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Franklin Mc Cellan Houck [Parents] was born in 1862. He died in 1943. He married Maude Evelyn Spangler.

Maude Evelyn Spangler was born in 1872. She died in 1960. She married Franklin Mc Cellan Houck.


Daniel Labar was born on 1 Mar 1809 in Pennsylvania. He died on 7 Oct 1890 in Pennsylvania. He was buried in Oct 1890 in Mt. Zion Cem., Franklin Township, Luzerne County, , Pennsylvania. He married Eliza.

Eliza was born on 23 Mar 1812 in , , New Jersey. She died on 25 Apr 1889 in date questioned Pennsylvania. She was buried in 1889 in Mt. Zion Cem., Franklin Township, Luzerne County, , Pennsylvania. She married Daniel Labar.

They had the following children:

  F i Annette Labar

William Chatfield Sickler [Parents] was born on 14 Oct 1804 in Beekman, Dutchess County, New York. He died on 13 Jan 1833 in Rockport, Atchison County, Mo. He was buried in 1833 in Greenhill Cem., Rockport, Atchison County, Mo. He married Emeline Fox Dailey about 1833/1834. The marriage ended in divorce.

WILLIAM SICKLER: THE PIONEER BLACKSMITH

Born in Dutchess County, New York, moved about 1815 with parents and siblings to Exeter Township, Luzerne County, PA. After his marriage to Emeline, the young family, which now including two young sons, Emory and Miles, removed and settled in Atchison County, MO, where he became a large land holder and blacksmith.

The following article published in The History of Atchison County eloquently sums up the life of William: "Among the earliest settlers of the site of Rock Port, and indeed of what is now Atchison County, is William Sickler, who still (1882) resides near the northern limits of the town. He has been a resident of the place and immediate neighborhood upwards of forty years, and was the first blacksmith established in this part of the township, and the second in the county. Mr. Sickler started his shop at what is now the east end of Mill Street, near the site of the present bridge across the creek, about 1841. He made the first plow ever manufactured within the present limits of Atchison County, and ironed the first wagon.

Mr. Sickler is a man of medium stature, but has been, and still is, one of great physical activity, and more than ordinary powers of endurance. He is now at the advanced age of seventy-seven years, in full possession of his faculties, and bids fair yet to enjoy a longer additional lease of life than many a much younger man could reasonably hope to achieve."

Emeline Fox Dailey [Parents] was born on 26 Apr 1815 in Falls, Luzerne County, , Pennsylvania. She died on 30 Mar 1881 in Grand Detour, Ogle County, Il. She was buried in Apr 1881 in Grand Detour Cem, Grand Detour, Ogle County, , Pennsylvania. She married William Chatfield Sickler about 1833/1834. The marriage ended in divorce.

Other marriages:
Backus, Joseph Heister

They had the following children:

  M i Emory Jacob Sickler
  M ii Miles Sickler

Miles Sickler [Parents] was born on 17 May 1836 in Falls Township., Luzerne County, , Pennsylvania. He died on 29 Dec 1923 in Rockport, Atchison County, Mo. He married Elizabeth Fox.

MILES SICKLER: THE BIG LITTLE MAN

Born in Luzerne County, PA, moved with his parents and sibling brother to Rock Port, MO. After the separation of his mother and father, removed with his mother and brother to Ogle County, IL, where he grew up in the home of his step-father, Joseph Backus. Although heartbreak and adversity characterized the Miles Sickler household as seven of their ten children died early in life, Miles is remembered as an optomistic, friendly, and generous personality.

Tough as nails, while visiting in Kansas, Miles suffered severe injuries as the victim of a runaway accident. His shoulder was broken and he had internal injuries; injuries that would have been fatal to most men. Even though one arm was practically useless for a number of months, being the fighter he was overcome this temporary handicap and regained his strength. A newspaper account in the Atchison County Mail said that "Last winter he suffered a lengthy illness which his family and friends felt would be his last, as his life was at its lowest ebb for days at at time. But he fought his way back to fair health and the past year has been about as usual."

Other newspaper accounts of his life said the following: "Mr.Sickler had his hobbies, as do most men, and if there was one more outstanding than any other it was the unselfish manner in which he devoted time, money, and energy to furthering the interests of the now defunct Rock Port Fair, of which he was one of the chief backers and promoters for many years. He was one of the men who conceived the idea of the little log cabin at what is now the city park. In it were displayed and stored relics of a bygone day, pictures of pioneers of Achison County." Another article reports that "Miles Sickler had a fine Clydesdale Stallion on exhibition at Enoch's Livery Stable last Saturday. He is a fine built animal. Jet black in color. Two years old and weighs 1,030 pounds." Still another article reports that "Miles Sickler and wife returned from their lengthy visit in Wisconsin. During his visit in Eau Clair, he had the exciting pleasure of killing a black bear." And, another aricle reported that "Miles Sickler had a $200.00 mule killed by lightening on Wednesday of this week."

Elizabeth Fox was born on 2 Jan 1838. She died on 18 Jun 1914. She married Miles Sickler.


Emory Jacob Sickler [Parents] was born on 12 Jan 1834 in Williamsport, Lycoming County, , Pennsylvania. He died on 10 Aug 1924. He was buried in 1924 in Pine Grove Cem., Ringle, Wisconsin. He married Amelia Bublitz.

Other marriages:
Goerne, Wilhelmina

OH PIONEER!
By Helen Hill

Emory Jacob Sickler did not like Chicago or his Episcopalian step-father. He longed to get away and see the country of pine forests. Sam Kelly, son of Milo, felt the same urge. So they boarded a train bound for Racine. Here they worked at odd jobs for a time with ears and eyes tuned to the double value of pine land upstate, where men could make two fortunes in a lifetime: one, on pine logging, and two, a cleared farm of one's own. They learned about a weekly tote wagon from Racine to Portage and engaged passage for the long, slow trip upstate in 1846. Emory was 17.

From Portage they slowly worked their way to Dancy where the trail merged into a mere path or rutted road. This was sandy country, easier to walk on than to follow an ox team. The Wisconsin river afforded easier transportation if one had a boat or canoe. It was faster too.

At the present site of Schofield at the confluence of the Eau Claire and Wisconsin rivers they came in direct contact with men familiar with the pine drives of this famous area. William N. Allen, author of the famous Shanty Boys songs, had eulogized it with songs of love, death and bravery of loggers. Everyone sang them. Some even knew a few of the characters. Here, Emory decided, was their destination.

With fresh provisions they started east on the Eau Claire River. Trees and logs were there beds. They ate birds and berries and kept getting lost in the heavy woods. Emory began to doubt the wisdom of his choice, He sought free land to log and homestead. He found it at last on the west bank of the Eau Claire River on the south side of the present County Trunk N.

Here, Emory and Sam erected a log house. Later Emory built a mill, using the first cut lumber in his own buildings. Soon others came and staked claims, used Sickler sawed lumber in their buildings, helping in the mill to pay for their sawing. Marchetti, Silverthorn and Dave Plummer worked for Emory. Later they became prominent in Wausau history as a judge, lumberman and lawyer.

In the winter men cleared land. Emory liked the nice high lay of the land on the east side of the river and cleared it, thinking it to be part of his claim. It was not. That piece of land is now the town cemetery.

Once a year an agent came from New York to get furs from the Indians, who exchanged them for white men's goods. The women sold their lovely hand-made baskets for salt pork. Old Highsnakes, chief of the Chippewas, went on the trail many years. Emory spoke Chippewa fluently and served as an interpreter in all fur sales with white agents. The Indians tanned hides for the farmers.

Emory prospered. He bought more land and found it at what is now Callon, taking out claims with Bill Kelly, son of Milo Kelly. This small settlement was named after John Callon who had a railroad spur there for loading logs cut from areas east of present Highway 29, and hauled by teams to the spur.

Men also used the rivers for moving logs, but it was an ever-present danger. William Hewitt came near to drowning but was saved by a branch thrown to him by Emory. Hewitt was intelligent and a great reader. He became known as Emory's boy. He later served many years on the County Board. He was Rothschild's first president, and a township in Marathon County was named after him.

Emory's marriage was the first one recorded at the Marathon County Courthouse at Wausau on April 1, 1860. He was a versatile man: a drummer, a flutist, and served as a soldier in the Civil War. Five children were born to his first wife and 11 to his second wife.

His second wife Minnie nursed the sick and was mortician for the dead. Besides her own 11 children she raised five step-children and five grandchildren, yet had time as local midwife to help with 47 new lives. She read without need for glasses till her 90th year and despite her work load found time for her precious reading. She never failed to exercise her suffrage rights.

A Mrs. Knowles also acted as midwife in the area. A severe scarlet fever epidemic swept through the area, resulting in many eye and ear ailments.

What with all this population growth there was now a drastic need for a school. It was built in 1854 about a mile west of Catholic Church. Fifteen years later it was too small. It became the woodshed for a second new school.
Over 100 children were enrolled in this one which operated on a 12-month term..It had a high rostrum in front which let the chart class sit on the floor around the reading chart. A James Buckley was the teacher. Despite the fact that he was disliked by some, he stayed eight years.

In later years Emory became the blacksmith for the Callon mill which operated with a water wheel for 30 years before the new mill was built. The smithy operated for 92 years. I saw its sagging sides reduced by half by time's ravages a decade age. No marker now tells where it once stood.

Always busy as a blacksmith, Emory worked hardest on weekends. The oxen were brought in on Saturday for shoes, driven into a frame and securely tied. Two wide front straps went under the ox; two went over lifting him two inches from the floor. Such bellowing this caused! But in no other way could shoes have been attached to so huge a beast.

Mill hands got $16 per month and their keep. Those who worked on the landing got $35 per month. All help was paid at season's end. Ten cents per felled tree was also paid - a felled tree having to be cut and also limbed.
All pay was in gold. Emory had $1,000 in gold in the house each spring with which to pay off the help.

Saturday nights meant parties and fun. The accordian and mouth organ provided dance music in their homes. Mr. Sickler lived, to see cities and villages spring up and to witness the development of fine farms where deep forests stood before.

Mr. Sickler was born on January 12, 1834, in Pennsylvania, and when a youngster he migrated westward to Dixon, Illinois, with his parents. At eighteen years of age he was ready to battle his way farther from the borders of civilization and, together with William Kelly another of those veterans who opened up the pine forests of Marathon county, he walked from Dixon to what is now the village of Kelly, in the town of Weston. There was no town there then; probably not even a house. That was in 1852. En route the two stopped at Racine where they witnessed a big wrestling match. Wrestling in those days was the premier sport to which all boys aspired, and Emory Sickler, though small in stature, had few superiors. The champion wrestler of the west was wrestling and no comer had been able to throw him. Mr. Sickler was pitted against the man and threw him. So overjoyed was the crowd that Messrs.
Sickler and Kelly had to remain in Racine for three [sic] weeks.

So there was some pleasure on their long journey but from Racine on there were many hardships experienced, streams to be forded, dense forests to be penetrated. Young Sickler and Kelly were very happy to reach their destination. The former logged and ran the river for a time and was as well a blacksmith and a millwright. He knew the Eau Claire river thoroughly and came in direct contact with the hundreds of Indians who were located nearby.
Alcohol was mixed with good sweet Eau Claire water to lift the spirits. The neighborhood creek was named Alcohol Creek because of empty bottles covering its bed.

There were building and logging bees as well as soap making bees. These activities meant work, good meals and needed fellowship. Newly worked land was planted to rutabagas. The family dog was kept near the garden patch to keep deer from eating the crops. The small grain fields were hand cradled.
The woods abounded with meat. Partridges were plentiful with a bag limit of 10.

Thus was the Callon area brought into being.

Amelia Bublitz was born in 1842. She died on 21 Nov 1870. She married Emory Jacob Sickler.


Emory Jacob Sickler [Parents] was born on 12 Jan 1834 in Williamsport, Lycoming County, , Pennsylvania. He died on 10 Aug 1924. He was buried in 1924 in Pine Grove Cem., Ringle, Wisconsin. He married Wilhelmina Goerne on 14 Nov 1871.

Other marriages:
Bublitz, Amelia

OH PIONEER!
By Helen Hill

Emory Jacob Sickler did not like Chicago or his Episcopalian step-father. He longed to get away and see the country of pine forests. Sam Kelly, son of Milo, felt the same urge. So they boarded a train bound for Racine. Here they worked at odd jobs for a time with ears and eyes tuned to the double value of pine land upstate, where men could make two fortunes in a lifetime: one, on pine logging, and two, a cleared farm of one's own. They learned about a weekly tote wagon from Racine to Portage and engaged passage for the long, slow trip upstate in 1846. Emory was 17.

From Portage they slowly worked their way to Dancy where the trail merged into a mere path or rutted road. This was sandy country, easier to walk on than to follow an ox team. The Wisconsin river afforded easier transportation if one had a boat or canoe. It was faster too.

At the present site of Schofield at the confluence of the Eau Claire and Wisconsin rivers they came in direct contact with men familiar with the pine drives of this famous area. William N. Allen, author of the famous Shanty Boys songs, had eulogized it with songs of love, death and bravery of loggers. Everyone sang them. Some even knew a few of the characters. Here, Emory decided, was their destination.

With fresh provisions they started east on the Eau Claire River. Trees and logs were there beds. They ate birds and berries and kept getting lost in the heavy woods. Emory began to doubt the wisdom of his choice, He sought free land to log and homestead. He found it at last on the west bank of the Eau Claire River on the south side of the present County Trunk N.

Here, Emory and Sam erected a log house. Later Emory built a mill, using the first cut lumber in his own buildings. Soon others came and staked claims, used Sickler sawed lumber in their buildings, helping in the mill to pay for their sawing. Marchetti, Silverthorn and Dave Plummer worked for Emory. Later they became prominent in Wausau history as a judge, lumberman and lawyer.

In the winter men cleared land. Emory liked the nice high lay of the land on the east side of the river and cleared it, thinking it to be part of his claim. It was not. That piece of land is now the town cemetery.

Once a year an agent came from New York to get furs from the Indians, who exchanged them for white men's goods. The women sold their lovely hand-made baskets for salt pork. Old Highsnakes, chief of the Chippewas, went on the trail many years. Emory spoke Chippewa fluently and served as an interpreter in all fur sales with white agents. The Indians tanned hides for the farmers.

Emory prospered. He bought more land and found it at what is now Callon, taking out claims with Bill Kelly, son of Milo Kelly. This small settlement was named after John Callon who had a railroad spur there for loading logs cut from areas east of present Highway 29, and hauled by teams to the spur.

Men also used the rivers for moving logs, but it was an ever-present danger. William Hewitt came near to drowning but was saved by a branch thrown to him by Emory. Hewitt was intelligent and a great reader. He became known as Emory's boy. He later served many years on the County Board. He was Rothschild's first president, and a township in Marathon County was named after him.

Emory's marriage was the first one recorded at the Marathon County Courthouse at Wausau on April 1, 1860. He was a versatile man: a drummer, a flutist, and served as a soldier in the Civil War. Five children were born to his first wife and 11 to his second wife.

His second wife Minnie nursed the sick and was mortician for the dead. Besides her own 11 children she raised five step-children and five grandchildren, yet had time as local midwife to help with 47 new lives. She read without need for glasses till her 90th year and despite her work load found time for her precious reading. She never failed to exercise her suffrage rights.

A Mrs. Knowles also acted as midwife in the area. A severe scarlet fever epidemic swept through the area, resulting in many eye and ear ailments.

What with all this population growth there was now a drastic need for a school. It was built in 1854 about a mile west of Catholic Church. Fifteen years later it was too small. It became the woodshed for a second new school.
Over 100 children were enrolled in this one which operated on a 12-month term..It had a high rostrum in front which let the chart class sit on the floor around the reading chart. A James Buckley was the teacher. Despite the fact that he was disliked by some, he stayed eight years.

In later years Emory became the blacksmith for the Callon mill which operated with a water wheel for 30 years before the new mill was built. The smithy operated for 92 years. I saw its sagging sides reduced by half by time's ravages a decade age. No marker now tells where it once stood.

Always busy as a blacksmith, Emory worked hardest on weekends. The oxen were brought in on Saturday for shoes, driven into a frame and securely tied. Two wide front straps went under the ox; two went over lifting him two inches from the floor. Such bellowing this caused! But in no other way could shoes have been attached to so huge a beast.

Mill hands got $16 per month and their keep. Those who worked on the landing got $35 per month. All help was paid at season's end. Ten cents per felled tree was also paid - a felled tree having to be cut and also limbed.
All pay was in gold. Emory had $1,000 in gold in the house each spring with which to pay off the help.

Saturday nights meant parties and fun. The accordian and mouth organ provided dance music in their homes. Mr. Sickler lived, to see cities and villages spring up and to witness the development of fine farms where deep forests stood before.

Mr. Sickler was born on January 12, 1834, in Pennsylvania, and when a youngster he migrated westward to Dixon, Illinois, with his parents. At eighteen years of age he was ready to battle his way farther from the borders of civilization and, together with William Kelly another of those veterans who opened up the pine forests of Marathon county, he walked from Dixon to what is now the village of Kelly, in the town of Weston. There was no town there then; probably not even a house. That was in 1852. En route the two stopped at Racine where they witnessed a big wrestling match. Wrestling in those days was the premier sport to which all boys aspired, and Emory Sickler, though small in stature, had few superiors. The champion wrestler of the west was wrestling and no comer had been able to throw him. Mr. Sickler was pitted against the man and threw him. So overjoyed was the crowd that Messrs.
Sickler and Kelly had to remain in Racine for three [sic] weeks.

So there was some pleasure on their long journey but from Racine on there were many hardships experienced, streams to be forded, dense forests to be penetrated. Young Sickler and Kelly were very happy to reach their destination. The former logged and ran the river for a time and was as well a blacksmith and a millwright. He knew the Eau Claire river thoroughly and came in direct contact with the hundreds of Indians who were located nearby.
Alcohol was mixed with good sweet Eau Claire water to lift the spirits. The neighborhood creek was named Alcohol Creek because of empty bottles covering its bed.

There were building and logging bees as well as soap making bees. These activities meant work, good meals and needed fellowship. Newly worked land was planted to rutabagas. The family dog was kept near the garden patch to keep deer from eating the crops. The small grain fields were hand cradled.
The woods abounded with meat. Partridges were plentiful with a bag limit of 10.

Thus was the Callon area brought into being.

Wilhelmina Goerne was born on 23 Dec 1850. She died on 11 Aug 1941. She married Emory Jacob Sickler on 14 Nov 1871.


Barnabas Horton [Parents] was born on 13 Jul 1600 in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He was christened in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He died on 13 Jul 1680 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He was buried in 1680 in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He married Anne Stanton Smith in 1622/1624 in Leicestershire, England, England, England.

Other marriages:
Langton, Mary

"Barnabas Horton was born in July, 1600, in the tiny hamlet of Mowsley, which was called Mosele after the Norman Conquest. It is yet uncertain whether Barnabas' roots were in the Hortons of Derbyshire and Leicester- shire or whether his father, Joseph, moved there from the West Riding of Yorkshire. Barnabas's first wife, Anne Smith of Stanion in Northampton- shire, England, died after the birth of their second son. Barnabas later married Mary Langton of Wigston Magna and they emigrated with the two sons to Hampton, Mass, sometime between 1635-1638. They sailed to the New World on the ship "Swallow" which had as owner and captain one Jeremy Horton. An exact relationship is not certain [now accepted as brother to Barnabas and Thomas]. After several years in Hampton, Mass, Barnabas and Mary joined twelve other families, including that of their minister, Reverend John Youngs(Yonges), and set out for the eastern end of Long Island then part of the New Haven Colony. Western Long Island at that time was held by the Dutch.
Barnabas was a Magistrate and member of the court at New Haven for many years."

Source: "HortonS IN AMERICA" by Adaline Horton White, 1929 pg.xiii./pg.01.
(Dow's History of Hampton, Mass., states that Barnabas Horton was owner)
(of a house lot here in June, 1640.)

"Mr. Stuart T. Terry, of Southold, L. I., has kindly copied and forwarded to me many interesting facts from the New Haven Colonial Records, some of which are here inserted:
Concerning some farmers neere Southold, at a place called Hashamamock, aboute whom Barnabas Horton, one of ye Constables last yeare, which was 1656, also, Constable in 1659. 29 May, 1661, Barnabas Horton was a Deputy to the New Haven Court- also, 31 May 1654, the Deputies from Southold presented to ye court a wrighting from their towne, wherein it is desired that Barnabas Horton and John Peaken, the two present Deputies of Southold, may be chosen Constables for that plantation; which was done. Barnabas Horton was a Deputy to the Court in New Haven, in 1654-'56,-'59 and 1661. In 1665 there was no election, but he wrote a letter to the Court on public affairs. In 1662 he was admitted a Freeman of Connecticut Colony, at Hartford, and in 1663 and 1664 he was a Deputy to the General Court, at Hartford. He was a Magistrate in 1664, and until his death. He is one of the Patentees of the Town of Southold in 1676. Made his will May 10, 1680. Died 13 July, 1680. Will proved. Lib. 2, N. Y., p. 54. -- Vide "Moore's Indexes of Southold." "

The History Of Union, Connecticut, by Charles Hammond

Barnabas was born about 1600 and came to the colonies in 1635-1638.
He first landed in Mass., and went to Long Island in 1640.

"The Hortons In America" by Adaline Horton White 1929

"HISTORIC SITE OF THE BARNABAS Horton HOUSE, EARLY 1640's-1878" "Where Generations of Hortons Lived Until 1873, In Part, Became" "THE FIRST SUFFOLK COUNTY COURT HOUSE-1684-1729"
(Location: Northwest corner, Main Street and Horton Lane, Southold) "After Suffolk County was organized in 1683, from the East Riding of Yorkshire, County Courts were held for 45 years in the upper story of the Horton House."

Sourc: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.29. 1960.

Barnabas Horton is buried at the Old Cemetery, now the Presbyterian Church Cem. located on Main Street in the middle of block from Horton Lane and across the street from Town Hall. Many other first settlers are buried at the reportedly the first cemetery in the State of New York. I visited there and the Horton Point Lighthouse as well as other historical landmarks.

Source: Mike J. Horton. 5/24/95.

"Barnabas Horton, the Baker."

Source: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.42. 1960.

"To Daniel H. Horton was handed down the celebrated Barnabas Horton Cask of 1640, which according to "Hortons In America" (genealogy book of 1929) was brought over from England by Barnabas filled with household goods (or legendary gold and silver which gave it its name of "Uncle Barney's Money Pot") The cask has recently been presented by Mr. Horton to Southold Historical Society."

Source: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.45. 1960.

Anne Stanton Smith was born about 1600 in , Stanion, Northamptonshire, England. She died before 1636 in , , Mass. or, England. She was buried before 1636 in , , Mass. or, England. She married Barnabas Horton in 1622/1624 in Leicestershire, England, England, England.

"...of Stanion of Northamptonshire, ENGLAND."

Source: "Hortons In America" pg.01, 1929

They had the following children:

  M i Joseph Horton Captain
  M ii Benjamin Horton was born in 1627 in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He was christened in Sep 1627 in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He died on 3 Nov 1690 in , Rye, Westchester County, New York.

"Came to this country with his father and settled in Southold near his father, Barnabas Horton. He was a freeman of Connecticut Colony in 1664, deeds land to Christopher Youngs in 1670, and to Samuel King and others at various times. On 2/19/1686, he makes his will, appointing his brother, Joseph, devisee and his brother, Joshua, executor. He moved to Rye, (NY) about 1665, where he died, 11/3/1690, without issue."

Source: "Hortons In America" pg. 1, 1929.
(Vide "Moore's Indexes of Southold," pg. 22/23.)

Barnabas Horton [Parents] was born on 13 Jul 1600 in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He was christened in , Mowsley, Leicestershire, England. He died on 13 Jul 1680 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He was buried in 1680 in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He married Mary Langton before 1636 in Mowsley, Leicestershire, England, England.

Other marriages:
Smith, Anne Stanton

"Barnabas Horton was born in July, 1600, in the tiny hamlet of Mowsley, which was called Mosele after the Norman Conquest. It is yet uncertain whether Barnabas' roots were in the Hortons of Derbyshire and Leicester- shire or whether his father, Joseph, moved there from the West Riding of Yorkshire. Barnabas's first wife, Anne Smith of Stanion in Northampton- shire, England, died after the birth of their second son. Barnabas later married Mary Langton of Wigston Magna and they emigrated with the two sons to Hampton, Mass, sometime between 1635-1638. They sailed to the New World on the ship "Swallow" which had as owner and captain one Jeremy Horton. An exact relationship is not certain [now accepted as brother to Barnabas and Thomas]. After several years in Hampton, Mass, Barnabas and Mary joined twelve other families, including that of their minister, Reverend John Youngs(Yonges), and set out for the eastern end of Long Island then part of the New Haven Colony. Western Long Island at that time was held by the Dutch.
Barnabas was a Magistrate and member of the court at New Haven for many years."

Source: "HortonS IN AMERICA" by Adaline Horton White, 1929 pg.xiii./pg.01.
(Dow's History of Hampton, Mass., states that Barnabas Horton was owner)
(of a house lot here in June, 1640.)

"Mr. Stuart T. Terry, of Southold, L. I., has kindly copied and forwarded to me many interesting facts from the New Haven Colonial Records, some of which are here inserted:
Concerning some farmers neere Southold, at a place called Hashamamock, aboute whom Barnabas Horton, one of ye Constables last yeare, which was 1656, also, Constable in 1659. 29 May, 1661, Barnabas Horton was a Deputy to the New Haven Court- also, 31 May 1654, the Deputies from Southold presented to ye court a wrighting from their towne, wherein it is desired that Barnabas Horton and John Peaken, the two present Deputies of Southold, may be chosen Constables for that plantation; which was done. Barnabas Horton was a Deputy to the Court in New Haven, in 1654-'56,-'59 and 1661. In 1665 there was no election, but he wrote a letter to the Court on public affairs. In 1662 he was admitted a Freeman of Connecticut Colony, at Hartford, and in 1663 and 1664 he was a Deputy to the General Court, at Hartford. He was a Magistrate in 1664, and until his death. He is one of the Patentees of the Town of Southold in 1676. Made his will May 10, 1680. Died 13 July, 1680. Will proved. Lib. 2, N. Y., p. 54. -- Vide "Moore's Indexes of Southold." "

The History Of Union, Connecticut, by Charles Hammond

Barnabas was born about 1600 and came to the colonies in 1635-1638.
He first landed in Mass., and went to Long Island in 1640.

"The Hortons In America" by Adaline Horton White 1929

"HISTORIC SITE OF THE BARNABAS Horton HOUSE, EARLY 1640's-1878" "Where Generations of Hortons Lived Until 1873, In Part, Became" "THE FIRST SUFFOLK COUNTY COURT HOUSE-1684-1729"
(Location: Northwest corner, Main Street and Horton Lane, Southold) "After Suffolk County was organized in 1683, from the East Riding of Yorkshire, County Courts were held for 45 years in the upper story of the Horton House."

Sourc: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.29. 1960.

Barnabas Horton is buried at the Old Cemetery, now the Presbyterian Church Cem. located on Main Street in the middle of block from Horton Lane and across the street from Town Hall. Many other first settlers are buried at the reportedly the first cemetery in the State of New York. I visited there and the Horton Point Lighthouse as well as other historical landmarks.

Source: Mike J. Horton. 5/24/95.

"Barnabas Horton, the Baker."

Source: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.42. 1960.

"To Daniel H. Horton was handed down the celebrated Barnabas Horton Cask of 1640, which according to "Hortons In America" (genealogy book of 1929) was brought over from England by Barnabas filled with household goods (or legendary gold and silver which gave it its name of "Uncle Barney's Money Pot") The cask has recently been presented by Mr. Horton to Southold Historical Society."

Source: Southold Historical Society, "Guide To Historic Markers" pg.45. 1960.

Mary Langton [Parents] was born about 1615 in , Wisconsingston Magna, Leicestershire, England. She died on 22 Oct 1640 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She was buried in 1640 in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She married Barnabas Horton before 1636 in Mowsley, Leicestershire, England, England.

"The Hortons In America" by Adaline Horton White 1929

Mary (Langton) Horton is buried at the Old Cemetery, now the Presbyterian Church Cem. located on Main Street in the middle of block from Horton Lane and across the street from Town Hall. Many other first settlers are buried at the reportedly the first cemetery in the State of New York. I visited there and the Horton Point Lighthouse and other historical landmarks.

Source: Mike J. Horton. 5/24/95.

They had the following children:

  M i Caleb Horton
  M ii Joshua Horton Lt.
  M iii Jonathan Horton Capt.
  F iv Hannah Horton
  F v Sarah Horton
  F vi Mary Horton
  F vii Mercy Horton
  F viii Abigail Horton

Caleb Horton [Parents] was born in 1640 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He died on 3 Oct 1702 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He married Abigail Hallock on 23 Dec 1665 in Southold, Long Island, New York.

Other marriages:
Mapes, Esther or Hester

"...settled in Cutchogue, L.I., NY. He was accepted as a freeman of Caleb Horton CT, 1664. Land deeded to him by S. King the same year. In 1670 he is rated for 30 acres of land, 37 cattle, 5 horses, L282, and in 1683 his valuation was L350. In 1686 he has four males and six females in his family. His wife died 1702. He married second Esther_____."
"He was the first English child born at Southold, Long Island."

"The Hortons In America" by Adaline Horton White 1929, pg. 137.

Abigail Hallock [Parents] was born about 1642/1645 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She died on 7 Apr 1697 in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She was buried in 1697 in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She married Caleb Horton on 23 Dec 1665 in Southold, Long Island, New York.

Source: "Hortons In America, 1929" pg. 137.

They had the following children:

  M i Barnabas Horton
  M ii Jonathan Horton
  F iii Rachel Horton was born in 1669 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She died on 1 Apr 1697.
  M iv David Horton
  F v Mary Horton
  F vi Abigail Horton
  F vii Phebe Horton was born in 1678 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She died on 5 Dec 1706.
  F viii Esther Horton
  M ix Nathan Horton was born in 1670 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York.
  F x Hannah Horton was born about 1677 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York.

Barnabas Horton [Parents] was born on 23 Sep 1666 in , Cutchogue, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He died on 15 Nov 1705 in , , Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He was buried in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. He married Sarah Wines in 1686.

Source: The Hortons in America, by Adaline Horton White, 1929.

Source: Hays GLOVER, 4995 Mt. Olive Shores Dr., Polk City, FL 33868
via Prodigy Email pepb03a@prodigy.com, 7/18/95.

"...died December, 1696."

Source: Peggy (Smith) CORRIE, 25 Sycamore Court W., Homosassa, FL 34446-4523
(phone unlisted) via letter. 1/23/96. 2/14/96.

Sarah Wines [Parents] was buried in Old Bury Ground, Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York. She married Barnabas Horton in 1686.

She is called Sarah Hines. There is some confusion about the Hines
or Hinds/Haynes family and the Wines/Windes family. This needs
further research, as Sarah has been claimed to be either a Hines/Hynes
or a Wines/Whines.

Source: The Hortons in America, by Adaline Horton White, 1929.

Source: Hays GLOVER, 4995 Mt. Olive Shores Dr., Polk City, FL 33868
via Prodigy Email pepb03a@prodigy.com, 7/18/95.

Source: Desc. chart from Emperor Charlemagne, via Don W. Bridenstine. 8/22/95.
(34th generation descendant)

They had the following children:

  M i Caleb Horton
  M ii Barnabas Horton
  F iii Penelope Horton
  F iv Bethia Horton was born in , Southold, Suffolk Co. L.I., New York.

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