The remains were shipped Thursday morning to Penetanguishene the former home of the deceased, for interment.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 1
Death of Lindsay Stoddard
Lindsay Stoddard, aged 32 years, died Thursday morning at his residence on Minneapolis street. The deceased was a painter by trade and leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss. The remains were shipped yesterday morning to Woodville, Ont., the former home of the deceased, for interment.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 2
Death of Capt. Lundy
Capt. Lundy, of the tug Constitution, died Monday afternoon, at James Pullar's residence on the Hay Lake road, from the effects of a stroke of paralysis received last Wednesday morning. The remains were taken to Cleveland for interment, Tuesday afternoon, by Miss Nellie Lundy, sister of the deceased.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 2
They are Thankful
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Campbell, of 533 East Spruce street, desire through THE NEWS to extend heartfelt thanks to the many friends for sympathy and assistance extended to them during the sickness and death of their infant daughter.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 4
Mrs. J. A. Hubbell, wife of Judge Hubbell, of Houghton, died Saturday, of Bright's disease.

Saturday, May 20th 1899 Page 6
Neebish (Special Correspondence)
George Still died at his home, St. Joseph Island, last week. The remains were transferred to DeTour Thursday, on the Elva.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 1
KILLED BY THE CARS
P. Connelly the Victim
Patrick Connelly, a brakeman on one of the E.D. Smith Co's water power dump trains, fell underneath his train Thursday night, and had his head crushed to pieces, death coming instantly. How the accident occurred cannot be learned.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 1
Matin McNeely's Death
The following is an extract from a letter published in the Toronto Globe of May 25, from Laird River, P.O., B.C. , and gives the first authentic account of the death of Martin McNeely of this city, who died last winter, while attempting to reach the Klondike. The excerpt says:
A man by the name of Macnealey (or McNealy) from Sault Ste. Marie, was found dead in a tent on the bank of the Laird river, about 100 miles below here. He had met death in this way. Both his feet had been frozen travelling up the river last winter. His partner had left him to die.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 1
ANGEL OF DEATH
Mrs. Samuel Peel died Saturday evening, at the family residence on Elizabeth street, after a short illness, of typhoid fever. The deceased was 29 years of age and leaves a husband and two children aged 3 and 5, to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday morning by Rev. J. H. Sowerby, after which the remains were taken to Gorrie, Ont., Mrs. Peel's former home, for intement. Mr. Peel's many friends extend their heartfelt sympathy in his bereavement.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 2
Death of Orval Clegg
Orval Clegg, the 17-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. James L. Clegg, of Pickford died Thursday evening, after a lingering illness, of pnemonia. The funeral services will be held today from the Methodist church at Pickford, and the internment will be made in the village cemetery.- - -

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Honora Hayden
Mrs. Honora Heyden, of Rudyard, died Sunday after a short illness, of consumption. The funeral services were held Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church, in the city and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 3
Bay Mills
George Smith was fatally injured while unloading logs from the log train, near the pulp mill, early Tuesday morning and died an hour after being taken to his home in town. - - - - a wife and three children survive him- - - The interment took place in Mission Hill cemetery Wednesday afternoon under the auspices of the Maccabees, Rev. F. J. Bate had charge of the services.

Saturday, May 27th 1899 Page 3
Neebish (Speical Correspondence)
Mrs. George Lawrence last week received the sad intelligence of the death of her sister Miss Belle Pringle at Rochester N.Y.. Mrs. Lawrence was unable to attend the funeral on account of ill health.

Saturday, June 3rd 1899 Page 1
A Young Life Gone
Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Williams died Sunday
Charles the 11-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C.Williams died early Sunday morning at the family residence on East Portage avenue, after three months illness. Typhoid fever was the immediate cause of death. The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the house and the remains were interred in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, June 3rd 1899 Page 2
The Hart-Statton Wedding
Wm. H. Hart, of Schlesser, and Miss Lily A. Stratton, of Raber were married at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. John Schlesser, on Dawson street, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Rev. S. L. Clarke of Pickford, performed the ceremony. Mrs. Wm. Mitchell was the bridesmaid and T.M.Crichton officiated as best man. The newly wedded couple are well known - - - They will reside at Schlesser.

Saturday, June 3rd 1899 Page 3
A child of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Scott was buried at Mission Hill cemeter on Tuesday.

Saturday, June 3rd 1899 Page 4
The remains of the late Patrick Connelly were interred here Wednesday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, June 10th 1899 Page 1
Death of Chas. Bailey
Word Received Her Announcing His Demise in Houghton Yesterday
Chief of Police Neslon A. Burdick received a telegram yesterday afternoon from E. E. Bailey of Decorah, Ia., announcing the death in Houghton that morning of his brother, Chas. Bailey - - - Mr. Bailey had been a resident of the Soo for several years.

Saturday, June 10th 1899 Page 7
The two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Barnes of Rudyard died Sunday at the home of Mrs. Barnes' parents Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Johnson, of Nolte street. The funeral services were held Monday from the house, and the interment was made in the Hill cemetery.

Saturday, June 10th 1899 Page 7
Drummond (Special Correspondence)
Edwin Seaman, died very suddenly of heart trouble Friday night Mr. Seaman was 55 years of age. Born in St. Lawrence county, New York, he came to Drummond with his parents when about 8 years old and it has been his home since then. He was one of our most progressive citizens. Sturdy, honest, upright and a good neighbour he will be greatly missed. He carried a considerable insurance in the knight of the Maccabees, of which order he was a member in good standing and one of the original on Drummond. There was a very large attendance at the funeral service which was conducted by the Rev. John Drumm.

Saturday, June 17th 1899 Page 1
Death of Frank Frichette
Frank Frichette the 19-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Frichette of West Portage avenue died early Thursday morning, after a lingering illness of consumption. The funeral service will be held this morning from the catholic church and the remains will be interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, June 17th 1899 Page 5
Pickford (Special Correspondence)
Mrs. F. H. Taylor received a telegram, Wednesday that her sister, Mrs. John Sowerby, was dead at Grand Rapids.

Saturday, June 17th 1899 Page 8
Death of Little Jennie LaLonde
Jennie, the three-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph LaLonde, died early Thursday morning. The funeral services were held yesterday afternoon from St. Mary's church and the interment was made in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, June 24th 1899 Page 4
The Grim Reaper
A number of People Called Hence By Angel of Death
[] Wm. Smith of Pickford died Monday at the home of his brother-in-law, James Penfold, of Hursley avenue. Mr. Smith had his right arm injured a few weeks ago at a barn raising in Pickford and gangerine set in. He was brought to this city last week for medical treatment, but the progress of the disease had been too rapid, and death ensued. The remains were taken to Pickford and interred in the village cemetery Thursday.
[] John Harrington, an aged resident of Brimley, died Tuesday, in that village, of a complication of liver and kidney trouble. The remains were taken Thursday to Lindsay, Ont., for interment at his former home. Mr. Harrington was at one time a resident of this city having been employed here for years in the capacity, of a laborer.
[] George Coulter, aged 27 years, died Monday morning at the residence of Patrolman Henry Coulter 208 Douglas street, after a lingering illness of consumption. The remains were taken to Babcaygeon, Ont., Tuesday, for interment at his former home.
[] Fred Hess, an assistant to the second steward of the steamship North Land, died Sunday morning on the boat, from heart failure. The remains were taken to Vanderhook's morgue and from there shipped Wednesday morning to his home in New York city.
[] Ignatius, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. P. A'Hearn, died Tuesday morning of consumption. The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon from St. Mary's church and the remains were interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.
[] The 6-weeks-old son of Mr. and Mrs. P. Quack, of the Mackinac road, died Tuesday. The remains were interred Wednesday in Pine Grove cemetery.

Saturday, June 24th 1899 Page 5
Tone (Special Correspondence)
The funeral of the late Wm. Smith took place Wednesday. It was one of the largest ever held here. Interment was made in Bethel cemetery.

Saturday, June 24th 1899 Page 5
Neebish Special Correspondence)
Last Tuesday Mr. and Mrs. Owen Rains, of Sailor's Encampment received the sad intelligence of the death of their son, Walter, at Peace River Landing, May 22, 1889?? Being the first time the Angel of Death has visited their family. The blow was a severe one. The deceased started in April 1898, for the gold fields in the Peace River district, via the Edmonton trail. He was accompanied by Capt. George W. Pontine, and subsequently joined a party of three miners travelling in the same direction. The five reached the Findlay River safely, and built their camp on Clear Water Creek, where they passed the winter. In April scurvy broke out among them. Capt. Pontine died, and the rest were two weak to bury him. Eight days after this engineer Dibble and party found them, buried Pontine and brought the remainder with them toward Edmonton. When within 600 miles of that place, Walter Rains, also expired and was buried in the Roman Catholic cemetery, at Peace River Landing. Much sympathy, is felt for the bereaved family. Walter Rains was a very fine young man.- - - -

Saturday, July 1st 1899 Page 7
Death of Thomas Wynn
Thomas Wynn died Sunday afternoon, at his residence on Minneapolis street, of pneumonia. The deceased was 59 years of age, and leaves a wife and 10 children to mourn his loss. The funeral services were held Wednesday, from St. Mary's Catholic church, and the interment was made in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, July 8th 1899 Page 1
Carelessness the Cause
The Young mas Was Making Repairs on the Boiler and Had Shut Off the Safety Valve He was Blown through the Roof of the Boiler Room and Horribly mangled
Rudyard was the scene of a most shocking accident Wednesday noon, when Kinney Bance, only son of J. D. Bance, one of the proprietors of the Rudyard brickyard, was instantly killed by the explosion of a factory boiler - - - - -
The deceased was 22 years of age and unmarried. He had been a member of the engineer corps of a Minnesota regiment and returned from Cuba about six weeks ago to accept a position with his father. The remains were shipped Thursday to Sheldon, Ia., his former home for internment.

Saturday, July 8th 1899 Page 1
Death of Hon. Andrew Jackson Wednesday
Funeral This Morning
Hon. Andrew Jackson a pioneer resident and highly respected citizen was called hence by the angel of death at 12 o'clock Wednesday night. Heart failure was the immediate cause of death, though he had been in ill health for many years. The funeral which will be under the auspices of Bethel Lodge - - - will take place at 10 o'clock this morning at the family residence and the remains will be interred at Riverside. - - - - Andrew Jackson was born Oct. 29, 1844 in Ohio, and has had a varied and eventful career. - - -
Mr. Jackson's mother and brother, Daniel, of Cleveland and his daughter Miss Bessie, arrived here yesterday to attend the funeral.

Saturday, July 8th 1899 Page 2
Death of Park E. Chapel
Park E. Chapel, a section foreman, in the railroad yard, died Saturday evening at his residence on West Ridge street. Mr. Chapel was struck by an engine some weeks ago and severly injured, dropsy, the immediate cause of his death soon setting in.
A wife and several children are left to mourn his loss. The funeral services wre held Monday from the Central M.E. church and the internment was made in the Hill cemetery. The deceased carried $2,000 insurance in the A.O.U.W. lodge.

Saturday, July 8th 1899 Page 8
John C. Shaw's Sister Dies
Capt. John C. Shaw arrived here Sunday on his fine yacht, the mini. Major Atkinson of Detroit and G.G. Scranton, accompanied him from Detroit. A telegram sent here from Bay City to Mr. Shaw announced the serious illness of his sister Mrs. James Watrous, and Monday Mr. Shaw together with Mrs. Shaw and children who were here left for Bay City. Mrs. Watrous died Monday evening.

Saturday, July 15th 1899 Page 1
Death of Miss L. Ripley
Miss Lilla Ripley, daughter of Mrs. Maria Ripley, died early Thursday morning at the family residence on Kimball street, after a lingering illness of consumption. The deceased had been an invalid for years, and had spent the greater part the past five winters in search of health, at resorts in the south and west.- - - - - - Miss Ripley returned to the Soo June 17 accompanied from Colorado by her sister, Miss Ida Ripley.
Miss Ripley was born in Pontiac July 3, 1858, and removed to this city with her mother about 21 years ago. Besides her mother Miss Ripley leaves two sisters, the Misses Mary and Ida Ripley and five brothers, Superintendant Joseph Ripley of the ship canal, L.V.Ripley, of East Claire, Wis., M.T. Ripley of Bruce Mines, Ont. Capts. Charles Ripley and Norman Ripley, both of this city, to mourn her loss. The funeral services will be held this afternoon from the house, and the interment will be made in the hill cemetery. - - - - the internment will only be a temperary one, the final resting place to be at the request of her mother at her birthplace in Pontiac.

Saturday, July 15th 1899 Page 1
Drowned In Ashmun Bay
George, the 7-year-old son of Mr.and Mrs. Michael Gardner of West Spruce street, was drowned about 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon in Ashmun bay, near the Union depot. The little fellow with his companions was in wading at the time of the accident. The E.D.Smith Co. which is doing excavating work at that place, has an excavation there about eight feet deep- - - -

Saturday, July 15th 1899 Page 2
Their Babe Died
Wilbert J. Hibblen the one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hibblen, of Ashmun street died Wednesday of acute gastritus. The funeral services were held Thursday and the interment was in the hill cemetery.

Saturday, July 15th 1899 Page 4
Wolverin Waifs
While out headlighting for deer at Iron River Monday night, Otto Westerbery was shot in the forehead and instantly killed by Erick Anderson, who mistook the headlight for the eyes of a deer.

Saturday, July 21st 1899 Page 1
Died At Grand Marais
Harry Carpenter, aged 22, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carpenter, of 503 Easterday avenue died Tuesday in Grand Marais, of spinal meningitis. The deceased had been in ill health for sometime. Mrs. Carpenter was informed last week of her son's serious illness and left Saturday to attend him. The remains were brought to the city Wednesday night by Mrs. Carpenter. The funeral services were held yesterday morning from St. Mary;s Catholic church, and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, July 21st 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Frank M. Weston
Mrs. Frank M. Weston died Tuesday evening, at her residence on Maple street, after a short illness. A husband and four children are left to mourn her loss. The funeral services wre held Thursday afternoon from the house, and the interment was made in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, July 21st 1899 Page 5
The funeral services of little George Gardner, the boy who was drowned Friday afternoon in Ashmun bay, took Monday morning, from St. Mary's Catholic church and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, July 29th 1899 Page 2
Death of Miss Kate Latimer
Miss Kate A. Latimer, aged 14 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Latimer, of McCarron, die Monday of brain trouble. The funeral services weer held Wednesday from the house and the interment was in the Rosedale village cemetery.

Saturday, July 29th 1899 Page 3
Soo and Bruce Townships
John Hynes, last of Rosedale, near Hay Lake, died on Monday last. He had been ailing for sometime.

Saturday, July 29th 1899 Page 5
Death of Miss Margaret Wilson
Miss Margaret Wilson, aged 61 years died Tuesdaay at the home of her brother, Andrew Wilson, of Pickford, of catarrhal gastritis. The deceased was a resident of Bayfield, Ont., and came to this county a few weeks ago on a visit with her brother. The remains were brought to the city Wednesday, and taken to Bayfield Thursday by Mr. Wilson for interment in the family cemetery.

Saturday, July 29th 1899 Page 4
Clarence McIntyre is Dead
Clarence McIntyre aged 14, died Tuesday at the home of his mother, Mrs. Louisa McIntyre, on East Maple street, after a lingering illness of consumption. The funeral services were conducted Wednesday at the home by Rev. J.H.Sowerby, and the interment in the Hill cemetery.

Saturday, July 29th 1899 Page 7
The infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. A. Campbell, of Helen street died Tuesday. The funeral services were held Wednesday from the home and the interment was in the hill cemetery

Saturday, August 5th 1899 Page 1
Wm. Glidden Killed on Water Power Railway
Wm. Glidden a brakeman on one of the dump trains of the C.D. Smith Co. fell underneath the engine about 9:30 Thursday morning, and was so severely injured that he died shortly afterwards. - - - The unfortunate man was 21 years of age and born in Barrie, Ont., - - - The remains were taken to Barrie yesterday by his uncle Walter Farnay, for interment.

Saturday, August 5th 1899 Page 5
Otto Wilford, the adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Lehigh of South Ashmun street, died Monday morning after a three weeks illness. The remains were taken to Rosedale and interred Tuesday in the village. cemetery.

Saturday, August 12th 1899 Page 3
Josephine, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Payment, died Sunday of cholera infantum, and was buried Monday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, August 19th 1899 Page 1
Death of Archie Dickson
Archie J. the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. E. Dickson, of 808 Cedar street, died Thursday of cholera infantum. The funeral services was held yesterday afternoon from St. Mary's church and the remains interred in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, August 19th 1899 Page 5
the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fletcher died yesterday morning. The funeral will be held this afternoon from the Free Methodist church.

Saturday, August 26th 1899 Page 1
Death of Little Geo. Ryan
Geo. J. jr., the five months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. J. Ryan, died Thursday. The funeral services were held yesterday from St. Mary's church and the internment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, August 26th 1899 Page 2
Death of Ruth McLane
Ruth, the 5-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Archie McLane, died Tuesday evening of cholera infantum. The funeral services were held Wednesday from the house and the interment was in the city cemetery.

Saturday, August 26th 1899 Page 8
Death of Josephine Sullivan
Josephinem the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Sullivan, died Thursday. The funeral services wer held yesterday from St. Mary's church and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, August 26th 1899 Page 8
Death of Trever TenEyck
Trever, the two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ten Eyck, died Tuesday, of cholera infantum. The funeral services were held Thursday from the house and the internment was in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, September 2nd 1899 Page 1
Miss Mary A. King Dies Early Tuesday Morning of Consumption
Miss Mary A. King, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. King of Currie street, died early Tuesday morning after eight months illness of consumption. The deceased had been in ill health for months - - - Miss King was born in this city 22 years ago and had since been a continous resident - - - Miss King leaves two sisters, Mrs. Charles Beauder and Mrs. F. Lessard and one brother Geo. King to mourn her loss. The funeral services were held at 9o'clock Thursday morning from St. Mary's church. Rev. Fr. Connolly conducting the service.- - - -

Saturday, September 2nd 1899 Page 2
The body of Louis Partridge, the young man that was drowned last week in the Bay Lake Channe., wa found about 1 o'clock Monday afternoon floating in the river, by Joseph Ojibaway, a member of one of the searching parties. - - - The body was taken to the residence of John Povey, on Hay Lake road the unfortunate man's home during the past few years. The funeral services were held Tuesday from the house and the remains were interred in the Hill cemetery.

Saturday, September 2nd 1899 Page 3
Joseph J. the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thorne, died Saturday and was interred Monday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, September 2nd 1899 Page 3
Basil, the three-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. McEmery, of 917 Brown street, died Monday. The internment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, September 2nd 1899 Page 8
Death of Mrs. A. Dewitt
Mrs. Amanda A. Dewitt, aged 61 years, died about 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the residence of her daughter Mrs. F.H.Brooks, of 408 Maple street. Paralysis was the immediate cause of death. - - Mrs. Dewitt had been a resident of this city since December, coming here from Chicago to spend the winter with her daughter.
Besides her daughter, Mrs. Brooks had another daughter Mrs. Lottie Jones of Chicago is left to mourn her loss. The funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow from the house and the interment in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 1
Died of Heart Failure
Jeremiah B. Montross, of Port Huron, died about 6 o'clock Thursday evening at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. R. Bishop, of East Spruce street. Mr. Montrous and wife came to the Soo about five weeks ao on one of their periodical visits, for the benefit of Mr. Montross' health. - - - The deceased was 57 years of age and leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his loss. The remains were taken to Port Huron yesterday by Mrs. Montross for interment.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 1
Death of Mrs. Arnott's Father
John Thackaberry, of Markdal, Ont., father of Mrs. John F. Arnott, died Monday in that city, aged 86 years. The remains were brought to this city Thursday evening and interred yesterday morning in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 1
Killed By Lightning
Dewar Patton of Sugar Island Meets a Sudden Death
Dewar Patton, an aged resident of Sugar Island, was struck and instantly killed by a bolt of lightning about 6 o'clock Monday afternoon. Mr. Patton in company with several companions, had been in attendance upon an annual school meeting, of that district, and was returning home at the time of the fatality. He Had just left the building when there was an usually vivid flash of lightning. - - - - The lightening had torn his clothes partially from his body and severely burned his right shoulder and a portion of his head. The body was picked up by his companions. - - - -.
Mr. Patton was 50 years of age, and leaves a wife and six children. He was treasurer of his school district and one of the best known residents of Sugar Island. The funeral services were held Wednesday from the house and the remains interred in the Island cemetery.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 6
DeTour
H. Melvin, one of DeTour's pioneer citizens passed away Monday at his daughter's residence on Drummond Island. He was buried on the island Wednesday. A large number of DeTour folks attended the funeral.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 6
Mr. Lahman, a feeble old gentleman, was found dead in the woods by his sons Herman and Gus Lehman. He was buried at DeTour, Tuesday.

Saturday, September 9th 1899 Page 6
Drummond
Mrs. Cadotte, relict of the late Charles Cadotte, boat builder, who lived at the "Black Hole" near Sailors Encampment for many years, died at Potagannissing at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Solomon Kosley, last Saturday, at an advanced age. She was blind and very decrepit and he demise had been expected for some time.

Saturday, September 16th 1899 Page 1
Death of Thos. Bell
Thos. Bell died Saturday noon at his residence on East Ridge street of congestion of the brain, as a result of paralysis. The deceased had been a sufferer for years with stomach trouble and kindred diseases, but no serious results were anticipated by his sorrowing wife or family. Friday night a decidedly change took place and he gradually sank to death. Mr. Bell Was born in England in 1859, and came to this country in 1880. One year after his arrival in the United States he emigrated to the Soo, and had been since a continuous resident. - - - - - The funeral services were held Monday morning from St. Mary's church, - - – The interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.- - -.

Saturday, September 23rd 1899 Page 2
Death of Richard Donnelly
Richard Donnelly, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Donnelly,
of Barbeau, died Tuesday morning in that village, after a brief illness. The deceased was 20 years of age and unmarried. The funeral services were held Thursday from the Barbeau catholic church and the remains interred in the village cemetery. Mr. Donnelly was one of the county's most popular young farmers, and his death is universally regretted.

Saturday, September 23rd 1899 Page 4
A Sad Fatality
St. Mary's River Claims Another Victim Saturday Night
Mrs. Joseph Allard, a resident of Sugar Island, was drowned about 8 o'clock Saturday evening, near Baie de Wasig, by the accidental overturning of her boat. Mrs Allard was returning home from the Soo in company with he 5-months-old daughter, Mrs. Roy, a neighbour, and her son, at the time of the fatality. The party had arrived at O'Shawamos place, when the severe storm of the night struck them. Mrs. Allard saw their danger and headed the boat for shore, intending to seek safety there till the storm subsided. They had proceeded but a short distance when the boat ran upon a partially sunken crib. mrs. Roy and son sought safety on the crib, while Mrs. Allard after handing her daughter to the young man headed the boat for land, promising to return shortly and release them. A minute after a sudden gust of wind capsized the boat and threw her into the water, where she disappeared before the terrified eyes of her companions - - — The body was picked up Sunday morning - - -and brought to the Soo, in the afternoon to the house of her brother C. Sylvester, on Cedar street. The deceased was 37 years of age and leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her untimely death. The funeral services were held Tuesday morning, and the remains interred in the Payment cemetery, Sugar Island. - - - -
this is the third fatality to occur in Mrs. Alord's family in a many years. Her father was dorwned three years ago, in Garden River, and her borther, met his death in the burning of the tug Swain.

Saturday, September 23rd 1899 Page 7
John, the 5-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Peterson, died Saturday, of cholera infantum. The funeral services were held Monday from the house and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, September 23rd 1899 Page 8
The four-days-old baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Zess, of Portage avenue, died this morning. The funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 at St. Mary's church.

Saturday, September 30th 1899 Page 1
Mrs. Thomas Parr Called Away By Angel of Death
Mrs. Thomas Parr of Sugar Island, and a pioneer resident of Chippewa county, died early yesterday morning at the residence of Alfred Appleyard, 1105 Ashmun street, this city, where she had been for the past two weeks. She was 63 years of age and had been an invalid for many months. An affection of the lungs and heart was the cause of death. The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow at St. James church, and the remains will be laid to rest at the city cemetery. Mrs. Parr leaves a husband and nine children, all of whom are grown up to mourn her loss - - - -.

Saturday, September 30th 1899 Page 5
Death of Abraham Boulle
Abraham Boulle, a pioneer and ove of the most picturesque characters of the early days of this region, died Monday, at his home on Sugar Island, of paralysis. Mr. Boulle was one of the few remaining old time mail carriers in the Soo from 1850-1874. With dogs and tobbagans these men performed dailty services that have reared a monument to their memory that does not decay with the passing of time. Mr. Boulle was born in the province of Quebec in 1833, and came to the Soo in June 1849. For several years he eked out an existence by hunting and fishing. From 1850 to 1860. Mr. Boulle carried mail betwen the Soo and Saginaw, and from 1870 to 1874 between this city and Marquette. - - - - -
Mr. Boulle married during the early years of his residence here and leaves a wife and two sons to mourn his loss.
The funeral service was held Wednesday morning and the interment was in the island cemetery.

Saturday, September 30th 1899 Page 5
Death of Mrs. Ellen McFarlane of Sugar Island
Mrs. Ellen McFarlane, one of the county's old residents, died of dropsy last Saturday at her home on Sugar Island, at the ripe old age of 80 years. The deceased was born on the Isle of Man, Scotland in 1819. When 20 years old she was married to her husband, the late Donald McFarlane, who died five years ago. The couple emigrated to Americas soon afterwards and settled in York county, near Toronto, and lived for a time and then moved to Bruce County, Ont., and lived on a farm about 25 years. In 1898 they moved to Sault Ste. Marie and settled on a homestead on Sugar Island. The deceased was a consistent and exemplary christen lady and a constant member of the Baptist church. The funeral services were held Tuesday at her home and conducted by Rev. E.S.Walker, paster of the Baptist church, S.S.M,ON. Her remains were laid to rest by the side of her late husband at Garden River, Ont. She left to mourn her loss, five children, two sons, James and Donald, and three daughters, Margret McFarlane, Mrs. Geo. D.McKay, of Underwood, Ont., and Mrs. Robt. Coulson, of Sailors Encampment.

Saturday, September 30th 1899 Page 5
Mrs. Wm. Myers died about 10 o'clock last night at her home on West Spruce street, after a lingering illness of catarrh of the stomach. The deceased was 36 years of age, and leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss. The funeral services will be held Tuesday from St. Mary's church and the interment will be in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, September 30th 1899 Page 6
DeTour
Annie Stacey, aged 27, wife of Andrew Olmstead, passed away Saturday night after a long illness. She was buried under the auspice of the Longshoremen's Union, of which her husband is a member. The funeral was the largest ever seen at Detour.

Saturday, October 7th 1899 Page 1
John McDonald, of DeTour, Fatally Injured Monday
John F. McDonald, son of Joseph McDonald, of DeTour was fatally injured Monday afternoon at the Highstone mill in that village. Mr McDonald was engaged in putting a belt around one of the pulleys when in some manner his clothing became entangled in the belt which wound him around the shaft until every bone was broken.- - - - In spite of his severe injuries, Mr. McDonald lived until Wednesday afternoon. The funeral services were held yesterday and the interment was in the DeTour cemetery.

Saturday, October 7th 1899 Page 1
Judge Steere's Sister Dies
Miss Jennie Steere, a sister of Judge J. H. Steere, of the city, died at her home in Adrain Tuesday evening, of spinal meningitis. Miss Stere was 52 years of age.

Saturday, October 14th 1899 Page 1
Death of Geo. J. Ryan
Passed Away Tuesday Night at His Residence on Court Street
Goe. J. Ryan, of 644 Court Street, died Tuesday evening, after a brief illness of pneumonia. The deceased wass 37 years of age and leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss.
The funeral services were held Thursday morning, at St. Mary's church and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery. Mr. Ryan was born in Cleveland in 1862, and came to this city with his parents in 1865. –

Saturday, October 14th 1899 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
James Cashen, aged 25 was murdered by two Finns near Lake Angeline mine location, Ishpeming, Monday night. His head was almost severed from his body.

Saturday, October 14th 1899 Page 7
Wm. Kallacky, the 2-year-old son of Mrs. Timothy Killacky of Bruce township, died Wednesday and was interred Thursday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, October 14th 1899 Page 7
Death of Frances L. Ferris
Frances L. the 5-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. Ferris, of Division street, died Tuesday. The little one fell from a sofa, about two weeks ago, striking heavily on her head, the fall rendering her unconcious. She was picked up and revived, but soon after passed into a series of spasms, which continued until they resulted in her death. The funeral was held Wednesday from the house and the interment was in the hill cemetery.

Saturday, October 14th 1899 Page 7
The infant baby of Postmaster and Mrs. James McCarron, of McCarron, died Thursday and was buried yesterday at Donaldson.

Saturday, October 21st 1899 Page 1
Death of Capt. Geary
A dispatch from Gen. Otis announces the death of Capt. Woodbridge Geary, 12th Infantry. He died Oct 10 at San Francisco de Malabon, from gunshot wounds received in a reconnoisance toward Buena Vista - - -

Saturday, October 21st 1899 Page 1
Death of Dr. Kirby's Brother
Dr. T.R.Kirby was called to Toronto Tuesday, to attend the funeral of his brother, Nathan Kirby - - a wife and three children are left to mourn his loss.

Saturday, October 21st 1899 Page 2
Jessie Wilcox, of the Ridge road, near Hay Lake, died Tuesday morning, aged 71 years. The funeral services were held from the house Thursday and the interment was in Riverside cemetery.

Saturday, October 21st 1899 Page
Death of Martin Healey
Martin Healey son of Mrs. Catherine Healey, of West Ridge street suddenly died of heart failure, Saturday noon. Mr. Healey with several companions, had spent the morning around town, with no premonition of his impending fate. Shortly after noon he complained of being unwell. About 1 o'clock Mr. Healey's conditon was noticed and an investigation caused. Death soon ensued. He was born in this city 27 years ago- - -
The funeral services were held Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church under the auspices of C. M. Third Reg't. M.N.G. of which Co. he still was a honored member. Rev. Father Connolly preached the sermon - - -.

Saturday, October 21st 1899 Page 4
Frank M. Lewis of Iron River, was accidentally shot by his companion Mr. Denton, while hunting. Death was almost instantaneous.

Saturday, October 28th 1899 Page 3
Death of Moses Greenbird
Moses Greenbird, an old resident of Sugar Island, and who is referred to at length in Mrs. Gilbert's historical article in this issue of THE NEWS, died Tuesday evening, aged 58 years. The deceased was a member of Co. F. 9th Michigan cavalry and served with his company throughout the cival war. The funeral services were held Thursday from the family residence and the internment was in the island cemetery.

Saturday, October 28th 1899 Page 6
Allie, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bonno died Sunday and was interred Tuesday in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, October 28th 1899 Page 8
To The Great Beyond
Death has claimed still another of the Soo's old residents in the person of Mrs. Margaret Galley, who died about 2 0'clock Thursday morning, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bernard Kelly, 217 Johnstone street. Extreme old age is given as the cause of her demise. Mrs. Galley had been ailing for years. - - -
Mrs. Galley was born in Ireland, March 17, 1817, and emigrated to America with husband in 1850. Six years later she came to the Soo. - - -
Mr. Galley died about 22 years ago. Since then Mrs. Galley has made her home in the Soo. Two children are left to mourn her loss, Mrs Bernard Kelly, of this city and James Galley, an engineer at St. Mary's Falls canal. The funeral services were held this morning from St. Mary's church and the interment was in Maple Ridge cemetery. - -

Saturday, October 28th 1899 Page 8
The infant son of Maj. and Mrs. W. O. Johnson died recently in Fort Thomas, Ky.
Saturday, November 4th 1899 Page 4
The 40 months-old child of Mrs. R. K. West, of Calumet, died on West Ridge street, Thursday morning. The funeral will be from the house today and the internment in the Hill cemetery.

Saturday, November 11th 1899 Page 6
John A., the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Watson, of South street, died Tuesday morning. The funeral services were held Thursday and the internment was in Maple Ridge cemetery.

Saturday, November 11th 1899 Page 7
Samuel Landauer, a former Sooite but late of Ashland, Wis, died Monday of last week, in that city in result of a paralytic stroke. The remains were interred in Milwaukee Friday. - -

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 1
Wm. Young an employee of the Soo Pulp & Paper was killed Tuesday morning by being crushed and mangled between the shaft and ceiling in the company's pulp room. - - - Mr. Youn was 15 years of age and was a resident of the Canadian Soo. He leaves a step-mother, besides several brothers and sisters to mourn his loss. - - -

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 1
Lucius Myrick died about 5 o'clock yesterday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. F. Hughart, at 125 Cedar street, of concussion of the brain, the result of a fall Thursday afternoon, while discharging his duties as janitor at the armoury. During the game the ball was served back to the rear of the court and in attempt to recover and return it to the wall, Geo. Beadle, one of the players, unintentially ran into the ladder, causing Mr. Merrick to fall, a distance of 10 feet, landing upon his head. - - - - He remained unconscious, watched by Doctor's Beadle and Townsend, till his death. Mr. Merrick was 67 years of age. He came to this city a month ago in company with his wife, from Sioux Falls, S.D. to spend the winter with his daughter, Mris Hugart. He was serving his third week as janitor of the armoury - - - The remains were taken to Sioux Falls yesterday afternoon, by Mrs. Myrick and H. F. Hughart for burial.

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 3
Bay Mills
Wm. Omenomonee was summoned from his camp at Salt Point last Friday on account of the death of his youngest child. The burial occurred at the Mission churchyard on Saturday.

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 3
Bay Mills
John Waiskal, the 5-year-old son of Andrew Waiskal died Thursday morning. This is the third death in the mission within in a week.

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 6
DeTour
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Smith, of St. Ignace, who are living at Clark A. Stevenson's camp, are mourning the loss of their 2- year-old son, who died of cramps Wednesday of this week.

Saturday, November 18th 1899 Page 7
Death of Mrs. Thos. Lackey
Mrs. Thos. Lackey of Bruce township, died Sunday evening, at the home of her brother, Abram Shunk, on the Hay Lake road, of catarrh of the stomach. The deceased was 25 years of age and leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss. The funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon, at the Shunk home by Rev. C.L. Lambertson and the internment was in Riverside cemetery. Mrs. Lackey was a daughter of the late Wm. Shunk.

Saturday, November 25th 1899 Page 1
Death of David Glendenning
David Glendenning of Rudyard, aged 50 died of heart failure Saturday night, while visiting his brother at Strong's. The remains were brought to the city Sunday, then taken to Mr. Glendenning's home at Rudyard then brought back Monday for internment in Maple Ridge cemetery. A wife and two children, are left to mourn his loss. - - -

Saturday, November 25th 1899 Page 4
Wolverine Waifs
Chas. C. Cavanagh, editor of the St. Ignace News, died of heart failure Thursday of last week. Mr. Cavanagh has been editor of this NEWS for the past 17 years and during that time was always prominently identified with every move toward advancing his home city

Saturday, November 25th 1899 Page 8
Frank M. Haley, a brakeman on