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Wisconsin Scandinavian
Obituaries Haa - Hal


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Haakenson Ellen Mrs.
Haakenson Gustav A.
Haakenson Haaken Mrs.
Haakenson John
Haakenson Thomas
Hagen Alfred
Hagen B. Gunda Mrs.
Hagen Christen C.
Hagen Edward M.
Hagen Edward M. 2
Hagen Eric
Hagen Eric 2Hagen Erick
Hagen Fred
Hagen Hans 1
Hagen Hans 2
Hagen Hans E. Mrs.
Hagen Maria Mrs.
Hagen Otto A.
Hagen Tom
Hagen Thomas 2
Hagestad Andrew C.
Hagestad Astrid Mrs.
Hagestad Carl
Hagestad Daniel
Hagestad Jens Mrs.
Hagestad K. K.
Hagestad Knut K. 2
Halderson Albert
Halderson Albert 2
Halderson Andrew
Halderson James
Halderson James O.
Haldorson John
Hallanger John B.
Hallanger Kundt K.
Hallanger Knudt P.
Hallanger Knudt P. 2
Hallingstad Martinus
Halvorsen Martin
Halvorsen Martin Mrs.
Halverson Anna Mrs.
Halverson Christ and Edward
Halverson John Mrs. a
Halverson John Mrs. b
Halverson John Mrs. c
Halverson Martha Mrs.
Halverson Mathea Mrs.
Halverson Ole Mrs.
Halverson Peter
Halverson Tarald
Halvorson Claus
Halvorson Claus Mrs.
Halvorson Christine Mrs.
Halvorson Ebert
Halvorson Ed Mrs.
Halvorson Halvor J.
Halvorson Hjoron Mrs.
Halvorson Julius Mrs.
Halvorson Karlius
Halvorson Mary Mrs.
Halvorson Nels
Halvorson Selmer Mrs.
Halvorson Sigrud



ALBERT HALDERSON
"Albert Halderson, a well known and respected resident of section 1, Caledonia Township, was born at Valders in the northern part of Norway, November 25, 1847, son of John and Gertie (Olson) Halderson. The father was born in the same locality in 1817 and his wife in 1816, their marriage taking place in 1841. While in his native land John Halderson lived under a landlord named Eric Strand and worked a certain number of days in each season--spring, summer, fall and winter--for home privileges on Strand's property. Mr. Strand finally sold out all his interests in Norway and came to America, and by arrangement with Mr. Halderson brought him and his family with him. While on the journey between New York and Wisconsin the two men became accidentally separated, but in Dane County, Wis., Mr. Halderson subsequently learned through a cousin, Ole Brown of LaCrosse, that Mr. Strand had located in Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, and so he came on with his family. This was in 1858. To pay his indebtedness to Mr. Strand, Mr. Halderson, who was a carpenter by trade, worked for him in that capacity at intervals, Mr. Strand assisting him and his family when it was necessary until the account was settled between them. The first home of the Halderson family in Wisconsin was a dugout in the side of a hill in Bostwick Valley, and in this they lived for the first year or two, In 1860 Mr. Halderson bought 120 acres of wild land from the government, on which he built a two-room log house and in 1870 he erected a more substantial and convenient log house, hewn inside and out, also sided and plastered. It was of two stories with basement and contained six rooms, and is today occupied by Knute Halderson, a brother of the subject of this sketch. Mr Halderson, the father, cleared and developed all the plow land on the 120-acre tract, using oxen for his first team, the money for which he obtained by splitting rails at 75 cents per hundred. To accomplish this he had to walk three and a half miles every morning and back at night, working all day without dinner. Being a powerfully built man, Mr. Halderson was popularly known in the neighborhood as "Big John." In 1991 he sold this farm to his brother Knute, and moved to Coon Valley, Vernon County, Wis., where he bought an unimproved farm of 80 acres, this place being his home until the death of his wife Gertie in 1891. He then sold the farm to his son Peter and spent the rest of his life with his children, his death occurring December 2, 1897 at the home of his daughter, Jane Nelson, near Viroqua, Wis. The children of John and Gertie Halderson were six in number: Jane, born in Norway, who resides in Spokane, Wash.; Albert, whose name appears at the head of this sketch; Ole, born in Norway, April 8, 1853, who now resides in Willamette Valley, Oregon; Knute, born on shipboard while on the trip to America in 1857; Peter, born in Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, in 1861, who died at LaCrosse during the winter of 1915-16, and a daughter, born in Bostwick Valley, who died in infancy. Albert Halderson was brought up on his parents' farm and adopted agriculture for his occupation. He was married in 1868 to Mary Baarder of Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, Wis., of which union there was one son, J.O. Halderson, now a furniture dealer in Galesville, Wis. Mrs. Mary Halderson died in August 1873, at the age of about 25, she having been [born] in Norway in 1847. Mr. Halderson contracted a second marriage with Rachael Larson, who was born in Norway September 22, 1850. She was killed in the summer of 1886 in a runaway accident. Their children are: Melvin of Holmen, LaCrosse County, Wis.; Louis of Trempealeau County, Wis.; Elmer and Frank, who reside with their father. Mr. Halderson was married the third time April 24, 1887 to Rosa Caswell. Their children are: Gertrude, resides at home; Raymond, county agent, living at Elkins, W. Va.; Grace, a teacher at Bangor, Wis.; Carrol, a student at Galesvile high school. The family church is the Methodist." History of Trempealeau County, 1917

JAMES O. HALDERSON
"James O. Halderson [includes a family photo], president of the Halderson-Plummer Company, Incorporated, of Galesville, of which place he is one of the leading businessmen, was born in Harmony, Vernon County, Wis., February 18, 1871, son of Albert and Mary (Gaarder) Halderson. He was educated in the common schools of Vernon County and remained at home until he was 20 years of age, when he became clerk in the furniture store of Joseph Polver at Viroqua, Wis. There he remained for three years, during the last year of which period he had full charge of the business, having mastered it in every detail. In 1894 Mr. Halderson came to Galesville and here established an up-to-date furniture and undertaking business with Thomas Call as an equal partner, the style of the firm being Halderson & Call. Two years later their establishment was burned out, entailing a complete loss, but, undaunted, Mr. Halderson made a new start, this time alone and on a small scale, his place of business being located in the Dutton building. By hard work and upright dealing he built up a flouishing business, which increased steadily year by year. He now owns a fine store building, complete in every branch of the business, located on the corner of Ridge and Allen streets. This location he purchased from M.B. Parker and son Ervin in 1898. He has just built a tasteful modern residence north of his business block facing on Ridge Street. In July, 1915, Mr. Halderson sold a half interest in the business to W.F. Plummer, and it was then incorporated as the Halderson-Plummer Company, with J.O. Halderson, president; Mrs. J.O. Halderson, vice-president; W.F. Plummer, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Halderson is a graduate of the Clark Embalming School of Chicago and of the Williams Embalming School of Oshkosh, Wis., and holds a state certificate as a thoroughly qualified funeral director. As a business man he has gained a reputation for honesty and reliability that is one of his most valuable assets. Aside from their furniture and undertaking departments, the Halderson-Plummer Company deal in pianos, organs, talking machines and other similar goods, keeping articles of standard merit. Mr. Halderson was married June 24, 1896 to Ellen Cook, who was born in Decorah Prairie, this county, July 25, 1870, daughter of David and Agnes (Henderson) Cook. Mrs. Halderson was graduated from the Galesville schools in 1888. For several terms she was a proficient teacher in the rural schools and for a long period a clerk in the department store of Gilbertson & Myhre at Galesville. Mr. and Mrs. Halderson have two children: James Haskell, born June 2, 1899, who graduated from Galesville high school in 1917, and Theresa Grace, born March 8, 1902, who is now a student in the high school. Mr. Halderson is a member of Decorah Lodge, A.F. & A.M.; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen." - History of Trempealeau County, 1917

MRS. SELMER HALVORSON:
"The death of Mrs. Selmer Halvorson caused a great deal of sorrow among her many friends in Blair and vicintiy. It seemed but a short time since we saw her among us apparently hale and hearty as the rest of us. She had been assisting Jens Hanson in his clothing store for many months until her marriage to Selmer Halvorson of Lakes Coulee, which took place last fall.
Mrs. Halvorson was known to her many friends as a quiet and unassuming young lady. She was diligent and prompt at her work and was always looked upon as very dependable Since her marriage she and her husband spent most of their time at the home of Mrs. Halvorson's parents Mr. and Mrs. Torval Dahl.
Last April a baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. Halvorson; but the baby lived only a short while. Since then Mrs. Halvorson had been poorly. She seemed at times to be better but was finally brought to the Winona Hospital for treatment. It was there she died August 11th, 1922.
Mrs Selmer Halvorson was born Novembet 3, 1899. She was confirmed by Rev. Rondistvedt of Westby, Wis. in Beaver Creek April 19th, 1914. She was acompanied to her grave by a very large number of friends and relatives on Monday August 15, 1922.
She leaves to mourn her untimely death her husband, Selmer Halvorson, her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs Torval Dahl, one sister, Tillie Dahl and four brothers, Clarence, Edwin, Palmer and Albert.
CARD OF THANKS: We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to all those who so kindly assisted during the illness,death and burial of our beloved wife, daughter and sister, also to Revs. Boe and Urberg for their comforting words and also for the beautiful floral offerings. Selmer Halvorson, Mr. and Mrs Torval Dahl, Miss Tillie Dahl, Edwin Dahl, Mr. and Mrs Clarence Dahl, Albert Dahl, Palmer Dahl." Probably the BLAIR PRESS
Researching this family -
Ellen Rigsby

MARTIN HALVORSEN:
"Martin Halvorsen, 91, pioneer farmer of the Lakes Coulee community passed away at his home here in Blair Friday, February 8, 1952, from the infirmities of age. Funeral services were held at the First Lutheran church Monday afternoon following family devotions at the home. Interment was in the Blair cemetery with five grandsons, Martin and Paul Halvorsen, Wendell and Clifton Koolmo and Laurel Thompson and a grand nephew, Duane Risberg, acting as pall bearers.
Martin Halvorsen Myhrer was born in Vaaler, Solor, Norway on November 17, 1860. He was baptized in the Vaaler church by Pastor Berg and confirmed by Pastor Sorenson. At the age of 22 he came to America and to the village of Blair. He worked in the woods and at a sawmill in Eau Claire and also on the Canadian Pacific Railroad for a year.
On November 4, 1884, he was united in marriage to Kari Lund at Eau Claire by the late Rev. Hoyme. The first two years of their marriage they lived in Eau Claire, then they moved to Superior where they resided for four years. On October 12, 1890 they purchased the farm in Lakes Coulee which was their home for 40 years. Through hard work and thrift they built up a nice farm home where they raised a family of ten children and also provided a home for relatives who came from Norway. They retired in 1930 and bought a home in Blair where he resided until his death February 8, 1952 at the age of 91 years, two months and 22 days. Following the death of his wife on November 3, 1946, he was cared for by his son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Selmer Halvorsen. He was a charter member of the First Lutheran church of Blair.
Mr. Halvorsen enjoyed good health until six weeks before he died. He enjoyed his radio and visiting with friends and relatives who called on him and got much comfort from the many visits of his pastor, Rev. Urberg.
He is survived by four sons, Helmer of Menomonie, Melvin of Minneapolis, Selmer of Blair and Tilman on the home farm; four daughters, Clara, Mrs. Joseph Swanberg of Minneapolis; Hilda, Mrs. Albert Koolmo of Gilman; Alida, Mrs. John Blomster of Seattle; and Myrtle, Mrs. Helmer Thompson of Ettrick; nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
He was the last member of his immediate family, his brothers and sisters, Mrs. Amalia Larson, Mrs. Hannah Robley and Haaken Myher of Superior, Mrs. Thea Lund, Mrs. Marie Stenbak and Nina Myhrer of Norway and Carelius of Donald, Wisc. having predeceased him. Two children, Almer, who died May 4, 1944, Marcus, February 19, 1911, also preceded their parents in death.
The family mourns the loss of a kind and loving father and will be greatly missed by all who knew him." THE BLAIR PRESS - February 14, 1952

MRS. MARTIN HALVORSEN:
"Funeral services were held on Thurday, November 7, from the home in the village and at the First Lutheran church for Mrs. Martin Halvorsen who pased away Sunday evening, November 3, 1946.
Kari Andersdatter Lundaasen Halvorsen was born September 9, 1862 in Horg parish near Trondhjem, Norway to the parents Anders Syverson Lundaasen and Berit Jonsdatter Einum. She was baptized on the Horg church by Rev. Holm, and on August 21, 1877 was confirmed in the same church by Rev. Parelius.
At the age of eleven years she went out to work and was engaged as a "Saterjente", a dairy maid, on the summer feeding grounds on the mountain. In 1879, the 16-year-old emigrated to America coming to a brother, Arnt Lund of Ishpeming, Mich. and remaining with him until 1881 when she went to Eau Claire and found work as a domestic.
While in Eau Claire, she met Martin Halvorsen Myhren, and on November 4, 1884, they were united in marriage at the First Lutheran parsonage there by the late Rev. G. Hoyme.
They made their home in Eau Claire for one year, and then five years in Superior, after which they moved to Lakes Coulee where they purchased 50 acres of land. This land was added to until the large home farms were arranged.
They farmed in Lakes Coulee until 1930 when they purchased their village home and established residence here until the present.
Her brothers and sisters, Syver, Hilda, John, Arnt and Erik, all passed on before her. She, the baby of the family passed on last.
She began to fail last January and during the summer and fall she failed rapidly, and fell asleep Sunday evening, November 3, 1946. Her aged husband, Martin, with whom she walked in matrimony within 15 minutes of 62 years, survives her besides the folowing children: Helmer, Menomonie; Clara, Mrs. Swanberg, Minneapolis; Hilda, Mrs. Albert Koolmo, Gilman; Melvin, Minneapolis; Selmer, Blair; Aleda, Mrs. John Blomster, Seattle, Wash.; Myrtle, Mrs. Helmer Thompson, Ettrick; and Tilman, Blair. All were present except Mrs. Blomster who visited her mother a few weeks ago. She also leaves 9 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Two sons, Elmer and Marius, preceded her in death.
The family mourns the loss of a kind and loving wife and mother and will be greatly missed by all who knew her.
She was a member of the First Lutheran church since coming to Blair and a Charter Member of the Ladies Aid.
Thus another victory has been won for a good lady of this communityl.
The pall bearers were Theo. Austin, Iver Thopson, Iver Berg, Ole Gunderson, Carlot Gusk, Oscar Nyen. The flower girls were Mrs. Herschel Dahl, Mrs. Melvin Solberg, Mrs. Amos Kolve, Mrs. Lloyd Skogstad and Miss Hazel Thompson." THE BLAIR PRESS =- November 7, 1946

THOMAS HAAKENSON: (TOTEN)
"Thomas Haakenson, who came from Norway as a young man and who lived in the Taylor area until two years ago when he went to the Ebenezer Home In Minneapolis to live, died at the Fairview, Minneapolis, December 19, 1955.
He was born July 7, 1875, at Toten, Norway.
Haakenson never married, but made his home with relatives.
Funeral services were held December 22 at 1:30 p.m. at the Ness Chapel, Black River Falls. The Rev. B.J. Hatlem officiated and burial was in the Morken cemetery, three miles out of Disco.
At the time of his death and burial his only sister, Mrs. Hannah Anderson, was too ill to attend funeral services and pased away just 10 days after the death of her brother." THE BLAIR PRESS - January 12, 1956

MARTINUS HALLINGSTAD: (VESTRE TOTEN)
"Martinus M. Hallingstad was born In Vestre Toten, Norway on March 7, 1868, the third child of Mathia and Martha Hallingstad. He was baptized in Norway by Rev. Magelson, and came to America with his parents in the spring of 1872, arriving at New York after a journey of six weeks on the ocean. They travelled by rail to Black River Falls and from there to Blair and to Larkin Valley to the home of Johannes Tangbakken. After two years they moved to Fitch Coulee which became their home until the children grew up.
In 1883 he was confirmed by the Rev. Emanuel Christopherson at Pigeon Falls. He worked in the pineries for fourteen winters. He was united in marriage to Emma Olson Hagseth on April 19, 1903 at Blair, Wisconsin by Rev. Ole Gulbrandsen and established their home on the Hagseth farm. He was a member of the First Lutheran Church.
They retired from the farm and moved to Whitehall in December, 1972. Two years later on September 23, 1929, Mrs. Hallingstad suddenly passed away.
Mr. Hallingstad is survived by his only child, Mayme, who made a home for him after the death of his wife and cared for him during his illness: also the following brothers and sisters; Mrs. Tillie Skoyen, Holmen, Wis.; Ole of Whitehall; Andrew and Mrs. Edwin Anaas of the Town of Pigeon. The following brothers and sisters are deceased: Mrs. Nels Windjue who died August 24, 1931; Mina died at the age of 14 years; Adolph who died in infancy; and Mrs. Martin Pederson who died March 21, 1936.
Martinius had been in failing health for a long time and was taken to the Community hospital where he pased away the same evening.
Funeral services were held Monday afternoon 1:30 at the home and 2:00 at Our Saviour's Lutheran Church, Rev. O.G. Birkeland officiating. Burial was in the Zion Lutheran church cemetery at Blair.
Mrs. Arthur Haralsrud and Miss Bertha Galstad sang "It Is Well With My Soul," at the home. At the church service Mrs. Arthur Haralsrud sang "Jeg Ved Mig En Sovn i Jesu Navn" and the Senior choir sang two songs "Heaven Is My Home" and "Abide with Me."
Pall bearers were Adolph Hanson, Palmer Hagen, Hans Melby, Ole Storley, Miland Elland and Albert Tenneson.
Flowers were carried by Clara Steffenson, Gladys Sanrope, Amy Kins, Alice Speerstra, Mabel Larson, Mrs. A.W. Wright, Alice Larson and Alice Hallingstad." THE BLAIR PRESS - October 9, 1941


MRS. JOHN HALVERSON: (VALDERS)
"Mrs. John Halverson died at the home of her son Halvor in Eleva May 16, aged nearly 88. Funeral services were held at the Eleva and Pleasant Valley churches on May 20, the Revs. A. Wichmann and Th. Moen officiating. Interment was in the Pleasant Valley cemetery beside her husband, who died in 1928.
Mrs. Halverson, nee Marit Hagerness was born in Valders, Norway, September 10, 1849, and came to Seneca, Wisc in 1876. She spent some time in Prairie du Chien and later in Neillsville, and on December 10, 1873, she was married to John Halverson at Chippewa Falls. In 185 Mr. and Mrs. Halverson bought the farm in Pleasant Valley where he lived until death and she until 1930, when she moved in with her son at Eleva.
Deceased is mourned by four sons: Halvor, Hector, Aaron and Kjel; three daughters, Mrs. C.H. Schmidlin, Mrs. C. Moen and Mrs. Noble Goss; 15 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; three sisters, daughters, Mrs. C.H. Schmidlin, Mrs. C. Moen and Mrs. Noble Goss; 15 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs. Berg and Mrs. Isaacson of Eleva and Gertrude in Norway, and two brothers, K. Hagerness of Eleva and Severt in Norway." THE WHITEHALL TIMES - May 27, 1937


MRS. HAAKEN HAAKENSON: (SOLAR)
"Mrs. Haaken Haakenson, nee Marie Mellsness, died at her home in Chimney Rock on the 26th of May, 1917. She was born June 24, 1865, in Solor, Norway,
The funeral took place May 29, interment being in the Norwegian cemetery. A great many neighbors, friends and relatives from far and near were present. Rev. Langhoi of Strum officiated.
The deceased leaves to mourn her loss, besides her husband, one son 14 years old and three brothers, of which Arne Mellsness of Eagle Bend, Minn., and Adolph Mellsness of Eau Claire were present at the funeral." THE WHITEHALL TIMES-BLAIR BANNER - June 14, 1917

GUSTAV A. HAAKONSON: (SOLAR)
"In 1868, Hakon Johnson, with his wife Oliea, his wife's father, Guttorm, cam from Solor, Norway, to the town of Preston. Mr. Johnson did not stay long in Preston. He found some land in section nine, in what is now the town of Chimney Rock, which he homesteaded. There he built and cleared until his death July 3, 1883. He died from injuries received in a runaway. His widow survived him nearly 39 years and died June 10, 1922, age 96 years. Her father, Guttorm, died on the homestead at the age of 100 years and 11 days. During the last 25 years of his life he was totally blind. There were three children in the family, Haakon Haadonson, who still lives on the homestead, and the subject of this sketch, Gustav. The brother, was Johan Haadonson, a half-brother who for many years, was one of the leading citizens in Chimney Rock. It is told of grandfather, Guttorm, that he was a very constant smoker, and that for the sake of economy he used pine splints or slivers to light his pipe. He usually had on hand quite a collection which he kept in a certain place where he could reach them from his usual seat near the kitchen stove. It sometimes happened that after lighting his pipe he would replace the sliver he had used without extinguishing the fire on the end of it. One day, while his grandson Gustav was still so young that he could not talk, the old man replaced a sliver which set fire to the other slivers he had in stock. The little lad, being unable to tell his grandfather what had happened, grabbed his hand and steered it in among the burning splinters.
It was hard on the old man's hand but it saved the home. Haakon, the surviving brother, says that it was characteristic of Gustav throughout his whole life to judge surely and act quickly. In fact, that he has not met anyone whose judgement within the range of his knowledge and the sphere of his activities, was safer or more dependable.
Gustav never married. He was born on the old homestead and always made his home there. And for years he and his brother had everything in common. Every passing year strengthened the bond between them, making their relationship more tender. Like Damon and Pythias of old, the threads of their lives became one beautiful web, where the slightest rent or injury would be felt alike by them both. It is difficult to find such a peculiar union of generations occupying the same home for so many years. There was the centenarian Guttrom, his daughter Olia, almost a century, his two grandsons, Haaken and Gustav, and for a time a great grandson, the son of Haakon. All their lives have been comparatively quiet, silent and uneventful.
About six years ago, Gustav had an attack of what may be called progressive paralysis, and during the last two years and a half he was practically helpless. On April 25, 1933,he went quietly to sleep, leaving a vacancy in the heart of his brother which never can be filled. His funeral, conducted by Reverend Wichmann, at the Chimney Rock church took place April 29, And there by the side orf his mother, father and grandfather, Mother Nature clasps his mortal remains. His nearest surviving relatives are his brother, Haakon Haakonson, his nephew, Oliver Haakonson, and numerous descendents of Johan Haakonson, his half brother.
"They that govern the most make the least noise." Many people, possessed of a vast urge to let the world know how smart they are, will dispute the truth of the saying I have quoted. But while they rave, rant, waste and idle, tearing to pieces the social moral and political fabrics of society, the silent ones are constantly at work repairing and sustaining the social structure The thieves, the sluggards, the spendthrifts and all the wreckers of thrift, industry and human well being, under whatever name or title they may act or pose, must be fed and clothed. Homes must be built, the earth must be tilled, the fruits of labor must be saved or there will be nothing to gather taxes from- nothing to support the government-nothing even for the noisy horde who construct nothing unless they can get the material from the silent workers. Praise be to the silent ones who listen to the voice of their God and the thousand and one voices of Nature while they follow their ideals step by step to the harbors of peace and happiness. May 7, 1933 by H.A. Anderson" WHITEHALL TIMES - May 11, 1933

MRS. ELLEN HAAKENSON: (GRUE, SOLAR)
"Mrs. Ellen Haakenson was born in Grue parish Solor, Noway, on the 11th day of March, 1952, and her girlhood days were spent at the place of her birth.
At the age of 16 years she left the place of her childhood, and emigrated to the United States coming to Blair, Wisconsin in the summer of 1868. Here she was married to John Haakenson in the same year that she arrived.
The present town of Chimney Rock was at that time practically a wilderness, but to prospective homestead-seekers, it was a land of promise. Full of vigor, ambition and courage the young couple, therefore, in the spring of 1869 gathered up their earthly belongings and headed for the promised land, intending to make a part of the wilderness their future home. Following the lead of the compass they landed and located in a valley which has ever since been known as the Haakenson valley. Here they shared pleasures with hardships incidental to pioneer life; here they built up a farm which became the home of Mrs. Haakenson for nearly 56 years; here they raised a family of 12 children - three of whom are dead: Harold died in infancy, Emil four years ago at the age of 51 years, and Laura (Mrs. Emil Huslegaard) four years ago at the age of 49 years. Her husband died in the fall of 1891, and she was left alone with the task of bringing up a large family and taking care of the farm.
Mrs. Haakenson was always a quiet, unassuming woman who devoted all her time to her home duties and strangers as well as neighbors and friends would always find a place of welcome and hospitality at the Haakenson home.
Shortly before her death Mrs. Haakenson had a paralytic stroke from which she did not recover, and on January 30, 1925, in the presence of all her surviving children with the exception of Maurice and Ole, she peacefully passed away into her last slumber.
Besides 13 grandchildren she is survived by the following children who mourn the death of a kind and loving mother: Mrs. Hannah Gunderson of Gilmanton, Wisconsin; Mrs. Alice Insteness of Chimney Rock; Mrs. Ida Erickson of Leeds, North Dakota; Maurice Hawkenson of Bienfait, Sask., Can.; Ole Hawkenson of Portland, Oregon; Adelaide, Hilda, Harry and John of Chimney Rock.
The funeral services were held at the home and in the church on Tuesday, February 3, and were conducted by Rev. A. Wichmann as officiating pastor, and by Mr. H.L. Kjentvet as undertaker. The remains were laid to rest by the side of her husband in the family burial lot in the Chimeny Rock cemetery." WHITEHALL TIMES - February 25, 1925

JOHN HAAKENSON:(NORWAY)
"John Haakenson died at his home in this village on the 24th of April, 1907, of pneumonia, aged about 73 years. Deceased leaves a wife and seven grown children, two living in Norway. Those residing in this country are, Christ Johnson of Welch coule; Miss Ella of Hixton; Hans Johnson of Blair; John G. Haakenson and Mrs. Anna Olson of Emerson, Mich. The funeral was held Friday, Rev. Gulbrandson officiating." - THE WHITEHALL TIMES AND BLAIR BANER - May 2, 1907


ERICK HAGEN (SONDRE LAND)
Funeral services for Erick Hagen, who died at the hospital in Whitehall, Sunday, June 12, at the age of 79 years, 5 months and six days, were held at the Bruce Valley church last Thursday at 2 o’clock., the Rev. N.E. Halvorsen officiating, assisted by the Rev. O.G. Birkeland of Whitehall. Pallbearers were Albert Halvorson, Anton Lien Andrew Kensmoe, Hartvig Bergerson, Olaf Christianson and Theodore Eide. Flowers were carried by Charles Hulberg and Elaine Elstad. Many memorials to the deceased were announced by the pastor, created by relatives and friends to different institutions. Mr. Hagen was born Sondre Land, Norway, January 6, 1859, son of Christian and Martha Hagen. He came to America in 1878, arriving at Arcadia on December 4 of that year. In 1882 he married Karen Sand, who died in 1892. Four years later, he married Maren Anderson, who died on February 18, 1913. He lived in Tamarack Valley until the spring of 1897, when he moved his family to the farm in Bruce Valley that he had purchased the previous fall. In both communities he joined the Lutheran church. He is survived by four brothers, Mikal of Bruce Valley, Martin of Clear Brook, Minnesota; and Christian and Carl of Fosston, that state; by one sister, Petrine, who lives in Norway, and by many more distant relatives both here and in Norway. Tom Lomsdahl of Osseo is his step-son and Ed Hagen of that place and Mrs. Melvin Elstad of Whitehall are cousins. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - JUNE 23, 1938

HANS HAGEN (SONDRE LAND)
Funeral services for Hans Hagen, Whitehall’s oldest citizen, were held at Our Saviour’s Lutheran church Monday afternoon preceded by brief rites at the Melvin Elstad home where he had lived over thirty years and died Thursday, June 3 at midnight following an illness of a few days. Had he lived until August 27, this year he would have been 98 years old. Mr. Hagen attributed his longevity to hard work and moderate living habits. Born of poor parents in Norway, he learned to work early in life and continued an industrious individual until old age forced him to retire. In his association with his family and fellowmen he applied the Golden Rule. If all citizens were of this type of manhood that Mr. Hagen exemplified, laws would be unnecessary. He led a devout Christian life, applying the teachings of the Scriptures in all his undertakings. During the later years of his life whenever an acquaintance talked to him, he expressed his appreciation of the tender care accorded him by the family with whom he made his home and by other relatives. When his long, useful life came to a close, the community at large paid tribute to his memory, knowing that it had benefited by the example of his noble life. The Rev. O.G. Birkeland officiated at the service, speaking in Norwegian and American. Phillip Thomte sang a Norwegian hymn, “Glad O Sjael Og Frygt Bog El.” and the choir of Our Saviour’s sang. Pallbearers were Edward Elstad, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Hartwig Elstad, Whitehall; Theodore Drangstveit of Blair; Henry Hagen of Osseo, grandsons of the deceased; and George and John Lund of Tamarack, nephews. Flowers were carried by Mrs. Aaron Lenmark, Eau Claire; Mrs. Jay Dodmead, Osseo; Mrs. Ernest Nelson, Eleva; Mrs. Walter Draeger and Mrs. Hartwig Elstad, Whitehall, and Mrs. Ben Bertelson, LaCrosse, granddaughters and Harriet Nelson, Eleva, and Elaine Elstad, Whitehall, great-granddaughters. Burial was in the Tamarack cemetery where those of his family preceding Mr. Hagen in death are buried. Hans Hagen was born in Sondre Land, Norway, August 27, 1839. He grew to manhood and was married in his native land. On April 13, 1870, Mr. and Mrs. Hagen set sail for America, together with their three children and Mrs. Hagen’s father. They spent two months on the ocean before arriving at Quebec, Canada, but stayed aboard the Colonist until they reached Milwaukee via the Great Lakes. Coming to LaCrosse by train, the immigrants again boarded a boat and came up the Mississippi river to Trempealeau, arriving there July 2. The family was met at Trempealeau by Mrs. Hagen’s brother, Gulbrand Lund of Norway Valley in Tamarack, town of Arcadia, where Mr. Hagen filed on 160 acres of land, built a little log cabin and began immediately to develop the land on his homestead. The three children who came to America with their folks were Ed, now of Osseo; Mrs. Melvin Elstad of Whitehall and Caroline, deceased. Two more children were born to them, Gilbert and Anna, and after giving birth to the latter, Mrs. Hagen died. The child followed her two months later. In 1877 Mr. Hagen married Bergit Rue. After the children were reared to maturity, the two decided to retire so they sold their farm in 1903 and bought a home in Whitehall. Three years later Mrs. Hagen died, since which time Mr. Hagen has made his home with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Elstad. Of the family of five children only Ed of Osseo and Mrs. Elstad survive. Gilbert, who grew to manhood and fought in the Spanish-American War, having died in 1900 in army service in Alaska. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - JUNE 10, 1937

MRS. HANS E. HAGEN (TELEMARKEN)
Mrs. Hans E. Hagen died July 13, 1906 after a long illness of old age. Her maiden name was Bergitte Rue. She was born in upper Telemarken, Norway, October 7, 1831. When 19 years of age she married Even Olson. Six children were born to them, two of who survive her, Ole Evenson of Tamarack and Mrs. Ingebor Drangstveit of Blair. They immigrated to America in 1866 and came to Blair, Wisconsin, where he husband died the first year of sunstroke, after which she moved to Tamarack, where she took up a homestead. In 1877 she married Hans E. Hagen of that place where they resided until three years ago, when they tired of farming and removed to Whitehall. Her health had been failing ever since. She also leaves a brother, Aslak of Balston, Minnesota; and a sister, Mrs. K. Thompson of Arcadia, and two stepchildren, Erick Hagen of Osseo and Mrs. Marie Elstad of Whitehall. Her children and sister were all present at the funeral, which took place July 16 at the Synod church Rev. O.K. Ramberg officiating. THE WHITEHALL TIMES AND BLAIR BANNER - JULY 19, 1906

EDWARD M. HAGEN (BIRI)
Edward M. Hagen passed away at his home in Pigeon Falls Thursday, June 19, from a lingering illness and old age. He was born January 12, 1864 in Biri, Norway, the son of Mathias and Agnette Nelson. At the age of 19 years, he took leave of his parents, other relatives and his native land to come to the land of greater opportunities, America, arriving at the home of Thorsten Lysengen Johnson of the Pigeon Falls community in 1883. In 1891 Mr. Hagen was joined in marriage to Johanna Johnson Moe by the late Rev. E.M. Christophersen and to this union were born ten children, Ilette, Mrs. Alfred Nelson; Adolph; Elvina, Mrs. Earl Larson; Mrs. Amanda Van Tassel; Harold, deceased; Hilmer; Ansel; Delia, deceased; Melford and Raymond. Funeral services were held from the old home farm in Moe coulee and the Synod Lutheran church in Pigeon Falls, of which he had been a member since his marriage, the Rev. K.M. Urberg of Blair and the Rev. C.K. Malmin of Pigeon Falls officiating and in charge of E.A. Sletteland, funeral director. Pallbearers were six grandsons, Hensel Nelson, James and Harlan Hagen, Edward and George Van Tassel and Ralph Perso. Flowers were carried by three granddaughters, Evelyn Nelson, Mary Hagen and Bernice Van Tassel. A short service at the home included the reading of the 23rd Psalm by Rev. Urberg and a song, “I Know of a Sleep in Jesus’ Name’. The church services were conducted by both pastors. Songs were rendered by Rev. Malmin, who sang “Taenk naar engang den taage er for svunden.” And Mrs. E.A. Sletteland, who sang “The Lord’s Prayer” and by the audience, “O Happy Home Where Thou Art Loved the Dearest”. Floral gifts were many as well as memorial of $103, of which $75 went to the church’s building fund and rest for charities. Mr. Hagen is survived by his wife, eight children, 15 grandchildren, one great-grandchild, one half-brother Oluf and one half-brother Anton of Norway. One brother, Thorvald, preceded him in death. Interment was in the Synod Lutheran church cemetery at Pigeon Falls on June 24. Having known Mr. Hagen from my youth, I must say a few words concerning his long and useful life. No words of mine can express so beautifully his home life as the words in the hymn, “O Happy Home, Where Thou Art Loved the Dearest.” He enjoyed a rich and blessed life and was permitted to see all his children grow to maturity, useful and respected citizens. Six years ago he and his wife were the honored guests at a large gathering of relatives and friends who were at their home to express their well wishes on their golden anniversary. Ed Hagen found employment in Pigeon Falls as the first butter maker of the P. Ekern Co. creamery and continued in their employ for many years. After his marriage to Johanna Moe, they lived in Pigeon Falls for one year, after which they moved onto the farm of his wife’s parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Johannes Moe, a farm that they continued to operate until 1945, when they moved into their new home in Pigeon Falls. He was an industrious and thrifty man, a kind and loving husband and father, a good and helpful neighbor. He lived his life according to the new commandment, “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” This was attested to by the large number who attended his funeral to pay their last respects to a fine friend and neighbor. It was always a pleasure to call at this home and share in their hospitality. One always felt the friendliness that radiated from there and that you were always a welcome visitor. He will be missed by a host of admiring friends, but the remembrance of him will remain with us until our passing. God bless his memory. Written by G.M. Steig THE WHITEHALL TIMES - JULY 3, 1947

TOM HAGEN (BIRI)
Tom Hagen, an old resident of Pigeon, died Sunday at his home in Blair. Mr. Hagen was 58 years old and had been seriously ill many weeks. Funeral services were held Tuesday at Blair and Pigeon, Revs. Urberg and Christophersen officiating. His pallbearers were his former neighbors here: Peter Norland, Bernt Moe, Andrew Semb, Thor Thorson, Ole Larson and B.S. Olson. He leaves his wife and seven sons, Joel, Albert, Edwin, Palmer, Peter, Rudolph and Carl; also two brothers, Edward and Oluf of Moe coulee. Mr. Hagen was a native of Norway. He was born in Biri, February 12, 1867. In 1883 he came to America and settled in Moe coulee, town of Pigeon. December 25, 1882, he was joined in marriage to Miss Pauline Moe. Ten children were born to them, seven boys and three girls, all the girls dying in infancy. Mr. Hagen and family continued on the farm in Moe coulee until the fall of 1919, when he disposed of his place and bought a farm in Reynolds coulee near Blair. In the spring of 1923, Mr. and Mrs. Hagen retired from active farm life and purchased a home in Blair where he resided until called by death. The family has the deepest sympathy of a large circle of friends in the loss of a kind and loving husband and father. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - APRIL 2, 1925

HANS HAGEN (NORWAY)
Hans Hagen passed away suddenly Tuesday noon July 11, at the home of his brother, Oluf, in Schimmerhorn, where he has resided all his life. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the Hagen home and at the S.L. church at Pigeon, the Rev. E.B. Christophersen officiating. Pallbearers were John Gilbertson, George Gilbertson, Otto Flugstad, Ed Nelson, John Magelee and Ed Jacobson. Flowers were carried by Misses Cassie Olson, Irene Olson, Marian Steien and Alma Steien. Hans Hagen was born in Norway, June 6, 1864. He came to America at the age of three with his parents, Ole and Mathea Hagen, who settled in Schimmerhorn valley. Two sisters and one brother preceded him in death. He had reached the age of 75 years, one month and five days. Deceased is survived by four sisters; namely, Mrs. John Paulson, Osseo; Mrs. Anton Olson, Black River Falls; Mrs. Sam Steien, Big Slough; and Mrs. Carl Halberg, Rainer, Oregon; and by two brothers, Olaf and Martin Hagen, both of Schimmerhorn. THE WHTEHALL TIMES - JULY 20, 1939

OTTO A. HAGEN (SOLAR)
Otto A. Hagen passed away at his home in Northfield at 5:30 Monday morning, February 25, at the age of 82 years, four months, and 15 days. Deceased had been failing in health for the past two years and the last three months had been confined to his bed. All his 11 children except two who live in California were at his bedside when he died. Mr. Hagen was born in Solar, Norway, October 11, 1852. His parents were Amund and Matthia Hagen. He came to America at the age of 22 He was married to Inge Maria Solberg in 1878. Pastor Sherven, a former minister of French Creek, conducted the ceremony. The following spring the young couple moved to a farm in the town of Northfield, where they resided for 37 years. All the 11 children were born and reared on this farm. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen lived in Fargo, North Dakota for a few years. In 1920 he built a house in the village of Northfield, where they have since resided. Mr. Hagen was a faithful member of the Upper Pigeon Lutheran church. He belonged to this congregation for over 56 years. Whenever he was asked to do anything for the church, he always answered “yes.” He was glad to be of service to the religious cause. Funeral services were held in the Upper Pigeon church at two o’clock, the Rev. E. B. Christophersen officiating. Dorothy Amundson, Mrs. Amundson, Mr. and Mrs. Olger Steen and John Tweed sang a hymn. Rev. Christophersen sang “Den Store Hvide Flok.” Pallbearers were Martin Mickelson, Anton Ellingson, Emil Bergerson, Olaf Bergerson, James Johnson and Ole Steen. Deceased leaves to mourn his death his widow and 11 children: Morris Whitehall; Oscar of Mariposa, California; Melvin of Fargo; Bennett of Northfield; Alette, Mrs. J. R. Myhre of Fargo; Laura, Mrs. Ed Swanson of Northfield; Olga, Mrs. M.J. Larson of Timber Creek; Emma, Mrs. G.E. Richwine, of Los Angeles, California; Connie, Mrs. L. J. Aver of Huron, South Dakota; Magna, Mrs. George Beckstrom of Fargo and Belva at home. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - MARCH 14 1935

MRS. MARIA HAGEN (NORWAY)
Funeral services for Mrs. Maria Hagen, 87, Northfield, who died at her home last Wednesday morning, August 18, 1948, were held in the Upper Pigeon church Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Hagen was quite well known to Blair people as she had often visited her at the home of her brother, George Solberg. She was born March 5, 1861 in Norway and came to America when she was eight years of age. She was married to Otto Hagen and they lived in Fargo, North Dakota and Northfield. Survivors include 11 children, Morris and Oscar of Mariposa, California; Ben of Hixton; Melvin and Mrs. M.R. Myhre of Fargo; Mrs. Ed Swanson, Northfield; Mrs. M.J. Larson, Osseo; Mrs. Emma Richwine, Los Angeles; Mrs. Lloyd Avery, Huron, South Dakota; Mrs. George Beckstrom, Fargo and Belva at home. Other survivors are one brother, George Solberg, Blair, and one sister, Mrs. Hellick Olson, Hixton. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1935 and one brother and one sister. THE BLAIR PRESS - AUGUST 26, 1948

CHRISTEN C. HAGEN (SONDRE LAND)
Christen C. Hagen was born November 22, 1863 in Sondreland, Norway. He was baptized and at the age of 15 years was confirmed in Hof church in Norway. At the age of 18 years he came to America, coming to Tamarack valley, Trempealeau County, where he worked on a farm and in logging camps for seven years. May 22, 1888, he was united in marriage to Bertha Marie Larsen of Tamarack valley and the same year they came to the Township of Rosebud, Polk County, 3 ½ miles south of Fossum, where he farmed for 31 years. In 1919 he retired from farming and moved to Fossum where he has resided ever since, failing in health the last years. He was finally removed to the hospital, where he passed away Thursday afternoon, July 6, at the age of 86, years, 7 months and 14 days. Those surviving are his granddaughters, Mrs. Calvin Redden of San Diego, California; two brothers, Mekel Hagen of Strum and Martin Hagen of Clearbrook; also a large number of nieces and nephews. His wife and daughter, Mrs. Oscar Amundson, his parents, one sister and two brothers preceded him in death. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - AUGUST 3, 1950

ERIC HAGEN (NORWAY)
Funeral services were held at the Congregational church in Osseo on June 20 for Eric “Ed” Hagen, 88, who died the previous Sunday at his home in that city. Mr. Hagen was a brother of Mrs. Melvin Elstad of Whitehall. Born April 23, 1863, in Norway, he came to this country at the age of six years. In 1895 he established himself at Osseo, where he had a long list of achievements to his credit. He built the first creamery there and operated it until the organization of a cooperative. He also built the first grain elevator and for many years was engaged in the mercantile business. In this endeavor he was in partnership with the late Oliver Waller until his death may years ago, but he did not retire from active participation in the store until April 1, 1950. Mr. Hagen served for two years as president of the Osseo village board and for eight years represented the village on the county board of supervisors. During that time he served two terms as chairman of the board. He was a charter member of the Osseo S.A.F. lodge, he was an organizer of the Congregational church, had served as a director of the school board, and organized and was president of the Bank of Osseo, the Indianhead Bank of Chetek and the Farmers Produce company of Osseo. Survivors are three daughters and one son, Mrs. Mabel Nelson of St. Charles, Minnesota; Mrs. Magaret Dodmead of Osseo; Mrs. Aaron Lenmark of Eau Claire and Henry Hagen, Osseo. He also leaves six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - JULY 5, 1951

MRS. B. GUNDA HAGEN (GULBRANDSDALEN)
“In the midst of life we are in death.” These words were vividly illustrated by the sudden death of Mrs. B. Gunda Hagen when she was suddenly stricken ill at her home at noon on November 11, 1944. Without any previous warning, she peacefully passed away at 1:30 P.M. without regaining consciousness.. At the time of her death, only three of her seven children were home at her bedside, Mrs. Bennie Enger, Roy and William. Bertha Gunda Potterud was born in Gulbrandsdalen, Norway on March 17, 1871, the daughter of Johan and Mathia Potterud. She was baptized in the Norwegian Lutheran church in Oslo, Norway, on April 7, 1871. At the age of nine years she came to America with her parents and settled in Eau Claire. On October 25, 1885, she was confirmed by the Rev. G. Hoyme. She was united in marriage on October 4, 1889 to Joseph Hagen by the Rev. Hoyme. They resided in Eau Claire until 1895, when they moved to the present homestead in Hale, where she lived continuously until the time of her death. Mr. Hagen passed away on December 19, 1934. She was a member of the Hale Lutheran church, a charter member of the Ladies Aid, a member of the American Legion Auxiliary and of the Royal Neighbors of America. She was secretary of the Elk Creek Lutheran Church Cemetery Association, having succeeded her husband at the time of his death, thus completing 51 years of faithful service in this capacity. Mrs. Hagen, together with her late husband took great pleasure and pride in helping to keep up and beautify the cemetery, which lies on a hill across the road from the church, originally a part of the Hagen farm. Mrs. Hagen was a devoted wife and mother. Her unselfish consideration of others will make her long remembered by those who knew her. Her comforting ways and words were sometimes called upon by those in dire anxiety and grief. Her kind and lovable disposition and sterling qualities, beloved by all her family and those who knew her, won the highest respect of everyone. Those outstanding traits were evidenced by the host of sympathizing relatives and friends who came from far and near to pay their last respects. The profusion of floral tributes and memorials were sufficient testimony to the memory of one who was well beloved. She is survived by seven children: Margaret, wife of Capt. George Ralph of Fort Sill, Oklahoma; Marie and Cora of Madison; Mabel, Mrs. Bennie Enger of Hale; Guy of Strum; Roy of Osseo and William of Hale, all of whom were present at the funeral. She also leaves 15 grandchildren, one great-grandchild; one sister, Mrs. J.B. Baumann of Carton, Minnesota and one brother, Marshall Potterud, Iron Mountain, Michigan. Funeral services were held November 16 at the home and the Hale Lutheran church, the Rev. N.E. Halvorsen of Osseo officiating. Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Rhode of Whitehall undertakers, sang at the home of the departed, “One Radiant Saviour” and Ovid Berg of Osseo sang, “My Task.” Flowers were carried by members of the American Legion Auxiliary, Royal Neighbors of America and neighbors, namely, Mrs. Louie Christianson, Miss Esther Jacobson, Mrs. Nels Johnson, Mrs. Vern Van Tassel, Mrs. Albert Fleming and Mrs. Fred Johnson. Honorary pallbearers were old time friends who were Mr. Hagen’s pallbearers ten years ago, also officers of the Elk Creek Lutheran Church Cemetery Association, Henry L. Olson, Hans Holmen, Carl Jacobson, Sever Steen, Chris Vold, Fred Fischer and Albert Anderson. Albert Saxrud was unable to attend on account of his health. Two of Mr. Hagen’s pallbearers preceded Mrs. Hagen in death, Ole Rongstad and Theodore Holmen. The following active pallbearers were young men who are at the present time or who in the past have been employed at the home of the deceased: Lester Vold, Arnold Rue, Howard Jermstad, Hans Monson, Anton Vold, Lawrence Nelson, Lawrence Larson and James Jacobson. She was laid to rest in the Hale cemetery beside her husband. God bless her memory. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - NOVEMBER 23, 1944

CARL HAGESTAD (NORWAY)
Carl Hagestad, 90, one of Ettrick’s oldest citizens, died at a LaCrosse hospital Tuesday evening following an illness of several weeks duration. He was born in Norway, February 21, 1863, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jens Hagestad. He was married June 20, 1888 to Emma Grinde, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.L. Grinde of Galesville. The couple engaged in farming in the North Beaver Creek Valley moving to Ettrick in 1920. Mrs. Hagstad died March 25, 1940. Having no children of the own, Mr. and Mrs. Hagestad adopted four who survive. They are Mrs. Harold Noren, Ettrick Township; Mrs. Henry Peterson, Minneapolis; Norman Hagestad, Eau Claire and Mrs. Joseph Norgaard of Melrose. Surviving also is a brother, Hans, of Marshall, Texas, and by his adopted children, 13 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday at the Runnestrand funeral chapel in Ettrick , and at First Lutheran Church in North Beaver Creek. The Rev. K.M. Urberg officiated and burial was in the church cemetery. THE BLAIR PRESS - SEPTEMBER 3, 1953

JOHN HALDORSON (NORWAY)
Funeral services for John Haldorson who passed away at the Krohn hospital in Black River Falls Wednesday, July 15, 1953, were held at the Trempealeau Valley church, Saturday afternoon, July 18 with the Rev. B. J. Hatlem officiating. Mrs. Hatlem sang “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” and “Rock of Ages” with Mrs. Enoch Anderson at the organ. Pallbearers were neighbors and friends of the Haldorson family and interment was in the church cemetery. John Haldorson was born in Norway on August 24, 1865 and at the age of 11 years, with his parents and two younger brothers, he came to the Town of Springfield, Jackson County, arriving here in August 1876. In 1882 his parents bought a farm in the Town of Springfield which remained in the family and on which Mr. Haldorson had made his home for 64 years, until 1946 when the farm was sold and he moved to Black River Falls where he spent the remaining days of his life. Mr. Haldorson was baptized in the Lutheran faith while in Norway and confirmed his baptismal vows in the Trempealeau Valley church. He lived an unassuming Christian life, a friend in need and always willing to administer to the comforts of others. During his last illness he was confined in the Krohn Hospital in Black River Falls where he was administered to with loving care by the hospital staff and relatives. He leaves to mourn his passing three brothers: Lewis of Glenwood, Minnesota; Chris of Mondovi and Albert of Taylor, besides many other relatives and friends. THE BLAIR PRESS - JULY 23, 1953

K.K. HAGESTAD (ULVIK, HARDANGER)
K.K. Hagestad was born in Ulvik, Hardanger, Norway, June 26, 1846. He emigrated to America with is parents in 1854 and settled in Lodi, Columbia County, Wisconsin. In 1860 he, with his parents, moved to Beaver Creek, this county, where his father filed on a home stead which remained his home until death. His father did not live to be an old man and younger Hagestad was obliged to assume the responsibility as head of the family. June 3, 1872, he married Miss Esther Knutson who has been an exceptionally helpful and devoted wife, successfully managing the household affairs and farm during the absence of Mr. Hagestad in attending to his many official duties entrusted to him. Mr. Hagestad was prominent in politics as well as local and church affairs. For twenty years he was a member of the Synod church council, for eighteen years a member of the Board of Trustees and one year, its chairman, which is the highest office the church can bestow upon a layman, and has the distinction of being the only layman honored with that office. He was instrumental in the organization of the Ettrick Farmers Cooperative Creamery, also the Ettrick Scandinavian Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which company he served as its president for over forty years, up to the time of his death. He was at one time a member of the Wisconsin Assembly, also served as Chairman of the County Board, director and chairman of the Board of Directors of the Home Bank of Blair. Was for many yeas a trustee of the Trempealeau County Asylum, for fifteen years trustee of the Gale College and for ten years, it’s chairman. He was at the time of his death a member of the Board of Directors of the LaCrosse Lutheran Hospital. There were fourteen children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagestad, eight of whom survive him: K.M. Hagestad, principal of a school in California; Andrew, managing the home farm; Willie, in charge of their farm at Camp Douglas; Olene who is married and lives in North Dakota; Mrs. John Fillner and Mrs. Irving Swenson of Ettrick; Cora, a nurse at LaCrosse; and Hilda. Mrs. Hagestad also survives him. The funeral was held at Beaver Creek church Saturday afternoon, Rev. S.S. Urberg officiating. John Berg, president of trustees of Gale College, also spoke. Rev. Bestul of French Creek spoke of Mr. Hagestad’s fine qualities as a citizen. A large crowd was in attendance at the funeral, many not being able to get inside the church. THE BLAIR PRESS - APRIL 26, 1917

MRS. ASTRID HAGESTAD (HALLINGDAL)
After a lingering illness, Mrs. Astrid Hagestad, Ettrick, Wisconsin, widow of the late Hon. K.K. Hagestad, died July 9, 1935 at the old homestead, the home of her son, A.G. Hagestad, at the age of 80 years, 8 ½ months. Astrid Knudtson was born in Hallingdal, Norway October 25, 1854. In 1861, at the age of 6 ½ years she, with her parents, migrated to America. After nine weeks on the ocean in a sailing ship, they landed at Quebec. They settled at Perry, Dane county, Wisconsin and in October of the same year, they came by oxen and covered wagon to Bear Creek Trempealeau County. At the age of 14, she was confirmed into the Lutheran faith by the Rev. O. Valdeland. On June 3, 1872, she was united in marriage to Knute K. Hagestad. To this union 14 children were born. Her husband and seven children preceded her in death. Twenty-six grandchildren, one great-grandchild, together with the following children survive: Professor Knut M. Hagestad of Salinas, California; Andrew C. Hagestad, on the old homestead; Mrs. Almina J. Vetterhus of Colton, South Dakota; Mrs. John C. Fillner of LaCrosse; William A. Hagestad of Ettrick; Mrs. Irving Swenson of Ettrick; and Mrs. George W. Greyes of Oroville, California. Two brothers, Knudt Knudtson of Galesville and John Knudtson of Beach, and a sister, Mrs. Sever Knudtson of Blair also survive. Funeral services were held Friday at 1:30 at the home and 2:00 at the North Beaver Creek Lutheran church, the Rev. K.M. Urberg officiating. Pallbearers were Bernt Erickson, Gust Erickson, E.C. Anderson, Carl Johnson, Hans Anderson and Helland Henderson. THE BLAIR PRESS - JULY 18, 1935

KNUDT P. HALLANGER (HARDANGER)
Knudt P. Hallanger was brought to the Community hospital Friday, January 12, while suffering from an attack of appendicitis. His condition was considered serious at the time of admission and he failed to withstand the operation. Death occurred Saturday, the 11th. Knudt P. Hallanger was born in Hardanger, Norway, July 31, 1860, son of Paul and Guri Hallanger. The family came to this country in 1867, locating in the Beaver Creek valley, near what is now Hegg. Mr. Hallanger’s youth was spent at a time when hard work was required to subdue the virgin soil. He was married in 1891 to Betsy Johnson, daughter of Nels and Jorand Johnson of Franklin, Jackson county, and were blessed with a family of 13 children. Mr. Hallanger had acquired a common English education and this gave him influence and participation in local affairs of the community. He was a member of the school board for 15 years in the capacity of clerk and treasurer, was town assessor for five years and was a trustee of the United Lutheran church of which he and his wife were members. He farmed in an up-to-date manner and was successful, being considered one of the most progressive agriculturists in the valley in which he lived. THE WHITEHALL TIMES-BANNER - JANUARY 17, 1924

DANIEL HAGESTAD (ULVIK, HARDANGER)
Ulvik, Hardanger, Norway was the birthplace of Daniel Hagestad, who was born to the parents , Ole O. and Martine Hagestad, March 14, 1858. He was baptized in the parish church of Ulvik. Early in life, he came with his parents to America. He was confirmed in the Lutheran church in the Tamarack Valley by Rev. Stenner Svennungsen. October 23, 1877, his marriage to Radine Johnson was solemnized by the Rev. Anders Lobben at the Trempealeau Valley church. Their home after marriage was on the farm in Bear Creek where Mr. Hagestad resided a period of sixty years with the exception of one year spent in Blair. He was engaged in farming and also in the carpenter trade. His wife suffered a paralytic stroke and she passed away December 8, 1936. After his wife’s death, Mr. Hagestad spent one year on the farm, a year with his daughter, Mrs. Julius Thompson at Waterloo, Iowa and the last three years, he has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Gilbert Hanson at LaCrosse. His health declined the past year years with the infirmities incident to old age. The last six weeks of his life were at the St. Francis Hospital in LaCrosse and here he died Monday morning, March 10, 1941 at 7 a.m. He lacked four days of being 83 years of age at the time of his death. Besides the daughters previously mentioned, Josie (Mrs. Hanson) and (Clara) Mrs. Thompson and one son, Helmer, survives at Lacrosse. There are seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Two sons died in infancy. Our minds are saddened with the thought of all those we have known, who have passed from our life into the great silence of the life beyond. Let us cherish in gratitude their memory and their contribution for our well being. Industry, patience, sacrifice has marked the course of many a life. It is only in the after years we estimate its true worth. Funeral services will be held this Thursday afternoon, March 13th at 1:15 at the Ettrick Undertaking Parlors and 2 p.m. at the North Beaver Creek church, Rev. T.E. Sweger officiating. The pall bearers will be Ed. Lokken, Julius A. Johnson, Carl Stenberg, Ben Smikrud, Lewis Larson and Rudolph Hanson. THE BLAIR PRESS - MARCH 13, 1941

MRS. JENS HAGESTAD (OXMES?)
Ellen Marie Nelson was born in Oxmes, Norway, May 3, 1832, and died on April 28, 1917, at the home of her son Carl M. Hagestad in Beaver Creek, after a long and patient suffering from cancer. In 1860 she was married to Jens K. Hagestad and came to America and settled in Beaver Creek, which place has since been her home. Mr. Hagestad died in 1902. To this union three children were born: Carl M. on the farm; Hans J. of Scottsville, Texas; and Mrs. Andrew Quammen of Glendive, Montana. The funeral was held at the Beaver Creek church Tuesday, Rev. S.S. Urberg officiating. THE BLAIR PRESS - MAY 3, 1917

CLAUS HALVORSON (KVITESEID, TELEMARK)
Funeral services for Claus Halvorson, 90, who died Thursday morning, August 31, 1951, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Einar Stenberg Ettrick, were held Sunday at 1 p.m. at the Runnestrand funeral chapel and at 1:30 p.m. at the French Creek Lutheran church. The Rev. George C. Strum officiated and burial was in the French Creek cemetery. Mr. Halvorson had been at the home of his daughter since last Saturday after hospitalization in LaCrosse for five weeks. He was born February 22, 1861, at Kvitseid, Telemark, Norway, coming to America at the age of 22. He settled first in Norway and American Valley, near Arcadia. Six years after his arrival in this country he was married to Hermina Christianson who died 14 years ago. The couple was engaged in farming in the French Creek Valley, Ettrick Township for 26 years and the moved to Blair. Mr. Halvorson was a member of French Creek Lutheran church. Survivors are seven daughters: Mrs Jennie Haug, Idaho; Miss Matilda Halvorson, Whitehall; Mrs. Albert Kolve, Colorado Springs, Colorado; Mrs. Olaf Bjorge, Blair; Mrs. George Tidquist, French Creek; Mrs. Alf Peterson Blair and Mrs. Stenberg, Ettrick; a son Arthur of Durand; 28 grandchildren and 36 great-grandchildren. A son, Carl, was killed in World War I and was buried in France. A grandson, Donald Stenberg, who served in the European theater during World War II, visited the grave of his uncle in France. A daughter, Mrs. Nels Sjuggerud of Blair, also preceded her father in death. THE BLAIR PRESS - SEPTEMBER 6, 1951

ANDREW HALDERSON (GIVI, CHRISTIANA)
Andrew Halderson, a prominent farmer of Centerville, died Monday of cancer of the stomach, at the age of 62 years, after an illness of a few weeks and had confined to his bed but ten days. He was born at Givi, Christiana, Norway in 1843, coming to this country in 1869 and locating in Trempealeau Township where he had resided. The funeral took place at the M.E. church of Centerville, Wednesday, Rev. Kerfoot, of Winona, officiating, and interment at the Evergreen cemetery. He leaves a widow, one son and two daughters, besides a host of friends to mourn his loss. THE WHITEHALL TIMES AND BLAIR BANNER - JULY 6, 1905

MRS. ANNA HALVERSON
Mrs. Anna Halverson, another of the old settlers of this community, died at her home in Trump Coulee on Friday, March 15, at the age of 76 years. She came to America in 1852 and has spent most of her life here in Trempealeau County. She is survived by her husband, Peter Halverson,; a son, Peter C. Olson; two daughters, Mrs. Ole Sylfest and Mrs. Nels Thompson and a sister, Mrs. Martha Halvorson of Spokane, Washington. The funeral was held at Trempealeau Valley church Monday, in charge of Rev. S.S. Urberg and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery nearby. THE BLAIR PRESS - MARCH 21, 1918

MRS. CLAUS HALVORSON (SONDRE LAND)
After long waiting for the consummation of her dearest desire, to be with Jesus in Paradise, Mrs. Claus Halvorson was granted her wish on Friday evening November 27, 1936, when she peacefully closed her eyes and drew her last breath. Mrs. Halvorson was confined to her home during the last few years, due to the infirmities of her high age, and there she lived in constant communion with the Savior Whom she loved more than anything else. Herimine Krisitiansdatter was born on Sands Ele in Sondre Land, Norway, on September 25, 1856 to the parents, Kristian Hanson and his wife, Mari Hansdatter. She became a child of God in infancy through the Sacrament of Holy Baptism. She was educated in the school of Norway, and after instruction, was confirmed in the Lutheran faith on October 8, 1871. At the age of 27, she emigrated to America with the report of her pastor that was well versed in Scripture and of fine Christian character. She came to Beloit in 1884 and there found employment for a year and a half. Then she went to French Creek where she had relatives. She spent the next few years working as a maid. On March 20, 1889 she was united in marriage with Claus Halvorson, After living in American Valley for six years, they purchased and moved to the farm which was to be their home for 25 years. In 1921 they moved to Blair where they have since resided. As the infirmities of age crept upon her, her daughter, Mrs. Alf Peterson, has constantly cared for her and made her home comfortable and cheerful. After being bedridden for nearly two months, she passed away on Friday, November 27, 1936 at six in the evening. Her husband and seven daughters were with her when the end came. She is preceded in death by a son, Carl, who was called upon to sacrifice all in the great World War in France. Also preceding her in death is a sister, Mrs. Christ. Lebakken, whose demise came in August of this year. She is survived by her husband and the following nine children: Mrs. Jennie Hough, French Creek; Mrs. Thea Sjugerud, Blair; Mathilda, Whitehall; Mrs. Helga Folkedahl, Taylor; Mrs. Inga Bjorge, French Creek; Arthur, Durand; Mrs. Anna Tidquist, French Creek and Mrs. Clara Peterson, Blair. She is also survived by a brother, Kristian Enger of Whitehall, 26 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held from the home and from the First Lutheran church on Monday, November 30 with her pastor, the Rev. Konrad Urberg officiating, and Rev. Johan Olsen assisting. Interment was made in the French Creek cemetery. Kind sympathy is extended to the bereaved. THE BLAIR PRESS - DECEMBER 3, 1936

EBERT HALVORSON (NORDE AURDAL)
Ebert Halvorson was born in Norde Aurdal, Norway May 27, 1862. He was the son of Halvor and Anna Petersdatter Flaaten. He was baptized in the Skrutvold church June 9th, 1862. He was confirmed in the Christian faith in the Strand church in Aurdal. He came with his sister, Anne, to America in 1887. Their destination was Blair, Wisconsin. He was engaged in farm labor, worked in the pineries and homesteaded land in South Dakota. He was employed several years in the Railroad Shops at Minneapolis. The past seventeen years, he has made his home with his brothers on the farm in Lakes Coulee. He was united in marriage to Grace Dewitz at Kasson, Minnesota by Rev. J.E. Abrahamson September 14, 1910. To this union the following children were born: Eileen (Mrs. Arnold Haugen), Northfield; Helen (Mrs. Glen Boyd) Chicago, Illinois; Louise (Mrs. Oliver Engelien), French Creek; Phyllis (Mrs. Henry Moe) Newcomb Valley and Delmont at home. His wife passed away in the influenza epidemic in 1918 at Minneapolis. Mrs. Halvorson had enjoyed the best of health all his life. In fact, had never suffered a day’s illness until last Saturday when he was suddenly stricken with paralysis and passed away the same evening, December 6, 1941, at the age of 79 years, 6 months and 9 days. Besides the children, the following sisters and brothers survive: Knute and Peter on the home farm; Anne (Mrs. Sever Erickson), Blair; and Sarah, Whitehall. There were two brothers by the name of Ole, one of whom died in Minneapolis and the other on the home farm August 7, 1925. A brother George died 30 years ago. Mr. Halvorson was a man of industrious habits who found in every task a duty and a joy. He possessed a kindly heart and good will toward his fellow travelers on life’s journey. His children occupied a large place in his affections and after his wife’s early death, he strove in every way to be both father and mother to them. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, December 10, at 2 p.m. at the Zion Lutheran church, the Rev. T.E. Sweger officiating. Mrs. Francis Herreid sang “I’m but a Stranger Here: and a favorite song of the deceased, “Saved by Grace”. The pallbearers were Selmer Knutson, Albert Anderson, Jens Pederson Emil George, Odvin Berg and Melvin Hill. The flower bearers were Miss Evelyn Pederson and Mrs. Selmer Knutson. THE BLAIR PRESS - DECEMBER 11, 1941

MRS. ED HALVORSON (FAABERG)
Mrs. Ed Halvorson, one of our active young women, passed away Friday morning, September 18, at the Lutheran Hospital at LaCrosse. Karen Olson was born in Faaberg Prestegjeld, Gulbrandsdalen, Norway, came to this country six years ago and was married to Ed Halvorson in June 1913 and has since lived on their farm in this valley. She was a kind and active woman, who had many friends. She leaves to mourn her death her husband; two children, Josie, aged four years and a baby four days old; and a sister, Mrs. Albert L. Olson of this valley; and other relatives in Norway. Funeral services were at the house and at the church Tuesday a.m. and remains interred in the Tamarack Lutheran cemetery. THE WHITEHALL TIMES-BANNER - OCTOBER 4, 1917

MRS. HJORON HALVORSON (VINLAUS, TELEMARK)
Mrs. Hjoron Halvorson, born October 12, 1844 in Vinlaus, Telemark, Norway, passed quietly away at the home of her son, Edward, March 7, 1918, at 5 o’clock a.m. Mrs. Halvorson came to America and settled at Madison, where she married Hjermund Halvorson. They lived at Madison one year, then came to Tamarack to take up a homestead, where they have since resided up to the time of death. Hjermund Halvorson died August 21, 1907, leaving Mrs. Halvorson a widow. They were the happy parents of ten children, who are all living: Mrs. Ella Hagen of Fossten, Minnesota; Ole and Mrs. Oscar Olson of Tamarack; Halvor, Mrs. J.J. Lee and Julius of Valley City, North Dakota; Mrs. Ludvig Nelson of Cuba, North Dakota; and Ed ad Christ on the home farm. Mrs. Halvorson received her first stroke of paralysis October 10, 1915, while visiting at the home of her son, Ole. Being ill about a month, she was taken to the home of her son, Ed, where she has since been in bed. The first stroke lasted two years, four months and 26 days, till the light stroke on her left side ended her life, Thursday morning at 5 o’clock, March 7. She was one of the older settlers of this valley and knew of the hard times of a newly settled country. She was a good mother, jolly even through the hard strife, besides bringing up a large family. She leaves to mourn her death all her children, several grandchildren besides other relatives and friends. The funeral was held Tuesday at the house and church, Rev. C. B. Bestul officiating. Interment was made in the Tamarack Lutheran cemetery. The children who were present were: Mrs. C.J. Lee, Halvor, Mrs. Ludwig Nelson, Mrs. Oscar Olson, Ole, Christ and Ed. The floral tributes were many and beautiful. THE WHITEHALLTIMES-BANNER - MARCH 14, 1918

MRS. CHRISTINE HALVORSON (SELJOR, TELEMARK)
Mrs. Christine Halvorson was born at Seljor, Telemark, Norway, October 23, 1834. In 1883 she came to this country, making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Henry Olson, and was loved by all who knew her. The lady was taken ill about a year ago, but was able to be up and around until a few days before her death, which occurred on Saturday December 19, 1914, aged 80 years, 1 month and 26 days, passing away in peace with God. She leaves to mourn her death a sister, and five children as follows: Mrs. Henry Olson of Blair; Mrs. H.H. Rustyen of Detroit, Minnesota; Mrs. A.J. Myhre of Audubon, Minnesota; Ms. Thomas Olson of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Ole Miller of Blair. The funeral services were held in the United Lutheran church, Revs. Boe and Urberg preaching in English and Norwegian. The friends and neighbors came with offerings of flowers as tokens of love and sympathy. THE WHITEHALLTIMES AND BLAIR BANNER - DECEMBER 31, 1914

MRS. JOHN HALVERSON (TRYGSTAD)
Mrs. John Halverson, a daughter of Henry and Johanna Sorlie, was born in Smaa Lenne, Trygstad parish, Norway, April 13, 1883. When she was two years of age he parents immigrated to America. The family settled in Lakes Coulee. She grew to womanhood in that community and on September 25, 1903, was united in marriage to John Halverson. Mr. and Mrs. Halverson have resided in this community during their married life. Eight children were born to them. Mrs. Halverson’s health began to fail about a year ago. The past few weeks her condition was very serious, and she was cared for at the Community hospital, where everything was done to restore her health, but without avail. She was relieved of her suffering Thursday morning, September 20, 1928, when death called her from this life, aged 45 years, 5 months and 7 days. Mrs. Halverson is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sorlie of Blair; two sisters, Mrs. Albert Hill of Whitehall and Ms. Gilbert Anderson of Arcadia; two brothers Arnold of Blair and Albert of Whitehall; her husband and six children, Mrs. Alice Erickson of La Moille, Minnesota; Mrs. Myrtle Christianson of Whitehall, Clarence, Edward, Doris and LaVerne at home. Funeral services were held at the Lutheran church in Whitehall Monday afternoon September 24. Rev. Maakestad conducted the rite. A ladies chorus sang “Nearer My God to Thee.” Mrs. Carl Jahr sang a solo, “Face to Face,” and Rev. Maakestad sang in the Norwegian language, “Behold a Host Arrayed in White.” Burial took place in Lincoln cemetery beside two children who preceded her in death. THE BLAIR PRESS - OCTOBER 4, 1928

MRS. JOHN HALVERSON (NORWAY)
Mrs. Julia Halverson was born in Norway, October 25, 1867 and passed away at her home in Trump Coulee, January 30, 1935 at the age of 67 years, 3 months and 5 days. She came to this country wit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nels Larson in 1871. She resided at Eleva, Wisconsin until the time of her marriage to John Halverson, May 15, 1888. Before moving to Taylor in 1908, they made their home at Superior, Wisconsin. She is survived by her husband, John C. Halverson, eight children and one brother, namely, Mrs. O.W. Sorvig of St. Paul, Minnesota; Mrs. Ben Warosh of Edgar, Wisconsin; Gertrude of Duluth, Minnesota; Cornell of Grand Forks, North Dakota; John of Superior; Walter of Racine, Wisconsin; William and Norman at home and Nick Larson of Eleva. Funeral services were conducted at the Lutheran church in Taylor, Saturday afternoon, February 2nd, by Rev. O. L. Hofsad and interment was made in the Trump Coulee cemetery. The following memorial wreaths were given memory of Mrs. Halverson: The local Ladies Aid of which she had been a faithful member ever since coming to Taylor gave $500 to missions; from friends and neighbors $6.00 to the Wittenberg Old People’s Home and $5.00 to the radio station at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota; from the hospital staff at the Whitehall Community Hospital a gift of $6.00 was received for the Altar Fund of the local congregation. THE BLAIR PRESS - FEBRUARY 7, 1935

KARLIUS HALVORSON (GRUE, SOLAR)
Karelius Halvorson was born in Grue, Solar, Norway, on June 11, 1858. He emigrated to America in 1880. He was united in marriage to Aletta Floberg in 1880, and to this union five children were born. Two of the children, Albert and Clara, died several years ago. The children who survive are Oscar and Thomas at home, and Ole of Plapot, Sask., Canada. His wife, with whom he lived happily for 15 years, died March 6, 1895. This was a serious blow to him and a grief that time found hard to heal. He suffered a serious heart attack a year ago. He died December 4, 1928, aged 70 years, 5 months and 23 days. He was found dead in bed, having passed to the Great Beyond peacefully during the night. Mr. Halvorson was an honest, upright citizen, very well thought of by those who knew him; a member of the Trempealeau Valley congregation and a loyal supporter. Besides the children mentioned, he leaves the following brothers and sisters: Herman of Seattle, Washington; Ole of Solar, Norway; Mrs. Mathilda Overby and Anna Halvorson of Solar, Norway. Funeral services were held Saturday at the Trempealeau Valley church, and interment was made in the cemetery there. THE BLAIR PRESS - DECEMBER 13, 1928

NELS HALVORSON (NORWAY)
Nels Halvorson, one of the old and most respected citizens of Preston, died Friday evening January 27, 1911, of heart disease, aged 75 years, 5 months and 29 days. Deceased was born in Norway July 28, 1834. He came to American in 1851 at the age of 17 years, and settled in Vernon County, this state. In 1855 in company with Peter and Jacob Tenneson, he came to the Trempealeau valley, where the three entered land, Mr. Halvorson taking the homestead on which he thereafter continuously resided up to the time of his death. In 1861 he married Turi Nuland, who survives him. They had twelve children born to them, nine of which are living. They are Henry of Moscow, Idaho; Albert of Preston; Mrs. Morris Hanson of Blair; Mrs. Thomas Herreid of Madison; Mrs. O.A. Kvensmoen of Childs, Minnesota; Chrstine of Preston; Mrs. M.I. Glbert of Blair; Thomas of Blair and Joseph of Preston. All were present at the funeral except Henry. Deceased also leaves one sister, Mrs. Samuel Peterson. Mr. and Mrs. Segrud Anderson of Houston, Minnesota attended the funeral, the lady being a cousin of Mr. Halvorson. Thus another of our pioneers has been called home. Mr. Halvorson was a good citizen, dutiful husband and a kind and indulgent father. His life and character was a fitting example to pattern after and his wise counsel and wholesome advice many times benefited his friends and neighbors. Mr. Halvorson’s genial ways and kindly disposition will be missed by his large circle of friends. The funeral was held Monday at the Trempealeau Valley church, Rev. Gulbrandson officiating. THE WHITEHALL TIMES AND BLAIR BANNER - FEBRUARY 2, 1911

MRS. JULIUS HALVORSON (GRUE, SOLAR)
Mrs. Julius Halvorson, age 86, of Eleva died April 8, 1938, and funeral services were held at the Chimney Rock church, April 10, when many relatives and friends gathered to pay her the last tribute. Deceased was born in Grue, Solar, Norway, November 18, 1851. In 1877 she married Julius Halvorson and they came to America in 1881, settling on a farm in Chimney Rock. They resided there until six years ago, when they went to Eau Claire to make their home with their daughter. Mr. Halvorson died in September 1934, and one daughter, Mrs. A. Bjork of Marion, North Dakota, also preceded him in death. Mrs. Halvorson is survived by one son, Jalmer, living on the old home place; five daughters, Mrs. J. Otterson, Blair; Mrs. J. Johnson, Strum; Mrs. A. Severson, Mrs. H. Hendrickson and Mrs. Ed Emberson of Eau Claire; one sister and three brothers in Norway; and 36 grandchildren. THE BLAIR PRESS - APRIL 28, 1938

MRS. MARY HALVORSON (GULBRANDSDALEN)
Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Halvorson, 75, who passed away at the Community hospital at Whitehall April 23 at 7 p.m., were held Tuesday with a prayer service at the E.A.Sletteland home at 1:30 p.m. and the formal rites at the United Lutheran church at 2 o’clock, the Rev. C.K. Malmin officiating. Mary Lokken Halvorson was born in Gulbrandsdalen, Norway, August 7, 1872, daughter of Lars and Marie Lokken. She was baptized and confirmed in the Lutheran faith. When she was 18 years old she came to Coon Valley, where her parents, who had preceded her, had established their home. Here she met John Halvorson whom she married in 1900. They moved to Westby, residing there until 1904, when they moved to the town of Curran, Jackson county and went to farming in the Big Slough community near Pigeon Falls. The Halvorsons were honored and respected by their new neighbors and shared in the community life. Mr. Halvorson died May 7, 1932. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Tilman Steien of Big Slough, Alvin Halvorson of Hixton and Lloyd of Pigeon; two grandchildren, Marian Steien and Orlin Halvorson; a brother, Matt Lokken of Big Slough, and a sister, Mrs. A. Ambrosen of Coon Valley. Mrs. Halvorson sold the farm to her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Tilman Steien and then purchased the former Lena Kjos home in Pigeon Falls and moved in the early winter of 1942, where she has resided with her son, Lloyd. Mrs. Halvorson had been in poor health since Christmas but did not become critically ill until a week ago when she was taken to the hospital for medical care. A malignant tumor was the cause of her illness. Mrs. Oscar Fremstad sang “Jesus is Calling” at the last rites and Rev. Malmin sang two Norwegian hymns. Pall bearers were John and Henry Berge, Sever Staff, Palmer Ackley, Sigvald Stalheim and Willie Jacobson, The flowers were carried by Mrs. Newland Berge Alma and Marion Steien. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - APRIL 29, 1948

MRS. MATHEA HALVERSON (VAR Mrs. Mathea Halverson, 83, Independence, passed away at 9 a.m. Monday at the Whitehall Community Hospital, where she had been a patient about two weeks. Funeral services will be held this afternoon Thursday, at the Independence Lutheran church, the Rev. O.G. Birkeland officiating. Burial will be in Bethel Cemetery. As Mathea Olson, Mrs. Halverson was born November 12, 1861, in Varmland, Sweden. When she was 21years old, she came to America with relatives, settling in the Independence vicinity. Her parents never immigrated. In about the year 1888 she was joined in marriage to Lars Halverson and the couple settled on a farm near Independence, where they resided until Mr. Halverson passed away in 1930. Surviving Mrs. Halverson are the following children: Helmer Halverson, Minneapolis; Oscar, Lawrence and Helen, Mrs. Albert Hanson, Independence, Eau Claire.(?) She was preceded in death by one son, Albert. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - DECEMBER 14, 1944

MRS. MARTHA HALVERSON (VOSS)
Funeral services for Mrs. Martha Halverson, 81, pioneer resident of this community who died at her farm home south of Taylor Tuesday, February 14, 1939, were conducted Saturday at 1:30 p.m. and at the Lutheran church at 2 p.m. The Rev. A.J. Bringle will officiate and burial will be in the Trump Coulee cemetery beside her husband. Mrs. Halverson lived on the family farm since the death of her husband October 25, 1918, and although somewhat incapacitated by failing eyesight, she did her household duties with the aid of her three sons until recently. She was born at Slen, Voss, Norway, July 26, 1857, a daughter of Joseph and Ragna (Peterson) Johnson. She came to America with her parents when she was seven years old and the family settled in Walworth county, Wisconsin. Two years later Mrs. Halverson and her parents came by stage coach to Sparta and then drove to Jackson county where they settled on a farm in the community which was her home for the remainder of her life. Taylor was settled later. Mrs. Halverson walked from eight to ten miles from her home across the bluffs to church to prepare herself for confirmation and was a member of the first confirmation class of the historic First Evangelical Lutheran church of Trempealeau Valley. A reunion of the remaining charter members was attended by Mrs. Halverson here a few years ago. She left her home in Vosse Coulee following her marriage to Sever H. Halverson on June 24, 1887 and went to Skutley coulee, now called Rose Hill. The couple had six children and they all survive. They are Alfred, Mrs. Regina Johnson, Ernest, Mrs. Bennie Knutson (Gina), Bennie and Sedwin, all of Taylor. Mrs. Halverson is also survived by seven grandchildren, Shirley, Arlene and Alvira Halverson, Shirley and Lillian Johnson, Mrs. Gladys Harms and Morris Knutson and one great-grandchild, Laura Harmes. A half-brother, Bennie Thompson, was killed by a horse on a farm in Curran Valley, 42 years ago. THE BLAIR PRESS - MARCH 23, 1939

MRS. OLE HALVERSON (ULLENSAKER)
Maren Georgine Halverson was born in Ullensaker, Norway, September 12 1855, daughter of Jakob and Martha Jackobson. She grew to womanhood in Norway, receiving baptism and being confirmed in the parish of her birth. In 1874 three years before she came to America, she was united in marriage to Ole M. Halverson. The young couple sailed for this country in 1877, and traveled from the coast to Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, and located on a farm in Newcomb Valley, Town of Arcadia. They resided on the farm until 1902, when they moved into Arcadia village, residing there for eight years and then removing to the town of Preston, where they bought a farm, on which their son, Martin, now resides. Mr. Halverson died on the home farm, and since then Mrs. Halverson has resided for the most part with her son, Martin, on the farm. Six months ago she was stricken with various infirmities from which she suffered much, and it was necessary to bring her to the Community hospital for care. Finding that nothing could be done to prolong her life for long, she was taken to the home of her sister in Whitehall, Mrs. Mina Moen, where relatives gently tended her day and night until her demise on June 14, 1930. She leaves to mourn her passing seven children: Hans, Wisconsin Rapids; Martin, Johnnie and Emil, Whitehall; Albert, Wolcott, North Dakota; Emma, Mrs. John Erickson, Arcadia; and Mrs. Minnie Norby, Eau Claire. One son, Anton died in infancy. She is also survived by 20 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Mina Moen and one brother, Olous Jackobson. Funeral services were held from the Martin Halverson home Wednesday, June 18, and from the Fagnernes church, Rev. John Olson of that congregation and Rev. Makestad of Whitehall officiating. Burial was made in the church cemetery. Pallbearers were Albert Axness, Sam Hanson, Jim Hanson, Hans Hanson, Herman Moe and Mark Scow. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - JULY 3, 1930

SIGRUD HALVORSON (NORWAY)
Sigrud Halvorson, 51, passed away Monday morning, August 13, 1951 at the Krohn clinic, Black River Falls, of a heart ailment He had been employed in Milwaukee when he became ill about two months ago. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, August 15, at the Taylor Lutheran church, Rev. B.J. Hatlem, Pastor of the church officiating. There were many beautiful floral offerings and memorials given in his memory and many relatives and friends from far and near attended the service. Two hymns “Does Jesus Care” and “One Sweetly Solemn Thought” were sung by a ladies quartet, Mrs. T.B. Schansberg, Mrs. Art Haralsrud, Mrs. Alvin Nelson, Miss Marilyn Stai with Mrs. B. J. Hatlem at the organ. The burial was in the Woodlawn cemetery. Mr. Halvorson was born June 12, 1900 in Norway. He came to America with his parents when he was four years of age, and the family settled on a farm a few miles south of Taylor. His mother, Mrs. Olena Havorson, lives at Taylor. Mr. Halvorson was united in marriage to Myrtle Lien, Taylor, in 1933. To this union six children were born. Mrs. Halvorson survives, as do the six children, Howard, Harry, Robert, Adeline, Virginia and Patricia, all of Taylor and living at home. Also surviving are three sisters, Mrs. Archie Hanson, Taylor; Mrs. Hulda Norman, Chicago; and Mrs. Rachel Oppegard, Evanston, Illinois; and four brothers, Omar and Casper, Milwaukee; Robert, Brooklyn, New York and Einar, Taylor. Pallbearers were Manford Olson, Ray Sather, Osburn Lien, LaVern Lien Manford Sather and Joseph Oakland. THE BLAIR PRESS - AUGUST 23, 1951

PETER HALVERSON (SWEDEN)
Funeral services were held Monday at Our Saviour’s Lutheran church in Whitehall for Peter Halverson, 83, of Preston, who passed away very suddenly at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 17. The Rev. O.G. Birkeland officiated at the last rites and burial was in Lincoln cemetery. The pallbearers were Albert Arneson, Bennie Lien, Harry Amundson, Oscar Moe, Herman Jacobson and Peter Engen. A group of women from Our Saviour’s furnished special music. Mr. Halverson was born April 7, 1864 in Varmland, Sweden, the son of Halvor Olson and Karin Paulson. On June 25, 1892, he was joined in marriage to Sarah Larson. Two weeks later they immigrated to America. They lived for a year at the home of his brother, the late Lars Halverson, near Independence. Later they moved to the Irvin coulee area south of Whitehall, where they settled permanently. He leaves to mourn his passing, his wife and seven children; namely, Mrs. Clara De Haes, Minneapolis; Mrs. Hilda Gilbertson, Arcadia; Palmer, Arcadia; Alfred, Independence; Mrs. Agnes Hawkenson, Eleva; Ernest, Arcadia; and Mrs. Evelyn Christopherson, Blair. Two children are deceased, Mrs. Selma Wedin of Saskatchewan, Canada and Edna. He also leaves 12 grandchildren. THE WHITEHALL TIMES - APRIL 25, 1946

TARALD HALVERSON (BALESTAND)
Tarald Halverson, familiarly known as “Tom,” who died at Whitehall November 11, 1926 was born near Balestrand, Norway, February 2, 1853. Came with his parents to Dane County, Wisconsin in 1857. Three years later to the Town of Franklin, Jackson county, and the next year to Curran Valley, which was then a part of the Town of Hixton, but now is a part of the Town of Curran. Here his father acquired a tract of land consisting mostly of hills and sloughs. The home was built on a high steep hill, on the north side of which was a spring such as rarely seen, even in this region of beautiful springs. Only a short time ago, my deceased friend and I made a trip to see his beautiful natural fountain which had so often refreshed us with its sparkling waters. When Tom’s father became too old to work the farm, it was turned over to Tom, who in turn held it until he was too old and feeble to run it. After leaving the farm, he lived for a short time in Taylor, Jackson County. In 1919 he moved to Whitehall. On January 29, 1885, he was united in marriage to Carrie Wallen, from which union four children were born, Helmer, now at Taylor, Wisconsin; Sever at Fond du Lac; Tonette Ause of Eau Claire, Wisconsin; and Martha Larson of Whitehall. All of them, except Sever, attended his funeral . His wife died September 29, 1923. Mr. Halverson had been in poor health for several years and at times his life seemed like a flickering flame ready to go out. But from time to time he came back so as to be able to do little chores about the house. Regularly, until six days before his death, he used to come down town after his mail, until those, who commonly visit the P.O. at mail time expected to find him by the side of “Dave” Wood, “Ed” Weeks and Ole Marking, and now and then some other old fellows, sitting on the window bench in the P.O. waiting for what Uncle Sam would bring them. Often on such occasions I would inquire of him concerning his health. And not once in all these year of our mutual visits to the P.O. did he complain. His condition did not warrant the sprightliness and jollity of our earlier acquaintance, but there were no murmurings, no shadows of depression or discontent to darken those around him. And his few days of sickness were only a quiet, gradual quenching of the flame of life, which had long since been dimmed by sickness. Of all my friends an acquaintances in Whitehall, he was the one I had known longest. My first meeting with him was in the fall of 1887 when Elling Eielson, the first Norwegian preacher in the U.S. preached in the home of Anfin Erickson?, the nearest neighbor to the Halversons. After that I came to know the Halversons very intimately; for it was my privilege, later on, to spend three full school years, as a boarder, in the home where I heard Eielson deliver his fervid warning to sinners. Eielson was a zealous follower of the great religious reformer, Hans Nielsen Hauge and nearly every settler in Curran Valley, at that time, belong to the Haugian branch of the Norwegian Lutheran church. On doctrinal points, they differed but little from the State Church of Norway, but they insisted on a stricter morality in conduct. This resulted, in some instances, in an almost baleful austerity and repression. Dancing, drinking and card playing were looked upon as sins per se, and under no circumstances to be tolerated. Grace was asked before meals and sometimes after meals. Now and then hymns and long prayers were gone through while the stomachs of youth were crying out with hunger. I have been to several of their meetings of worship when three hours was considered a short meeting. But, not withstanding, that some seemed live in a perpetual gloom, on the whole, the Curran Valley community was one of the best I have ever known. For later, thrift, honesty and filial loyalty, from a sense of duty, became habits; and the result was, that in a few years nearly every householder in the valley became a freeholder in fact as well as in theory. Such, in part was the atmosphere in which my friend, Tom Halverson, passed his youth and early manhood, for his people were loyal members of the Haugian Church. But in their home, and his home, was always cheerfulness. Of course, such games as Jack Straws, Fox and Geese, checkers and dominoes were about the limit we could go in the direction of gambling. And our test in these innocent games was probably as keen as that experienced by the present generation in more exciting and hazardous amusements. Our sources of pleasure, that could be had for money, were fewer then than now. Likewise our resources for purchasing pleasures. But around us were the eternal and exhausting sources which are as accessible to the poor as the rich. Whether or not increase of opportunities for purchasable pleasures tend to a proportionate increase in real happiness is a debatable question. Some claim, that man’s wants increase with the opportunities for satisfying them, not in a proportioned ratio. In other words, that the poor have less unsatisfied wants and cravings than the rich. That this is the principal cause of the fall of empires as well as of individuals. My association with my departed friend was such that I shall always think of him with gladness. He was clean, upright, cheerful and hospitable. His life had neither romance nor tragedy beyond the common run of men. I shall think of him, as I would of a gentle flowing stream, soothing and refreshing. Think of him as I would of a bird that pleased me with its song, then went away, and as of a flower that shed its perfume around me and gladdened my eyes with its beauty, then faded and died. Think of him as a truly, kind and dependable friend and comrade, who journeyed with me uncomplainingly through the lights and shadows of life. And finally, think of him as “a link between dust and Deity” every ascending nearer to Him who controls the ever resolving chains of man’s destiny. Written by H.A. Anderson on November 28, 1926 THE WHITEHALL TIME (DATE UNKNOWN)

ALBERT HALDERSON (VALDERS, NORWAY)
Albert Halderson, a well known and respected resident of section 1, Caledonia TownshIp, was born at Valders in the northern part of Norway, November 25, 1847, son of John and Gertie (Olson ) Halderson. The father was born in the same locality in 1817 and his wife in 1816, their marriage taking place in 1841. While in his native land John Halderson lived under a landlord named Eric Strand and worked a certain number of days in each season - spring, summer, fall and winter - for home privileges on Strand’s property. Mr. Strand finally sold out all his interest in Norway and came to America, and by arrangement with Mr. Halderson brought him and his family with him. While on the journey between New York and Wisconsin, the two men became accidentally separated, but in Dane County, Wisconsin, Mr. Halderson subsequently learned through a cousin, Ole Brown of LaCrosse, that Mr. Strand had located in Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, and so he came on with his family. This was in 1858. To pay his indebtedness to Mr. Strand, Mr. Halderson, who was a carpenter by trade, worked for him in that capacity at intervals, Mr. Strand assisting him and his family when it was necessary until the account was settled between them. The first home of the Halderson family in Wisconsin was a dugout in the side of a hill in Bostwick Valley, and in this they lived the first year or two. In 1860 Mr. Halderson bought 120 acres of wild land from the government, on which he built a two-room log house, and in 1870 he erected a more substantial and convenient log house, hewn inside and out, also sided and plastered. It was of two stories with basement and contained six rooms, and is today occupied by Knute Halderson, a brother of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Halderson, the father, cleared and developed all the plow land on the 120-acre tract, using oxen for his first team, the money for which he obtained by splitting rails at 75 cents per hundred. To accomplish this he had to walk three and a half miles every morning and back at night, working all day without dinner. Being a powerfully built man, Mr. Halderson was popularly known in the neighborhood as “Big John.” In 1881 he sold this farm to his brother Knute, and moved to Coon Valley, Vernon County, Wisconsin, where he bought an unimproved farm of 80 acres, this place his home until the death of his wife, Gertie, in 1891. He then sold the farm to his son, Peter, and spent the rest of his life with his children, his death occurring December 2, 1897, at the home of his daughter, Jane Nelson, near Viroqua, Wisconsin. The children of John and Gertie Halderson were six in number: Jane, born in Norway, who resides in Spokane, Washington; Albert, whose name appears at the head of this sketch; Ole, born in Norway, April 8, 1853, who now resides in Williamette Valley, Oregon; Knute, born on shipboard while on the trip to America in 1857; Peter, born in Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, in 1861, who died at LaCrosse during the winter of 1915-16; and a daughter, born in Bostwick Valley, who died in infancy. Albert Halderson was brought up on his parents’ farm and adopted agriculture for his occupation. He was married in 1868 to Mary Gaarder of Bostwick Valley, LaCrosse County, of which union there was one son, J.O. Halderson, now a furniture dealer in Galesville. Mrs. Mary Halderson died in August 1873 at the age of about 25, she having been born in Norway in 1847. Mr. Halderson contracted a second marriage with Rachael Larson, who was born in Norway September 22, 1850. She was killed in the summer of 1886 in a run-away accident. Their children are: Melvin of Holmen, LaCrosse County; Louis of Trempealeau County; Elmer and Frank, who reside with their father. Mr. Halderson was married the third time April 24, 1887 to Rosa Caswell. Their children are: Gertrude, resides at home; Raymond, county agent, living at Elkins, West Virginia; Grace, a teacher at Bangor, Wisconsin; Carrol, a student at Galesville high school. The family church is Methodist. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

JOHN B. HALLANGER (ETTRICK TOWNSHIP, TREMPEALEAU COUNTY)
John B. Hallanger, a well known farmer of Hegg, Ettrick Township, was born in this township, February 5, 1866, son of Knut K. and Symoa (Bgotveit) Hallanger. He acquired a district school education in Ettrick Township and at the age of 18 years began to work out for others at threshing, sawing lumber and whatever he could find to do. He also spent some of his winters cutting timber in the woods, and with his brother operated the homestead farm for a number of years. In 1909 he made a trip to the Pacific coast, for pleasure only, spending the time in sightseeing. The following winter he bought his present farm at Hegg, consisting of 204 acres, in addition to which he has 20 acres of timber land lying six miles farther east. Mr. Hallanger, besides raising various crops, is engaged in dairying, keeping good cows for milking purposes, and is conducting his farm on a profitable basis. He is also a stockholder and director in the Ettrick Lumber Company, a stockholder in the Home Bank at Blair, the Ettrick Telephone Company and the Farmers’ Exchange at Blair. He belongs to the United Lutheran Church at Hegg and in politics may be termed an independent Republican. He has never married. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

KNUDT K. HALLANGER (HARDANGER, NORWAY)
Knut K. Hallanger, one of the earliest settlers in Beaver Creek Valley, Ettrick Township, was born in Hardanger, Norway, in June 1833. He came to the United States in 1854, settling on Koshhanong Prairie, near Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin. In 1858 he located in Beaver Creek Valley, Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, and engaged in farming, taking up government land and acquiring more by purchase. The land he obtained was wild, but he cleared and cultivated it, and after many years of hard labor had developed it into a good farm. It was his residence until 1910 in which year he retired and moved to Galesville, where he is now living in a comfortable residence which he bought at the time he left the farm. As one of the first settlers in Beaver Creek Valley, and a resident of it for more than half a century, Mr. Hallanger witnessed many changes and improvements in the township. For a number of years he served as postmaster at Hegg, being appointed in 1873 by President Grant. He was also for a number of years township assessor and for one term supervisor. A Lutheran in religion, he became one of the founders of the church of that denomination at Hegg, and assisted in building a number of the churches in the county. When he arrived here from Norway, he could speak no English, but soon acquired such a good knowledge of the language that he used to act as interpreter for the early Norwegian settlers. Knudt K. Hallanger was married in Wisconsin to Symoa Bgotveit, who also was native of Hardanger, Norway, and who died October 22, 1906. They had a family of seven children: Alexander, John (first) and John (second), who are deceased; John B., a farmer of Hegg, Ettrick Township; Helland Louis and Carl, both residing in Galesville; and Helena Bertina, who is now Mrs. C.G. Pains of Ettrick Township. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

KNUDT P. HALLANGER (HARDANGER, NORWAY) (2)
Among the flourishing and well-kept farms of Ettrick Township is that of the subject of this sketch, Knudt P. Hallanger, a practical agriculturist, who has achieved prosperity chiefly through his own efforts and is now numbered among the substantial citizens of this township. Like many other successful farms of the county, Mr. Hallinger is of Norwegian birth, having been born in Hardanger, Norway, July 31, 1860, son of Paul and Guri (Johnson) Hallanger, natives of the same country and locality, where Paul Hallanger was born January 9, 1837, and his wife November 2, 1834. On July 5, 1867, the family made their appearance in Beaver Valley, this county, locating on the farm now owned by Knudt P. Hallanger. It was not then a farm, however, but merely a tract of wild land awaiting the plow of the pioneer. With a pair of oxen Mr. Hallanger began the work of cultivation and for years thereafter he was an extremely busy man. The original tract consisted of 80 acres, and for awhile this was all he owned, but in time he doubled the size of the farm, so that it contained 160 acres at the time of his retirement in 1893. For a number of years he continued to use oxen for his plowing and other farm work, changing to horses as conditions improved and he became more prosperous, the horse being the less hardy animal. On retiring, as above mentioned, he took up his residence in Hegg, but after spending some years there he returned to the farm, where he died January 19, 1913. He took no active part in town affairs, but was a man well known and respected for his industry, intelligence and good neighborly qualities. His wife survived him a little over two years, dying February 2, 1915. They were the parents of eight children, four of whom are now living: Knudt P., who was the eldest; Breta, wife of Errick Sime, a farmer of Ettrick Township; Louisa, wife of John Shoblom, a farmer and ranchman in Montana; and Martin, who resides at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Knudt P. Hallanger acquired the elements of an English education in the district school of his present neighborhood. Like other farmers’ boys he had to make himself useful at an early age and was up in the morning doing chores long before the average city coy crawls reluctantly from bed. The hard work and fresh air did him no harm, however, but strengthened his lungs and his muscles and at the age of 18 years he began to work in the woods during the winter time, resuming his farm work on the family homestead in the summer, and in this way he was occupied for eleven years. Later he purchased the old homestead, on which he has since resided and which now contains 140 acres of land. Here he carries on general farming very successfully and according to up to date methods, having good barns and all necessary buildings and equipment, and in 1915 he erected a new and handsome modern residence, which is the comfortable home of a large family circle. Though devoting all his business hours to his farm, he is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company, the Farmers’ Exchange of Blair and the Ettrick Telephone Company. Mr. Hallanger began domestic life on his own account over 25 years ago, when April 20, 1891, he was united in marriage with Betsy Johnson, who was born in Franklin Township, Jackson County, daughter of Nels and Jorand (Erickson) Johnson. Her parents were born and married in Hardanger, Norway and came to America in 1867, settling in the location above mentioned, their dwelling being near the county line dividing Jackson and Trempealeau Counties, so that it was not far from the Hallanger farm. Mrs. Johnson died when her daughter Betsy was a mere babe, her husband surviving her until 1901. Mrs. Hallanger was the youngest member of the family, the other children being: Lesa, wife of Andrew Lee, who resides in Franklin Township, Jackson County; Aleck, also residing there in a part of the old Johnson home; and Nellie, who is the wife of C.. Lein, a farmer in Robinson Kidder County, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Hallanger have had a family of 13 children: Palmer Nicoli, Joseph Gilbert, Helmer and Christ, who are deceased; Helmer Bertram, residing at home; Cornelia, deceased; Cornelia Matina, Elvin Sigvort, Evelyn Jose, Carl Johan, Bernice Louisa, residing at home, and Edward Julius and Esther Juliet, who are deceased. The family are members of the United Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Hallanger is a Republican. He has served 16 years as a member of the school board, was township assessor five years and was again elected in 1917, and has also served as school clerk and treasurer and as trustee of his church. As a man of varied activities he is energetic and resourceful, using good judgment in business matters and conscientiously performing every piece of work that comes to hand, whether it is for himself or pertaining to the community at large. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

EDWARD M. HAGEN (BIRI, NORWAY) (2)
Edward M. Hagen, proprietor of a farm of 300 acres in section 5, Pigeon Township, known as Hagen's Farm, was born in Biri, Norway, January 12, 1864, son of Mathias Olson and his wife, Annette Thompson. The father died in Norway in June 1865 and his wife in Norway in 1884. In 1881 Edward M. emigrating to the United States, coming to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, and locating at Pigeon Falls, where he resided until the spring of 1892, working out and saving his money. Having by that time accumulated a fair sum, he purchased his present farm and has since resided on it, engaged in its development and cultivation, in which he has made great progress. The previous period of 11 years was spent in the employ of P. Ekern, for whom he worked seven years as butter-maker at Pigeon Falls. As a progressive farmer Mr. Hagen has sought to increase the value of his property by making substantial improvements. In 1910 he built his residence, which is a two-story building of 18 rooms and basement. In 1916 he rebuilt the barn, which measures 44 by 60 by 16 feet with basement and has an ell, 26 by 50 by 16, with basement, both furnished with concrete floors and installed with 40 steel stanchions and litter carrier. The silo, built in the center of the barn, measures 14 by 31 feet. All the buildings are electrically lighted and furnished with running water from a spring, the house having hot and cold water and bathroom. Mr. Hagen plants six acres of his land with tobacco and has a tobacco shed, 25 by 130 feet in size. His herd of Shorthorn cattle numbers 65 head, all high-grade animals, of which he milks 25. He also has a flock of 30 sheep and 50 acres of his land is planted in clover. He is a stockholder in the Pigeon Grain & Stock Company, and for six years has served as a director of the school board of his district. May 15, 1891, Mr. Hagen was united in marriage with Jennie Moe of Pigeon Falls, in which place she was born May 4, 1873. Her parents were John and Antoinette (Peterson) Moe, the former of whom, born in Norway, September 17, 1841, came to America in 1869, settling in Pigeon Township, this county. In 1872 he bought the farm on which his son-in-law, Mr. Hagen, now lives and still resides here. His wife, whom he married at Pigeon Falls August 28, 1872, was born in Norway, March 27, 1846 and is also now living and residing on the Hagen farm. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have ten children: Aletta, wife of Alfred Nelson, a contractor of Pigeon Falls; Adolph, living at home; Elvina, who graduated from the LaCrosse Normal school in 1914 and is now a teacher; Amanda, a student at the Whitehall high school, and Harold, Hilmer, Ansel, Delia, Milfred and Raymond, who are residing at home on the farm. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

THOMAS HAGEN (NORWAY) (2)
Thomas M. Hagen, who owns and operates Woodland Farm of 240 acres in section 5, Pigeon Township, is one of the thriving agriculturists of this township and one its best known and respected citizens. He was born in Norway, December 12, 1867, his father being Matt Olson and his mother in maidenhood, Annette Thompson. It was on May 17, 1883, that he left his native land for the New World, his journey coming to an end at Whitehall, this county. He soon entered the employ of P. Ekern of Pigeon Falls, for whom he worked for seven years. These were years, not only of industry, but of economy and thrift, as he had no intention of spending his life in working for others. At the end of the period mentioned having enough money for this purpose. He purchased his present farm, a good piece of agricultural property, well improved, where he carries on general farming and dairying. The house is a good frame building of two stories and basement. The barn measures 48 by 70 by 14 feet, having stone basement and concrete floors, also 22 steel stanchions. On the farm is also a stave silo, 14 by 32 feet. Mr. Hagen has a herd of 30 cattle, of the Durham and Holstein breeds, of which he milks 25. He was married December 25, 1891, to Pauline Moe of Pigeon Township who was born at Pigeon Falls, this county, May 8, 1874, daughter of John J. and Antoinette (Peterson ) Moe. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have had ten children, three of whom died in infancy. The others are: Joel, born January 11, 1893; Albert, February 10, 1895, was married June 30, 1917 to Elsie Margaret Evenson; Palmer, August 25, 1896; Edwin, March 15, 1899; Peter, November 18, 1900; Rudolph, September 12, 1904; and Karl, November 30, 1907. In March 1916 they adopted a girl, Alice, who was born July 21, 1909. The family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

KNUT K. HAGESTAD (ULVIC, HARDANGER, BERGENSTIFT, NORWAY) (2)
One of the most important industries of Trempealeau County is that of stock-raising, of which the subject of this sketch was for many years a leading representative. He was born at Ulvic, Hardanger, Bergenstift, Norway, June 25, 1846, his parents, Knut and Cathrine (Richolsen) Hagestad, being natives of the same place. The father, who in Norway was a boat builder, emigrated to America with his family in 1854, settling in Columbia County, Wisconsin. There he remained until 1860, in which year he came to Trempealeau County, taking land which now constitutes the farm lately owned by his son, Knut K., and which he cultivated and developed residing on it until his death, August 22, 1872. He became a man of influence in the community, serving as treasurer of the school board and in other offices. His wife survived him a few years, dying in May 1875. Their family consisted of four children, Knut being the first in order of birth. Knut K. Hagestad had but limited educational opportunities, attending school in Columbia County, Wisconsin, for a part of three or four terms only. He accompanied his parents to Trempealeau County, being then 14 years old, and resided at home until he was 18. He then returned to the old home in Columbia County and worked for farmers in that vicinity for about 18 months. Returning to this county in the month of January, he spent the next three months lumbering in the woods, after which he worked at grubbing for his father. By this time he had saved some money and with this, he bought two pairs of oxen, and hiring another pair from his father and one from his brother, he engaged in breaking land, among other jobs of this kind turning the first furrow in Lakes Coulee for Lars Jahr, on the farm now owned by H. K. Solberg and John Hogden. After one season at breaking he sold his oxen and engaged in threshing one summer, working in the woods the next fall and winter. From that time until 1872 he followed the carpenter's trade in the summer. In this year his marriage occurred and he then rented his father's farm and operated it on that basis for about a year after his father's death, the estate being as yet unsettled. It subsequently came into his possession and he took up his residence in the original house built of logs, but which was so skillfully constructed by himself that today it appears like a modern dwelling, the logs not being visible. Mr. Hagestad also erected the main part of the present barn, another excellent piece of work, the building measuring 124 by 32 feet, with a nine-foot basement and 15-foot stock-boards, the rock used for the foundations being quarried by him. Starting with 160 acres of land, Mr. Hagestad increased the size of the farm to 228 acres of highly improved land, and his buildings and equipment were and are adequate to the fullest demands of modern farming and stock raising. It was to the latter branch of his business that he devoted his chief attention. When he began agricultural work for himself it was with the desire to raise purebred cattle, and in the early eighties he commenced with Shorthorns, purchasing two full-blood sires. About 1886 he decided that breed of cattle was more suited to beef purposes and consequently would not produce the maximum amount of milk, also that he could not breed them as profitably as he desired. He then bought two full-blooded Holstein heifers and a bull and continued with this breed until his herd had become one of pureblooded Holstein-Friesian cattle exclusively, which experiment he found highly satisfactory. His original stock was obtained at Libertyville, Illinois and while there attending a sale he met Mons Anderson, a merchant of LaCrosse, who purchased 12 head and these, with Mr. Hagestad's three head, were shipped together to LaCrosse, Mr. Hagestad taking charge of the car. Upon arriving in LaCrosse they paraded their stock through the streets, attracting considerable attention, as these were the first Holstein cattle seen in the county or anywhere in the vicinity. Mr. Hagestad became the owner of about 50 head of these cattle, all fine specimens of the breed. He frequently shipped stock to Texas, Old Mexico and various states of the Union, and in 1903 shipped six head to Japan for breeding purposes. He and his son, Andrew C. for the last 25 years were engaged in breeding pureblooded Berkshire hogs and S.C. White Leghorn chickens, which he continued to do until his death, April 18, 1917. Mr. Hagestad was a member and vice-president of the Western Wisconsin's Holstein-Friesian Breeders' Association, and had been a director in the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company from its organization. In addition to the interests mentioned, he was a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company and a stockholder and director in the Home Bank at Blair. Others interests that he had in the Bank of Ettrick, he turned over to his son before his death, and was then living practically retired, the son having taken over the management of the farm. Mr. Hagestad was a Republican in politics and during his long and active career took a more or less prominent part in public affairs, serving on the township board, as chairman of the county board and as representative to the State Assembly during the session of 1889. On June 3, 1872, Mr. Hagestad was united in marriage with Astri Knutson, who was born in Hallingdahl, Norway, natives of the same province, came to America in 1860, locating in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, on land adjoining the Hagestad farm, where Mr. Knutson followed farming and stock raising. He died June 7, 1891 and his wife May 12, 1895. Mrs. Hagestad was the second born of seven children. In her girlhood she attended school in this county, her attendance, however, being limited to about two months each summer, as her services were needed in the household. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagestad are as follows: Knut Martimus, who is a professor in the city schools of Santa Cruz, California Andrew C. residing on the home farm; Albert J., deceased; Kathrina, also deceased, who was the wife of C.L. Grinde, her husband now residing in Blair; Esther, deceased, who was the wife of Hans Twesme of Galesville; Cora, deceased; Almina, wife of Ove Veterhaus, residing in South Dakota; Albert, deceased; Clara, wife of John Fillner of Ettrick; William, a graduate of Gale College and of the State Agricultural School at Madison, who is now a farmer near Camp Douglas; Anna, wife of Irving Swenson, a farmer of Ettrick Township; Cora (second), a nurse in the Lutheran Hospital at LaCrosse; Hilda, who resides at home, and a child who died in infancy. Mr. Hagestad was a member of the Lutheran church, to which his family also belong. One of the leading men in his line of business in Trempealeau County, he was widely known and highly esteemed. The example he set more than 30 years ago in the breeding of Holstein cattle has since been followed successfully by many other farmers in this region, and is now an important branch of the stock raising industry of the county, adding to the sum total of wealth and the general prosperity; and in this way he was a public benefactor. His activities along this and other lines also conduced to his own benefit, and he was recognized as one of the well-to-do and substantial citizens of the community in which he lived. His wife, an estimable lady, who was to him a worthy helpmate, still resides on the old homestead. Mr. Hagestad for many years took a warm interest in Gale College, becoming president of its board of directors at the time it passed into Lutheran hands. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

JAMES HALDERSON (VERNON COUNTY, WISCONSIN)
James O. Halderson, president of the Halderson-Plummer Company, Incorporated, of Galesville, of which place he is one of the leading businessmen, was born in Harmony, Vernon County, Wisconsin, February 18, 1871, son of Albert and Mary (Gaarder) Halderson. He was educated in the common schools of Vernon County and remained at home until he was 20 years of age, when he became clerk in the furniture store of Joseph Polver at Viroqua, Wisconsin. There he remained for three years, during the last year of which period he had full charge of the business, having mastered it in every detail. In 1894 Mr. Halderson came to Galesville and her established an up-to-date furniture and undertaking business, with Thomas Call as an equal partner, the style of the firm being Halderson & Call. Two years later, their establishment was burned out, entailing a complete loss, but, undaunted, Mr. Halderson made a new start, this time alone and on a small scale, his place of business being located in the Dutton building. By hard work and upright dealing he built up a flourishing business, which increased steadily year by year. He now owns a fine store building, complete in every branch of the business, located on the corner of Ridge and Allen streets. This location he purchased from M.B. Parker and son Ervin in 1898. He has just built a tasteful modern residence north of his business block facing on Ridge Street. In Jul 1915 Mr. Halderson sold a half interest in the business to W.F. Plummer, and it was then incorporated as the Halderson-Plummer Company, with J.O. Halderson, president; Mrs. J.O. Halderson, vice-president; W.F. Plummer, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Halderson is a graduate of the Clark Embalming School of Chicago and of the Williams Embalming School of Oshkosh, Wisconsin and holds a state certificate as a thoroughly qualified funeral director. As a businessman he has gained a reputation for honesty and reliability that is one of his most valuable assets. Aside from their furniture and undertaking department, the Halderson-Plummer Company deal in pianos, organs, talking machines and other similar goods, keeping articles of standard merit. Mr. Halderson was married June 24, 1896 to Ellen Cook, who was born at Decorah Prairie, this county, July 25, 1970, daughter of David and Agnes (Henderson ) Cook. Mrs. Halderson was graduated from the Galesville schools in 1888. For several terms she was a proficient teacher in the rural schools and for a long period, a clerk in the department store of Gilberton & Myhre of at Galesville. Mr. and Mrs. Halderson have two children: James Haskell, born June 2, 1899, who was graduated from Galesville High School in 19817 and Theresa Grace, born March 8, 1902, who is now a student in the high school. Mr. Halderson is a member of Decorah Lodge, A.F. & A.M.; the independent Order of Odd Fellows; the Modern Woodmen of America; and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

FRED HAGEN (LILLEHAMMER, NORWAY)
Fred Hagen, who is aiding in developing the agricultural resources of Gale Township on his farm of 104 acres in section 4, was born at Lillehammer, Norway, July 11, 1870, son of Simon and Ingeborg Hagen. The father was a mechanic and neither he nor his wife ever left their native land. Both are now deceased. Fred Hagen was the fifth born in a family of six children. He attended school in Norway and began regular industrial life at the age of 17 years. In 1893 he joined the tide of westward emigration and, landing in the United States, proceeded to Iowa where he worked as a farmer in Ward County for about three years. He then spent a winter in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin but at the time did not settle here permanently, going instead to Dodge County, Minnesota where he worked as a farm hand for about seven years. Then returning to Trempealeau County, he rented a farm in Gale Township, having previously rented one for three years in Minnesota, and went to farming for himself here. Eight years later, having saved money, he bought his present farm of 104 acres, on which he has since improved and he is enjoying a well-earned prosperity, being also a stockholder in the Farmer's Telephone Company. Mr. Hagen was married October 10, 1902 to Clara Dahl, who was born Gale Township, daughter of Gustave and Len Dahl. Her parents, both now living in this township, are natives of Norway, the father being a retired farmer. Mrs. Hagen died October 26, 1911, leaving three children: Stanley, born September 14, 1903; Lester, born July 20, 1905 and Norman, born November 8, 1908. The family are members of the Lutheran church at French Creek and in politics Mr. Hagen is a Republican. When he first came to this country he was entirely ignorant of the English language, but acquired it quickly, considering his opportunities and has since carved his way to a position of comparative prosperity, with good prospects for the future. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

ERIC HAGEN (SONDRELAND, NORWAY) (2)
Eric Hagen, manager and partner in the firm of Hagen & Waller, general merchants, Osseo, was born in Sondreland, Norway, April 23, 1863, son of Hans E. and Anne (Lunde) Hagen, the former of whom came to America in 1869, farmed in Arcadia Township for many years, and now lives a retired life in Whitehall, the latter having died in 1875. Eric Hagen was reared to farm pursuits, and attended the country schools. His attention, however, was early turned to mercantile lines and while still a youth he secured employment as a clerk in a store at Elk Creek. Further experience in the same line was secured in St. Paul and in Independence. In 1895 he came to Osseo and organized with Oliver Waller the firm of Hagen & Waller. This firm succeeded Larson, Getts & Co. in the general mercantile business. It has a large trade, and well deserves the esteem and confidence in which it is held by its numerous patrons. From 1897 to 1907 the firm owned a creamery at Osseo, and from 1904 until it was destroyed by fire in the winter of 1915, owned and operated the elevator there. Mr. Hagen is also interested in the State Bank of Osseo, in which he is the assistant cashier and one of the directors. Busy though he is with his financial interests, Mr. Hagen has found time for some excellent public service. Since the spring of 1914 he has been a member of the county board and he has also been a member of the school and village boards. His fraternal relations are with the A.F. & A. M., while his religious affiliations are with the Congregational church, in which he is one of the trustees. Mr. Hagen was married March 17, 1891 to Mary Reid of Burnside Township, daughter of James and Margaret (Lange) Reid. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have five children: Mabel A., who graduated from the LaCrosse normal school and was teacher in the Osseo schools. She was married to E.A. Nelson, a banker of Maddox, North Dakota, July 1917. Henry, a farmer in Steele, North Dakota; and Ralph E., Margaret and Alice, who are at home. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

ALFRED HAGEN (EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN)
Alfred Hagen, butter-maker for the Unity Cooperative Creamery at Strum, is one of the popular young men of the village, and is thoroughly proficient in his chosen line of work. He was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, October 10, 1882, son of Segvart A. and Karen (Olson) Hagen. Segvart A Hagen was born in Norway, came to Trempealeau County in the nineties, settled on a farm in section 12, Albion Township, and there lived until his death in 1906, since which time the widow has continued to make her home there. Alfred Hagen remained with his parents until 15 years old. Then he was employed as a farm hand for several years. In 1911 he entered the Unity Creamery as a helper, and gradually perfected himself as a butter-maker until he was promoted to his present position in the spring of 1916. Mr. Hagen was married April 7, 1915 to Clara Engen of Eleva, daughter of Ole and Mathia Engen, for many years residents of section 22, Albion Township, where the father died in 1908 and where the mother still lives. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have a daughter, Myrtle Kathrine, born March 12, 1916. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

ANDREW C. HAGESTAD (ETTRICK TOWNSHIP, TREMPEALEAU COUNTY, WISCONSIN)
Andrew C. Hagestad, proprietor of the Hagestad Stock Farm, which embraces the old Hagestad homestead in section 19, Ettrick Township, is one of the best-known agriculturists in this county. He has a wide reputation as a breeder of Holstein-Fresian cattle, he has been an important factor in many farmers' organizations, and he has been very active indeed in church, school and township affairs. Like his father before him, he is energetic and progressive, and is recognized as one of the most useful citizens in the community. A native of this county, he was born on the place where he now lives, January 23, 1876, son of Knut K. and Astri (Knutson) Hagestad, the early settlers. He was reared to farm pursuits, attended the public schools, and in the winters of 1896-97 he attended the College of Agriculture at the State University, receiving his diploma in the spring of 1897, thereafter became his father's partner in conducting the farm, acquiring a half interest in the place. In the winter of 1917, before his father's death, he secured the other half interest and is now sole owner. On this place he successfully conducts agricultural operations along the latest approved lines. In connection with his breeding of Holstein-Fresian cattle, he owns the noted sire, "Prince Korndyke," No. 177,392, whose dam, Princess De Kol Echo, has a world-wide reputation for having in a stated tested period given 98 pounds of milk a day and produced over 28 pounds of butterfat in a week. The farm is also known for its Berkshire swine and Single-comb White Leghorn poultry. Aside from his farm holdings, Mr. Hagestad has extensive business interests, including stock in the Ettrick Creamery, of which he is vice-president; in the Ettrick and Northern Railroad Company, of which he is a director, and in the Ettrick Lumber Company and the Farmers' Telephone Company at Ettrick. In church and public life he has been no less prominent, he is a member of the Lutheran church, and has held an office of trustee for eight years, has been director of the school district for the past nine years and township treasurer for the past five years. As a believer in agricultural progress he has affiliated himself with the Wisconsin Experiment Association, with headquarters at Madison. In advertising his farm, Mr. Hagestad makes use of an interesting device of his own invention. The device consists of two large wings, connected by a circle. The left wing bears the world "Quality," the right the word "Quantity," the top of the circle the word "Production," and the bottom of the circle the word "First," thus giving the slogan: "First in Production, First in Quality and First in Quantity." In the center of the circle is a picture of the famous Prince Korndyke. Mr. Hagestad was married June 25, 1901 to Martha Christianson of Ettrick, daughter of Hans Christianson and this union has been blessed with five children: Victor R., born June 13, 1902; Evelyn C. born June 19, 1904 and died December 27, 1904; Kenneth H., born January 22, 1906; Elsie M., born June 4, 1910; and Ruth C., born April 3, 1914. HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

HALVOR J. HALVORSON (CHIPPEWA FALLS, WISCONSIN)
Halvor J. Halvorson, expert butter-maker at the Eleva Cooperative Creamery, has been connected with the creamery industry in this village for 18 years, and is thoroughly familiar with all departments of his business. He was born in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, October 6, 1874, son of John and Mary (Haganess) Halvorson, who operate a farm in Eau Claire County. Halvor J. Halvorson spent his boyhood on a farm, and came to this county in 1899 as a helper in the old Eleva creamery. Desiring to further perfect himself, he studied in the Dairy School of the Agricultural College of the University of Wisconsin. Completing his course there March 1, 1903, he took his present position, and here he has since remained. In addition to this, he operates a farm of 75 acres in section 10, Albion Township, where he carries on general agricultural operations. He holds the agency for the Wonder Milking Machines for Eau Claire, Trempealeau and Buffalo counties, and has installed several on Trempealeau County farms. Busy as he is, he has found time for public service, and has been a member of the village council three years. Mr. Halvorson was married June 1, 1902 to Louisa Serum, who was born in Buffalo County, Wisconsin, February 23, 1877, and died October 1, 1907, daughter of Ole and Mary Serum. Mr. and Mrs. Halvorson had two children: Josephine, born April 1, 1903 and Obert, born June 14, 1906. SOURCE - HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

CHRIST AND EDWARD HALVERSON (TREMPEALEAU COUNTY, WISCONSIN)
Christ and Edward Halverson, two brothers who own and operate a fine farm in Norway Coulee, Arcadia Township, were born in this valley, Christ, June 13, 1875 and Edward, March 22, 1881. They are the sons of German and Jennie Halverson, both of whom were born in Norway, the father in December 1842 and the mother in October 1844. German and Jennie Halverson came to America in 1864, locating first in Dane County, Wisconsin, where they resided one year. Arriving in Trempealeau County in 1865, Mr. Halverson homesteaded 160 acres of wild land in Norway Coulee, Arcadia Township, it being situated in sections 13 and 24. The first residence of the family here was a dugout in the side of a hill, and it was in this humble dwelling that their first child, Ella, was born. Later on Mr. Halverson built a frame house, one and a half stories high, with upright and wing, which building is now standing, being occupied as a dwelling by the subjects of this sketch. He also built a frame barn, which though dilapidated, is still standing. In 1900 the property came into possession of Christ and Edward Halverson, and nine years later the father died. His wife is still living with her two sons, the joint proprietors of the farm, but since 1915 has been an invalid. She is now 71 years of age. The two brothers have built a frame barn with hip roof, 24 by 67 by 16 feet, together with machine sheds, granary, hog house and poultry house, corn cribs and all necessary buildings, which are kept in first class condition. They carry on general farming and dairying, having at this time 50 head of cattle, with hogs, horses and poultry. They are stockholders in the Arcadia Shipping Association, the Arcadia Cooperative Creamery and the Farmers Telephone Company. Their religious affiliations are with Norway Coulee Lutheran church, of which their parents were among the founders. Edward Halverson was married June 21, 1913, to Carrie, daughter of Ole and Helen Olson of Norway, she coming to America alone in 1911. They have one child, Josie, three years of age. The brothers and sisters of Christ and Edward Halverson are as follows: Ella, born in 1867, who is now Mrs. Carl Haagen of Fosston, Minnesota; Ole G. born in 1869, who is a farmer at Big Tamarack, Arcadia Township; Halvor, born in 1871 and now living at Valley City, North Dakota; Maline, born in 1872, now Mrs. Jens Lee of Valley City, North Dakota; Mary, born in 1876, now the wife of Carl Lee of Valley City, North Dakota; Minnie, born in 1878, who is the wife of Louis Nelson of Koba, North Dakota; Julius, born in 1883, whose present whereabouts is unknown and Julia, born in 1885, who is now Mrs. Oscar Olson, now of Valley City, North Dakota. The Halverson farm lies in one of the most beautiful coulees of Trempealeau County. The land is very rolling but fertile, and the labors of the two brothers, Christ and Edward, have greatly increased its value. SOURCE – HISTORY OF TREMPEALEAU COUNTY - 1917

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