Chapter Twenty Four
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Chapter Twenty Four
WOOLSEY FAMILY



Family of George Woolsey, Sr.

FAMILY OF GEORGE WOOLSEY, SR.
GEORGE WOOLSEY, Sr. was born about 1584 in a small parish about 30 kilometers northwest of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk County, England. This parish is still known as Kirstead, but then included another neighboring, smaller parish and the two were known as “Langhale-cum-Kirstead”. Langhale or Langhall was once a parish church, but that church has long since been destroyed, as well as the early parish registers for both churches. Because these registers were destroyed, there are no baptism, marriage, or death records for this early period. George Woolsey, Sr. was apprenticed in 1604 to Nicholas Cuttinge, grocer, of Great Yarmouth. George served out his apprenticeship and was enrolled as a FREEMAN of Great Yarmouth in 1611, at which time he took on his younger brother Philip Woolsey, as an apprentice. As George, Sr. approached the end of his apprenticeship and anticipated his gaining his journeyman’s entry into the Guild of Grocers in Great Yarmouth, he married FRANCES ROBERTS, possibly of Great Yarmouth. They must of have been married in Langhale-cum-Kirstead as no record of their marriage has been found in Great Yarmouth, probably in the latter part of 1610. Frances Roberts was born abt 1590, possibly not in Norfolk County, England, as neither she nor her parents have been found in the many records searched of that county.
Children of George Woolsey, Sr. and Frances Roberts

Children of GEORGE WOOLSEY, SR. and FRANCES ROBERTS: i. JOHN WOOLSEY, christened 27 Oct 1611 at St. Nicholas Church, Great Yarmouth. He married in the Dutch Reformed Church in Rotterdam 8 Mar 1637 to Maeijke Fransdaughter. [Was he the John Wolsey who died before 20 May 1692 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York?] ii. ROBERT WOOLSEY, christened 13 Mar 1613 at St. Nicholas Church. iii. GEORGE WOOLSEY, christened 15 May 1616 at St. Nicholas Church, our “Immigrant Ancestor” iv. FRANCES WOOLSEY, born abt 1617, her christening has not been found but she married 20 Jul 1633 in the Reformed Dutch Church in Rotterdam as Francijntje Robberts Wolsey to Abraham Jansz Brouwer, “Single man”. v. It is possible there were other children, possibly born in Holland. At this time, the Dutch were leaders in world trade, and George, Sr. took his family to Rotterdam, Holland, sometime before 1623, where in that year, he was called a “tobacconist”, indicating an importer and trader. He remained in Rotterdam, in South Holland, until he died sometime during the week of 21 Oct and 28 Oct 1629. James W. Woolsey, of Richland, Washington, gave the following abstract of a probate administration in which the “last will and testament of Sir Joris Wolsey, English merchant” was mentioned, but Arie Noot, Dutch researcher, could not find the will, and unfortunately, James W. Woolsey did not “document” where he obtained this information. Mr. Hugo Pietersz an English minister in this town and Johan Sanders, English merchant, both living in this town, by the last will and testament of Sir Joris Wolsey, English merchant living in this town, written by Philips Versins, Notaris with witness, that after his death, in 1629, will take his children which have been handed over by their mother, Franchina Robbechtsdr. They accepted this responsibility 18 Dec 1630. Sometime after this date Frances Roberts married Robert Hunt, Merchant (probably English). From the Records of the Dutch Reformed Church, Rotterdam, Zuid Holland, Netherland (from Arie Noot), her death is noted: A coffin of 6 guilders for Fransijntije Woolsij, widow, from of the dreijbreg next to the kamerbewaerder in street.” The dreijbreg or draij brugge as it is spelled out on the city map of 1599 (nr 24) is a bridge that can be lifted to allow ships to pass. (In English a drawbridge.) The meaning of the word kamerbewaarder is not clear. It indicates “room /custodian” but does not explain whether this is referring to the location in the street or to the location within the house where she died, nor what is meant, in this case by that title.
Marriage of George Woolsey and Rebecca Cornell

George Wolsey Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New Amsterdam and New York “They throw a flood of light upon the genealogical and social history of New Amsterdam and New York” Marriages Trouw - Bouck Oft Register der PERSONEN die Hieringeschzoovon,ou Hier, oft Buyton defe Stadt New ~ Yorke Getrouwt zyn. Van den ll Oct. 1639 . totten 15 May 1652 Ad 1639. den 21 Occturb. Ao 1643 den 1 Sep Thomas Willet, j. m. Van Bristol in Engelt en Sara Cornell, j.d. Van Essex in Engelt. p. 14 [580] Ao 1647 den 3 dicto. (Nov) Carel Ver Brugge, j. m. Van Cantelberg, en Sara Cornelis, Wede Van Thomas Welert. den 9 Decemb. Jarge Woltzen, j. m. Van Jarmuijden, en Rebecca Cornel, j. d. Uijt oudt Engelandt. [Above are the marriages of the two sisters Sarah and Rebecca Cornel] Translation 1 Sep 1643 Thomas Willet, young man from Bristol in England and Sara Cornell, young girl or maiden from Essex in England. 3 Nov. [1647] Charles Bridges, young man from Canterbury, and Sara Cornel, widow of Thomas Willett. 9 Dec [1647] George Wolsey, young man from Yarmouth, and Rebecca Cornel, young woman of old England. RECORDS Baptisms from 25 Dec 1639 to 27 December 1730 “The rite of baptism is as old as the Christian religion. Being a custom and not, like marriage, a contract; being founded on moral aspiration and religious belief, and not on civil polity, the universality of it among our immigrant Holland ancestors bears striking testimony to their deep-rooted piety and earnest faith in God.” [The ministers during this period of time were: Everardus Bogardus, b. , d. 1647, served from 1633 - 1647. Johannes Backerus, b. , d. , served from 1647 - 1649 Joannes Megapolensis, b. 1603, d. 1670, served from 1649 - 1670 DOOP ~ BOECK. [Baptisms Book] [page, date] [ouders (parents)] [Kinders, (children) [Getuygen (sponsors, witnesses)] p. 27 [277] Ao 1650 den 7 Aug Joris Wolsij Sara Breyne Nuijting, Sara Van Brugge, Susanna Breser. p. 32 [283] Ao 1652 13 dict (Oct) Joris Wolsij Joris Carel Verbrugge in sijn huvs vr. Rebecca Hendrick, en Elsje Nuton p. 52 [306] Ao 1659 den 4 Apr Tjaerts Wolsij Rebecca Carel Verbrugge, Rebecca Cornel p. 59 [313] Ao 1661 den 16 dicto (Jan) Joris Wolsij Johannes Thomas Hall p. 72 [326] Ao 1663 den 19 dicto (Mart) Joris Wolsij Marritie Carel Van Brugge, Maritie Jacobs Rebecca Varrivanger The Dutch “y” is little “i”, little “j” or “ij”. Now to us it looks like it should be pronounced “ij” but that is the Dutch “y” and is pronounced “e”. Thus Wolsij would be pronounced Wolsey. The J in Joris is not sounded as in English, so Joris would be pronounced “Youris.” So Joris Wolsij would be pronounced as “Youris Volsee”. “Tjaerts” is a dialect or local pronunciation, as “Yertz” so it is pronounced “Yertz Volsee”. It is more of a nick-name or a term of endearment, as we would say John, then “ Johnny.” God Parents and Witnesses p. 24 [271] Ao 1648 den 26 Apr Hendrick Bresart Rebecca Joris Wolsie, Jan Dalij, Jonas Nuijting, Rebecca Wolsie p. 34 [285] Ao 1653 den 20 d. (Apr) Rendel Huwits _______ Thomas Hall, Joris Wolsij, Elsje Nuton, Britje Baxster p. 65 [319] Ao 1662 Eodem. (2 Jul) Richard Cornell Elisabeth Georgie Wolsij, Sara Bridge A. Now there are three baptisms that must be accounted for: 1. Thomas Woolsey He is definitely mentioned in his fatherìs will. He has a definite date of birth (or baptism) but Wilford has not yet found his baptism date. 2. Mary Woolsey It appears as though there is another baptism for a Mary Woolsey, daughter of George and Rebecca, but at a later time. We will discuss this later. 3. William Woolsey There definitely is a William Woolsey, baptized at the same time as Mary Woolsey, above. These two will be discussed at the same time, later. B. At the same time, we will be discussing the interesting little document that the sheriff of Jamaica was required to submit in 1686, concerning various happenings in his district for the past seven years from 1679 to 1686. We will discuss this later.
Baptisms in New Amsterdam

BAPTISMS IN NEW AMSTERDAM JORIS WOLSY WOLSY, Joris, came to New Amsterdam in 1647; md 9 Dec 1647, in New Amsterdam [Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church], Rebecca Cornell. Issue: Sara, bp. 7 Aug 1650; Joris, bp 18 Oct 1652; Rebecca, bp 4 Apr 1659; Johannes, bp 16 Jan 1661; Maritje, bp 19 Mar 1664 - all at New Amsterdam [New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church]; and William and Marritje, bp 30 Jun 1678, at Flatbush [Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church]; by which it may be inferred he resided there at that date. There was, as per p. 128 of Vol. IV. of the Genealogical Record, a George Woolsey, an English boy, b in 1610, who had resided with his parents in Rotterdam, came over in a Dutch vessel with emigrants in 1623 and went to Plymouth, MA, (www does not agree with the 1610 and 1623 dates) and in 1647 made his appearance in New Amsterdam. In 1648 he was a fire-warden in said city. In 1661 there was a George Woolsey among the freeholders of Jamaica, and in the beginning of the 18th century there were Woolsey, probably descendants of Joris or George, residing in Flatlands. Signed his name “Joris Wolsy.”
Reformed Dutch Church Baptisms in New Amsterdam

JORIS [TJAERTS] WOLSY From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New York, we find these early Baptisms: [2:24] 26 Apr 1648, bapt. Rebecca d/o Hendrick Bresart Witnesses: Joris Wolsie, Jan Daly, Jonas Nuyting, Rebecca Wolsie. [2:27] 7 Aug 1650, bapt Sara d/o Joris Wolsy Witnesses: Breyne Nuyting, Sarah Van Brugge, Susan Bresea. [2:32] 13 Oct 1652, bapt Joris s/o Joris Wolsy, Rebecca Witnesses: Carel Verbugge, & spouse, Hendrick an Elsje, his spouse. [2:34] 20 Apr 1653, bapt _____ Rendel Huwits Witnesses: Britze Bax, Thomas Hall, Joris Wolsy, Elsje Nuton. [2:52] 4 Apr 1659, bapt. Rebecca d/o Tjaerts Wolsy Witnesses: Carel Verbugge, Rebecca Cornell [2:59] 16 Jan 1661, bapt Johannes s/o Joris Wolsy Witnesses: Thomas Hall [2:65] 2 Jul 1662, bapt Elisabeth d/o Richard Cornell Witnesses: Georgie Wolsy, Sarah Bridges [2:72] 19 Mar 1664, bapt Marretie d/o Joris Wolsy, Rebecca Witnesses: Carl Van Brugge, Marretie Jacoba Van Awange? Joris and Rebecca Woolsey had two children baptized in the Dutch Reformed church at Flatbush, Kings Co, NY. The record indicates that the children were not infants. [119] 30 Jun 1678 Wm & Maritje (of reasonable age) Joris and Rebecca Woolsey Flatbush (being reasonably old) Joris = Yourse = George Tjaert = Jertz = George
An Account of the Ages of Mr. George Woolsey's Children

The following was received 1 Jul 1998 from the Editor of the NYG&B Record, Harry Macy: New York Public Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts Division James Riker Papers, Memoria vol. 30, p. 187. “Extracts from an old manuscript book formerly belonging to Capt. William Hallett of Newtown (who died in 1729 age 81) and now in possession of one of his descendants, Marvin R. Briggs of New York, 1851. An Acount of the agees of Mr George Woolseys Children Sarah Woolsey was born in New York August y 3 in ye year 1650 Au 7 she was Baptized in ye English church by Mr. Denton Capt Newton godfather George Woolsey was born in New York October ye 10 1652. October ye 12 he was baptized in ye Dutch Church Mrs. Newton godmother Thomas Woolsey was born at Hemsted April ye 10 1655 & then Baptized by Mr. Denton Rebeckah Woolsey was born at New York February ye 13 1659 febr: 16 she was Baptized in ye Dutch Church Mr. Briges godfather and her grandmother godmother John Woolsey was born at New York January ye 12, 1661. January ye 16 baptized in ye Dutch Church Thomas Hall godfather William Woolsey was born in Jamaca on ye Isleand Nassau October ye 12 1665 Mary Woolsey was born at Jamaca on ye Isleand Nassau September ye 8 1673 An account of the ages of the children of William Hallett William Hallett born at Jamaca December ye 10 1670 Sarah “ ” “ March ye 19 1673 Rebeckah “ ” “ August ye 31 1675 Joseph “ ” “ March ye 4 1678 Moses “ ” Halletts Cove January ye 19 1681 George “ ” “ April ye 5 1683 Charity “ ” “ March ye 16 1685 Mary “ ” “ October ye 22 1687 Elizabeth “ ” “ April ye 12 1689 Richard “ ” “ November the 17 1689 Capt William Hallett Esqr Departed this life on Munday August the 18th 1729 aged 81/82” Some Comments on Woolsey-Hallett record from Riker Papers (by Harry Macy) This had to be compiled after 1664 as it refers to the city as New York, not New Amsterdam. Most likely William Hallett copied it from a Woolsey bible or other record after he married Sarah Woolsey. Sarah was baptized in the Dutch Church on the date indicated; Mr Denton at that time would have been pastor of the English Church in Newtown (Middleburgh) on Long Island. New Amsterdam Dutch Church records show baptisms of George, Rebecca, and John but not all the dates match. They also show another daughter Marritie in 1664, not on this list. The last two childrenìs baptisms are in the Flatbush Dutch Church records in 1678, where it is indicated that they were not infants, (of reasonable age). The birthdates of the Hallett children are in NYGBR 6:28 with one difference, and without the places of birth.
English Puritans in New York City

ENGLISH PURITANS In New York City in the Seventeenth Century By Prof. Charles A. Briggs, D.D. In an early account book, which has been handed down in my fatherìs family, and which is now in my possession, dating the seventeenth century, occur the following records: Sarah Woolsey was born in New York, August ye 3d, in ye year 1650 Aug. 7, she was baptized in ye English church by Mr. Denton, Capt. Newtown, godfather. George Woolsey was born in New York, October 10, 1652; October 12 he was baptized in the Dutch church, Mrs. Newton, godmother. Thomas Woolsey was born at Hemsted, April 10, 1655, and there baptized by Mr. Denton. Rebeckah Woolsey was born at New York, 13 Feb 1659. Feb. 16 she was baptized in the Dutch church. Mr. Bridges, godfather, and her grandmother, godmother, etc. Several times these records had passed under my eye; but not thinking of dates or ecclesiastical history, I innocently supposed that the two churches referred to in New York City were the Dutch Reformed and the English Episcopal. During the past Winter, however, my attention has been called to the origin of Presbyterianism in New York, and these ancient records assumed a new meaning. They disclose a very interesting and long forgotten chapter of ecclesiastical history in our metropolis and our empire state. [In the following, long continued mistakes are printed in bold type. www] George Woolsey was the son of the Rev. Benjamin Woolsey, a pastor of the English church in Rotterdam, Holland, the successor of Dr. Wm. Ames. He was a Puritan emigrant from Yarmouth, England. George, the son, came over in a Dutch vessel to Plymouth in 1623; but soon after, with Isaac Allerton, removed to Manhattan Island, where they established themselves as merchants. He Married, Dec. 9th, 1647, Rebeckah Cornell, a sister of Sarah Cornell, whose first husband was Thomas Willett, formerly of Bristol, England, and whose second husband was Charles Bridges, the gentleman mentioned in the register. (“Whitakerìs Southhold.”p. 250.) Captain Newtown, the godfather, was the celebrated military officer of Governor Stuyvesant, who became one of the original proprietors of Jamaica, Long Island. Sarah, the eldest child, whose baptism is first recorded, married Capt. William Hallett, of Hallettìs Cove, L. I., whose father, William, had come from Dorsetshire, England, to Greenwich, Conn., and thence to Hallettìs Cove, L. I. He was a sturdy Puritan, and was deposed from this office as sheriff in 1656, and fined and imprisoned, by Governor Stuyvesant, “for entertaining Rev. Wickenden from Rhode Island, allowing him to preach at his house and receiving the sacrament of the Lordìs Supper from his hands.” (See Rikerìs Newtown,” p. 403.) Mr. Denton, the minister who baptized Sarah in New York in 1650 and Thomas at Hempstead in 1655, was Richard Denton, the English Presbyterian, who came to America from Halifax, England, in 1630 “ .... some Independents, also man of our persuasion, and Presbyterians. They had also a Presbyterian preacher named Richard Denton, an honest, pious, liberal man.” Richard Denton seems to have ministered also to a little flock of Puritans in New Amsterdam (now New York City). We note that it is said that the baptism of Sarah Woolsey took place in the English church. There can be no mistake here; for English is contrasted with the Dutch of the next baptism, and Richard Denton, the English Presbyterian, officiates. We have examined the records of the Reformed Church and find the entry: Sara Wolsey baptized Aug. 7. Getuygen. - Brejne Neuting, Sara Van Brugge, Susanna Breser.” This entry does not mention the officiating minister. Indeed, this registry of baptisms is not the original list, but a copy made by Dominie Selyns of all the baptisms in the church up to his pastorate, 1682. We do not understand by English church a distinct edifice from the Dutch church, but that an English Puritan church worshiped alongside of the French and the Dutch churches in the one church building then existing within the fort at New Amsterdam. That there was such an English Puritan church at the time, and even earlier, is clear from abundant evidence. Francis Doughty, an English Presbyterian minister, son of a Bristol alderman, and probably vicar of Godberry, Gloucester, who was silenced for nonconformity, was one of the original settlers of Taunton, Mass., in 1637. He removed from New England because he differed from the Taunton church in holding that children of baptized parents, whether these were communicants or not, were Abrahamìs children and ought to be baptized. He sought a home among the Dutch and received the conveyance of Mespat (now Newtown), L. I., with the view of establishing a Puritan colony from New England. The settlement was begun, but was soon destroyed by the Indians, and the minister and his flock were driven into Manhattan Island for shelter during the war. He officiated as minister to the English Puritans in our infant city for several years, from 1643 to 1648 (“Doc. Hist. N.Y.” I, 426; “Rikers Newtown,” p. 20), and was supported by public contributions from the English with the assistance of the Dutch. His daughter was married to Adrien Van der Donck, a prominent lawyer in the city. Governors Kieft and Stuyvesant did not interfere with his preaching. They rather favored it, but they were indignant at Doughty, and persecuted him because he would not give up his claims on Mespat. This case was the subject of complaint in a representation from New Netherland, published in 1650, subscribed by Van der Donck and others, which Stuyvesant was compelled to answer to the authorities of Holland. Doughty was glad to escape from the arbitrary governor, and went into Maryland and became the first Presbyterian minister in that colony and in Virginia. This fact has recently been brought to light by Edward D. Neill, in his valuable historical monographs. Doughty preached in Lower Accomac County, on the eastern shore of Virginia, where his brother-in-law, William Stone, resided, in 1650. He was at Patuxent in 1659 at a dinner given to the Dutch ambassadors, and also preached for a time in Westmoreland County, Virginia. He was more than thirty years prior to Makemie in Maryland and Virginia and deserved the credit of being the first Presbyterian minister not only in New York City, but also in Maryland and Virginia. He preached to the little flocks here and there, which were subsequently gathered, from thirty to fifty years later, into church organizations. Driven from one place by intolerance he fled to another, and carried on his Masterìs work in spite of difficulties of every kind. The English church to which Doughty ministered in New Amsterdam . . . the vacant charge. He was intolerant to the Lutherans and the Independents, and was rebuked for it by the West India Company (“Corwinìs Manual,” p. 379). The English Puritans demanded services of their own, and kept together during the times of Doughty and Denton. The Dutch saw it to be good policy to satisfy them. Accordingly Samuel Drusius, who had been pastor of the Dutch church of Austin Friars, London, and who could preach in French and English, was called to assist Megapolensis. In 1652 he began his work, and was very acceptable to the Puritans. We see no reason to doubt that the English service was continued in the one church alongside of the Dutch and the French, for the benefit of the Puritan population. The establishment of the Church of England worship by the chaplain in the fort in 1678, after the English conquest, doubtless drew some from their numbers. And the establishment of the Church of England, in 1694, supported by the Tory governors, tended to weaken them. Yet the Rev. John Miller, the Episcopal rector, on his return to London in 1695, reports that there were 40 families of English Dissenters in the city; and we learn from Episcopal sources that the Congregation of Trinity church was in large part of those who preferred the Presbyterian order, but who worshiped there, having no other place to go to. (See Baird, “Magazine of American History, 1879.” p. 605.) In 1707, Francis Makemie and John Hampton, two Presbyterian ministers on their way to Boston, were invited by the New York Puritans to preach for them. The Consistory of the Dutch church, in accordance with their generous custom, offered their church edifice for the purpose; but their kindness was prevented by the tyranny of Governor Conburg. However, Makemie preached in the private house of William Jackson, in Pearl Street, and baptized a child there, and Hampton went to Newtown, L. I., and preached there. They were arrested and put on trial by the arbitrary act of the governor; but he was obliged to release them; for it was shown that they had violated no law. A narrative of this trial was published by Makemie, and the affair noised abroad as an act of unjustifiable persecution; it was made a great deal of by Presbyterian lawyers in subsequent times. Otherwise, it might have been forgotten that Makemie preached that sermon and baptized that child. We have no reason to suppose that the serviced rendered by Doughty, Denton and Makemie to the Puritans of our city were the only ones in those early times. We should not be surprised if it should be found that several other Presbyterian and Congregational ministers conducted services for the Puritan population of our metropolis between the time of Denton and that of Makemie. It is noteworthy that there is the same connection between the Puritans of our city and the Long Island towns in the time of Makemie as we have observed in the times of Doughty and Denton. The Puritan families were intermarried, and the connection continued to be intimate during the seventeenth family. The names which meet us in the early records of the Puritans of Long Island again appear among the founders of the Presbyterian Church in New York in the early part of the eighteenth century. The Halletts, the Woolseys, the Jacksons, the Youngs, the Van Hornes and Smiths were the nucleus of Puritanism in both places. Union Theological Seminary.
George "Tjaerts" Woolsey

Tjaerts Wolcy 1610 - 1698 George Wolsey of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England and Nieu Amsterdam New Amsterdam to Jamaica, Long Island, New York January 24, 2006 Murray, Utah 84107 Joris Wolsey Tjaerts, also known as Joris Wolsey, which is how he signed his name, first appears in the New York records in 1646. George is the anglicized version of the Dutch Tjaerts roughly (pronounced Yeartz) or Joris (pronounced Yoris). 1646 12 Apr. Joris Wolsie, appearing for Tomas Willit, plaintiff, vs. Cornelis Tonisen, defendant, for the balance of the purchase money of a house. Ordered that defendant may not sell the house until Tomas Willitìs wife is paid. [p. 251] 1646 31 May 1646. The fiscal, plaintiff, vs. Jorse Wolsy, defendant. Plaintiff, having seized some powder which was not entered, demands its confiscation. Defendant says that it belongs to Allerton, his master, and requests delay until his master shall have come back from New England, which is granted him. [IBID. p. 255] [Artwork ] Whereas for some years past all free traders here in New Netherland have duty on all peltries purchased and bartered by them here and exported to the fatherland by every opportunity of ships, the council have therefore considered it highly necessary to established a fixed duty, in order that each person may know what impost he has to pay. Therefore, it is resolved that the duty shall be computed as follows; On every exported merchantable beaver skin shall be paid 15 stivers, two halves being counted as one whole and three drielings as two whole beavers; on each other and bear skin 15 stivers; on each elk hide 15 stivers, and on the other furs of less value according to circumstances. Thus done in Council. Present: The honorable Dir Willem Kieft, late director; Mr. Dincklagen, Mr. La Mongagne, Lt. Nuton, Paulus Leenersz, commissary of naval stores & Jan Claesz Bol. 23 Jul 1847. Jan Dollinghj from Bristol, aged about 32 years, being legally summoned to court, declares that when Mr. Brattonìs bark a short time ago was about to sail, it was found that Mr. Bratton aforesaid must pay 50 Carolus guilders duty on the goods which were sold by him here. Fiscal van Dyck came and demanded the aforesaid duty and said to Mr. Bratton: “Fifty guilders is too much for the honorable Company; give the Company 30 guilders and me ten guilders.” The deponent declares that he paid the said ten guilders to the fiscal in seawan in the Great Tavern and handed him a note for 30 guilders for the Company in payment of the duty. The deponent declares that he heard from Joris Wolsey and Ritchert Clof that Mr. Tomas Willet made the above named fiscal a present of a veaver on condition that he should not inspect his bark. Thus done in council in Fort Amsterdam, dated as above. Richard Clof from Manchester, aged 40 years, being legally summoned to court, declares that he heard Mr. Willet say that the honorable fiscal came to inspect the bark of the said Willet. The aforesaid Willet said in the deponentìs presence in the house of Isaack Allerton that he said to Fiscal van Dyck when he came on board to make his inspection that it was too much trouble to open the hold and to overhaul things and that in doing so he would lose much time. He promised to give Fiscal van Dyck a beaver if he would not inspect. Deponent further declares that Gorge Wolsey carried a veaver. The deponent asked where he was going with it. Wolsey answered, he was going to take the beaver to Fiscal van Dyck. [IBID, p., 320.] 1647 23 July Declaration of George Woolsey that Fiscal van Dyck accepted a bribe from Thomas Willett to let his bark sail without inspection. [160d] At the request of the Honorable Director General Petrus Stuyvesant and the council of New Netherland Gorge Wolsey, aged about twenty-six years, from Yarmouth in Old England, attests, testifies and declares in the presence of Captain Lieutenant Nuton (Captain Bryan Newton) and Jan Claessen Bol, captain of the ship De Princes, in place and with promise of a solemn oath if need be, that on the Saturday last Fiscal van Dyck came on board Mr. Tomas Willitìs bark to inspect it and [he, the deponent,] heard the above mentioned Mr. Willit say at Mr. Isaac Allertonìs house that because he must be away he had presented the above named Fiscal van Dyck with a beaver, in order that he would not lose his time by clearing things away and in order that the fiscal would be content to let him sail unhindered; which beaver he, Gorge Wolsey, placed in the hands of the said fiscal himself. The deponent,m in the presence of the aforesaid councilors, declares this to be true and offers to confirm the same on oath. Done in Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland, the 23d of July A◦. 1647. [signed] Joris Wolsy. Acknowledged before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary. 1647 16 Aug I, Thomas Robertson have sold to George Wolsey a house and plantation standing and situate in Flushing and the main bounds are to be seen in the book of the Town of Flushing; together with all the grain that is now on it and everything that that is fastened by earth and nail, for the sum of one hundred and thirty guilders which is now paid me. Wherefore I convey in true and real property the said land and house to said Wolsey or his successors. In token of the truth this is signed by Thomas Robertson in the presence of Jan Damen as witness, the 16th of August Ad 1647, in Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland. This is the mark of Thomas Robertson made by himself. J. Vinje. 1648 23 Jan. Whereas the honorable director general of New Netherland, Curacao and the islands thereof, and the honorable council, have by experience seen and observed that some careless people neglect to keep their chimneys clean by sweeping and do not pay attention oth their fires, whereby recently fire broke out in two houses and greater damage is to be expected in the future by fire, the more so as houses here in New Amsterdam are for the most part built of wood and thatched with reed, besides which the chimneys of some of the houses are of wood, which is most dangerous; therefore, the honorable general and council have considered it advisable and most expedient to provide herein, Wherefore the said honorable general and council ordain, enact and command, as they hereby do, that henceforth no chimney shall be built of wood or lath and plaster in any house between the fort and the Freshwater, but those already erected may remain until further order and pleasure of the fire-wardens. And in order that the foregoing shall be well observed, the following are appointed fire-wardens: from the honorable council, Commissary Adrisen dìKeyser, and from the commonalty, Tomas Hall, Martin Cregier and Gorger Wolsey, with power at their pleasure to inspect the chimneys of all houses situated and standing within this city between this fort and the Freshwater, to see if they are kept well cleaned by sweeping. And if any one be found negligent, he shall, every time the aforesaid fire-wardens make an inspection and find the chimneys foul, pay them forthwith, without any contradiction,m a fine of three guilders for every flue found on examination to be dirty, to be applied to the maintenance of fire ladders, hooks and buckets, which shall be procured and provided at the earliest and most convenient opportunity, and if any oneìs house be burned or be the cause of fire, either through negligence or his own fire, he shall forfeit twenty-five guilders, to be applied as above. Thus done and enacted at Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland, and published the 23d of January. 1648. [IBID. p. 357ff.]ì][ 1652 Cornelys de Potter, plaintiff, representing his maid servant, against Isaack Allerton and Jorys Woolsy; the plaintiff complains against a certain Ralph Clarck who had deceived his maid, Willemmeyntien, with a promise of marriage. [p. 54] 1652 Carel Gabry, plaintiff, against Joorys Wolsly; the plaintiff requests payment for rope sold by Augustyn Herman to Prince, governor in the South River, for which Isaack Allerton is security together with the agent of the aforesaid Prince. The director and council refer them to the judgment dated 31 Oct. [Council minutes missing for that time period.] [ibid. p. 57]
George 'Joris' Woolsey

JORIS WOLSY WOLSY, Joris, came to New Amsterdam in 1647; md 9 Dec 1647, in New Amsterdam [Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church], Rebecca Cornell. Issue: Sara, bp. 7 Aug 1650; Joris, bp 18 Oct 1652; Rebecca, bp 4 Apr 1659; Johannes, bp 16 Jan 1661; Maritje, bp 19 Mar 1664 - all at New Amsterdam [New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church]; and William and Marritje, bp 30 Jun 1678, at Brooklyn [Brooklyn Dutch Reformed Church]; by which it may be inferred he resided there at that date. There was, as per p. 128 of Vol. IV. of the Genealogical Record, a George Woolsey, an English boy, b in 1610, who had resided with his parents in Rotterdam, came over in a Dutch vessel with emigrants in 1623 and went to Plymouth, MA, and in 1647 made his appearance in New Amsterdam. In 1648 he was a fire-warden in said city. In 1661 there was a George Woolsey among the freeholders of Jamaica, and in the beginning of the 18th century there were Woolsey, probably descendants of Joris or George, residing in Flatlands. Signed his name “Joris Wolsy.”
Early Baptisms

JORIS [TJAERTS] WOLSY From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New York, we find these early Baptisms: [2:24] 26 Apr 1648, bapt. Rebecca d/o Hendrick Bresart Witnesses: Joris Wolsie, Jan Daly, Jonas Nuyting, Rebecca Wolsie. [2:27] 7 Aug 1650, bapt Sara d/o Joris Wolsy Witnesses: Breyne Nuyting, Sarah Van Brugge, Susan Bresea. [2:32] 13 Oct 1652, bapt Joris s/o Joris Wolsy, Rebecca Witnesses: Carel Verbugge, & spouse, Hendrick an Elsje, his spouse. [2:34] 20 Apr 1653, Rendel Huwits Witnesses: Britze Bax, Thomas Hall, Joris Wolsy, Elsje Nuton. [2:52] 4 Apr 1659, bapt. Rebecca d/o Tjaerts Wolsy Witnesses: Carel Verbugge, Rebecca Cornell [2:59] 16 Jan 1661, bapt Johannes s/o Joris Wolsy Witnesses: Thomas Hall [2:65] 2 Jul 1662, bapt Elisabeth d/o Richard Cornell Witnesses: Georgie Wolsy, Sarah Bridges [2:72] 19 Mar 1664, bapt Marretie d/o Joris Wolsy, Rebecca Witnesses: Carl Van Brugge, Marretie Jacoba Van Awange? Joris = Yourse = George Tjaert = Jertz = George
George Woolsey

GEORGE WOOLSEY Our immigrant Woolsey Ancestor appears to be one George Woolsey of Yarmouth or Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. Born 27 Oct 1610, he and his parents moved to Holland when he was a young lad, where his father worked for a Dutch Company. In Rotterdam, he quickly picked up the Dutch language, and was a big help in his fatherìs business. He came to Salem in 1623, age 13.New Amsterdam Map This map shows New Amsterdam, Flatlands, Jamaica Bay, Brooklyn, Bedford, Newtown Creek, each a place where these early Woolseys (Wolsys) lived. Perhaps one can get one's bearing from Staten Island and Coney Island at the bottom of the map.
George Woolsey in New Amsterdam

GEORGE WOLSEY IN NEW AMSTERDAM, 1661 George Wolsey's wife Rebecca Cornell had a sister Sara Cornell who married Thomas Willett, “The soldier”, not to be confused with the more noted and longer living Thomas Willett, the first mayor of New York City. Thomas Willett “The soldierìs” , home in New Amsterdam was on the then East River bank immediately east of the Great Tavern which soon became the Stadt Huys or City Hall of the time. It was located in the present block bounded by Pearl Street [Willettìs plot was at the present #75-89 Pear Street, per Icon., IV-104] (once the thoroughfare along the waterside and at this section called Dock Street), Coenties Alley, and Stone Street (formerly called Hoogh, then Duke Street), New York City. There is evidence that Willett occupied this plot earlier than its formal grant to him on 4 Jul 1645. Seven houses are pictured thereon in the graphic 1660 Castello Plan of New Amsterdam. The chain of title to this land provides conclusive evidence of Thomas and Sara (Cornell) Willettìs immediate descendants, and of their separate identiy from the family of Capt. Thomas Willett who was mayor in 1665 and died in 1674. [Hoff, p. 702-703] 2 Jan 1645. Thomas Willett sold to Cornelis Teunison a lot and house on Manhattan adjoining the Public Tavern for 775 guilders; he took a mortgage on the house. 7 Dec 1645 he won a judgment against Teunison for the balance on the purchase of the house (Icon., IV-103; Cal.D., pp. 31 & 98). 4 Jul 1645. Groundbrief granted by the West India Company to Thomas Willet, no recorded (but see below). Same date groundbrief to Ritsaert Smidt for lot on Manhattan Island next to Thomas Willetìs (HS 1901,p.172.) 11 Jul 1667. Confirmation by Governor Nicolls to Charles Bridges, recites the July 1645 groundbrief to Thomas Willet and also the marriage of Sarah, widow of Thomas Willet, to Charles Bridges; lying todward the East River to the East of the present State House 8 rods 2 feet, before, towards the Wall [Waal in this context means Wharf; see 1645 grant to Smith in Icon., ibid.) and the waterside, 14 rods 5 feet; on the east side next to Mr. Smithìs 6 rods 5 feet, and on the north side behind to the Highway 9 rods 8 feet 4 inches, amounting in all to 89 rods 6 ft. (Icon., II-404 from Patents II-47). Corner lots on west end of Willett patent: 16 Apr 1661. Sale by Charles Bridges to (his wifeìs brother-in-law) George Wolsey, not recorded. Was in Wolseyìs possession by 1660. 11 Feb 1666. Confirmation by Gov. Nicolls to George Wolsey, reciting the above sale, lot bounded to East by Charles Bridges, 34' x 92' x 24' x 92'. Feb 1669. Sale by George Wolsey to William Pattison; confiscated 1673. Oct 1673. Regrant to Lodowyck Pos (Icon., II-319 & 404, from records.) 1680 Capt. John Young, High Sheriffe of Yorkshire on Long Island His Account of Ye Country Rates for ye Year 1680. Flushing ..... To George Wolsey ₤ 07.00.00 21 Jan 1684. Lodowick Post of NYC sold a slip he had obtained 26 Mar 1681 from Sarah Bridges. Sale to Tobias Ten Eycke and Conrade Ten Eycke, Jr., both of NYC, slip of ground in NYC between the house and ground where said Tobias now liveth and the house and ground whereon the widow of Clement Sybrak now liveth by the East River, runs along the water 4' 2", then northward along Tobias Ten Eyckeìs to his corner where said slip comes to nothing (NYD 13-62). 4 Sep 1686. Will of Coenradt Ten Eyck of N.Y., proved 5 Apr 1687, son Tobias to have 1 yearìs rent of my 2 houses; my 3 sons Dirck, Tobias and Coenradt to have preference as to my tannery, etc. (NYHS-W 1-143.) 12 Apr 1687. Sale by Lodwick Post of NYC, joyner and wife Agnelia, for ₤30, to Tobias Teneyck of N.Y.C. Shoemaker and Conrade Teneyck of same shoemaker, all that Toft of ground whereon the houses of ye said Tobias and Conrade are no erected and built in NYC, on ye south side of said city near ye Strat or waterside. Memorandum it is agreed between the agove parties that this conveyance only contains sale of so much of the land whereon ye within mentioned houses are said to stand as is patented to said Lodwick Post (NYD 13-288). Corner lots on east end of Willett patent: 16 Apr 1661. Sale by Carel Van Brugge, burgher and inhabitant of this city, by virtue of a 4 Jul 1645 groundbrief, to Solomon La Chair, lot bounded west by the house and lot of said van Brugge, 77' 6" x 24' x 77' 6" x 24'. This lot was in La Chairìs possession by 1658 when he built a house thereon and was worried about right to adjoining alley of Richard Smithìs. 24 Sep 1661. Sale by Solomon La Chair to Oloff Stevenson Van Cortlant, bounded west by house of Carel van Brugge, north by house of said La Chair, east by the lane and south by the Waal. 1667. Confirmation to Van Cortlandt, reciting the 1661 deed by La Chair. La Chair died 1662-63 still owning the northern portion of the lot, which: 9 Jun 1666, his administrators sold the small house on Hoogh Street to Ariaen van Laer. Jan 1667. Ariaen van Laer sold it to Cornelius Jansen Ooost (Icon., II-321 & 404, from the records.) 12 Dec 1688. Will of John Darvell of NYC, merchant, proved 5 Mar 1688/9 bequeaths all to his wife Catharine (NYHS-W 1-183). Undated will of Andries Teller, Sr., of NYC, merchant, proved 9 Nov 1702, wife Sophia to be in possession of all my estate while widow, my daughter Margaret after her motherìs death shall enjoy the rent and profit of my house that stands behind that I now live in dudring her life; etc. executors include brother-in-law Jacobus Van Cortlandt. (Editorìs note identifies the house lived in by testator as present #87 Pearl Street, and the house from which daughter Margaret was to benefit as fronting on Stone Street (NYHS-W 1-352). Willett patent on 1677 tax list and in 1679-80 Labadist view of NYC: #47 Lodowick Post #48 vacant. not on 1677 tax list. belonged to Thomas Willett. #49 house of Charles van Brugh, occupied by Clement the Cooper - in 1677. #50 house of Charles van Brugh, next to John Darvallìs. #51 John Darvall on the 1677 tax list (Icon., I-228) Central lots in the Willett patent: 7 Jan 1686. John Lawrence of Flushing and wife Sarah gave a release to Thomas Willett of Flushing, reciting that because of controversies between them concerning the moyety of certain lands in NYC to the east of City Hall between the houses of John Darvall and Conrad Ten Eyck to which said Moyety said John and Sarah did claim title, the three submitted to arbitration 30 Mar 1685, and in performance of the resulting judgment, said John Lawrence and his wife Sarah released to said Willett all their right to said Moyety or half part of said shouses and lands (NYD 13-294). 13 Nov 1698 and 10th year of the reign of King William (recorded 22 Mar 1700), Thomas Willett of Flushing in Queens Co, and William Willett of Westchester, son of said Thomas , are firmly bound unto George Heathcote of NYC, merchant, ₤560; the condition of said obligation that they acquit, and indemnify the said Heathcote “of and from all and all manner of action, suits . . . and demands to be brought . . . or made by or from or under John Lawrence Junior the son of John Lawrence of the City of New York, merchant, deceased or any other person” by reason of any of the covenants in a certain lease from Charles Briges and his wife Sarah to said Heathcote on 7 May 1682, for a dwelling house in New York City between the house of Andries Teller and the house of Jacob Dekey now or late in possession of George Heathcote (NYD 23-165). Then follows deeds that name the daughters and their husbands, of Thomas Willett, Jr., son of Thomas Willett, decìd, and Sarah Cornel.
George Woolsey's Land Transactions

GEORGE WOOLSEY LAND TRANSACTIONS George ‘Joris’ Woolsey, our intrepid and adventurous Immigrant Ancestor was baptized 15 May 1616 in St. Nicholas Church in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk County, England, along with two of his brothers, sons of George Woolsey Sr. and Frances Roberts. George Woolsey Sr. is later referred to as a “grocer” and a “tobbaconist”, probably meaning he was a trader in commodities. While George ‘Joris’ Woolsey was still a young boy [abt 1621-1622], his father moved the family to Rotterdam, South Holland, where he was active in trading, “groceries” and ‘tobacco’. However, George Sr. died in 1629, (the week of 21-28 Oct) leaving his widow and young children in this foreign country. Frances married again and the children seem to have been ‘farmed’ out. In the meantime, George ‘Joris’ Woolsey had been going to school and learning to write and speak the Dutch language, in which he became quite proficient. There is reason to infer that George ‘Joris’ Woolsey was in New Amsterdam by about 1643, [see Note below]. Isaac Allerton, of the MAYFLOWER and Plymouth Colony fame came to New Amsterdam in 1643, having been hired by the Dutch to represent them in the New England Colonies. It was probably here in New Amsterdam that Isaac Allerton and George ‘Joris’ Woolsey first met, although it is possible that Allerton and George ‘Joris’ may have met in Rotterdam. Allerton needed someone with whom he could work, who had a good understanding of Dutch, to handle his Dutch accounts and George ‘Joris’ Woolsey was that young man, who was mentioned at least three times in Allerton’s Will. George ‘Joris’ Woolsey probably was living in the Dutch Fort at New Amsterdam, when he met the young and beautiful and extremely marriageable Rebecca Cornell, daughter of Thomas Cornell and Rebecca ____ [Briggs?]. By this time, George ‘Joris’ was doing well financially so he purchased a “house and plantation” in Flushing, Long Island, from Thomas Robertson 16 Aug 1647, (for 130 guilders) giving George ‘Joris’ time to harvest the grain crop and to fix up the plantation, to which he would bring his new bride after their marriage 9 Dec 1647, in the Dutch Reformed Church, at the Dutch Fort in New Amsterdam. Thomas Willett [the soldier and not the mayor], who married, in 1643, Rebecca Cornell’s sister, Sarah Cornell, received a grant of land in 1645 from the Dutch for his military services. Thomas Willett sold a parcel of this grant to his brother-in-law, George ‘Joris’ Woolsey, some time before 1660, precisely when it is difficult to say [possibly about 1650?], but George ‘Joris’ Woolsey is mentioned in the New Amsterdam records quite frequently and so it is possible he had a ‘town house’ located east of the ‘Great Tavern’ which became the ‘Stadt Hyse’ or ‘City Hall’ and a country ‘plantation’ located in Flushing. He had children baptized near both locations. 1643 NEW AMSTERDAM 01. 1639 - Isaac Allerton deposed at Boston calling himself "of New Plimouth aged about 53 years". 1643 - 19 May. Albert Cuyn conveyed a house and two lots at New Amsterdam to Isaac Allerton and Govert Loockerman and on 2 Jun 1643 Allerton and Loockerman received a grant of land in New Amsterdam from the West Indian Company of Amsterdam, Holland. Scott, Kenneth & Kenn Stryker-Rodda. New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch - "The Register of Salomon Lachaire, Notary Public of New Amsterdam, 1661-1662." Translated from the Original Dutch ... by E. B. O'Callaghan. 6 Jan 1662. ". . . before me Salomon Lachaire, appeared Thomas Hall, George Wolsy, John Laurence and Sara Brigies, wife of Carel van Brugge, of this city . . they certainly known, that Lady Debora Moedy, and her associates did in the year 1643 come to dwell in the place now called Gravesend, with the consent of the late Honorable Director General Willem Kieft, of laudable memory . . . Joris Wolsy signed with the others. "at the house of Joris Wolsy" 5 Jan 1662 ["Sara Brigies" is Sarah Cornell, sister of Rebecca Cornell, who married George ‘Joris’ Woolsey. Sarah md 1st) Thomas Willett, then 2nd) Carl Bridges "Carel van Brugge", and then 3rd) John Lawrence.] 1645 02. 2 Jan 1645. Thomas Willett sold to Cornelia Teunison a lot and house on Manhattan adjoining the Public Tavern for 775 guilders; he took a mortgage on the house. 7 Dec 1645 he won a judgment against Teunison for the balance on the purchase of the house (Icon., IV-103; Cal.D., pp. 31 & 98). 2. 4 Jul 1645. Groundbrief granted by the West India Co to Thomas Willet, not recorded (but see below). Same date groundbrief to Ritsaert Smidt for lot on Manhattan Island next to Thomas Willet's (HS 1901, p. 172). 03. Thomas Willett's home in New Amsterdam was on the then East River bank immediately east of the Great Tavern which soon became the Stadt Huys or City Hall of the time. It was located in the present block bounded by Pearl Street (present #75-85 Pearl Street, per Icon., IV-104) (once the thorough fare along the waterside and at this section called Dock Street), Coenties Alley, and Stone Street (formerly called Hoogh, then Duke Street), New York City. Seven houses are pictured there on in the graphic 1660 Castello Plan of New Amsterdam. Corner lots on west end of Willett patent: 16 Apr 1661 Sale by Charles Bridges to (his wife's brother-in-law) George Wolsey, not recorded. This was in Wolsey's possession 1660. 11 Feb 1666 Confirmation by Gov. Nicolls to George Wolsey, reciting the above sale, lot bounded East by Charles Bridges, 34' x 92' x 24' x 92'. Feb 1669 Sale by George Wolsey to William Pattison; confiscated 1673. Oct 1673 Regrant to Lodowyck Pos (Icon., II-319 & 404, from records) E H o a d Great Tavern & City Hall o [1st Column - Read Down "Original Dock"] r s o Coenties Alley o [2nd Column - Read Down "East River" ] i t c 1661 - Bridges to Wolsey g [3rd Column - Read Down "dockage (then) (now) "Pearl Street"] g k Woolsey -> Pattison -> Post -> Ten Eyck h [4th Column - as written] i R a Bridges -> Post -> Ten Eyck [5th Column - Read Down "Hoogh Street"] n i g 1701 Thomas Willett to Richard Willett Street a v e 1783 sold out of the family by John Willet to Coles l e 1701 Thomas Willett to Jacob DeKey r Thomas Willett of Flushing then now 1715 Thomas Willett to Wm Hartshorn of NJ D P 1661 Van Brugge to La Chair o e Alley since closed c a 1645 Grant to Richard Smith K r l Street Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. THE WILLETS FAMILY OF HEMPSTEAD AND JERICHO, LONG ISLAND. Contributed by Arthur S. Wardwell. Brooklyn 26, NY. p. 706. 1645 Grant to THOMAS WILLETT as confirmed 1667 to CHARLES BRIDGES HOOGH STRAET - then DUKE STREET - now STONE STREET Great | Coenties | 1661 | 1701 | 1701 | The | 1715 | 1661 | alley | 1645 | Tavern | Alley | Bridges | Thomas | Thomas | Homestead | Thomas | Van | (since | Grant | & City | | to | Willetts | Willetts | Thomas | Willetts | Brugge | closed) | to | Hall | | Wolsey| | to | to | Willetts | to | to | | Richard | | | | | Richard | Jacob | of | William | La | | Smith | (a) SLIP of land | a | Willetts | DeKey | Flushing | Hartshorn | Chair | | | Original EAST RIVER wharfage - then DOCK STREET - Now PEARL STREET (More City blocks later created here out of fill) Dutch Manuscripts - 3:84. 13 Jun 1651 - Manhatans, New Netherlands. Tho. Willet buys the frigate "The Palomme" from Capt Philipis Rest - for sum of 800 Pieces of eight - Winter beavers @8 guilders each - each piece of Eight =50 stivers. 20 stivers = 1 guilder 8 x 20 = 160 stivers = 1 Winter beaver 1647 FLUSHING 04. Fernow, B. "Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island, etc. Albany, New York. Weed, Parsons and Co. 1883. New York Historical Records." p. 79. DEED FOR A HOUSE AND PLANTATION IN FLUSHING, LONG ISLAND. I, Thomas Robertson have sold to George Wolsey a house and plantation standing and situate in Flushing and the main bounds are to be seen in the book of the Town of Flushing; together with all the grain that is now on it and everyting that is fastened by earth and nail, for the sum of one hundred and thirty guilders which is now paid me. Wherefore I convey in true and real property the said land and house to said Wolsey or his successors. In token of the truth this is signed by Thomas Robertson in the presence of Jan Damen as witness, the 16th of August Ao 1647, in Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland. This is the mark TR of Thomas Robertson made by himself. J. Vinje. George ‘Joris’ Woolsey paid 130 guilders to Thomas Robertson for this ‘house and plantation standing’. The pelts of a “Winter beaver” was valued at 8 guilders each, so George ‘Joris’ paid a little more than 16 ‘Winter beavers’ for his estate at Flushing. Richard Cornell [brother of Sara Cornell and Rebecca Cornell] and his wife Elizabeth Jessup settled at Flushing, Long Island, probably before 1656,[before 1647?] in which year his name appears in the account book of John Bowne, now in the Library of the Long Island Historical Society, since known as the Brooklyn Historical Society. 1650 Ye English Church at NEWTOWN 3 Aug 1650 - Sara Woolsey b 3 Aug 1650 New Amsterdam, chr 7 Aug 1650 “at ye English Church at Newtown.” 1652 Dutch Reformed Church, NEW AMSTERDAM 10 Oct 1652 - George Woolsey b 10 Oct 1652, New Amsterdam, chr 13 Oct 1652 at the Dutch Ref. Church there 1655 Ye English Church at HEMPSTEAD 10 Apr 1655 - Thomas Woolsey b 10 Apr 1655, Hempstead, chr Sunday 11 Apr 1655 by Mr. Denton at ye English Church 1658 HEMPSTEAD 05. Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, New York. Town Board. 1898. I:20 "The numbers of every mans gattes that they have at the neska. George Wollsie hath six gattes .06 (Semons had 20, Wm Smith had 12, for example). Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, New York. Town Board. 1898. I:32 "The number of akers of Medows given out in allotments unto the particklar Inhabitants of the Towne of Hempstead. About June 1658 "Mr. Wollsey hath fortene akers. .06. [14 acres] Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, New York. Town Board. 1898. I:68. A rate made for the Levy of the Publique charge for the year anno 1658 by ye townsmen-8 Mar 1659."By Mr. Wolsey -14-. George ‘Joris’ Woolsey had 14 acres and six gattes (gates) at Hempstead. What is a gate? 1659 Dutch Reformed Church, NEW AMSTERDAM 13 Feb 1659 - Rebecca Woolsey b 13 Feb 1659, chr Sunday 16 Feb 1659 at the Dutch Reformed Church in New Amsterdam. 1661 Dutch Reformed Church near FLUSHING 12 Jan 1661 - John (Johannes) Woolsey b 12 Jan 1661, New Amsterdam, chr Sunday 16 Jan 1661 at the Dutch Reformed Church near Flushing. 1663 NEW AMSTERDAM or FLUSHING 06. Court Minutes of New Amsterdam: Vol. 4:234 - 4 May 1663 - Hendrick Janzen, cooper of the ship "The Purmerland Church" now a prisoner, acknowledged that he with Jasper Abrahamzen committed great violence at Rendel Huit's house and forced his wife to give them to eat; they proceeded to Joris Wolsey's house and demanded drink, so that Wolsey, Ely Douty and Ritchert Cornwell had enough to do to put them out, then they went to Carel Von Brugge's house and demanded drink, and continued their violence in a manner indecent to be mentioned, so that Carel & Douty & Ritzert Cornewell had enough to do before they could get them out, not without tearing a flap or fall of his unmentionables, which they removed in the shoving out of his body." [NOTE: Richard Cornell, a brother of Sarah and Rebecca Cornell, was a resident of Little Neck, Long Island, afterwards of Rockaway, where he died in 1693.] And Carel Von Bruggs (English name was Charles Bridges) came to New Netherland with Stuyvesant in May 1642, died 1682. His wife was Sara, daughter of Thomas Cornell, and sister of Rebecca Wolsey. Sarah (Cornell) Married (1) Thomas Willett, (2) Charles Bridges, and (3) John Lawrence. From time to time, George ‘Joris’ Woolsey kept an inn and it was probable that these two were looking for more liquor when they tried to break into his house. 1664 Dutch Reformed Church, NEW AMSTERDAM 19 Mar 1664 - Mary (Marritje) Woolsey b 19 Mar 1664, New Amsterdam, chr Sunday 19 Mar 1664, at the Dutch Reformed Church in New Amsterdam, died before 1673, (Jamaica?). 1664 JAMAICA - BEAVER POND 07. Jamaica Town Records. NYG&B Soc. 1:30. 15 Feb 1664 - John Baylies Jr. TO Geo. Woolly Land & meadows in Jamaico - i.e. my hse lot being on W side of ye bever pond with 10 acres of meadow [wit:] Daniel Denton, Thomas Benedict. - John baylies Jr. [21]. 1st. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved and eldest Son, GEORGE WOLSEY all my lott of land being at ye Beaver Pond within ye town of Jamaica aforesaid. To have and to hold ye said Lott of land with ye appurtenances there on being to him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use of him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns forever, John Baylies, Jr. of Jamaica sold to George ‘Joris’ Woolsey [Wooly] his house lot, which was on the west side of Beaver Pond, with 10 acres of meadow land North House ---------- Prospect | Beaver | Wes t | Pond | East Cemetery ---------- Meadow South 10 acres 1665 JAMAICA 12 Oct 1665 - William (Willem) Woolsey b 12 Oct 1665 at Jamaica, “on ye Isleand Nassau”, chr 30 Jun 1678, Flatbush, Brooklyn, “of reasonable age.” William died before 1691 as he is not listed in his father’s will at that time. JAMAICA Grace Church - [Episcopal] !PARISH: Ladd, Horation Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. The Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. p. 287. Buried Thos Wiggins xber 12, 1728 at Jamaica. Rebecca Wiggins 8ber 19, 1731 at Jamaica. Prospect Cemetery was originally known as the Village Burial Grounds of Jamaica. We know Thomas Wiggins is buried in Prospect Cemetery. Prospect Cemetery is on the western side of Beaver Pond, as is the George ‘Joris’ Woolsey Homestead. 1673 JAMAICA 8 Sep 1673 - Mary (Marritje) Woolsey b 8 Sep 1673 at Jamaica, “on ye Isleand Nassau”, chr 30 Jun 1678, Flatbush, Brooklyn, “”of reasonable age.” with her brother William. She was named after Mary, above, who died earlier. 1673 - 1676 JAMAICA - LITTLE PLAYNES 08. Jamaica Town Records. page 184. about 1673/1676. Little Playnes measure Surveyors selected - John Baylis Senr & George Woolsey, Senior - copied from old book. 1673 - George Woolsey was Jamaica Town Clerk. [21]. 3rd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, JOHN WOLSEY all ye my thirty acre lott of land lying to ye eastward by ye Little Plains runing within ye bounds of Jamaica a for said to have and to hold the said thirty acre lott of land with its appurtenances to use ye said JOHN WOLSEY, heirs and assigns to ye only proper use and benefitt and behoff of him ye said JOHN WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. I do also give and bequeath unto my said Son, JOHN WOLSEY after my decease, two oxen and all my wearing apperall. George ‘Joris’Woolsey had this 30 acre lot ‘lying to ye eastward by ye Little Plains’. 1674 SALT MEADOW 09. Jamaica Town Records. page 63. 23 May 1674. Lay out lots of safe [SALT?] meadow to minister's lot & George Woolsey. Where is this lot of ‘salt meadow’? 1678 FLATBUSH - BROOKLYN 10. Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Flatbush, Kings Co, NY. Vol. 1. Translated & Edited by David William Voohees. Published under the Direction of the Ad Hoc Committee of Church Records of the Holland Society of New York. FHL# 974.723/F1 K2v. p. 386. [191] [1678]. Den 30 Junii, op Breukelen; Kinderen: Willem, & Marritje; redelijk oud zijnde; Ouders: Joris Wolseij; Rebecca Wolseij; [Translation: 30 June 1678 at Brooklyn, Children William and Mary being reasonably old (were baptised), elders: George Wolsey; Rebecca Wolsey.] Being ‘reasonably old’ means they were not infants, but young children. abt 1700 FLATLANDS On a map of Flatlands (late 1690's - early 1700's) a lot of ‘MRS. WOOLSEY’ appears on the top middle of the map. This is probably the Widow Rebecca Woolsey, so it appears the Woolseys had a lot in Flatlands, also - unless the John Woolsey who died in Jamaica in 1691 (George ‘Joris’s brother??) left a wife?? Rebecca Woolsey, George ‘Joris’ Woolsey’s widow had a homestead in Jamaica where she was living. Intriguing?? 1680 LONG NECK - JAMAICA 11. Jamaica Town Records. p. 175. 20 Dec 1680. Bryan Newton & wife Alis Newton "sould and asured my whol Lot and allowance of midow ... comanly called ye Long nick ... to Georg Wolsie Juner ... make over to ye sayed Georg Woolsie my homested Land orchard fencing housing and all immovabls ... after ye desert of me and my wiffe.... ye sayed George Wolsie is to make and maintaine all ye fence and fencing ... And in case yt either I or my wife during our life shall be nesesitated to sell any part of ye sayed homsted for our sustinance or any nesesity supply for our comfort ye sayed Georg Woolsie shall be ingaged to give ye valuation yt another would doe. ... I have subscribed my name ys 20th day of desember in ye year of our Lord 1680. Witness: John Pruden Thomas Woolsie Bryan Newton Alis Newton A trew Copie takin out of ye origanall by Benjemin Coe, Clerk. 1681 - 1683 WEST FIELD - JAMAICA 12. Jamaica Deeds. Vol. 2, p.59. 22 Dec 1680. Brian Newton of Jamaica in ye North Rydinge of Yorkshier upon Long Island sold TO Thomas Woolsey bacheler inhabitant of sd Jamaica - my ten acer West ward of the town with my wife Ales Newton - bounded by Daniel Whiteheads land on ye nek by the highway , on the N by Joseph Thursten & Nicalos Eaver'ts land on the E and S by Commons. Wit: John Pruden & George Wollsey. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 122. bet 1681-1683. Thomas Woolsey land, 10 acres. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:320. Tho. Wolsie 13 acors of land in ye west fild 60 rods longe 34 rods broad Bound on ye N wt Yorke path on ye W with Mr. Ashman E wt Nicholas Everit on ye S wt Peter Stringham - [21]. 2nd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, THOMAS WOLSEY all ye fifteen acre lott of land lying to ye westward of Anthony Walters home lott in Jamaica afor said to have and to hold ye said lott of land all ye appurtenances there unto being to him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use, benefitt and behoof of him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. 1683 BOGGY MEADOW 13. Jamaica Town Records. p. 251. 1 Jan 1683. Give our Right to Boggy Meadow-George Woolsey Jn & George Woolsey, Sen. 1683 - 1684 MEADOW - LITTLE NECK WEST OF HAUGH TREE NECK 14. Jamaica Town Records. p. 73. 7 Jan Ann 1684/3 ... wee George Woolsey senior of Jemaica in the Queens County upon Long Iseland and Thomas Wellin of the same ... have ... made a full and absolute exchange of our medowse which lyeth as ... viz George Woolsey's medow lying upon the little neck west of the haugh tree necke ... and Thomas Wellins medow ... owld Towne neck... Teste Nathaniell Denton John X Rodes- George Woolsey Thomas X Wellin [See Note #19 below] There is a Haw Tree Island and this ‘neck’ may have stretched off the mainland in the direction of Haw Tree Island. George ‘Joris’ Woolsey’s meadow was ‘on the little neck west of the haugh tree necke’. 1684 FURTHER EAST NECK 15. Wood, Matthew. THE DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY WOOD, OF LONG ISLAND. The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132, Number 1 and 2. Jan and Apr 2001. 2:121 ff. From 1684 to 1686 Jonas Wood assembeled several small parcels of meadow on "further east neck" into a single lot. On 26 Aug 1684, he purchased from John Prudden, minister of Jamaica church, "my whole right in ye bill of sale I had of George Woolsie," which contained a small meadow "did belong to Mr Bryan Newtons lot"; etc. [22]. Jamaica Town Records 2:538. George Woolsey ... with consent of my wife Rebeckah Willsey ... acer & 1/2 ?? south east side of Jamaica further east neck west sid of Capt Daniell Whitthead east side by Joseph Philipes meadow land 20 ____ 1693. in presence of Andrew Allexander Josias Wiggens George Woollse Rebecka Woolsey 1 ½ acres South East Side of Jamaica Joseph Philips Further East Capt. Daniell Whitthead Meadow land West Neck East !PROBATE: Abstracts of Wills. Liber 1-2. [p. 122] p. 451. - John Bayles, SR., Jamaica, 18 Oct 1682. Makes wife Rebecca executor. Leaves to son John 5s. Leaves to son Elias the meadow at furthest east neck, with the orchard, and 3 acres at the lower end of Great meadow. To sons Thomas and Jonathan all the rest of houses, lands and meadows. To daughter Elizabeth Hubbard 10 pounds. Legacies to daughter Mary Hewlett, Damoris Lyns, Abigail Smith, Ruth and Rebecca. Leaves to Elias, son of Nicholas Stilwell and my daughter Rebecca, 10 pounds. Leaves to his wife Rebecca household goods. Mentions grand child, John Bayles. Not witnessed. Proved 13 Dec 1682. [Sent 6 Jul 1998 by Harry Macy, editor NYGBR] !PROBATE: Abstracts of Wills. Liber 1-2. [p. 122] p. 451. - John Bayles, SR., Jamaica, 18 Oct 1682. Makes wife Rebecca executor. Leaves to son John 5s. Leaves to son Elias the meadow at furthest east neck, with the orchard, and 3 acres at the lower end of Great meadow. To sons Thomas and Jonathan all the rest of houses, lands and meadows. To daughter Elizabeth Hubbard 10 pounds. Legacies to daughter Mary Hewlett, Damoris Lyns, Abigail Smith, Ruth and Rebecca. Leaves to Elias, son of Nicholas Stilwell and my daughter Rebecca, 10 pounds. Leaves to his wife Rebecca household goods. Mentions grand child, John Bayles. Not witnessed. Proved 13 Dec 1682. [Sent 6 Jul 1998 by Harry Macy, editor NYGBR] 1686 MEADOW & UPLAND 16. Jamaica Town Records. p. 123. about 1686. George Woolsey Meadow - 20 acres; a small lot 1 acre 1/2 upland; sixty six acres priveledge - to all ye meadows. George Woolsey Meadow - 20 acres A small lot Upland - 1 ½ acres Privileges to all Meadows - 66 acres [26] JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. 2:491. George Woolsy Seanor with Rebecca my wife for vallewable satisfaction to us in hand paid by Hendricke Lotte a certain parcell of upland llying in ye boundes of Jamaica 22 acres this 30 Sep 1695. 1686 - 1687 WEST BOUNDS OF JAMAICA 17. Jamaica Town Records. 2:490. We George Woolsy Senr & Benjamin Coe both of Jemaica in Queens County, for valuable consideration, 50 acres in ye west bounds of Jemaica & near Newtown hay path in length 100 rods in breadth fourescore rods bounded on ye east wt Newtown hay path that goes to ye south medows & on ye south joyning to ye commons & likewise on ye west & bouonded on ye northwest wt Henry Lotts land & on ye north wt ye land off Andrews Onderdonk sell to John Monfort 7 Mar 1686/7. George Woolsy O Signed seald & delived before us Joseph Smith Rebecca X Woolsy O Danll Denton was present when signed by George Woolsy her mark Danll Denton & Hendrick Onderdonk present when signd by Benjamin Coe O & his wife Abigail X Coe O It is to be understood yt ye land mentioned thirty acres her mark belonged to George Woolsey and 20 acres to Benjamin Coe. George Woolsey - 30 acres West Bounds of Jamaica - Near Newtown Hay Path - On the north with the land of Andrews Onderdonk Bounded on the North West with Henry Lotts land Bounded on East by Newtown Hay Path that goes to the south meadows & likewise on the west Bounded on the south joining to the Commons !PROBATE: Abstracts of Wills. Liber 1-2. [p. 122] p. 451. - John Bayles, SR., Jamaica, 18 Oct 1682. Makes wife Rebecca executor. Leaves to son John 5s. Leaves to son Elias the meadow at furthest east neck, with the orchard, and 3 acres at the lower end of Great meadow. To sons Thomas and Jonathan all the rest of houses, lands and meadows. To daughter Elizabeth Hubbard 10 pounds. Legacies to daughter Mary Hewlett, Damoris Lyns, Abigail Smith, Ruth and Rebecca. Leaves to Elias, son of Nicholas Stilwell and my daughter Rebecca, 10 pounds. Leaves to his wife Rebecca household goods. Mentions grand child, John Bayles. Not witnessed. Proved 13 Dec 1682. [Sent 6 Jul 1998 by Harry Macy, editor NYGBR] !LAND: Index Deeds of Queens Co., Long Island, NY Liber A,B,C. FHL film # 017873. B1:30. John Bayles of Jamaica with Consent of Ruth, my wife, TO Garret Clausen of Jamaica, formerly of Flatbush - My dwelling house being westward from Jamaica + 40 acres - house bounds on S by NY road & fronting up the road & on E bounded by Newtowne Path & on W by the lott of Thomas Wiggins, Jr. & N by Newtown bounds. 4 Mar 1686/7 - 24 Jun 1687. Newtowne Bounds -----------------------------------------------------| | | | | | Newtowne | Thomas | John Bayles | | | Wiggins, Jr. | Ruth, his wife | | Path | 1687 | To | | | | Garret Clausen | | |-------------------------|----------------------------| | New York Road ------------------------------------------------------- | | | Andrews | Garret | | Onderdonk | Clausen | | | | | | Jonathan Mills | | |--------------------------|----------------------------| Theodorus Polhemus 1687 ON FORSTERS RIVER [FOSTERS] 18. Jamaica Town Records. p. 128. abt 1687? Living on Forsters River Thomas Wiggins 7 & 35 acres George Woolsy 19 & 25 acres Mr. Woolsy 29 & 15 acres 1687 OLD TOWNE NECK 19. Jamaica Town Records. p. 74. 27 Jun 1687. George Woolsy senr & Thomas Wellen above mentioned doe by a mutual consent disannull & make void ye above written exchange of medow & each to enjoy their own medow ffully & every part off it as they did possess it before this exchange. George Woollsey Witness: Danll Denton Hannah X Denton Thomas Wellin [See Note #14 above] 1683 - 1688 JAMAICA TOWNE ESTATE 20. Christoph, Peter R. "The Dongan Papers 1683-1688, part 2" Syracuse University Press. FHL #974.7 N2do pt 2. p. 287. A List of the Towne Estate of Jemaica. Anno 1683. horse 3ye 2ye 1ye oxe cowse 3ye 2ye 1ye swine land hds estate Geo. Woolsey Jun 0 0 0 0 4 6 0 1 0 0 25 0 081.10.0 Geo. Woolsey Sen 2 0 0 0 4 6 2 4 0 0 36 2 168.00.0 Tho. Woolsey 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 40.00.0 For those who keep track of such things, George Sen. was the 5th highest taxed. !HIST: Paltisits, Hon. Victor Hugo, Litt. D. "The Dongan Charter to JAMAICA of 1686. It Antecedents and Implications." Historical Address. 29 Oct 1839. Jamaica, NY, printed for B. Gertz, Inc. 1940. “The people suffered from Indian ravages in the year of 1655. This prompted Director-General Stuyvesant to proclaim that the scattered settlers should form villages after the fashion of their New England neighbors. This resulted in a petition to him from several of the inhabitants of Hempstead, then called Heemstede, for permission to erect and build a town about midway between that place and Flatlands, then called Amersfoort. Stuyvesant and his council thereupon granted the petitioners "free leave to erect or build a town" upon such privileges and particular grants, called ground-briefs "as the inhabitants of New Netherland generally do possess in their lands; and likewise in the choice of their magistrates, as in the other villages and towns" heretofore erected on the west end of Long Island. A beaver pond in the neighborhood was called by the Indians Gemeco or Jemeco, and the first settlers wanted that name for their village. It was, however, first incorporated by the Dutch name of "Rust-dorf," meaning "Quiet Village," by a more ample patent of 1660. During a revolutionary uprising on Long Island, in 1663, certain Englishmen sought to seize the English settlements by proclamation of the English king, Charles II, and anglecized the names of the villages. So Jamaica or Rust-dorf was named "Crafford" or "Crawford." It was at this time that the First Presbyterian Church of Jamaica, in which we meet today, had its beginning as a "meeting-house" twenty-six feet square, in which Zachariah Walker preached.”
George Woolsey Will

1691 GEORGE WOOLSEY WILL (1691-1698) 21. George Wolsey WILL: filed 22 Feb 1698, Orange Co,NY. City Registers office, Queens, NY, NY. Dated 22 Day of Sep 1698. File location - At X-M, X-Block X- Liber A of Deeds. In the name of God, Amen, I GEORGE WOLSEY of Jamaica in Queens County upon Long Island being at present weak of body but through Gods mercy, of sound memory and perfect understanding and considering ye frailty of humane nature ye certainty of death ye uncertainly of ye time do make and ordain this to be my last WILL and TESTAMENT as followeth, that is to say, first and principally I bequeath my soul to God who gave it cleaned from its sins and uniquely through ye meritts of my blessed Saviour and Redeemer ye Son Jesus Christ and my body to ye dust from which it was first taken to be decently and Christian like intered at ye discretion of my Executors here after named and as for ye worldly estate God hath endowed me with all I do give and bequeath as followeth; That is to say 1st. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved and eldest Son, GEORGE WOLSEY all my lott of land being at ye Beaver Pond within ye town of Jamaica aforesaid. To have and to hold ye said Lott of land with ye appurtenances there on being to him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use of him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns forever, 2nd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, THOMAS WOLSEY all ye fifteen acre lott of land lying to ye westward of Anthony Walters home lott in Jamaica afor said to have and to hold ye said lott of land all ye appurtenances there unto being to him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use, benefitt and behoof of him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. 3rd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, JOHN WOLSEY all ye my thirty acre lott of land lying to ye eastward by ye Little Plains runing within ye bounds of Jamaica a for said to have and to hold the said thirty acre lott of land with its appurtenances to use ye said JOHN WOLSEY, heirs and assigns to ye only proper use and benefitt and behoff of him ye said JOHN WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. I do also give and bequeath unto my said Son, JOHN WOLSEY after my decease, two oxen and all my wearing apperall. 4th. item - I do give and bequeath unto my well beloved daughter, MARY WOLSEY, one feather bed and bolster, two pillows, a pair of sheets and two coverlids to be delivered her at her day of marriage or is when she attains ye age of eighteen years, also one cow to be delivered her at ye same time. 5th. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife, REBECCA, all ye remainder of my land & tenements, good and chattels to have and to hold to her ye said REBECCA for and during her natural life, after her decease as followeth, that is to say all ye remainder of my house, land and meadow not already given. I do after my wifes decease give and bequeath ye same unto my three Sons, GEORGE, THOMAS & JOHN WOLSEY to be equall in portion without ye benefitt of joint tenancy or survivership and to usery of them, their heirs and assigns for ever and all my goods and chattels of what nature or kind soever ye shall be and remaine after my wifes decease, I give and bequeath unto my three Daughters, that is to say, SARAH HALLET, REBECCA WIGGINS & MARY WOLSEY to be equally divided between them. 6th. item - I do appoint, make and ordain my well beloved wife, REBECCA to be sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament, desireing all my children to behave themselves to their mother, lovingly each to other. 7th. item - Lastly I do hereby revoke, make void and null all former and other Wills and Testaments by me made and do appoint this to be my last Will and Testament. As Wittness my hand and seal at Jamaica ye second day of November in ye year of our Lord, Jesus Christ 1691. [signed] George Wolsey (Seal) Signed sealed and published in ye presence of: Thomas Willett - Daniell Whitehead - Andrew Gibb, Sr. Queens County (S - - ) At a Court of Common Pleas held at Jamaica this 23rd. of September in ye tenth year of ye reign of William ye Third, by ye grace of God of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, King Defender of ye Faith and the last Will and Testament of ye within written, GEORGE WOLSEY deceased was forward by ye oaths of Capt. Daniell Whitehead and Andrew Bibb [Gibb?], witnesses there unto subscribed and dye Executor herein mentioned whereby authorized to sact and do what Exectors by law are impowered to do the giving in bond to bring into ye Court of Common Pleas for Queens County a true and perfect inventory of all and a list ye goods and chattels of ye said Testator. Entered the 22nd.day of Sept.1698. Per - A. Gibb (Clerk) Queens County (Seal)
Thomas Woolsey & Ruth Baylis



Modified Register for Thomas Woolsey-1491 First Generation 1. Thomas Woolsey-1491 was born on 10 Apr 1655 in Hempstead, Long Island, Nieuw Nederlandt. He was christened on 11 Apr 1655 in "Ye Englandlish Church by Mr. Denton" (Newtown (Middleburgh), Long Island). He died in 1742 in Bedford, Westchester, New York. He was buried in Union Cemetery, Bedford, Westchester, New York. GENE: Sent to www by Harry Macy, editor of NYG&B Record, 1 Jul 1998. From New York Public Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts Division James Riker Papers, Memoria Vol. 30, p. 187. "Extracts from an old manuscript book formerly belonging to Capt. William Hallett of Newtown (who died in 1729 age 81) and now in possession of one of his descendants, Marvin R. Briggs of New York, 1851. An Acount of the agees of Mr George Woolseys Children Sarah Woolsey was born in New York August y 3 in ye year 1650. Au 7 she was Baptized in ye English church by Mr. Denton Capt Newton godfather George Woolsey was born in New York Octobeer ye 10 1652. October ye 12 he was baptized in ye Dutch Church Mrs. Newton godmother Thomas Woolsey was born at Hemsted April ye 10 1655 & then Baptized by Mr. Denton Rebeckah Woolsey was born at New York february ye 13 1659 febr: 16 she was Baptized in ye Dutch church Mr Briges godfather & her granmother godmother John Woolsey was born at New york January ye 12, 1661. January ye 16 baptized in ye Dutch Church Thomas Hall godfather William Woolsey was born in Jamaca on ye Isleand Nassau October ye 12 1665 Mary Woolsey was born at Jamaca on ye Island Nassau September ye 8 1673 [Then follows "An account of the ages of the children of William Hallett", q.v. in William Hallett's notes. ] SOME COMMENTS ON WOOLSEY-HALLETT RECORD FROM RIKER PAPERS by Harry Macy This had to be compiled after 1664 as it refers to the city as New York, not New Amsterdam. Most likely William Hallett copied it from a Woolsey bible or other record after he married Sarah Woolsey. Sarah was baptized in the Dutch Church on the date indicated; Mr. Denton at that time would have been pastor of the English Church in Newtown (Middle burg) on Long Island. New Amsterdam Dutch Church records show baptisms of George, Rebecca and John but not all the dates match. They also show another daughter Marritie in 1664, not on this list. The last two children's baptisms are in the Flatbush Dutch Church records in 1678, where it is indicated that they were not infants. The birthdates of the Hallett children are in NYGBR 6:28 with one difference, and without the places of birth. ON-LINE: Family Treemaker. Woolsey. Posted by Mary A. Kurila 25 Jan 1999. "I am researching the family of William Fowler, born in Providence, RI in 1659 and died 8 May 1714 in Flushing NY he md Mary Thorne. Their dau Sarah Fowler md Richard Woolsey." ALSO: "Searching for the parentage of Ruth Bailey who md Thomas Woolsey. She was probably born in the mid 1600's, maybe in NY." GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.120B. b. New Amsterdam in New Netherland, to Jamaica, N.Y. 1664. Later to Bedford, Westchester Co., NY. (On 6 Feb 1716, Thomas Woolsey, with others, signs a testimonial at Jamaica. 76p33) 2a Bdfd Union #7. This Thomas is probably the Woolsey of Woolsey's Farm Bedford Town, obtained from Colonel Peter Matthews (see map 1.048) about 1721, and known as Woolsey's Farm by 1736. 80(II)p197. Ref.: 16(VI)p88;65;67p5;69. (14 Jan 1970). GENE: Hart, Donald C. A Woolsey Family of America (1623 - 1975). Santa Cruz, CA. n.d. FHL # 929.273 W887a. p. 2-3. GENE: Bolton. "Woolseys of Westchester Co, NY." GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. Merrimack, NH !HIST: Westchester County, NY, History. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 175. 20 Dec 1680. Bryan Newton & wife Alis Newton "sould and asured my whol Lot and allowance of midow ... comanly called ye Long nick ... to Georg Wolsie Juner ... make over to ye sayed Georg Woolsie my homested Land orchard fencing housing and all immovabls ... after ye desert of me and my wiffe.... ye sayed George Wolsie is to make and maintaine all ye fence and fencing ... And in case yt either I or my wife during our life shall be nesesitated to sell any part of ye sayed homsted for our sustinance or any nesesity supply for our comfort ye sayed Georg Woolsie shall be ingaged to give ye valuation yt another would doe. ... I have subscribed my name ys 20th day of desember in ye year of our Lord 1680. Witness: John Pruden Thomas Woolsie Bryan Newton A trew Copie takin out of ye origanall by Benjemin Coe, Clerk. Alis Newton JAMAICA: Jamaica Deeds. Vol. 2, p.59. 22 Dec 1680. Brian Newton of Jamaica in ye North Rydinge of Yorkshier upon Long Island sold TO Thomas Woolsey bacheler inhabitant of sd Jamaica - my ten acer West ward of the town with my wife Ales Newton - bounded by Daniel Whiteheads land on ye nek by the highway , on the N by Joseph Thursten & Nicalos Eaver'ts land on the E and S by Commons. Wit: John Pruden & George Wollsey. ON-LINE: BAILEY FAMILY - NEW YORK MARRIAGES - Donna Beers (www e-mail to her was returned) Bailey, Ruth 11 Jan 1684 New York Queens County Thomas Woolsey (No documentation included) HIST: Christoph, Peter R. "The Dongan Papers 1683-1688, part 2" Syracuse University Press. FHL #974.7 N2do pt 2. p. 157. Return of Divided Land, Marriages, baptisms and Burials in Jamaica for seven years. Whereas the Sheriff by warrant from the Governor and Councell did demand off us the inhabitants off Jemaica to give an account off the number of Mariages Christnings and burialls and what are the names off all such as hold land from the crown by paten[] or otherwise or what Rent may bee standing out in Arears etc; to satisffie his excellency wee give an accounty as Followeth (viz) Imprim: Land devided eight thousand Acres besides pasture land more or less lying in Common to the town Which wee hold From his Majestie by vertue off purchass From the natives and a patent From his excellency Thomas Dongan Generall Governor etc. bearing date the 17th day off May 1686 by which patent wee are to Make payment off forty shillings per Annum quit Rent. Marriages Christnings Burialls Capt Carpenter 3 0 0 Joseph Smith 1 1 0 John Oldfield 1 2 0 Mr Woolsy 1 0 1 (Thomas Woolsey married & William Woolsey buried) Will: Foster 1 0 1 Samll. Smith 3 2 0 John Everet 0 3 0 . George Woolsy 0 3 1 . Mr. Whitehead 0 0 1 . [Notice: in the seven years preceeding 1686, George Woolsy had 1 marriage and 1 burial and his son George had 3 christenings, and one burial, so between 1679 - 1686:] 1 marriage . . . . . . . (Thomas Woolsey) 3 christenings . . . . . ( Capt. George Woolsey) christening . . . . . . ( Hannah Woolsey) christening . . . . . . (Rev. Benjamin Woolsey) 1 burial . . . . . . . . (William Woolsey buried) 1 burial . . . . . . . . . (unknown child of Capt. George Woolsey) This is what wee Can Remember hath hapned within 7 years. For the Number off horse and Foot and how armd and provided an account is alreddy given by the Military officers: by order From the Comissioners By Danll. Denton Cler. [Endorsed:] To Major Thomas Willet Sheriff. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 411. 18 Sep 1695. Richard Gilderssleve - land on ye N side of ye path gooing to Jamaica & on y W by a lott of Thomas Wolles only a high waye between. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 122. bet 1681-1683. Thomas Woolsey land, 10 acres. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:320. Tho. Wolsie 13 acors of land in ye west fild 60 rods longe 34 rods broad Bound on ye N wt Yorke path on ye W with Mr. Ashman E wt Nicholas Everit on ye S wt Peter Stringham - LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 61. 11 Jun 1692 - between Daniel Whitthead, Esqr & Thomas Wollsey - Wollsey to occupy and enjoy a sartain ten acre lott Bounded front and reare on the Highways E by Thomas Wollsey & W by Ed Burrowes, provided sd Thomas Wollsey shall pay ore case to be paid unto Mr. Sollenes that marryed the widow Stenwick in New Yorke sum of 42 pounds before 1 Apr 1694 - Dan'll Whithed & Tho. Wollsey - O Wit: Edward Burrowes, Will Whitt, Peter Chek - Samuel Ruscoe, Clerk p. 60. Daniell Whitehead of Jamaica to Thomas Wollsey ten acre lot in Jamaica, bounded E by sd Thomas Wollsey W by land of John Prudden S by King's Road ore Common highway & N to a highway betwext ye hills 5 Apr 1694. Wit: Sam'll Ruscoe & Edward Burrowes. JAMAICA: Frost, Josephine C. RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF JAMAICA, Long Island, New York. FHL# 928518. p. 375. 1 Jan 1693/4 - John Dweke, Richard Oldfield, Samuel Denton & Daniell Smith, shall gather the sumes promised to the minister and pay 1/4 each. Captin Wollsey 01 - 10; Will: Creed 01 - 00; Tho: Wollsey 01 - 00; Gersham Wiggins 00 - 10; John Wollsey 01 - 00; Josias Wiggins 00 - 10; Ben Wiggins 00 - 10; John Bayles 01 -10; Tho: Wiggins 00 - 12; Johannas Williamson 00 - 04. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:371. I John Basford of City of New Yorke husband of Damaris Basford, eldest dau of Nate Lynos late of Jamaica, deceased, have sould unto Thomas Wollsey of Jamaica fiveten sheep younge & olde as they are now in his posestion - do warrant and bind, etc. 21 Nov 1696. LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 248. Thomas Foster of Monmouth River, Co. of Salem, of West New Jersey, son & heir of Thomas Foster, late of Jamaica, sum paid by Benj Thurston of Jamaica, blacksmith for and in behalf of himself, Anne Thurston, Daniell Thurston, Samuel Thurston, Thomas Thurston, Richard Denton & Mary his wife, Richard Oldfild & Jane his wife & David Wright & Hannah his wife - 1/2 part & home lott beginning at Thomas Wollsey's land E to walnut bush marked by Thomas Waters across to Whitt oak bush on N side of same lott & an equal 1/2 part of ye hill lot which 1/2 lyeth next to Anthony Waters [&] all that lott of land lyinge behind the Swam near the heatherEast Neck - adj land of John Hansen - 61 acres - late in tenuer & occupation of Thomas Foster, dec'd & Joseph Thurston, dec'd. 23 Oct 1697. Wit: Andrew Gibb, Samuell Smith. Thomas Foster O LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 9. John Pruden quondam minister of Jamaica now inhabitant of Newwarke, Co Essex, East New Jersey, to Thomas Burrowes, yeoman of Jamaica, a lot lying Westward of the mettinge hse upon road that leads to New Yorke, fiveten acres Bounded by 10 acre lot formerly Edward Higbe's now in possession of Edward Burrows & partly by lot formerly belonging to Andrew Messenger now in tenur & poss of Thomas Wollsey on ye E & by a highway on N - Begin at NW corner of ye sd Wollsey's lott runing Westward under the hills by the highway. S to ye road to Newtown - 16 Nov 1700. Wit: John Hubbert, John Pruden, Jr. John Pruden O LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. Vol 2 - 3 Feb 1708/09. p. 441. Gersham Wiggins 6 9 3 1 Mrs. Woolsey 1 9 Samuel Bayleys 7 7 4 Capt. George Wolsey 7 3 1 1 Benjamin Wiggins 5 6 Josiah Wiggins 9 4 3 3 Thomas Wiggins 6 4 4 John Woolsey 5 11 1 3 Thos Woolsey 5 5 1 1 EARMARK: Bedford Town Records. The mark of Thomas Woolsey is a cropp on ye left ear and two slits in ye ropp and a slitt in the top of ye right ear. 5 Jul 1721. PROBATE: George Wolsey WILL: filed 22 Feb 1698, Orange Co,NY. City Registers office, Queens, NY, NY. Dated 22 Day of Sep 1698. File location - At X-M, X-Block X- Liber A of Deeds. 2nd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, THOMAS WOLSEY all ye fifteen acre lott of land lying to ye westward of Anthony Walters home lott in Jamaica afor said to have and to hold ye said lott of land all ye appurtenances there unto being to him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use, benefitt and behoof of him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. As Wittness my hand and seal at Jamaica ye second day of November in ye year of our Lord, Jesus Christ 1691. [signed] George Wolsey (Seal) Signed sealed and published in ye presence of ; Thomas Willett - Daniell Whitehead - Andrew Gibb, Sr. Entered the 22nd.day of Sept.1698. Per - A. Gibb (Clerk) Queens County (Seal) GUARD: Scott, Dr. Kenneth. "Records of the Chancery Court Province and State of New York. Guardianships 1691-1815. The Holland Society of New York. FHL# 974.7 P28sc p. 1 [Case 11 Sep 1701] of William Lawrence, guardian of Johannis Lawrence, VS. Rebecca Woolsey. John Lawrence (age upwards of 50), of Newtown, Queens Co., gentleman, is non compos mentis. In 1692, being lunatic, he gave care of moneys, goods, merchandize, plate, jewells, linen, household stuff and other belongings to his wife Sarah, who carried the same to the house of George Woolsey in Jamaica, Queens Co., where she lodged for about six years. Sarah Lawrence died at Woolsey's house in Sept., 1697. Woolsey refused to give up the items brought by Sarah and kept them until he died about May 1698. His widow, Rebecca Woolsey refuses to surrender the objects, claiming that Sarah owed #105 for rent for seven years, of which only #24 had been paid. On 4 Feb 1701/02 it was ordered that John Lawrence be examined as an evidence on the part of the complainant and that Dr. Henry Taylor, of Flushing, Queens Co., physician, be examined on the part of the defendant [A, pp. 7,9,10,17,21,23-24,34,335,38-40,50). .. Affidavit (20 Jan 1701/02) of Thomas Woolsey to the effect that Dr. Taylor is a material witness in the case of William Lawrence (guardian of John Lawrence), plt., VS. Rebecca Woolsey, widow. Affidavit (12 Mar 1701/02) of Zacchariah Mills, of Queens Co., concerning the serving of a subpoena. Affidavit (20 May 1702) of Paroculus Parmyter, gent., in the same case (BM 1272-L) LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:302. [p. 62]. The land of Thomas Wollsey of Jamaica is as followeth, viz: 1. One lott of upland lyeinge to the westward of this Towne abovesd containinge fourten acers be it more ore less as it was laid out & bounded N by ye road leading to York & E by Anthony Waters & S by ye sd Waters & W by William Creed. 2. As also one third partt of a thrty acer lott lyeinge southward of ye forsd lott & is bounded by Fredrick Hendricks one the E & John Lambertes on the W & N by the highway & S by Jacob Ramson - 3. As allsoe five acers of meadow lyeing at the hawtrees & bounded E by William Creed & W by Peter Hendriks being ye half of a ten acer lott - 4. As allsoe one third partt of the home lott formerly my fathers 5. As allsoe the one third partt of a ten acer lott of meadow lyeinge att the further East Neck - 6. As allsoe the one third partt of a hill lott lyeinge above Samuell Millses. 7. The above parcells of land & Meadow with an adition of meadow alsoe lying at ye east sid of the Great Island at the further East Neck - - the 29 of December 1699. [14 acres + 10 acres + 5 acres + ____? + 3.3 acres + ____? + ____? = 33 + acres] DEED: (3:135-6) 21 Feb 1711/12 - indenture between Georg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy John Woolcy of Jemaica in Queen County on Nasaw Island & in ye Province of New York of ye one partee and Samuell Denton of ye same place of ye other partee witnesseth for consideration of nine pounds ten shillings corrant or New York acknowledge [sell to] Samuell Denton all that peice parsill or lot of upland in ye bounds of Jemaica containg seven acors be ye same more or less butted & bounded as followeth bounded south by ye rode that lead down to New York or Cuntry rode & east by commons land and west by common land also and north by common land or Nathaniell Denton warrent for next seven years - hath set their hands and affixed thire seales ye day etc Signed sealed & delivered Gorg Woolcy O in presents of Thomas X Woolcy O Wait Smith his mark Nehemiah Smith John X Woolcy O Memorandum that on ye 25 day of Jul 1712 appeared his mark before me Richard Olfeild one of Her Maigs Justeses for the keeping of the peace for Queens County ye ye with in named Gorg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy & John Woolcy and did acknowlidg the with written instrument to be their own vollintary act and deed Tes. Richard Olfeild A true coppy of ye orignall deed entred & compared this fift day of Desember 1712 by me per Nehemiah Smith - Cler - LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 3:487-8. 1712 - Thomas Woolcy was one of 4 trustees of the town.Samuell Smith, Jonathan Watters, & Peter White JAMAICA: IBID 3:488. Apr 1714 the above same chosen trustees of town. PARISH: Ladd, Horation Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. Ladd, Horatio Oliver, A.M., S.T.D. Rect. Emerit. FHL# 974.7243/J1 K2l. Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica. Kept by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, Rector from 1710 to 1732. Persons married, ye time wn & place where. p. 278. Wm Woolsey & Derica Williamson of Jamaica at Jamaica 4 Jan 1711 publish'd. p. 278. Henry Dusenbury of Hampstead & Mary Fowler of Flushing 9ber (Sep) 29, 1711 at Flushing, publish'd. p. 280. Benjamin Fowler of ys Prsh & Hannah Dusenburie of ye Prsh of Hempstead 1 Nov 1714 at Jamaica, publ. Persons Buried Ye Time Wn & Place Where. p. 286. [Buried] Ruth ye Daughter of Wm & Derica Woolsey 11 Nov 1712 at Jamaica. p. 286. [Buried] Rebeca Woolsey aged 91 5 Feb 1713 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Abigail ye Daughter of Thos & Ruth Woolsey Apr 4, 1716 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Thos Wiggins xber 12 (Oct) 1728 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Wm Hallett 20 Aug 1729 at Hell-Gate. p. 287. [Buried] Rebecca Wiggins 8ber (Aug) 19, 1731 at Jamaica. LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:56. Thomas Woolsey, yeoman, of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO John Gray, yeoman, of Jamaica, FOR pounds 240 for home lott of Jamaica, where sd Thomas now dwells, bounded W by Thomas Smith, S partly by county road leading to New York & partly by sd Smith, E by land in Possession of Eliz. Waters & by Samuel Thurston's land & N by David Wright & Samuel Thurston, containing 30 acres as now within fence in possession of sd Thomas Woolsey with one certain piece of land in Jamaica on the hills Northward of ye sd premises bounded W & N by Joseph Smith, S by David Wright & E by Thomas Thurston - 8 acres in fence and all houses, etc. Thomas Woolsey 19 Mar 1717 - 1 Apr 1718Ruth Woolsey Lewis Hewlett, Daniel Waters. LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:70. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica, yeoman, & Ruth his wife TO Richard Betts for pounds 80 - 19 acres as inclosed by the fence now standing, in Jamaica bound N by the highway which leads from Jamaica to the New York Ferry, E & S by land of Daniel Waters & W by land belonging to sd Richard Betts. 19 May 1718 - 1 8ber 1719.Thomas X Woolsey Mary Waters, John Cornell Ruth X Woolsey LAND: Abstract of Deed of Gift: 16 Jul 1740, Recorded 8 Mar 1755. Original p. 52-3. Thomas Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester, N.Y., yeoman, "for ye good will and efectoin which I have and doe bare my son John Woollsey of Bedford" Gave John Woolsey of same town, yeoman, "All that the two folowing peices or persels of land which are part of and included within ye bounds of twelve hundred & eighty accrees of land which I purchased of Petter Mathews of ye city of New York, gent and is lying ... within ... Bedford one peice hearby conveyed is bounded as foloweth begining at ye south east corner of my son Jonathans northernmost peice of land and runs south eleven degrees east thirty five chains and fifty(?) links to my son Richards northeast corner thence along Richards line west eleven eleven degrees south thirty eight chains to ye stake with stones thence north eleven degrees west seven chains & fifty links to a stake with stones thence west eleven degrees south forty two chains to ye line of Bedford Township thence north eleven degrees west twenty five chains to my son Jonathans land thence east eleven degrees north to whare it began containing two hundred & thirty one acrees the other peice begins at ye south east corner of my son Jonathan's southerly peice and from thence runs south eleven degrees east eleven chains & seventy five links to my son William Woollseys land thence west eleven degrees south thirty seven chains and twenty five links to Dusinburys land thence north eleven degrees west eleven chains & seventy-five to my sd son Jonathans land thence east eleven degrees north thirty seven chains & twenty five links to where it began containing forty three accrees and three quarters" Orig. p. 53. Thomas Woolsey his mark. 16 Jul 1740 "in ye fourteenth year of His Majastys reign" Witnesses: George Denis, Samuel Purdy. Acknowledged 1 Sep 1740, before Samuel Purdy, Esq., one of the judges of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas. Recorded 8 Mar 1755, by John Holmes, Clerk. LAND: p 240. Westchester County DEEDS, lib. G, pp. 58-8. Abstract of Bill of Sale. Thomas Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester, N.Y., yeoman, with the consent of wife Ruth, and sons William, Jonathan, Richard, and John Woolsey sold to Henry Dusenbury of Rye, yeoman, for L 105, N.Y. money 12 Jan 1729/30 in the 3rd year of George II. "All that a certain parcel ... of land ... in ... Bedford ... & is part of the lands granted by Peter Mathews (who was one of ye pattentees of said township's New Purchase) unto ye said Thomas Woolsey ... bounded ... bounded as followeth beginning at ye northwest corner at a stake ... from thence runing southerly on a strait line one hundred & forty one rods & twenty links & a half of ye chain to another stake set up at ye southwesterly corner from thence runing easterly on a strait line to an heap of stones at ye southeast corner one hundred & seventy rods from thence runing northerly on a strait line one hundred & forty one rods & twenty links & a half of a chain to a stake set up at ye northeast corner & from thence on a strait line one hundred & seventy rods to ye first above mentioned stake where it first began, bounded westerly by Fauconiers West pattent ... wch. is the west bounds of Bedford Pattent & northerly easterly & southerly yt. is three sides thereof by land belonging to ye said Thomas Woolsey & his above named sons containing ... one hundred & fifty7 acres English measure" Thomas Woolsey his mark, Ruth Woolsey, William Woolsey, Jonathan Woolsey, Richard Woolsey, John Woolsey. Witnesses: Hugh Hunter, Richard Pullen. On 17 Nov 1730 Hugh Hunter swore before Wm. Willett, judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, that he saw every one of the above execute this deed. Entered by W. Forster, clerk (no date) HIST: Le Fevre, Ralph. HISTORY OF NEW PALTZ, New York and its old Families, from 1678 to 1820, including the Huguenot pioneers and others who settled in New Paltz previous to the Revolution. Albany. Fort Orange Press. 1903. includes index. p. 96. 1765 - Real Estate Taxation - New Paltz 1765: Thomas Woolsey 1765 5 lbs 5 shillings 0 pence. John Woolsey 1765 0 lbs 5 shillings 0 pence. Jadediah Dean 1765 1 lbs 8 shillings 0 pence. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. CEM: Town of Bedford, Westchester, NY "Cemeteries" FHL #974.7277/B1 N2b Vol. 8. p. iv. "One such stone, preserved underground for perhaps a century, has recently been unearthed in the village graveyard. Its inscription reads: "1742 [next line illegible] Deceased Thomas Woolsey Born in the yeare 1656" This stone was evidently left behind when bodies of the Woolsey family were removed to the Bedford Union Cemetery in the Nineteenth Century. p. 393. A gravestone for Thomas Woolsey, dug up in the Old Bedford Cemetery in 1976, bears the dates 1656-1742. CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Old Bedford Cemetery "OB" - Route 22, facing Bedford Green (Sec. 20A, Lot 38); 191 graves marked with field stones. Unmarked grave: Rev. Thomas Denham 1689. Last stone: Elizabeth Belden McDonald 1885.] 1742 1742 /ge + George + /ecca ReBeccA geD -- [DeceaseD?] AgeD 86 [DeceaseD?] |-homAs ThomAs WooLSey WooLSey BoRne DIN BoRne DIN the yeaR the yeaR 1656 1656 CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Old Bedford Cemetery "OB" - Route 22, facing Bedford Green (Sec. 20A, Lot 38); 191 graves marked with field stones. Unmarked grave: Rev. Thomas Denham 1689. Last stone: Elizabeth Belden McDonald 1885.] Woolsey, Thomas s. of George Woolsey* 1656 - 1742 * A gravestone for Thomas Woolsey, dug up in the Old Bedford Cemetery in 1976, bears the dates 1656-1742. (See Foreword, page iv.)" Woolsey, William 7 Mar 1771 Age 83 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-12 Woolsey, William [Jr.] 17 Feb 1761 Age 16 Old Bedford Cemetery OB ---- Woolsey, Abigail w. of Josiah Woolsey 19 Sept 1851 Age 81. Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-8. Woolsey, Josiah 2 June 1861 86/5/25 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-7. Woolsey, Levi s. of Josiah & Abigail Woolsey 20 Oct 1821 Age 19 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-9. [Supplementary List. A Transcription of tombstone inscriptions in the Old Bedford Cemetery, made by Sarah Williamson and Mrs. James Day in 1917, listed 30 burials that were not recorded by the WPA in the 1930s. These included: Woolsey, Dorcas w. of William Woolsey 21 Jan 1764 Age 69 OB Woolsey, William [Jr.] 17 Feb 1761 Age 16 OB CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpahabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Bedford Union Cemetery "BU" Clinton Road (Sec. 17, Lot 16); organized 1864; still in use. Oldest stone: Thomas Woolsey 1730. Woolsey, Thomas s. of George Woolsey 1656 - 1742 BU 7 Woolsey, Daniel s. of Thomas & Tamar Woolsey 1791 - 1832 BU 7 Woolsey, Frank Aug 1974 BU 7 Woolsey, Josiah s. of Richard Woolsey 1738 - 1780 BU 7 Woolsey, Mary d. of Thomas Woolsey 1794 - 1821 BU 7 w. of James Pine Woolsey, Mary w. of Seth Lyon - 1 Apr 1894 89/1/0 BU 103 Woolsey, Richard s. of Thomas Woolsey 1697 - 1777 BU 7 Woolsey, Simeon s. of Thomas & Tamar Woolsey 1795 - 1891 BU 7 Woolsey, Tamar Brady w. of Thomas Woolsey 1772 - 1857 BU 7 Woolsey, Thomas s. of Josiah Woolsey 1765 - 1839 BU 7 Woolsey, Zilpha Martin w. of Simeon Woolsey 1802 - 1887 BU 7 Thomas married (MRIN:647) Ruth Baylis-1492 daughter of John Baylis Sr.-1498 and Rebecca Stillwell-1499 (MRIN:655) on 11 Jan 1684 in Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, New York. Ruth was born in 1660 in Jamaica, Queens, New York. She died in 1739 in Bedford, Westchester, New York. She was buried in Old Cemetery, Bedford, Westchester, New York. ON-LINE: OUR BAYLESS FAMILY by Virginia Bayless O'Connell. "This is an attempt to document one line of the Bayless family of Alabama. Our first ancestor, John Bayless, came from England and settled in Long Island, NY. ... The weight of evidence indicates that John Baylessd came from the Parish of St. Peters of Mancroft in Norwich, England. His birth date is given as 1617 and supposedly he was of humble yeoman stock. He sailed from England on the TRUELOVE on 10 Jun 1635 as an indentured servant of Wm Wells of Norwich. ... The TRUELOVE reached Boston in 1635 and Wm Wells can be traced from Boston (1635) to Lynn (1638) to New Haven (1639) and to Southold, Long Island in 1640. The first recodrds of John Bayless in this country are from the First Church of Southold, Long Island, which shows thaat he lived there prior to 1654. He bought a lot on Town Street in 1656 upon which he built a house. He sold this house in 1661 and moved to Jamaica. In 1664 John Bayless was involved in a land deal ... a group of Long Islanders consisting of John Bayless, Daniel Denton, John Foster, Luke Watson and Associates ... and group bought 200,000 acres of land from the Staten Island Indians ... ratified by Governor Nichols of New Jersey. New governor repudiated the transaction ... paid them for their outlay ... John Bayless sold his portion and returned to Long Island. His will is dated 18 Oct 1682, proved 15 Jan 1683. ... John Bayless, Jr. b abt 1642, d abt 1696, md Ruth Rusco, 12 Mar 1655. "It appears that John Bayless, s/o John and Rebecca, was less adventurous than his father. He remained in Soouthold when the family moved to Jamaica but joined them a year later and married there in 1655. His name appears often in Jamaica records as fence inspector, tax payer, recipent of land and in purchases and sales of property. He was a delegate to the Governor, Tax Assessor and Contributor to the Minister's salary. There is a record of five children - Samuel, John, Elias, Daniel, and Sarah. ON-LINE: Family Treemaker. Woolsey. Posted by Mary A. Kurila 25 Jan 1999. "I am researching the family of William Fowler, born in Providence, RI in 1659 and died 8 May 1714 in Flushing NY he md Mary Thorne. Their dau Sarah Fowler md Richard Woolsey." ALSO: "Searching for the parentage of Ruth Bailey who md Thomas Woolsey. She was probably born in the mid 1600's, maaybe in NY." GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.120B. b. New Amsterdam in New Netherland, to Jamaica, N.Y. 1664. Later to Bedford, Westchester Co., NY. (On 6 Feb 1716, Thomas Woolsey, with others, signs a testimonial at Jamaica. 76p33) 2a Bdfd Union #7. This Thomas is probably the Woolsey of Woolsey's Farm Bedford Town, obtained from Colonel Peter Matthews (see map 1.048) about 1721, and known as Woolsey's Farm by 1736. 80(II)p197. Ref.: 16(VI)p88;65;67p5;69. (14 Jan 1970). GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.63. ON-LINE: BAILEY FAMILY - NEW YORK MARRIAGES - Donna Beers (www e-mail to her was returned) Bailey, Ruth 11 Jan 1684 New York Queens County Thomas Woolsey GENE: Harry Macy, Editor, NYG&B Record. 1 July 1998. "You asked if I had any further information on Ruth bailey or baylis, who married Thomas Woolsey. My colleague Henry Hoff is descended from this couple (I think through a daughter) and has done research on them. He says there is no question Thomas' wife was named Ruth, but he never found any proof that she was Ruth Bailey, although he thinks that is a good possibility. John(1) Baylis of Jamaica did have a daughter Ruth who was unmarried when he made his will in 1682 (see enclosed abstract). As most of her sisters were married by that time, she probably was also close to marriageable age. Henry says there is a marriage date of 11 Jan 1684 that has been quoted for Thomas and Ruth, but he has no idea where it came from. There are no Jamaica church records for this period. Possibly it comes from a family record that no longer exists." PROBATE: Abstracts of Wills. Liber 1-2. [p. 122] p. 451. - John Bayles, SR., Jamaica, 18 Oct 1682. Makes wife Rebecca executor. Leaves to son John 5s. Leaves to son Elias the meadow at furthest east neck, with the orchard, and 3 acres at the lower end of Great meadow. To sons Thomas and Jonathan all the rest of houses, lands and meadows. To daughter Elizabeth Hubbard 10 pounds. Legacies to daughter Mary Hewlett, Damoris Lyns, Abigail Smith, Ruth and Rebecca. Leaves to Elias, son of Nicholas Stilwell and my daughter Rebecca, 10 pounds. Leaves to his wife Rebecca household goods. Mentions grand child, John Bayles. Not witnessed. Proved 13 Dec 1682. [Sent 1 Jul 1998 by Harry Macy, editor NYGBR] LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:56. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO John Gray FOR pounds 240 for home lott of Jamaica bounded W by Thomas Smith, S partly by county road leading to New York & partly by sd Smith in Possession of Eliz. Waters & by Samuel Thurston's land & N by David Wright & Samuel Thurston. Thomas Woolsey 30 acres + 8 acres 19 Mar 1717 - 1 Apr 1718 Ruth Woolsey Lewis Hewlett, Daniel Waters. LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:70. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO Richard Betts for pounds 80 - 19 acres in Jamaica bound N by the highway which leads from Jamaica to the New York Ferry, E & S by land of Daniel Waters & W by land belonging to sd Richard Betts. 19 May 1718 - 1 gber 1719. Thomas Woolsey Mary Waters, John Cornell Ruth Woolsey CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. ON-LINE: Family Treemaker. Woolsey. Posted by Mary A. Kurila 25 Jan 1999. "I am researching the family of William Fowler, born in Providence, RI in 1659 and died 8 May 1714 in Flushing NY he md Mary Thorne. Their dau Sarah Fowler md Richard Woolsey." ALSO: "Searching for the parentage of Ruth Bailey who md Thomas Woolsey. She was probably born in the mid 1600's, maaybe in NY." GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.120B. b. New Amsterdam in New Netherland, to Jamaica, N.Y. 1664. Later to Bedford, Westchester Co., NY. (On 6 Feb 1716, Thomas Woolsey, with others, signs a testimonial at Jamaica. 76p33) 2a Bdfd Union #7. This Thomas is probably the Woolsey of Woolsey's Farm Bedford Town, obtained from Colonel Peter Matthews (see map 1.048) about 1721, and known as Woolsey's Farm by 1736. 80(II)p197. Ref.: 16(VI)p88;65;67p5;69. (14 Jan 1970). GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.63. GENE: Harry Macy, Editor, NYG&B Record. 1 July 1998. "You asked if I had any further information on Ruth bailey or baylis, who married Thomas Woolsey. My colleague Henry Hoff is descended from this couple (I think through a daughter) and has done research on them. He says there is no question Thomas' wife was named Ruth, but he never found any proof that she was Ruth Bailey, although he thinks that is a good possibility. John(1) Baylis of Jamaica did have a daughter Ruth who was unmarried when he made his will in 1682 (see enclosed abstract). As most of her sisters were married by that time, she probably was also close to marriageable age. Henry says there is a marriage date of 11 Jan 1684 that has been quoted for Thomas and Ruth, but he has no idea where it came from. There are no Jamaica church records for this period. Possibly it comes from a family record that no longer exists." PROBATE: Abstracts of Wills. Liber 1-2. [p. 122] p. 451. - John Bayles, SR., Jamaica, 18 Oct 1682. Makes wife Rebecca executor. Leaves to son John 5s. Leaves to son Elias the meadow at furthest east neck, with the orchard, and 3 acres at the lower end of Great meadow. To sons Thomas and Jonathan all the rest of houses, lands and meadows. To daughter Elizabeth Hubbard 10 pounds. Legacies to daughter Mary Hewlett, Damoris Lyns, Abigail Smith, Ruth and Rebecca. Leaves to Elias, son of Nicholas Stilwell and my daughter Rebecca, 10 pounds. Leaves to his wife Rebecca household goods. Mentions grand child, John Bayles. Not witnessed. Proved 13 Dec 1682. [Sent 1 Jul 1998 by Harry Macy, editor NYGBR] LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:56. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO John Gray FOR pounds 240 for home lott of Jamaica bounded W by Thomas Smith, S partly by county road leading to New York & partly by sd Smith in Possession of Eliz. Waters & by Samuel Thurston's land & N by David Wright & Samuel Thurston. Thomas Woolsey 30 acres + 8 acres 19 Mar 1717 - 1 Apr 1718 Ruth Woolsey Lewis Hewlett, Daniel Waters. LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:70. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO Richard Betts for pounds 80 - 19 acres in Jamaica bound N by the highway which leads from Jamaica to the New York Ferry, E & S by land of Daniel Waters & W by land belonging to sd Richard Betts. 19 May 1718 - 1 gber 1719. Thomas Woolsey Mary Waters, John Cornell Ruth Woolsey CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. Thomas and Ruth had the following children: 2 M i. Thomas Woolsey Jr.-8784 was born in Dec 1684 in , Jamaica, Long Island, New York. He died before 1721 in , Westchester, New York. He was buried in Old Cemetery, Bedford, Westchester, New York. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. HIST: Thompson, Benjamin F. History of Long Island from its Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time. 3rd Edition. 1918. Vol. III, page 609. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.121. given by rmw but b/d different than www. HIST: Le Fevre, Ralph. HISTORY OF NEW PALTZ, New York and its old Families, from 1678 to 1820, including the Huguenot pioneers and others who settled in New Paltz previous to the Revolution. Albany. Fort Orange Press. 1903. includes index. p. 96. 1765 - Real Estate Taxation - New Paltz 1765: Thomas Woolsey 1765 5 lbs 5 shillings 0 pence. John Woolsey 1765 0 lbs 5 shillings 0 pence. Jadediah Dean 1765 1 lbs 8 shillings 0 pence. Thomas married (MRIN:3773) Abigail-39230 about 1716 in , , New York. Abigail was born about 1694 in , , New York. 3 F ii. Abigail Woolsey-8785 was born in 1685 in Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, New York. She died on 4 Apr 1716 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York. She was buried in Prospect Cemetery, Jamaica. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. PARISH: Ladd, Horation Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. Ladd, Horatio Oliver, A.M., S.T.D. Rect. Emerit. FHL# 974.7243/ J1 K2l. Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica. Kept by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, Rector from 1710 to 1732. Persons married, ye time wn & place where. p. 278. Wm Woolsey & Derica Williamson of Jamaica at Jamaica 4 Jan 1711 publish'd. p. 278. Henry Dusenbury of Hampstead & Mary Fowler of Flushing 9ber (Sep) 29, 1711 at Flushing, publish'd. p. 280. Benjamin Fowler of ys Prsh & Hannah Dusenburie of ye Prsh of Hempstead 1 Nov 1714 at Jamaica, publ. Persons Buried Ye Time Wn & Place Where. p. 286. [Buried] Ruth ye Daughter of Wm & Derica Woolsey 11 Nov 1712 at Jamaica. p. 286. [Buried] Rebeca Woolsey aged 91 5 Feb 1713 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Abigail ye Daughter of Thos & Ruth Woolsey Apr 4, 1716 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Thos Wiggins xber 12 (Oct) 1728 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Wm Hallett 20 Aug 1729 at Hell-Gate. p. 287. [Buried] Rebecca Wiggins 8ber (Aug) 19, 1731 at Jamaica. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. 4 M iii. William Woolsey I-8782 was born on 30 Jan 1687 in Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, New York. He died on 7 Mar 1771 in Bedford, Westchester, New York. He was buried in Old Bedford Cem. Removed to Bedford Union Cem. 1976.. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.126. b. Jamaica N.Y., to Westchester County, NY about 1708 rmw. Mentioned on pp 137, 139 of Ref. 80(I); records concerning various pieces of land in NE corner of Bedford Town (see map 1. 048) dated 28 May & 24 Jun 1736. conjectural family. PARISH: Ladd, Horatio Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. The Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. p. 278. "The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica. Kept by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, Rector from 1710 to 1732. Persons married, ye time wn & place where" Wm Woolsey & Derica Williamson of Jamaica at Jamaica Jany 4, 1711 publish'd. PARISH: Ladd, Horation Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. Ladd, Horatio Oliver, A.M., S.T.D. Rect. Emerit. FHL# 974.7243/ J1 K2l. Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica. Kept by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, Rector from 1710 to 1732. Persons married, ye time wn & place where. p. 278. Wm Woolsey & Derica Williamson of Jamaica at Jamaica 4 Jan 1711 publish'd. p. 278. Henry Dusenbury of Hampstead & Mary Fowler of Flushing 9ber (Sep) 29, 1711 at Flushing, publish'd. p. 280. Benjamin Fowler of ys Prsh & Hannah Dusenburie of ye Prsh of Hempstead 1 Nov 1714 at Jamaica, publ. Persons Buried Ye Time Wn & Place Where. p. 286. [Buried] Ruth ye Daughter of Wm & Derica Woolsey 11 Nov 1712 at Jamaica. p. 286. [Buried] Rebeca Woolsey aged 91 5 Feb 1713 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Abigail ye Daughter of Thos & Ruth Woolsey Apr 4, 1716 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Thos Wiggins xber 12 (Oct) 1728 at Jamaica. p. 287. [Buried] Wm Hallett 20 Aug 1729 at Hell-Gate. p. 287. [Buried] Rebecca Wiggins 8ber (Aug) 19, 1731 at Jamaica. BAPT: Frost, Josephine C. Mayou Stillman. Baptismal Record of the First Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Copied from the original. microfilm of manuscript (4v.) at the Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York. Includes indexes. p. 25. Magdalena d/o William Wolse & Dirckje. 28 May 1714. Sponsors: Johannes Williams & Antie - p. 36. William s/o William Wolse & Ddirckje Wolse. 2 Jun 1717. Sponsors: Jonathan Wolse, Femmetie Willemse. ON-LINE: 1763 List of the Freeholders in Westchester County, New York William Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford. Richar Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford. William Woolsey, yeoman. Pound Ridge. CEM: Town of Bedford Cemetery Records (1681-1975) FHL # 974.7277/B1 N2b Vol. 8. p. 292-293. "William Woolsey [d. 7 Mar 1771, age 83]" OB D-12. 1771 WW Here Lies The Body of William Woolfey Decea- sed March The 7th AD 1771 in The 84th Year of His Life ------------- HIST: The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132. Number 3. July 2001. p. 171ff. "Customers and Others in the Ledger of Caleb Fowler of New Castle 1754-1760". A transcript of all names which appear in the store and tavern ledger of Caleb Fowler (c. 1708-c.1776-78). He seems to have taken over a tavern run by his father, William, and his brother, Moses. Its exact location has not yet been identified, but it was in the old town of North Castle somewhere near the Philipsburgh line and the Bronx River. Caleb Fowler was a "resident of the West Patent of north Castle [i.e. present New Castle] where he owned a great deal of property" [J. Thomas Scharf, HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, New York, 1886 1:527) . . . " A microfilm copy was obtained by the NYG&B Society Library. p. 173. Green, John 47. sub[sidiary] Thomas Wright 6, Benjamin Brown, Richard Woolsie, Sr. 165. Green, John, Jr. 47; sub[sidiary] Gilburt Wright 99; John Woolsey 152; Moses Fountain, Sr. 175. p. 176. Woolsey/Woolsie, John, John, sub John Green 47 and sub Daniel Totten 20. Woolsie, Benjamin 110 Woolsey, Jr. "son of Richard 14 Woolsie, John "son of William" 152 [ " for your brother Jonathan Woolsey" ] Woolsie, Jonathan, Sr. 144. Woolsie, Richard, Sr. 165. Woolsie, Richard "carpenter son of William" 61. PROBATE: Wood, W. Herbert, B.A., F.A.S.G., New Haven, CT. THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST. Volume XXVI. 973 D25aga__ p.200-201. "Heirs of Noah5 Woolsey, Marlborough, N.Y." "On (31) Mar 1832, Richard I. Woolsey in a petition for Letters Testamentary in the matter of the estate of Noah Woolsey (William4, William3, Thomas2, George1) states that Noah Woolsey died on or about 5 Mar 1832 (aged 82 by gravestone) in the town of Marlborough and left Phebe, his wife, but no issue, and that the heirs at law are: . . . [Very few documents of this nature show so large a related group of people." HIST: Bolton, Robert, Jr. HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF WESTCHESTER FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. New York. Alexander S. Gould. 1848. Use this article with great care, many problems and mistakes. "William of Bedford, second son of Thomas, left two sons, viz. John and Jonathan. John mar. Ruth Owen, by whom he had issue, John of Bedford. The latter mar. ___ Knowlton and had 1. Nathaniel. 2. John of Bedford, who mar. Elizabeeth Fountain, dau. of Ezra. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Old Bedford Cemetery "OB" - Route 22, facing Bedford Green (Sec. 20A, Lot 38); 191 graves marked with field stones. Unmarked grave: Rev. Thomas Denham 1689. Last stone: Elizabeth Belden McDonald 1885.] Woolsey, Thomas s. of George Woolsey* 1656 - 1742 * A gravestone for Thomas Woolsey, dug up in the Old Bedford Cemetery in 1976, bears the dates 1656- 1742. (See Foreword, page iv.) Woolsey, William 7 Mar 1771 Age 83 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-12 Woolsey, William [Jr.] 17 Feb 1761 Age 16 Old Bedford Cemetery OB ---- Woolsey, Abigail w. of Josiah Woolsey 19 Sept 1851 Age 81. Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-8. Woolsey, Josiah 2 June 1861 86/5/25 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-7. Woolsey, Levi s. of Josiah & Abigail Woolsey 20 Oct 1821 Age 19 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-9. William married (MRIN:4660) Dorothy (Dorcas) Williamson Dirckje-8786 daughter of Johannes Williamson-11473 and Magdalena Wynants-11474 (MRIN:4736) on 4 Jan 1711/1712 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Dorothy was born about 1689 in of Flatbush, Long Island, New York. She died on 24 Jan 1764 in Bedford, Westchester, New York. She was buried in Old Bedford Cemetery in Bedford Village. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.126. 2b Bdfd Old Grd. or Derkje Williamse [Dutch]. GENE: "The Hoppe-Hoppen-Hopper Lineage". THE NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. Vol. XL, 1909. vol 40:171. NB. "William Dusinberre's wife was Magdalena, dau of William Woolsey of Bedford (son of Thomas and Ruth_ and Dirckje, dau of Johannes Williamson of Flatbush, etc., and Magdalena Wynants." GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland."Descendants of John Wolsey". p. 16. PARISH: Ladd, Horatio Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. The Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. p. 278. "The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica. Kept by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, Rector from 1710 to 1732. Persons married, ye time wn & place where" Wm Woolsey & Derica Williamson of Jamaica at Jamaica Jany 4, 1711 publish'd. BAPT: Frost, Josephine C. Mayou Stillman. Baptismal Record of the First Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Copied from the original. microfilm of manuscript (4v.) at the Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York. Includes indexes. p. 36. William s/o William Wolse & Ddirckje Wolse. 2 Jun 1717. Sponsors: Jonathan Wolse, Femmetie Willemse. BAPT: Frost, Josephine C. Mayou Stillman. Baptismal Record of the First Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Copied from the original. microfilm of manuscript (4v.) at the Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York. Includes indexes. p. 25. Elizabeth Phillips d/o Daniel Phillips & Catrina Phillips bapt Tues, 10 Aug 1714. Sponsors were Wm Gretman, Dirckje Wolse. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Old Bedford Cemetery "OB" - Route 22, facing Bedford Green (Sec. 20A, Lot 38); 191 graves marked with field stones. Unmarked grave: Rev. Thomas Denham 1689. Last stone: Elizabeth Belden McDonald 1885.] D W Here Lies the Body Dorcas Woolsey the Wi fe of William Woo lsey Who Depart ed This Life Jan ye 21 in ye 70 Year of Her Age 1764 CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Old Bedford Cemetery "OB" - Route 22, facing Bedford Green (Sec. 20A, Lot 38); 191 graves marked with field stones. Unmarked grave: Rev. Thomas Denham 1689. Last stone: Elizabeth Belden McDonald 1885.] Woolsey, Thomas s. of George Woolsey* 1656 - 1742 * A gravestone for Thomas Woolsey, dug up in the Old Bedford Cemetery in 1976, bears the dates 1656- 1742. (See Foreword, page iv.)" Woolsey, William 7 Mar 1771 Age 83 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-12 Woolsey, William [Jr.] 17 Feb 1761 Age 16 Old Bedford Cemetery OB ---- Woolsey, Abigail w. of Josiah Woolsey 19 Sept 1851 Age 81. Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-8. Woolsey, Josiah 2 June 1861 86/5/25 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-7. Woolsey, Levi s. of Josiah & Abigail Woolsey 20 Oct 1821 Age 19 Old Bedford Cemetery OB D-9. [Supplementary List. A Transcription of tombstone inscriptions in the Old Bedford Cemetery, made by Sarah Williamson and Mrs. James Day in 1917, listed 30 burials that were not recorded by the WPA in the 1930s. These included: Woolsey, Dorcas w. of William Woolsey 21 Jan 1764 Age 69 OB Woolsey, William [Jr.] 17 Feb 1761 Age 16 OB 5 M iv. John Woolsey Sr.-8787 was born in 1691 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York. He died in Nov 1751 in Bedford, Westchester, New York. He was buried in Old Cemetery, Bedford, Westchester, New York. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.125. b. Jamaica, NY. rmw. Res. Bedford, Westchester, Co., NY. Ref: 75p117. LAND: Abstract of Deed of Gift: 16 Jul 1740, Recorded 8 Mar 1755. Original p. 52-3. Thomas Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester, N.Y., yeoman, "for ye good will and efectoin which I have and doe bare my son John Woollsey of Bedford" Gave John Woolsey of same town, yeoman, "All that the two folowing peices or persels of land which are part of and included within ye bounds of twelve hundred & eighty accrees of land which I purchased of Petter Mathews of ye city of New York, gent and is lying ... within ... Bedford one peice hearby conveyed is bounded as foloweth begining at ye south east corner of my son Jonathans northernmost peice of land and runs south eleven degrees east thirty five chains and fifty(?) links to my son Richards northeast corner thence along Richards line west eleven eleven degrees south thirty eight chains to ye stake with stones thence north eleven degrees west seven chains & fifty links to a stake with stones thence west eleven degrees south forty two chains to ye line of Bedford Township thence north eleven degrees west twenty five chains to my son Jonathans land thence east eleven degrees north to whare it began containing two hundred & thirty one acrees the other peice begins at ye south east corner of my son Jonathan's southerly peice and from thence runs south eleven degrees east eleven chains & seventy five links to my son William Woollseys land thence west eleven degrees south thirty seven chains and twenty five links to Dusinburys land thence north eleven degrees west eleven chains & seventy-five to my sd son Jonathans land thence east eleven degrees north thirty seven chains & twenty five links to where it began containing forty three accrees and three quarters" Orig. p. 53. Thomas Woolsey his mark. 16 Jul 1740 "in ye fourteenth year of His Majastys reign" Witnesses: George Denis, Samuel Purdy. Acknowledged 1 Sep 1740, before Samuel Purdy, Esq., one of the judges of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas. Recorded 8 Mar 1755, by John Holmes, Clerk. LAND: Abstract of bill of sale MS in Gerard H. Wood Collection William and Sarah Woolsey, executor and executrix of the will of John Woolsey late of Bedford, Westchester Co., N.Y. deceased - sold to Lewis McDonald of Bedford for L400 - 12 Mar 1755, in the 28th year of George II. " A certain tract ... of land ... within . .. Bedford in quantity two hundred and thirty one acres it being the farm where John Woolsey died possest of in the New Purchase ... and it is bounded at the southeast corner of the land which formerly belonged to Jonathan Woolsey late of Bedford deceast which was his northernmost pees of land running south eleven degrees east thirty two chains and fifty links to the north east corner of Richard Woolsey land from thence along Richard Woolsey line west eleven degrees south thirty eight chains to a stake with stones thence north eleven degrees west seven chains and fifty links to a stake with stones thence west eleven degrees south forty two chains to the line of Bedford patten thence north eleven degrees west twenty five chains to the land which formerly belonged to said Jonathan Woolsey thence east eleven degrees north to the place of beginning" William Woolsey, Sarah Woolsey her mark. Witnesses: Richard Woolsey, Jr., John Holmes III On May 25, 1757, Richard Woolsey, Jr. swore before Gilbert Bloomer, judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, that he saw William and Sarah Woolsey execute this deed. No note of recording. PROBATE: Pelletreau, William S. A.M. EARLY WILLS OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. FROM 1664 TO 1784. New York. Francis P. Harper 1898. p. 117. #215. John Woolsey, Sr., Bedford, [Westchester, New York]. Leaves to wife Sarah L60. Rest of estate to be sold and one half the money is to be used for benefit of son Gilbert, "to bring him up to learning." If he die before 21, the estate to go to my brothers William, Jonathan and Richard. Witness: Samuel Miller, Peter Helmes, Geo. McDonald. Dated 16 Aug, proved 27 Nov 1751. HIST: "Stamford's Soldiers - Genealogical Biographies of Revolutionary War Patriots from Stamford, Connecticut." p. 105. JOSIAH HOYT. p. 347-348. GILBERT WOOLSEY, SR. and GILBERT WOOLSEY, JR. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. !PROBATE: Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the year 1893. Publication Fund Series. New York. Printed for the Society. 1895. p. 374-5. Abstracts of Wills - Liber 18:[p. 59]. In the name of God, Amen, 16 Aug 1751 I, John Woolsey, Sr. , of Bedford, in Westchester County, I direct all debts and funeral charges to be paid. I leave to my wife Sarah, 60 pounds. My farm is to be sold, and all money and book debts and bonds to be put at interest for my son Gilbert, "and the interest to be expended upon him to bring him up to learning, and when he leaves off learning, he is to have the interest till he is of age". If he dies under age, then the estate is to go to my brothers, William, Jonathan, and Richard Woolsey. My brother William and my wife Sarah are to sell all lands, and I make them executors. Witnesses, Samuel Miller, Peter Holmes, Lewis McDonald. Mem.- I leave my wife a horse, saddle and bridle, and a feather bed. Proved, 27 Nov 1751. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. PROBATE: 26 Sep 1743 - John Woolsey & Wm Bradford made inventory of Thomas Parvin, of Cohansey, Salem Co, NJ. ?? John married (MRIN:4737) Sarah Woolsey-8788 daughter of Capt. George II Woolsey L.I.Mil-8672 and Hannah van Zandt-8677 (MRIN:4633) about 1726. Sarah was born about 1689 in of Bedford, Westchester, New York. She died in Probably Bedford, Westchester, New York. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.125. see will. www GENE: Reierson, Art. The Wulcy/Woolsey Family. Columbia, South Carolina. 1998. p. 4. Reierson makes many bold statements concerning this family but seldoms follows through with documentation. He states that John Woolsey, s/o Thomas Woolsey and Ruth Bailey md. 1712 to Sarah Woolsey. From John's will we know his wife is named Sarah, but if she was a Woolsey, there couldn't be many choices as to her parentage. At this time, www makes supposition both to her maiden name and her parentage. HIST: "Stamford's Soldiers - Genealogical Biographies of Revolutionary War Patriots from Stamford, Connecticut." p. 105. JOSIAH HOYT. p. 347-348. GILBERT WOOLSEY, SR. and GILBERT WOOLSEY, JR. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. PROBATE: Pelletreau, William S. A.M. EARLY WILLS OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. FROM 1664 TO 1784. New York. Francis P. Harper 1898. p. 117. #215. John Woolsey, Sr., Bedford, [Westchester, New York]. Leaves to wife Sarah L60. Rest of estate to be sold and one half the money is to be used for benefit of son Gilbert, "to bring him up to learning." If he die before 21, the estate to go to my brothers William, Jonathan and Richard. Witness: Samuel Miller, Peter Helmes, Geo. McDonald. Dated 16 Aug, proved 27 Nov 1751. PROBATE: Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the year 1893. Publication Fund Series. New York. Printed for the Society. 1895. p. 374-5. Abstracts of Wills - Liber 18:[p. 59]. In the name of God, Amen, 16 Aug 1751 I, John Woolsey, Sr. , of Bedford, in Westchester County, I direct all debts and funeral charges to be paid. I leave to my wife Sarah, 60 pounds. My farm is to be sold, and all money and book debts and bonds to be put at interest for my son Gilbert, "and the interest to be expended upon him to bring him up to learning, and when he leaves off learning, he is to have the interest till he is of age". If he dies under age, then the estate is to go to my brothers, William, Jonathan, and Richard Woolsey. My brother William and my wife Sarah are to sell all lands, and I make them executors. Witnesses, Samuel Miller, Peter Holmes, Lewis McDonald. Mem.- I leave my wife a horse, saddle and bridle, and a feather bed. Proved, 27 Nov 1751. 6 M v. Jonathan Woolsey-8789 was born in 1695 in Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, New York. He died in 1754 in , Ulster, New York. He was buried in Riverview Cem., Marlboro, Ulster, New York. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. BAPT: Frost, Josephine C. Mayou Stillman. Baptismal Record of the First Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Copied from the original. microfilm of manuscript (4v.) at the Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York. Includes indexes. p. 25. Magdalena d/o William Wolse & Dirckje. 28 May 1714. Sponsors: Johannes Williams & Antie - p. 36. William s/o William Wolse & Ddirckje Wolse. 2 Jun 1717. Sponsors: Jonathan Wolse, Femmetie Willemse. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. PROBATE: Genealogical Data from Administration Papers. Abstracted by Dr. Kenneth Scott. National Society of Colonial Dames. 1972. FHL# 974.7 D2g. p. 371. Jonathan Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester County, New York. Renunciation (18 Jan 1754) of Abigail Woolsey, w. of dec'd in favor of William Dusenbery of Bedford. Wit: Lewis McDonald, John Holmes, Jr. 8 Feb 1754 - Admin. granted - Book 1 1/2 485-B #902204-5 to Wm Dusenberry. Jonathan married (MRIN:4738) Abigail-28889 . Abigail was born about 1697 in of Bedford, Westchester, New York. PROBATE: Genealogical Data from Administration Papers. Abstracted by Dr. Kenneth Scott. National Society of Colonial Dames. 1972. FHL# 974.7 D2g. p. 371. Jonathan Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester County, New York. Renunciation (18 Jan 1754) of Abigail Woolsey, w. of dec'd in favor of William Dusenbery of Bedford. Wit: Lewis McDonald, John Holmes, Jr. LAND: Close, George R. General index to the land records of the town - city of Stamford, CT. Series 1 covering all of the instruments recorded in the years 1641 to 1900, both inclusive. Boston : Remington Rand, 1949. 4 vols. 4:Grantee - Woolsey, Gilbert. From John Morehouse G:154. Warranty Deed 25 Aug 1762. 10 Jan 1763. - Woolsey, John. From David Bates, et ux I:174 Deed 30 Dec 1774. 31 Dec 1774. 2:Grantor - Woolsey, Abigail To Joseph Huested H:119 Quit Claim 18 Mar 1768. 9 Apr 1768. Woolsey, Gilbert. To Silas Hoyt, et al L:547. Warranty Deed. 12 Sep 1787. 22 Mar 1791. " " To Josiah Hoyt N: 47 Warranty Deed. 20 Aug 1793. 17 Mar 1794. " " To Munson G. Raymond P:293. Quit Claim. 18 Sep 1809. 18 Sep 1809. " , Israel. To Silas Hoyt, et al L:709 Warranty Deed. 21 Sep 1792. 2 Feb 1793. " " To Munson G. Raymond P:324. Quit Claim 2 Mar 1810. 15 Mar 1810. " , John To Munson G. Raymond P:339. Quit Claim 12 Apr 1810. 19 Apr 1810. " , Rebecca To Joseph Huested H:119. Quit Claim 18 Mar 1768. 9 Apr 1768. 7 F vi. Elizabeth Woolsey-27562 was born on 24 Jun 1696 in Flushing, Long Island, New York. GENE: Pierce, F. C. THE FIELD FAMILY GENEALOGY. 1901. p. 183. FHL film# 908983. See in Newberry Library folder. GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. THE WOOLSEY FAMILY --- A Genealogy in the form of annotated Family Charts. 1939-1969 The NYG&B Society. 2.121. Elizabeth is not in rmw, but put here by www as conjectural source. GENE: Pierce, Frederick C. THE FIELD FAMILY GENEALOGY, being all the Field family in America whose ancestors were in this country prior to 1700. Chicago. 2 vols. 1901. p. 183. FHL film# 908983. Item 1-2. Elizabeth married (MRIN:6082) John Field-11252 son of Benjamin Field-25536 and Hannah Bowne-25538 (MRIN:6083) on 12 Jan 1720 in Flushing, Long Island, New York. John was born on 13 Jan 1694 in Flushing, Long Island, New York. He died on 23 Mar 1773 in Flushing, Long Island, New York. GENE: Pierce, Frederick C. THE FIELD FAMILY GENEALOGY, being all the Field family in America whose ancestors were in this country prior to 1700. Chicago. 2 vols. 1901. p. 183. FHL film# 908983. Item 1-2. 8 M vii. Richard Woolsey Rev.War-1489 was born in 1697 in Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, New York. He died - 12 Dec 1782 in Marlborough, Ulster, New York. He was buried in Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Marlborough. HIST: Cochrane, Charles H. THE HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. ILLUSTRATED. POUGHKEEPSIE 1887. p. 171 The Woolsey Family. William and John Woolsey were brought up in Dutchess County, but came to Marlborough some time prior to 1763. John Woolsey's name appears among the contributors to the fund raised in 1763 to build the Presbyterian Church in Marlborough. William Woolsey was an ensign in the Continental army. He left a son, Richard I., who md Chlorine Woolsey, his cousin. Their children were: David Woolsey, Thomas Woolsey and John Woolsey, who all lived and died in this town. David md Lucy T. Meech, of Westfield, Mass. Their children were: George, William , Richard, C. Meech, Mary, Ellen. William and Richard lived in Milton, but are now dead. Mary md John Atkins and went to Cornwall where she died. Ellen is the wife of Ira Wood and lives in Cornwall. C. Meech is a lawyer, living in Milton. He has been honored with many public positions, from justice of the peace to the state legislature. At present he represents the town in the Board of Supervisors. [Richard Woolsey, of Marlborough, ancestor of Peter V. L. Purdy, John Ed. Woolsey, Mrs. John Lawson and others, is thought to have been a brother or cousin of William and John Woolsey.] William Woolsey (2) md a cousin Chlorine Woolsey, and settled in Jersey City, and had children: David, Thomas, John and Electa. GENE: Wilford W. Whitaker, Murray,UT descends through Thomas & Sarah Pierce !GENE: James W. Woolsey, Richland, WA descends through Josiah & Mary Owen. !GENE: Donald C. Hart, Santa Cruz, CA descends through Henry & Abigail --. !GENE: Grace Woolsey Nelson, Onamia, MN descends through Jos. & Mary Haight. !GENE: James C. McKnight,Ft Collins,CO descends through Thomas & Sarah Pierce !GENE: C. M. Woolsey, Bedford, NY descends through Rev. Benjamin & Abigail. !GENE: Marjorie Young, descends through John & Abigail Whitehead !GENE: Hart, Donald C. "A Woolsey Family of America 1623-1975". 929.273 W887a. Santa Cruz, CA. !GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. Merrimack, NH ON-LINE: Family Treemaker. Woolsey. Posted by Mary A. Kurila 25 Jan 1999. "I am researching the family of William Fowler, born in Providence, RI in 1659 and died 8 May 1714 in Flushing NY he md Mary Thorne. Their dau Sarah Fowler md Richard Woolsey." ALSO: "Searching for the parentage of Ruth Bailey who md Thomas Woolsey. She was probably born in the mid 1600's, maybe in NY." ON-LINE: 1763 List of the Freeholders in Westchester County, New York William Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford. Richar Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford. William Woolsey, yeoman. Pound Ridge. ON-LINE: 1770 TAX ROLLS - Town of Amenia, Dutchess County, New York. Woolsey, Denton Woolsie, Richard ON-LINE: 1772 TAX ROLLS - Town of Amenia, Dutchess County, New York. Woolsey, Richard HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 201. Cattle Marks - At the time of the first settlemnt of this community, it was the custom to brand cattle that each owner might readily distinguish his property from that of his neighbors. Following is a description of some of the various brands, from 1750 to 1790, approximately: Richard Woolsey - A crop in ye Left & with Slits and a Slit in the right Ear Richard Woolsey - A Crop of the Left Ear a Slit in the Crop a half penny the under Side of the Same Ear a Slit in the Right Ear a half penny the back Side of the Same. LAND: Ulster County, New York DEEDS. FHL film #944756. 26:414. 2 May 1754. Richard Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester County, New York, yeoman TO Richard Harcourt of Precinct of Highlands in Ulster County, yeoman for 425 pounds - land on W side of Hudsons River in Precinct of Highlands in Ulster County - Begin at a pitch pine sapling marked on 4 sides with stones round it thence N 73 degree W 79 chains to a S &S round it thence S 1 degree 36 chains to a stake with a heap of stones round it thence S 73 degrees E 71 chains & 50 links to Hudsons River to a white pine bush marked on 4 sides with a heap of stones round it thence along the river to the place where it begun. 256 acres. Bounded N & W by Richard Woolsey's land and E by Hudsons River.Signed: Richard Woolsey Witnesses: Thomas Knowlton, Benjamin Woolsey, Thomas Woolsey. 12 Feb 1761 Thomas Knowlton appeared and swore he was a witness to above deed and Richard's signature. Recorded 25 Feb 1825. HIST: The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132. Number 3. July 2001. p. 171ff. "Customers and Others in the Ledger of Caleb Fowler of New Castle 1754-1760". A transcript of all names which appear in the store and tavern ledger of Caleb Fowler (c. 1708-c.1776-78). He seems to have taken over a tavern run by his father, William, and his brother, Moses. Its exact location has not yet been identified, but it was in the old town of North Castle somewhere near the Philipsburgh line and the Bronx River. Caleb Fowler was a "resident of the West Patent of north Castle [i.e. present New Castle] where he owned a great deal of property" [J. Thomas Scharf, HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, New York, 1886 1:527) . . . " A microfilm copy was obtained by the NYG&B Society Library. p. 173. Green, John 47. sub[sidiary] Thomas Wright 6, Benjamin Brown, Richard Woolsie, Sr. 165. Green, John, Jr. 47; sub[sidiary] Gilburt Wright 99; John Woolsey 152; Moses Fountain, Sr. 175. p. 176. Woolsey/Woolsie, John, John, sub John Green 47 and sub Daniel Totten 20. Woolsie, Benjamin 110 Woolsey, Jr. "son of Richard 14 Woolsie, John "son of William" 152 [ " for your brother Jonathan Woolsey" ] Woolsie, Jonathan, Sr. 144. Woolsie, Richard, Sr. 165. Woolsie, Richard "carpenter son of William" 61. HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 355. 30 Dec 1765. This day was chosen a committee for Marlbough Society (of Presbyterians) & a Moderator. Thomas Knowlton, Moderator; Capt. Richard Woolsey, Lieut. Lewis Du Bois, Eliphalet Platt & Daniel Thurston, Committee. LAND: Ulster County, County Clerk, Kingston, New York. "In 1770, Richard conveyed to Thomas Knowlton 211 acres of land. I think he was the original Richard." (C.M. Woolsey 1 Sep 1920 to W. Herbert Wood.) LAND: Ulster County, New York DEEDS FHL film# 944743 GG:339. 28 Apr 1770. Richard Woolsey of Bedford in County of Westchester and Province of New York, yeoman, of the 1st part and sold to Thomas Knowlton, yeoman of Precinct of Newburgh County of Ulster for 220 pounds - all of land being in precinct of New Burgh begin at Hudson River at a pitch pine sapling - standing in the NE corner of Richard Harcourt's farm marked on 4 sided with stones runs N 73 degrees W 82 chains and 40 links to a chestnut tree N 1 degree W 34 chains & 60 links - S 63 degrees 92 chains and 50 links to Hudson river to beginning. 211 acres. Witnessed by Richard Woolsey and Joseph Woolsey. signed by Richard Woolsey /seal/ ON-LINE: Descendants of Thomas Knowlton of Bedford, Westchester, New York. July 2002. - Thomas Knowlton, b 7 Apr 1720, Bedford, Westchester Co, NY, d abt 1800/01, Ontario, Canada. a Farmer. probably had different mother if this is his correct birthdate. 1752 - wit deed in Marlborough, Ulster Co, NY. 1763 - signed subscription pledge for Marlborough Presbyterian church. 1770 conveyed 200 acres in Ulster Co, by Richard Woolsey. - md abt 1746, Bedford, Anna ____?, b 4 Jul 1725. children: i. Enoch Knowlton, b 1760, d 1827/28, Leeds Co, Ontario, Canada, farmer. ii. Thomas Knowlton, b 6 Jul 1761, Bethlehem, Albany Co, NY, d. Canada, farmer. "In 1801, John Woolsey, (son of above Richard), conveyed to Henry Woolsey his son, 203 acres of land in 1801." (C.M. Woolsey 1 Sep 1920 to W.H. Wood) "In 1811, Moses Woolsey, son of Daniel Woolsey, and Abigail his wife gave a deed. (ibid cm. woolsey to wh wood) 4444"In 1811, Thomas Woolsey & Rebecca his wife gave a deed 117 acres. (ibid) "In 1823, David Woolsey and Rebecca his wife, deed dated 1822, also gave a deed in 1823." (ibid) "In 1824, Richard S. Woolsey and Phebe his wife gave a deed." (ibid) "In 1754, Richard Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester Co. have a deed to Richard Harcourt. 256 acres. This was the first Richard Woolsey. Witnessed by Benjamin Woolsey and Thomas Woolsey. (ibid) CEM: Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. FHL # 974.7277/B1 N2b Vol. 8 p. 393. "Richard Woolsey [1697 - 1777] Son of Thomas Woolsey." BU 7 LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Discovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW" p. 353. Subscriptions for the Presbyterian Church, Marlborough, 8 Aug 1763, includes Thos Woolsey, 2 lbs, John Woolsey, 2 lbs, Benj. Woolsey, 3 lbs, Richard Woolsey, 3 lbs. LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Discovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW" The First Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths. Presbyterian Churchyard, Marlborough, Ulster, New York. p. 305. Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, aged 80 years. [Discrepancy here - s/ b 1779?? Will was written 1 Apr 1779?? www] Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. ?? [mentioned in will written 1779] PROBATE: In the Name of God, amen. [21 Apr 1779] I Richard Wolsey of Bedford in Westminister County and State of New York, being Weakly in Body But of perfect Mind and Memory Thanks be given unto God, calling to mind the Mortality of my body and Knowing that it is appointed to all Men once to Die, Do make and ordain this My Last Will and Testament That is to Say Principally and first of all I give and Recommend My Soul into the Hand of Almighty God that gave it and My Body I Recommend to the Earth to be buried in Decent Christian Manner at the Discretion of My Executors Nothing Doubting but at the general Resurection I Shall Receive the Same again by the Mighty Power of God, and as touching Such Worldly Estate Wherewith it has Pleased God to Bless me in this Life I give demise and Dispose of the same in the following Manner and Form: First I make Daniel Wolsey of New Palze and Jacob Griffin of Fish Kills the Sole Executors of this My Last Will and Testament. I give to Sarah My well beloved Wife all My Estate During her life and after her Decease to be Divided in the following Manner: First I give to my Eldest Son Thomas ten pounds New York Money the Rest of my Estate I give to my three Daughters that is Ruth, Sarah and Hannah to be divided Equally Between the three, and I do hereby Utterly disallow Revoke and Disanul all and every other former Testament Wills Legacies Bequests and Executons, by me in any ways Before Named Willed and Bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be My Last Will and Testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto Set My Hand and Seal this twenty first Day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Nine. Signed Sealed Published Pronounced and Declared by the Said Richard Woley as his Last Will and Testament in the Presence of us Who in his Presence and in the Presence of Each other have here to subscribed our names. Justes Harris James Clark Richard Wooley Bettey Clark Dutchess County, New York Probates Records. p. 413. [12 Dec 1782] Dutchess County FS Be it remembered that on the twelfth day of Decemb. one thousand Seven hundred and eighty two personally came and appeared before me Thomas Tredwell Judge of the Court of Probates of the State of New York James Clark of Bedford in the County of Westchester yeoman and being duly sworn on his oath declared that he did see Richard Wolley Sign and seal the within written Instrument purporting to be the Will of the said Richard Wooley bearing date the twenty first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine and heard him publish and declare the same as and for his last Will and testament. That at the time thereof he the said Richard Wooley was of Sound disposing mind and memory to the best of the knowledge and belief of him the deponent and that his name subscribed to the said will is of his own proper hand writing when he subscribed as a Witness to the said Will in the presence of the Testator and that he the deponent saw Gustes Harris and Betty Clark the other witnesses to the said Will subscribe their names as Witnesses thereto in the Testators presence. Thomas Tredwell Judge of Probates Dutchess County FS Be it also Remembered that on the same day Jacob Griffin one of the Executors of the within written will of Richard Wooley likewise appeared before me the said Thomas Tredwell and was duly sworn to the true execution and performance of the said will by taking the oath of Executor as by law appointed before me. = Thomas Tredwell Judge of Probates HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 305. "The Marlborough Presbyterian churchyard is almost as old as the first two spoken of; the first interment there was in Mar, 1764 - a child of James Merritt; and the following are some of the oldest graves I find there: Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, [wrote his will 1779] aged 80 years. Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. [Will probated 12 Dec 1782, see below] HIST: C. M. Woolsey - writer of "History of Ulster" He says his great grandfather had 8 boys and 4 girls and he can hardly give his own descent, let any one else's. Correspondence of C. M. Woolsey, attorney at Law and Real Estate, Milton, NY, 7 Nov 1923 to W. Herbert Wood. "I am not yet satisfied about when and where Richard Woolsey died, nor Sarah Fowler. I had always supposed that they died here. I am positive that Richard built a log house and afterward added a stone addition to it in this town. And that they raised a part if not all of their twelve children here. I find by ancient records that he was identified with this town for years. He was among the early subscribers to the erection of the Presbyterian Church, and had a patent of land here and held offices. His name appears in many records - in assessment to work on highways, etc. If he died anywhere else he must have gone there in his old age. After his son John, my great grandfather, took the premises that Richard lived with him. There is an ancient field stone marked "R.W." in the Presbyterian graveyard near his son John's grave. There is no WILL of his recorded in Ulster or Westchester counties. Then I wrote to Albany about his and his wife's WILL and there is no record there. In your letter of August to me, you speak of finding his WILL in NY city. Did you find it in the Surrogates Office? Or where did you find it? I am positive that this Richard Woolsey is the original Richard. Please give me what information you can. Very truly yours, C. M. Woolsey. Richard & Sarah moved from Jamaica, L.I. to near Bedford, NY, about 1719, just prior to the birth of their first child. Richard's father Thomas followed to Westchester Co, abt 1721. J. W. Woolsey believed that Richard moved to Dutchess Co., NY abt 1721. Here he purchased land and moved onto it. This is where he died, and left a WILL. But many years later his grave was moved to the Old Burying Ground Cemetery at Bedford, NY. That is where it is to be found today - 1982. But the dates on his tomb stone do not agree with some dates in his WILL. A large percent of the American Woolsey Family can trace their Family back to one of the children of this family. There are some problems with dates here, as the later dates show children being born to Sarah when she was over 50 years old. More research needed! One of the biggest problem start right with his will which states clearly it was written in 1779 and probated in 1782, while the tombstone dates state 1777 was when he died. HIST: Bolton, Robert, Jr. HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF WESTCHESTER FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. New York. Alexander s. Gould. 1848. p. 548-549. Use this article with great care, many mistakes and problems. GENE: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Vol. 58. 1927. check index for pages. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12. LAND: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Jan 1925. Westchester County, New York Miscellaneous Land and Property. p. 322. Gilbert Palmer sold to Jacob Griffin of Fishkill in Dutchess County, executor for Richard Wolsey of Bedford, dec'd, land in Bedford, bounded by land formerly belonging to Josiah Woolsey, dec'd. 16 May 1787. LAND: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Jan 1925. Westchester County, New York Miscellaneous Land and Property. p. 244. James McDonalds mortgaged land in Beford, bounded by land late the property of Richard Woolsey, dec'd, and of "Mathew" Fountain, late dec'd. 28 May 1789. CORRES: Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. (715) 284-7085. mevg@cuttingedge.net. 2 Nov 1998. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years. ON-LINE: Woolsey-L@rootsweb.com. Posted 6 Oct 1999 by Renee' and John Sykes "My husband's line joins in through George's son Thomas, to Richard, to Daniel, to Sarah Woolsey, to Noah Woolsey Kelsey, to Benjamin Fuller Kelsey, to Lavina Augusta Kelsey, to Clayton Frank Dickinson, to Joanne Carol Dickinson (my husband's mother) also the lines cross at Richard's (1697) son Henry, to Daniel, to Richard (1779), to Sarah Woolsey and she md Noal Woolsey Kelsey down through their son Benjamin. Very confusing, only took me several days to figure it out and four wall charts. It is from George back and some dates before. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Renee' and John." DAR: Daughters of the American Revolution Graves Index. FHL film# 860330. 3:106. Bedford, Westchester Co., NY. Union Cemetery abt 2 miles W of village a little S of the main road to Bedford Station - opened abt 1850 - older stones moved here with bodies - 1730-1901. 3:106. Woolsey, Josiah 1738 - 17880 s/o Richard Woolsey Thomas 1772 - 1839 s/o Richard Woolsey (s/b Josiah Woolsey?) Tamar 1772 - 1867 (s/b 1857?) his wife (wife of Thomas Woolsey) MONUMENT Family from Robert Woolsey of Ipswich, England, the father of Cardinal Woolsey through George Woolsey, b 1647 at Flushing, Long Island, New York and from him come Col. Melancthon Taylor Woolsey b 1720 Dosoris, L. I., NY, died in Canadian French War in 1758. Major General Melancthon Taylor (s/b Lloyd) Woolsey b Dosoris, L. I. in 1758, died in Trenton, NJ. 1819. Col. Melancthon Taylor Woolsey b Dosoris, L. I. 1780 d Utica, NY 1838. Record of all family are in same plot. DAR: Personal correspondence and DAR application papers of Carolyn Woolsey Fillers Jennings. May 2002. - Richard Woolsey, resided at New Marlborough, Ulster Co, NY assisted in estab. American Independence, while acting in the capacity of Road Commissioner and signer of ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION FOR CONTINENTAL CONGRESS 29 Apr 1775 in Ulster Co, NY. from NEW MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER CO, NY, IN THE REVOLUTION, edited by Ruth P. Heidgerd 1997, pg 20 - "signers of Articles of Association from New Marlborough". ON-LINE: Alliance Chapter, NSDAR - Chapter ancestors - Roll of Honor - Woolsey, Richard (Sara) - Pennsylvania - SUPPOSITION by www - doesn't know of another Richard Woolsey, wife Sarah, of PA.?? DOCUMENTS: [Sent 19 Aug 2002 - by E. W. Knowlton, 361 Arizona Ave., NE, Atlanta, GA 30307.] PETITION OF INHABITANTS OF NORTH CASTLE, about 1750 . . . . [From Westchester Documents - Edward Raymond Collection - Town Historians' Collection] "To the Right Honorable George Clarke Esq Commander in Chief of the Province of New york, &c. - The Petition of the Inhabitants of North Castle and bordering neighbors Hunibly Sheweth, That your poore petitioners are greivously oprest by francies Pellem Esqr Justice of the peach for this county for that the said Justice Is a man that is given to Drinking and for the most part apears a party and Is very Rash In way of Speaking in Liccor that If it Was not for the Law of man he would kill a man before night, and he will have Special warrants and Send for poore men and then perswade them it Will be Charge to them and If they would not give him some money In pocket and treat him with puch which I his usal drink, and ye sd compleaner was forsd so to do and when money has been paid and a Receit given he has given Judgment again for some of that money by - By these and many other Like actions wee are much oprest therefore wee yoour Honours poore petione's pray you would Suspend him from acting as a Justice any Longer that we may Injoy peace and wee shall Ever pray for your long administration ouer us, and In the main time beg Leive to subscribe our Selves your Honours most obedient Humble Servants. William Dusinberre Rychard Wooley Reuben Hallam Dauid Febe Robert Knoulton Jacob Forman Robert Carpenter Joseph Sarls Joseph Fowler Richard Honeywell Henery Dusinberre [ abt 1750 ] CEME: Town of Bedford - Westchester County, New York - Bedford Historical Records Vol VIII - Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. Community and Church Graveyards and Family Burial Grounds. An Alpohabetical List of Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records. A Bicentennial Publication. Bedford Hills, New York. Published by the Town of Bedford 1977. [Sent by Fred Woolsey] [Bedford Union Cemetery "BU" Clinton Road (Sec. 17, Lot 16); organized 1864; still in use. Oldest stone: Thomas Woolsey 1730. Woolsey, Thomas s. of George Woolsey 1656 - 1742 BU 7 Woolsey, Daniel s. of Thomas & Tamar Woolsey 1791 - 1832 BU 7 Woolsey, Frank Aug 1974 BU 7 Woolsey, Josiah s. of Richard Woolsey 1738 - 1780 BU 7 Woolsey, Mary d. of Thomas Woolsey 1794 - 1821 BU 7 w. of James Pine Woolsey, Mary w. of Seth Lyon - 1 Apr 1894 89/1/0 BU 103 Woolsey, Richard s. of Thomas Woolsey 1697 - 1777 BU 7 - [problem here is death date, which s/b aft 1779 www] Woolsey, Simeon s. of Thomas & Tamar Woolsey 1795 - 1891 BU 7 Woolsey, Tamar Brady w. of Thomas Woolsey 1772 - 1857 BU 7 Woolsey, Thomas s. of Josiah Woolsey 1765 - 1839 BU 7 Woolsey, Zilpha Martin w. of Simeon Woolsey 1802 - 1887 BU 7 Richard married (MRIN:644) Sarah Fowler-1490 daughter of William Fowler-1500 and Mary Thorn-1501 (MRIN:648) on 24 Jan 1717/1718 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York. Sarah was born in 1698 in Flushing, Long Island, Queens, New York. She died after 1779 in Marlborough, Ulster, New York. She was buried in Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Marlborough. HIST: Fowler, Christian Cecilia. "History of the Fowler Family". DAR# 265987 - Fowler motto: "He is wise who Watches." - INTERNET: Thorn(e) Genealogy. http://thorn.pair.com/williamthorne1/d829.htm ON-LINE: Family Treemaker. Woolsey. Posted by Mary A. Kurila 25 Jan 1999. "I am researching the family of William Fowler, born in Providence, RI in 1659 and died 8 May 1714 in Flushing NY he md Mary Thorne. Their dau Sarah Fowler md Richard Woolsey." ALSO: "Searching for the parentage of Ruth Bailey who md Thomas Woolsey. She was probably born in the mid 1600's, maybe in NY." GENE: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Vol. 58. 1927. check index for pages. GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland."Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12-13 !PROBATE: Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the year 1893. Publication Fund Series. New York. Printed for the Society. 1893. p. 132-3. Abstracts of Wills - Liber 8:[p. 323]. In the name of God, Amen, this 24 Jan 1711. I, William Fowler of Flushing, in Queens County, yeoman, being in perfect health. . . . My son Joseph is to pay to my daughter Sarah, 30 pounds, when she is 18, and to my daughter Hannah, the same. . . . I leave to my daughter, Mary Dusenbury, a negro girl, and to my daughter Rebecca another, and 30 pounds to each. . . . To my daughters Sarah and Hannah, 20 pounds. I leave to my son, Benjamin Fowler, all my lands and meadows in Flushing and he shall pay to his mother 100 pounds, and 25 pounds to each of my daughters Rebecca, Sarah, and Hannah. I make my wife Mary Fowler and Jeremiah Fowler of Eastchester, and William Thorne of Flushing, exeutors. Witnesses, Joseph Hunt, Thyomas Cook, Daniel Clarke. Proved 25 May 1714. GENE: Purdy, Clayton C. GILBERT PURDY OF NEWBURGH, NY. 1721-1778. 30 Meadowbrook Road, Syosset, NY 11791. 1981. 929.273 P972pc v.5. pt.1. p.3707. In 1762 the old Precinct of the Highlands was divided into the Precincts of New Windsor and Newburgh - Newburgh embracing the towns of Marlborough and Plattekill in Ulster County, and the present town of Newburgh in Orange County. and Also: 16 Apr 1770, Samuel Fowler, Stephen Wiggins, Leonard Smith and Nathan Purdy petitioned Governor Cadwallader Colden for a "Royal Charter of Incorporation of St. George's Church in thne Parish of Newburgh and County of Ulster". The Charter was granted 2 May 1770. Also: Among the persons who refused to sign a pledge of association drawn up by a Committee of Safety and Observation in 1775. "Those who refused to sign were "deemed enemies of their country" - American Archives, Vol.ume 2, 4th Series, page 471 + "History of Orange County and Newburgh". E. M. Ruttenber 1875, p. 197 et seq.) were: - Nehemiah Fowler md Abigail Purdy, Stephen Wiggins md miss Purdy, Isaiah Purdy, Gilbert Purdy, Nathan Purdy, John Wiggins, John Wiggins, Jr., Abel Flewwelling, Jonathan Pine Samuel Fowler, Jonathan Brundage, Nathan Purdy, Jun., Daniel Purdy, Daniel Purdy Jun., David Horton, Daniel Durland, John Morrell, Daniel Gedney, Joseph Gedney, Daniel Denton md a dau of David Purdy, Daniel Denton, Jun. HIST: Fowler, Christian Cecilia. "History of the Fowler Family". DAR# 265987 - Fowler motto: "He is wise who Watches." - Sara Fowler, born after 1698/9 md Richard Woolsey and settled at Beford, NY. Sara was the dau of William Fowler and Mary Thorn. She and her brothers and sisters were all (probably) born at Flushing, Long Island, New York. HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 305. "The Marlborough Presbyterian churchyard is almost as old as the first two spoken of; the first interment there was in Mar, 1764 - a child of James Merritt; and the following are some of the oldest graves I find there: Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, aged 80 years. Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Idscovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW" The First Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths. Presbyterian Churchyard, Marlborough, Ulster, New York. p. 305. Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, aged 80 years. [Discrepancy here - s/ b 1779?? www] Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. PROBATE: Hoff, Henry B. editor. LONG ISLAND SOURCE RECORDS. from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore. 1987. FHL# 974.721 H29L. 2:181. Mary Thorne b abt 1669; d not earlier than 1714. Abt 1687 md William Fowler b Providence, R.I; bur 11 May 1714 in Flushing, a son of henry and Rebecca (Newell) Fowler of Providence. 2:181. The family of William and Mary (Thorne) Fowler appear in the Flushing Census of 1698 as: William ffowler Carp [enter] and Mary his wife 8 (The "8" indicates 8 persons in the family) William John Joseph Benj Mary Rebeca Negro Jack 1 (The "1" indicates 1 slave) (DHNY:1:662-3). 2:181. On 29 Nov 1711, "Mary ye wife of Wm Fowler" and daughter Mary were baptized at Flushing by the Rev. Thomas Poyer (Grace Church, Jamaica, p. 269). 2:181. William Fowler was a carpenter and blacksmith in Flushing who invested heavily in land in Harrison's Purchase at Rye, including property recently a part of the Whitelaw Reid estate. before his death William Fowler transferred 720 acres of his Westchester holdings to his sons William, John and Joseph (Rec:58:264-5). In his will, executed 24 Jan 1711 and proved 25 May 1714, he left all lands and meadows in Flushing together with "his shope and tools of the smith's trade" to his son benjamin, when of age, and dived 900 acres of land in Westchester County between his sons Jeremiah, Thomas and Henry, also when they came of age. His four daughters received a total of 80 pounds, plus a Negro girl for the eldest, who was then married. Reference was made in the will to "50 pounds due from Father Thorne," an item which appeared in the will of John Thorne as a bequest to Daughter mary Fowler." His wife, together with Jeremiah Fowler of Eastchester and "William Thorne of Flushing," presumably his brother-in-law William Thorne, were named executors (WNYHS:2:132 cf N.Y. Co. Wills:8:323). The children of William and Mary (Thorne) Fowler, the first six in the order of the Flushing Census, and the others as named in the will, were: [Then follows a list of 11 children]. 2:182. Sarah Fowler b abt 1700; md Richard Woolsey and settled in Bedford (Rec:58: 265). 9 F viii. Deborah Woolsey-9187 was born about 1709 in Newtown, Long Island, New York. HIST: Thompson, Benjamin F. History of Long Island from its Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time. 3rd Edition. 1918. Vol. III, page 609. Thomas Lawrence married Deborah, dau of Thomas Woolsey of Newtown, 5 Jan 1730 but removed from the town. GENE: Woodhull, Mary Gould & Francis Bowes Stevens. WOODHULL GENEALOGY. The Woodhull Family in England and America. Henry T. Coates & Co. Philadelphia. 1904. p. 53 ff. Thomas Lawrence md 3 Jan 1730, Deborah, d/o Thomas Woolsey, of Newtown, Long Island. They had four children. He died in 1752. ON-LINE: Ancestry.Com. 21 Nov 2000. American Genealogical-Biographica Index (AGBI). Gen. Col. of the "Boston Transcript". 1906-1941. 21 Jul 1926, 4210. Deborah married (1-MRIN:4976) Thomas Lawrence Major-9190 son of John Lawrence Capt.-9182 and Deborah Woodhull Wodhull-9183 (MRIN:4973) on 5 Jan 1730 in Newtown, Queens, Long Island, New York. Thomas was born about 1693 in Newtown, Long Island, New York. He died in 1752 in West Farms, Westchester, New York. HIST: Thompson, Benjamin F. History of Long Island from its Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time. 3rd Edition. 1918. Vol. III, page 609. !GENE: Woodhull, Mary Gould & Francis Bowes Stevens. WOODHULL GENEALOGY. The Woodhull Family in England and America. Henry T. Coates & Co. Philadelphia. 1904. p. 253 ff. "Americans of Royal Descent" from Charles H. Browning. HIST: New York State Historian. Third Annual Report of the State Historian of the State of New York. 1898. Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crafford Co. New York and Albany. p. 387-389. "At a Gen'all Court of Assizes, held in the city of New Yorke by his Ma'ties Authority, begun the 7 Oct 1672. p. 125. The Names of the Jurors: Robert Jackson John Seaman William Wilkins Richard Stillwell John Adams Robert Terry Nathaniel Denton George Woolsey Thom: Townsend John Garland Jonathan Hazard Thom: Lawrence [Laws of the Colony of New York: p. 80. [Jurors. This to follow the 3d clause.] "That the payment of Jurymen and witnesses, who shall attende the Court of Sessions or Assizes shall bee from the tyme of theire goeing from whom to their returne." [This to followe.] "That whosever shall bee nominated to serve in a Jury and without Just Cause showed shall refuse it, he shall forfeit twenty Shillings; towards the defrayhinge of Publique Charges, which is to be levied by the Constable." [This to be ye latter end of ye last clause save one.] And the Court upon Occasion is to Judge of other Just exceptions agtainst Jurors besides kindred." HIST: Thompson, Benjamin F. History of Long Island from its Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time. 3rd Edition. 1918. Vol. III, page 609. Thomas Lawrence married Deborah, dau of Thomas Woolsey of Newtown, 5 Jan 1730 but removed from the town. GENE: Woodhull, Mary Gould & Francis Bowes Stevens. WOODHULL GENEALOGY. The Woodhull Family in England and America. Henry T. Coates & Co. Philadelphia. 1904. p. 53 ff. Thomas Lawrence md 3 Jan 1730, Deborah, d/o Thomas Woolsey, of Newtown, Long Island. They had four children. He died in 1752. HIST: Thompson, Benjamin F. History of Long Island from its Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time. 3rd Edition. 1918. Vol. III, page 609. Thomas Lawrence married Deborah, dau of Thomas Woolsey of Newtown, 5 Jan 1730 but removed from the town. GENE: Woodhull, Mary Gould & Francis Bowes Stevens. WOODHULL GENEALOGY. The Woodhull Family in England and America. Henry T. Coates & Co. Philadelphia. 1904. p. 53 ff. Thomas Lawrence md 3 Jan 1730, Deborah, d/o Thomas Woolsey, of Newtown, Long Island. They had four children. He died in 1752. Deborah married (2-MRIN:8084) Jan Boekhout-20825 on 7 Sep 1753 in New York, New York, New York. ON-LINE: rootsweb. Thomas Lawrence/Deborah Woolsey - John Lawrence/ Deborah Woodhull Family information 1692 10 ACRE LOT - JAMAICA 22. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 61. 11 Jun 1692 - between Daniel Whitthead, Esqr & Thomas Wollsey - Wollsey to occupy and enjoy a sartain ten acre lott Bounded front and reare on the Highways E by Thomas Wollsey & W by Ed Burrowes, provided sd Thomas Wollsey shall pay ore case to be paid unto Mr. Sollenes that marryed the widow Stenwick in New Yorke sum of 42 pounds before 1 Apr 1694 Dan'll Whithed & Tho. Wollsey - O Wit: Edward Burrowes, Will Whitt, Peter Chek - Samuel Ruscoe, Clerk 1693 FURTHER EAST NECK & 1 ½ ACRE LOT 23. Jamaica Town Records 2:538. George Woolsey ... with consent of my wife Rebeckah Willsey ... acer & 1/2 - south east side of Jamaica further east neck west sid of Capt Daniell Whitthead east side by Joseph Philipes meadow land 20 ____ 1693. in presence of Andrew Allexander Josias Wiggens George Woollse Rebecka Woolsey 1693 - 1694 MINISTER’S TAX 24. Frost, Josephine C. RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF JAMAICA, Long Island, New York. FHL# 928518. p. 375. 1 Jan 1693/4 - John Dweke, Richard Oldfield, Samuel Denton & Daniell Smith, shall gather the sumes promised to the minister and pay 1/4 each. Captin Wollsey 01 - 10; Will: Creed 01 - 00; Tho: Wollsey 01 - 00; Gersham Wiggins 00 - 10; John Wollsey 01 - 00; Josias Wiggins 00 - 10; Ben Wiggins 00 - 10; John Bayles 01 -10; Tho: Wiggins 00 - 12; Johannas Williamson 00 - 04. 1694 10 ACRE LOT - JAMAICA 25. p. 60. Daniell Whitehead of Jamaica to Thomas Wollsey ten acre lot in Jamaica, bounded E by sd Thomas Wollsey W by land of John Prudden S by King's Road ore Common highway & N to a highway betwext ye hills 5 Apr 1694. Wit: Sam'll Ruscoe & Edward Burrowes
Woolsey General Store in Jamaica

1693 - 1703 JAMAICA - WOOLSEY GENERAL STORE 26. From the book JAMAICA, LONG ISLAND 1656-1776: A STUDY IN THE ROOTS OF AMERICAN URBANISM by Jean Peyer. City University of NY, PhD, 1974, History, Modern. F 129J2 P48 19974A. Page 152: "Jamaica had 8 shopkeepers during the colonial period. Most notably were Edward Willet, Isabel & Josias Wiggins, Nehemiah Denton, Sr. and George Woolsey ... Lastly, the Woolsey family opened a general store and in addition to selling meat, grains, beverages, kitchen & farm utensils and sewing and building materials, the Woolseys loaned small amounts of money and made and repaired items for several townspeople ... Ref: Yale University Library. Hillhouse Family Collection, New Haven, CT. Woolsey, Capt George, 1652-1740. Acounts 1693-1703, of a General Store in Jamaica, LI kept by Capt George Woolsey, 1652-1740; continued from 1740-1758, by his grandson Melancthon Taylor Woolsey, wife Rebecca (Lloyd) Woolsey, 1718-1796. [www has microfilm.] [ON-LINE: Sent by Bob Tucker 7 Sep 2002. "I am researching the family of Chas Williamson. Although he is not a direct ancestor, I am hoping that he will lead to other Williamson who are.] 1695 JAMAICA - LANDS LYING . . . 27. !GENE: Ancestors of Welding Ring and his wife Ida Malvina Mailler, comp. for Julia Frances Ring by Josephine C. Frost. Brooklyn, NY. 1935. FHL# 929.273 R472f. p. 227. GEORGE PHILLIPS. " On 7 Apr 1695 George and Hannah Woolsey convey George Phillips the lot former occupied by Capt Briant Newton, together with all its buildings, orchards, etc." Refs: Annals of Newtown, pp 403-4; Colonial Records of CT, 1:426,428; Savage; History of Greenwich, CT, p. 6, 289; History of New London, p. 64; Colonial Wars, 1922, p. 217; Colonial Hist of NY 14:116, 117,562; NY Wills, 11:156; NY RECORD, 6:28. Howland, IBID, p. 10. " the above said George Wollsey with Hanah my wiffe (the first mention of her) have sold to George Phillipse all that lott lying" etc, dated "ye 7th year of their magesties Reigne & in ye year of our Lord Christ 1695. 1695 JAMAICA - ON YE NORTH SIDE OF PATH TO JAMAICA 28. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 411. 18 Sep 1695. Richard Gilderssleve - land on ye N side of ye path going to Jamaica & on y W by a lott of Thomas Wolles only a high waye between. 1695 PARCEL OF UPLAND 29. JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. 2:491. George Woolsy Seanor with Rebecca my wife for vallewable satisfaction to us in hand paid by Hendricke Lotte a certain parcell of upland llying in ye boundes of Jamaica 22 acres this 30 Sep 1695. [See Note # 16.] 1696 JAMAICA - SHEEP & THOMAS WOOLSEY 30. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn:The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1-2 FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:371. I John Basford of City of New Yorke husband of Damaris Basford, eldest dau of Nate Lynos late of Jamaica, deceased, have sould unto Thomas Wollsey of Jamaica fiveten sheep younge & olde as they are now in his posestion - do warrant and bind, etc. 21 Nov 1696. 1697 JAMAICA - SOUTH WEST FIELD 31. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:319. Georg Wolsi, Jr. - 30 acors of land in SW fild Bounded on E wt his father's land S wt ye comans N wt Jonathan Baylis on W wt Nat Lina's - in length fower score Rod & 60 Rod Broad - 20 May 1697. 1697 JAMAICA - THOMAS WOOLSEY’S LAND 32. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 248. Thomas Foster of Monmouth River, Co. of Salem, of West New Jersey, son & heir of Thomas Foster, late of Jamaica, sum paid by Benj Thurston of Jamaica, blacksmith for and in behalf of himself, Anne Thurston, Daniell Thurston, Samuel Thurston, Thomas Thurston, Richard Denton & Mary his wife, Richard Oldfild & Jane his wife & David Wright & Hannah his wife - 1/2 part & home lott beginning at Thomas Wollsey's land E to walnut bush marked by Thomas Waters across to Whitt oak bush on N side of same lott & an equal 1/2 part of ye hill lot which 1/2 lyeth next to Anthony Waters [&] all that lott of land lyinge behind the Swam[p] near the further East Neck - adj land of John Hansen - 61 acres - late in tenuer & occupation of Thomas Foster, dec'd & Joseph Thurston, dec'd. 23 Oct 1697. Wit: Andrew Gibb, Samuell Smith. Thomas Foster O 1699 SAMUEL BAILEY & CAPT. GEORGE WOOLSEY 33. Harry Macy, Jr. "Underhills", q.v. p. 17. "Samuel Bailey did exchange lands with Capt. George Woolsey in a 1699 deed, [Jamaica TR 2:243-5] while other deeds show that they owned adjoining parcels of land, [see Queens County Deeds, Jamaica, B1:417] and several other times their names also appear together in town or county records; but in no case is any relationship ever stated. Samuel also is mentioned in land transactions involving Capt. George's sister Rebecca (Woolsey) Wiggins. [Queens County Deeds, Jamaica, B2:140, 147, 161.] Unfortunately, there is no probate record for Capt. George Woolsey which might identify his daughter more clearly. 1699 - 1700 JONAS WOOD & CAPT. WOOLSEY 34. Records of the Town of Jamaica. FHL# 928518. p. 7. Jonas Wood and Samuell Ruscoe b/o Jamaica, lot of 5 acres bounded S by road, S by Thos Wiggins W by Richard Everitt & N by the hills & Samuel Ruscoe exchange to Jonas Wood lot of 14 acres Bounded N by Capt. Wollsey E by lot formerly Hope Carpenter & by Jonas Wood. 3 Jan 1699/1700. 1700 GEORGE WOOLSEY & FATHER’S LAND - 10 ACRES 35. Howland, op.cit, p. 11. recorded 19 Sep 1700. George Wollsey sells "for 14 lbs a certain pece or parcell of upland . . . which land did belong to my father George Wollsey late of Jamaica deseast, containg about 10 acres more or less" [www did not find this deed] 1700 BY THOMAS WOOLSEY’S LOT 36. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 9. John Pruden quondam minister of Jamaica now inhabitant of Newwarke, Co Essex, East New Jersey, to Thomas Burrowes, yeoman of Jamaica, a lot lying Westward of the mettinge hse upon road that leads to New Yorke, fiveten acres Bounded by 10 acre lot formerly Edward Higbe's now in possession of Edward Burrows & partly by lot formerly belonging to Andrew Messenger now in tenur & poss of Thomas Wollsey on ye E & by a highway on N - Begin at NW corner of ye sd Wollsey's lott runing Westward under the hills by the highway. S to ye road to Newtown - 16 Nov 1700. Wit: John Hubbert, John Pruden, Jr. John Pruden O 1705 WOOLSEY HOME LOT 37. Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:92. Lib. B2:239-241. George Woolsey of Jamaica on ye one part & John Woolsey of Jamaica on ye other part said George Woolsey for a sum of money sold unto John Woolsey all his right in a home lott in Jamaica in which John Woolsey & Mother now lives, bounded W by ye land of Thomas Cardale, S by a back street, E by Joseph Barton's lot & N by ye highway. 20 Mar 1705 - 15 Aug 1706 George Woolsey Isaac Hicks and Thomas Cardall. 1st. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved and eldest Son, GEORGE WOLSEY all my lott of land being at ye Beaver Pond within ye town of Jamaica aforesaid. To have and to hold ye said Lott of land with ye appurtenances there on being to him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use of him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns forever, 38. Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. William Hallett 1715 JAMAICA THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH 13 May 1715 a lot of 25 square roods next to Henry Filkin’s was bought for the site of the new church, from Rev. Benjamin and Abigail Woolsey (of Dosoris), for the nominal price of five shillings. The church having been erected the congregation met in it for the first time on 15 Jun 1716, and chose persons to allot the men’s and women’s seats. The building was an octagon, with a steep roof, in the center of which was a cupola with a bell cast at Amsterdam, at a cost of 8 lbs. In 1720 the church was painted at a cost of 1 lb. 15 shillings and 10 pence. 1873 JAMAICA - ‘J. WOOLSEY’S’ LOT On the 1873 map of Jamaica, two lots of ‘J. Woolsey’ appears on Union Hall Street and South St. No Woolseys appear on census records for Jamaica, so this might have been an ‘absentee ownership’. Could this be the remaining bit of Woolsey’s Home Lot? And perhaps John “Sweet Hollow Giant” Woolsey of Huntington, Long Island? 1707 CAPT. WOOLSEY’S LOT - REARE 39. Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. p. 409. 15 May 1707. Laid out to Jonathan Whitehead one pece of land Bounded E by ye reare of Capt. Wolsey's lot, N by common land, W by common land, S by ye land of sd Jonathan Whitehead, Entered 17 Jun 1707. 1711 - 1712 JAMAICA UPLAND - 7 ACRES 40. Deeds (3:135-6) 21 Feb 1711/12 - indenture between Georg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy John Woolcy of Jemaica in Queen County on Nasaw Island & in ye Province of New York of ye one partee and Samuell Denton of ye same place of ye other partee witnesseth for consideration of nine pounds ten shillings corrant or New York acknowledge [sell to] Samuell Denton all that peice parsill or lot of upland in ye bounds of Jemaica containg seven acors be ye same more or less butted & bounded as followeth bounded south by ye rode that lead down to New York or Cuntry rode & east by commons land and west by common land also and north by common land or Nathaniell Denton warrent for next seven years - hath set their hands and affixed thire seales ye day etc Signed sealed & delivered Gorg Woolcy O Thomas X Woolcy O John X Woolsy O in presents of His mark His mark Wait Smith Nehemiah Smith Memorandum that on ye 25 day of Jul 1712 appeared before me Richard Olfeild one of Her Maigs Justeses for the keeping of the peace for Queens County ye ye with in named Gorg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy & John Woolcy and did acknowlidg the with written instrument to be their own vollintary act and deed Tes. Richard Olfeild A true coppy of ye orignall deed entred & compared this fift day of Desember 1712 by me per Nehemiah Smith -
Thomas Woolsey's Home Lot

1717 - 1719 JAMAICA - THOMAS WOOLSEY - HOME LOT 41. Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:56. Thomas Woolsey, yeoman, of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO John Gray, yeoman, of Jamaica, FOR pounds 240 for home lott of Jamaica, where sd Thomas now dwells, bounded W by Thomas Smith, S partly by county road leading to New York & partly by sd Smith, E by land in Possession of Eliz. Waters & by Samuel Thurston's land & N by David Wright & Samuel Thurston, containing 30 acres as now within fence in possession of sd Thomas Woolsey with one certain piece of land in Jamaica on the hills Northward of ye sd premises bounded W & N by Joseph Smith, S by David Wright & E by Thomas Thurston - 8 acres in fence and all houses, etc. Thomas Woolsey 19 Mar 1717 - 1 Apr 1718 Lewis Hewlett, Daniel Waters. Ruth Woolsey Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:70. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica, yeoman, & Ruth his wife TO Richard Betts for pounds 80 - 19 acres as inclosed by the fence now standing, in Jamaica bound N by the highway which leads from Jamaica to the New York Ferry, E & S by land of Daniel Waters & W by land belonging to sd Richard Betts. 19 May 1718 - 1 8ber 1719. Thomas X Woolsey Mary Waters, John Cornell Ruth X Woolsey REBECCA CORNELL WOOLSEY WIFE OF GEORGE WOOLSEY 5th. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife, REBECCA, all ye remainder of my land & tenements, good and chattels to have and to hold to her ye said REBECCA for and during her natural life, after her decease as followeth, that is to say all ye remainder of my house, land and meadow not already given. I do after my wifes decease give and bequeath ye same unto my three Sons, GEORGE, THOMAS & JOHN WOLSEY to be equall in portion without ye benefitt of joint tenancy or survivership and to usery of them, their heirs and assigns for ever and all my goods and chattels of what nature or kind soever ye shall be and remaine after my wifes decease, I give and bequeath unto my three Daughters, that is to say, SARAH HALLET, REBECCA WIGGINS & MARY WOLSEY to be equally divided between them. GEORGE WOOLSEY’S SONS LAND TRANSACTIONS 01. George Woolsey, Jr. (Captain George Woolsey) 1st. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved and eldest Son, GEORGE WOLSEY all my lott of land being at ye Beaver Pond within ye town of Jamaica aforesaid. To have and to hold ye said Lott of land with ye appurtenances there on being to him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use of him ye said GEORGE WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns forever, !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:92. George Woolsey of Jamaica on ye one part & John Woolsey of Jamaica on ye other part said George Woolsey for a sum of money sold unto John Woolsey all his right in a home lott in Jamaica in which John Woolsey & Mother now lives, bounded W by ye land of Thomas Cardale, S by a back street, E by Joseph Barton's lot & N by ye highway. 20 Mar 1705 - 15 Aug 1706 George Woolsey Isaac Hicks and Thomas Cardall. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 William Hallett Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. !ON-LINE: Sent by Bob Tucker 7 Sep 2002. "I am researching the family of Chas Williamson. Although he is not a direct ancestor, I am hoping that he will lead to other Williamson who are. I found the following: 1. Charles Williamson and others signed a petition dated 17 Jul 1721 in the Wawayanda Patent to offer a lot to encourage a blacksmith to settle in the area. - This may or not be the same person who md Mary Woolsey but a lot of Long Islanders settled in this area. 2. From the book JAMAICA, LONG ISLAND 1656-1776: A STUDY IN THE ROOTS OF AMERICAN URBANISM by Jean Peyer. City University of NY, PhD, 1974, History, Modern. F 129J2 P48 19974A. Page 152: "Jamaica had 8 shopkeepers during the colonial period. Most notably were Edward Willet, Isabel & Josias Wiggins, Nehemiah Denton, Sr. and George Woolsey ... Lastly, the Woolsey family opened a general store and in addition to selling meat, grains, beverages, kitchen & farm utensils and sewing and building materials, the Woolseys loaned small amounts of money and made and repaired items for several townspeople ... Ref: Yale University Library. Hillhouse Family Collection, New Haven, CT. Woolsey, Capt George, 1652-1740. Acounts 1693-1703, of a General Store in Jamaica, LI kept by Capt George Woolsey, 1652-1740; continued from 1740-1758, by his grandson Melancthon Taylor Woolsey, wife Rebecca (Lloyd) Woolsey, 1718-1796. !GENE: Wood, Matthew. THE DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY WOOD, OF LONG ISLAND. The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132, Number 1 and 2. Jan and Apr 2001. 2:121 ff. From 1684 to 1686 Jonas Wood assembeled several small parcels of meadow on "further east neck" into a single lot. On 26 Aug 1684, he purchased from John Prudden, minister of Jamaica church, "my whole right in ye bill of sale I had of George Woolsie," which contained a small meadow "did belong to Mr Bryan Newtons lot"; etc. !GENE: Ancestors of Welding Ring and his wife Ida Malvina Mailler, comp. for Julia Frances Ring by Josephine C. Frost. Brooklyn, NY. 1935. FHL# 929.273 R472f. p. 227. GEORGE PHILLIPS. " On 7 Apr 1695 George and Hannah Woolsey convey George Phillips the lot former occupied by Capt Briant Newton, together with all its buildings, orchards, etc." Refs: Annals of Newtown, pp 403-4; Colonial Records of CT, 1:426,428; Savage; History of Greenwich, CT, p. 6, 289; History of New London, p. 64; Colonial Wars, 1922, p. 217; Colonial Hist of NY 14:116, 117,562; NY Wills, 11:156; NY RECORD, 6:28. !JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. p. 118. 2 Mar 1682. Henry Foster & George Woolsey Juneor - Overseers of Poor. !JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. p. 251. 1 Jan 1683. Give our Right to Boggy Meadow - George Woolsey Jn & George Woolsey, Sen. !JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. p. 128. abt 1687? Living on Forsters River Thomas Wiggins 7 & 35 acres; George Woolsy 19 & 25 acres; Mr. Woolsy 29 & 15 !DEED: Howland, IBID, p. 10. " the above said George Wollsey with Hanah my wiffe (the first mention of her) have sold to George Phillipse all that lott lying" etc, dated "ye 7th year of their magesties Reigne & in ye year of our Lord Christ 1695. !HIST: Records of the Town of Jamaica. FHL# 928518. p. 7. Jonas Wood and Samuell Ruscoe b/o Jamaica, lot of 5 acres bounded S by road, S by Thos Wiggins W by Richard Everitt & N by the hills & Samuel Ruscoe exchange to Jonas Wood lot of 14 acres Bounded N by Capt. Wollsey E by lot formerly Hope Carpenter & by Jonas Wood. 3 Jan 1699/1700. !DEED: Harry Macy, Jr. "Underhills", q.v. p. 17. "Samuel Bailey did exchange lands with Capt. George Woolsey in a 1699 deed, [Jamaica TR 2:243-5] while other deeds show that they owned adjoining parcels of land, [see Queens County Deeds, Jamaica, B1:417] and several other times their names also appear together in town or county records; but in no case is any relationship ever stated. Samuel also is mentioned in land transactions involving Capt. George's sister Rebecca (Woolsey) Wiggins. [Queens County Deeds, Jamaica, B2:140, 147, 161.] Unfortunately, there is no probate record for Capt. George Woolsey which might identify his daughter more clearly. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:92. George Woolsey of Jamaica on ye one part & John Woolsey of Jamaica on ye other part said George Woolsey for a sum of money sold unto John Woolsey all his right in a home lott in Jamaica in which John Woolsey & Mother now lives, bounded W by ye land of Thomas Cardale, S by a back street, E by Joseph Barton's lot & N by ye highway. 20 Mar 1705 - 15 Aug 1706 George Woolsey Isaac Hicks and Thomas Cardall. !DEED: ibid, p. 11. recorded 10 Mar 1705, George Wollsey for a valuable consideration, sells to John Wolsy all his interest in "a home lot lying in Jamaica in which ye said John Wolsey & his mother Rebecca Wolsey now live." !DEED: (3:135-6) 21 Feb 1711/12 - indenture between Georg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy John Woolcy of Jemaica in Queen County on Nasaw Island & in ye Province of New York of ye one partee and Samuell Denton of ye same place of ye other partee witnesseth for consideration of nine pounds ten shillings corrant or New York acknowledge [sell to] Samuell Denton all that peice parsill or lot of upland in ye bounds of Jemaica containg seven acors be ye same more or less butted & bounded as followeth bounded south by ye rode that lead down to New York or Cuntry rode & east by commons land and west by common land also and north by common land or Nathaniell Denton warrent for next seven years - hath set their hands and affixed thire seales ye day etc Signed sealed & delivered Gorg Woolcy O in presents of Thomas X Woolcy O Wait Smith his mark Nehemiah Smith John X Woolcy O Memorandum that on ye 25 day of Jul 1712 appeared his mark before me Richard Olfeild one of Her Maigs Justeses for the keeping of the peace for Queens County ye ye with in named Gorg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy & John Woolcy and did acknowlidg the with written instrument to be their own vollintary act and deed Tes. Richard Olfeild A true coppy of ye orignall deed entred & compared this fift day of Desember 1712 by me per Nehemiah Smith - 02. Thomas Woolsey 2nd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, THOMAS WOLSEY all ye fifteen acre lott of land lying to ye westward of Anthony Walters home lott in Jamaica afor said to have and to hold ye said lott of land all ye appurtenances there unto being to him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns to ye only proper use, benefitt and behoof of him ye said THOMAS WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:56. Thomas Woolsey, yeoman, of Jamaica & Ruth his wife TO John Gray, yeoman, of Jamaica, FOR pounds 240 for home lott of Jamaica, where sd Thomas now dwells, bounded W by Thomas Smith, S partly by county road leading to New York & partly by sd Smith, E by land in Possession of Eliz. Waters & by Samuel Thurston's land & N by David Wright & Samuel Thurston, containing 30 acres as now within fence in possession of sd Thomas Woolsey with one certain piece of land in Jamaica on the hills Northward of ye sd premises bounded W & N by Joseph Smith, S by David Wright & E by Thomas Thurston - 8 acres in fence and all houses, etc. Thomas Woolsey 19 Mar 1717 - 1 Apr 1718Ruth Woolsey Lewis Hewlett, Daniel Waters. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 C:70. Thomas Woolsey of Jamaica, yeoman, & Ruth his wife TO Richard Betts for pounds 80 - 19 acres as inclosed by the fence now standing, in Jamaica bound N by the highway which leads from Jamaica to the New York Ferry, E & S by land of Daniel Waters & W by land belonging to sd Richard Betts. 19 May 1718 - 1 8ber 1719.Thomas X Woolsey Mary Waters, John Cornell Ruth X Woolsey !DEED: (3:135-6) 21 Feb 1711/12 - indenture between Georg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy John Woolcy of Jemaica in Queen County on Nasaw Island & in ye Province of New York of ye one partee and Samuell Denton of ye same place of ye other partee witnesseth for consideration of nine pounds ten shillings corrant or New York acknowledge [sell to] Samuell Denton all that peice parsill or lot of upland in ye bounds of Jemaica containg seven acors be ye same more or less butted & bounded as followeth bounded south by ye rode that lead down to New York or Cuntry rode & east by commons land and west by common land also and north by common land or Nathaniell Denton warrent for next seven years - hath set their hands and affixed thire seales ye day etc Signed sealed & delivered Gorg Woolcy O in presents of Thomas X Woolcy O Wait Smith his mark Nehemiah Smith John X Woolcy O Memorandum that on ye 25 day of Jul 1712 appeared his mark before me Richard Olfeild one of Her Maigs Justeses for the keeping of the peace for Queens County ye ye with in named Gorg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy & John Woolcy and did acknowlidg the with written instrument to be their own vollintary act and deed Tes. Richard Olfeild A true coppy of ye orignall deed entred & compared this fift day of Desember 1712 by me per Nehemiah Smith - 03. John Woolsey 3rd. item - I give and bequeath unto my well beloved Son, JOHN WOLSEY all ye my thirty acre lott of land lying to ye eastward by ye Little Plains runing within ye bounds of Jamaica a for said to have and to hold the said thirty acre lott of land with its appurtenances to use ye said JOHN WOLSEY, heirs and assigns to ye only proper use and benefitt and behoff of him ye said JOHN WOLSEY, his heirs and assigns for ever. I do also give and bequeath unto my said Son, JOHN WOLSEY after my decease, two oxen and all my wearing apperall. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:92. George Woolsey of Jamaica on ye one part & John Woolsey of Jamaica on ye other part said George Woolsey for a sum of money sold unto John Woolsey all his right in a home lott in Jamaica in which John Woolsey & Mother now lives, bounded W by ye land of Thomas Cardale, S by a back street, E by Joseph Barton's lot & N by ye highway. 20 Mar 1705 - 15 Aug 1706 George Woolsey Isaac Hicks and Thomas Cardall. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 William Hallett Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:92. George Woolsey of Jamaica on ye one part & John Woolsey of Jamaica on ye other part said George Woolsey for a sum of money sold unto John Woolsey all his right in a home lott in Jamaica in which John Woolsey & Mother now lives, bounded W by ye land of Thomas Cardale, S by a back street, E by Joseph Barton's lot & N by ye highway. 20 Mar 1705 - 15 Aug 1706 George Woolsey Isaac Hicks and Thomas Cardall. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 William Hallett Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. !DEED: (3:135-6) 21 Feb 1711/12 - indenture between Georg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy John Woolcy of Jemaica in Queen County on Nasaw Island & in ye Province of New York of ye one partee and Samuell Denton of ye same place of ye other partee witnesseth for consideration of nine pounds ten shillings corrant or New York acknowledge [sell to] Samuell Denton all that peice parsill or lot of upland in ye bounds of Jemaica containg seven acors be ye same more or less butted & bounded as followeth bounded south by ye rode that lead down to New York or Cuntry rode & east by commons land and west by common land also and north by common land or Nathaniell Denton warrent for next seven years - hath set their hands and affixed thire seales ye day etc Signed sealed & delivered Gorg Woolcy O in presents of Thomas X Woolcy O Wait Smith his mark Nehemiah Smith John X Woolcy O Memorandum that on ye 25 day of Jul 1712 appeared his mark before me Richard Olfeild one of Her Maigs Justeses for the keeping of the peace for Queens County ye ye with in named Gorg Woolcy Thomas Woolcy & John Woolcy and did acknowlidg the with written instrument to be their own vollintary act and deed Tes. Richard Olfeild A true coppy of ye orignall deed entred & compared this fift day of Desember 1712 by me per Nehemiah Smith -
Will of John Woolsey

!PROBATE: Long Island Source Records - From the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Selected and Introduction by Henry B. Hoff. Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD. 1987. FHL#974.721 H29L. p. 148. Abstracts of early Wills of Queens Co, NY Books A & C at Jamaica. C:112-113. I John Woolsey of Jamaica yeoman give to my wife Abigail - life estate in 1/3 of lands and use of the rest til my oldest child and only son John reaches age 21 when he inherits. I give unto my eldest & only son John Woolsey all my land & houses with 2 horses waggons oxes howes. My son John is to pay my daughter Rebecca Woolsey 60 pounds - 20 pounds at her marriage day - 20 pounds day after her marriage & 20 pounds 2 years after her marriage. To my wife Abigail a third part of all my land & meadow. I appoint my wife my sole executor. 10 Jun 1721.John Woolsey, L. S. Gabrie Luff, Jr. William Wiggins Robert Willis At a Meeting of Isaac Hicks Judge Jonathan Whitehead & John Messenger Justices of ye peace held at Jamaica 5 Feb 1727 [1721] was proved by William Wiggins. Entered 5 Feb 1721/22 J. Smith, Clerk Lib. C. Pages 112/113. The above "will" is from three different ABSTRACTS of wills, made by (1) WPA project, Abstracts of early wills of Queens co, NY 1683-1744, part of the "Long Island Collection" WPA project no. 165-97-6999(6115). FHL Film# 017872, item 1. (2) Eardeley, Willliam A. D., Records in the Office of the County Clerk at Jamaica, Long Island, NY 1680-1781. Microfilm of typed manuscript at the Queens Borough Public Library in Jamaica, NY. FHL Film# 017715. 3) From the New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD, selected and introduced by Henry B. Hoff. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, MD. 1987. p. 146. [www has not seen the original of John Woolsey's will but has combined information found in each of the three above sources into the one "will". www believes the discrepancy in the above dates (1727 vs 1721) is either a transcription error or a misreading of "1" for a "7". The bigger problem is the date given that the will was "proved" or entered into the record. www believes that this should read " 5 Feb 1721/22 " giving the "Old Style" date. This is further substantiated by the fact that this will precedes wills that were proven in Oct and Dec 1722.]
Thomas Willett & Sara Cornell

THOMAS WILLETT & SARA CORNELL Sister of Rebecca Cornell Woolsey !GENE: Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. Briefly, this article concerns the Thomas Willett, soldier, who was from Bristol, England, according to his marriage records of 1643, who was born about 1620-21 since he described himself as 23 years of age in an affidavit of 1644, [age 23 on 7 Jul 1644] and who died as a young man about 1646-47. Land granted him in 1645 was confirmed in 1667 to his widow's then husband and was later owned, at least between the dates 1686 and 1715, by his son Col. Thomas Willett of Flushing, who was baptized in 1645 and died in 1722. !HIST: As these facts and further corroborative proofs are cited in contemporary records set forth in the above article, there can no longer be any excuse for confusing the above Thomas Willetts, father and son, with the following more famous Thomas Willett and his son of the same name. The other family is that of the New England merchant and Captain Thomas Willett, better known here as the first mayor of New York City, in 1665; published records prove his origin - via Leyden, Holland - in Norwich, England, and indicate his birth in the approximate period - 1607 - 1611 (according as one takes his age from his will or his tombstone); he was married in New England in 1636, moved in and out of New Amsterdam and New York City from the 1640's and died at a full age in 1674 in New England. !HIST: The residences of this Willett family (Thomas the soldier) in its first century in America were all within the bounds of the present New York City - at New Amsterdam, Flushing, and Westchester. The town of New Amsterdam was along the East River at the southern tip of Manhattan Island; it was the capital of the Dutch Province of New Netherland, and, after capture by the British in 1664, continued (as New York City) to be the capital of the Province of New York. In the early English period the surrounding areas - Staten Island, Long Island, and Westchester on the mainland - were organized for judicial purposes into the Ridings of Yorkshire. The town of Westchester, in the North Riding of Yorkshire, became the seat of Westchester County upon the organization of county government in 1683; it has been a part of Bronx County since 1914. The town of Flushing, situated across the Sound on Long Island, was also in the North Riding of Yorkshire; it became in 1683 a part of Queens County, whose seat was and is at nearby Jamaica. !HIST: Thomas Willett's home in New Amsterdam was on the then East River bank iummediately east of the Great Tavern which soon became the Stadt Huys or City Hall of the time. It was located in the present block bounded by Pearl street (Willett's plot was at the present #75-89 Pearl Street, per Icon., IV-104.) (once the thoroughfare along the waterside and at this section called Dock Street), Coenties Alley, and Stone Street (formerly called Hoogh, then Duke Street), New York City. The chain of title to this land provides conclusive evidence of Thomas and Sara (Cornell) Willett's immediate descendants, and of their separate identity from the family of Capt. Thomas Willett who was mayor in 1665 and died in 1674. !GENE: Willett, Albert James, Jr. THE WILLETT FAMILIES OF NORTH AMERICA. Being a Comprehensive Guide Encompassing Willett, Willet, etc. Vol. 1. A Willett House Publication. 1958? p. 70. "Living in Flushing at this time was a third Willett family, the Richard Willett family. After Richard Willett's death, his wife and children became Quakers, and most of his children added a final "s" to their name to form "Willets" or "Willits". This form distinguishes this family from the other Willett families associated with New Amsterdam, New York, and Long Island. For the record, a fourth Willett family, that of Richard Willett, lived in New York City at the turn of the seventeenth century. This Richard Willett married the daughter of Colonel Thomas Willett, and even received through her, a portion of the original 1645 groundbrief. !GENE: Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. THE WILLETS FAMILY OF HEMPSTEAD AND JERICHO, LONG ISLAND. Contributed by Arthur S. Wardwell. Brooklyn 26, NY. "In the early English period the surrounding areas - Staten Island, Long Island, and Westchester on the mainland - were organized for judicial purposes into the Ridings of Yorkshire. The town of Westchester, in the North Riding of Yorkshire, became the seat of Westchester County, upon the organization of county government in 1683; it has been a part of Bronx County since 1914. The town of Flushing, situated across the Sound on Long Island, was also in the North Riding of Yorkshire; it became in 1683 a part of Queens County, whose seat was and is at nearby Jamaica." !GENE: Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. THE WILLETS FAMILY OF HEMPSTEAD AND JERICHO, LONG ISLAND. Contributed by Arthur S. Wardwell. Brooklyn 26, NY. p. 702. "Thomas Willett, bachelor from Bristol, England, was md 1 Sep 1643 at New Amsterdam to Sara Cornell, unmarried girl from Essex, England (NYDM 1-12) Her parents, her Cornell grandfather, and the town in Essex which was the family home before removal to Hertfordshire, England, and subsequently to New England, and then to New Amsterdam, are satisfactorily proved by wills and deeds (Delafield Gen. v.2, p. 647). Sarah Cornell was thrice married, but had only two children. The same marriage register of the Reformed Dutch Church in New Amsterdam reads: Carel Ver Brugge, j. m. Van Cantelberg, den 3 Nov 1647, en Sarah Cornelis, Wede, Van Thomas Welert (NYDM 1-14). Properly translated, this record reads: Charles Bridges, bachelor from Canterbury, England, was married 3 Nov 1647 to Sarah Cornell, widow of Thomas Willett. By license dated 20 Nov 1682, Sarah Bridges was md to John Laurence, Jr., (NYML p. 20). Sarah, wife of the latter, died between 1692 and 1698." !GENE: Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. THE WILLETS FAMILY OF HEMPSTEAD AND JERICHO, LONG ISLAND. Contributed by Arthur S. Wardwell. Brooklyn 26, NY. p. 702. "Thomas Willett seems to have lived in New Amsterdam five years at the very most before his untimely death, and the details of his life are not many. We are told by J. H. Innes in his NEW AMSTERDAM and its PEOPLE, 1902, p. 193, that Thomas Willett appeared in New Amsterdam in 1643, then a young man of 22 years, as one of the English soldiers in the employ of the West India Company; that he took part in the massacre of Indians at Pavonia ordered by Governor Kieft that year; and that he testified as to the killing in February of Dirck Straetmaker by the Indians, etc. This is substantially proved by two unpublished affidavits that I read at Albany. One, dated 18 May 1543, relates the circumstances attending the killing of Dirck Straetmaker, and his wife by Indians at Pavonia, and is by a sergeant, a cadet, and a soldier, the latter being Thomas Willett. In another affidavit dated 7 Jul 1644, concerning purchase of malt, Thomas Willett described himself as aged three and twenty years (Register of the Provincial Secretary, v. 2, pp. 57 and 118 and the translation pp. 114 & 201. Consequently, he was born about 1620-21." !GENE: Hoff, Henry B. Genealogies of Long Island Families. From NYGBR, Vol II - Praa-Youngs. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. Baltimore. 1987. p 700 ff. THE WILLETS FAMILY OF HEMPSTEAD AND JERICHO, LONG ISLAND. Contributed by Arthur S. Wardwell. Brooklyn 26, NY. p. 702. "Thomas Willett's home in New Amsterdam was on the then East River bank immediately east of the Great Tavern which soon became the STADT HUYS or City Hall of the time. It was located in the present block bounded by Pearl Street (Willett's plot was at the present #75-89 Pearl Street, per Icon, IV-104), (once the thoroughfare along the waterside and at this section called Dock Street), Coenties Alley, and Stone Street (formerly called Hoogh, then Duke Street), New York City. There is evidence that Willett occupied this plot earlier than its formal grant to him on 4 Jul 1645. Seven houses are pictured thereon in the graphic 1660 Castello Plan of New Amsterdam. The chain of title to this land provides conclusive evidence of Thomas and Sara (Cornell) Willett's immediate descendants, and of their separate identity from the family of Capt. Thomas Willett who was mayor in 1665 and died in 1675: 1. 2 Jan 1645. Thomas Willett sold to Cornelia Teunison a lot and house on Manhattan adjoining the Public Tavern for 775 guilders; he took a mortgage on the house. 7 Dec 1645 he won a judgment against Teunison for the balance on the purchase of the house (Icon., IV-103; Cal.D., pp. 31 & 98). 2. 4 Jul 1645. Groundbrief granted by the West India Co to Thomas Willet, not recorded (but see below). Same date groundbrief to Ritsaert Smidt for lot on Manhattan Island next to Thomas Willet's (HS 1901, p. 172).
William Hallet & Sarah Woolsey

WILLIAM HALLET & SARAH WOOLSEY !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 William Hallett Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. !WILL: In the name of God, Amen. I William Hallett, of Hellgate Neck, in Newtown, Queens County, being very infirm and weak. I leave to my son Joseph (my eldest son now living), all my houses, lands, tenements, and meadows, with all improvements, situate at Hellgate Neck. Beginning at a great Rock in the valley of the southwest of the Ridge, and ranging from the rock south easterly 40 Degrees, to a certain marked tree in the woods, 300 rods. Ranging from the marked tree North easterly along the Purchase line, 47 Degrees to a stone set in the ground and marked W. H. on the one side, and S.H. on the other side, 178 rods. Ranging thence along the fence as it now stands to a stone set in the ground on the east side of my gate, at the end of the lane by my orchard. Ranging thence along the orchard 36 rods, thence along the Garden 16 rods. From thence down to the Purchase line, that comes through Hellgate. From thence to the mouth of the Great Creek, thence to the little creek, from thence to the Great Rock, the first station. And he is to have the equal privilege of the lane with Samuel Hallett; as it is now fenced, from the stone, by my gate to the water side, so down west to the Purchase line. Except a certain tract of land and buildings, give to my son, Moses Hallett, by a deed, 7 June 1708. To him, my son, Joseph Hallett, and his heirs male, and in default of such, then to my son, George Hallett, and his heirs male. And in default to my son Richard and his heirs male, and in default of scuh to my female heirs forever. I also leave to my son Joseph, a negro man, and a negro wench, and a wagon, plough, and my great riding horse, and a cupboard, and the Great Table and great chest, and my silver Tankard. I leave to my sons George and Richard, and to my grandson Joseph Hallett and to my daughters Sarah Phillips, Rebecca Jacksonj, Sarah Blackwell, and Charity Moore, certain negroes. I leave to my true and loving wife, one third of the remainder of my moveable estate, and the privilege of the chamber in the stone house, during widowhood. And my son Joseph is to furnish her sufficient support and firewood. I leave two thirds of my moveables to my five daughters, Sarah Phillips, Rebecca Jackson, Charity Moore, Mary Blackwell, and Elizabeth Fish. And my son Joseph is to keep for his mother, four head of cattle, winter and summer. I leave to my sons Joseph and George, all my apparell. I make my wife Mary and my sons and James Jackson and Samuel Moore, executors. Dated 16 Sep 1727. Witnesses Samuel Hallett, Samuel Hallett Jr., Samuel Richards. No probate recorded. Endorsed 23 Aug 1729.
Thomas Wiggins & Rebecca Woolsey



THOMAS WIGGINS & REBECCA WOOLSEY JAMAICA: Frost, Josephine C. RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF JAMAICA, Long Island, New York. FHL# 928518. p. 375. 1 Jan 1693/4 - John Dweke, Richard Oldfield, Samuel Denton & Daniell Smith, shall gather the sumes promised to the minister and pay 1/4 each. Captin Wollsey 01 - 10; Will: Creed 01 - 00; Tho: Wollsey 01 - 00; Gersham Wiggins 00 - 10; John Wollsey 01 - 00; Josias Wiggins 00 - 10; Ben Wiggins 00 - 10; John Bayles 01 -10; Tho: Wiggins 00 - 12; Johannas Williamson 00 - 04. !LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:504. [p. 325]. Thomas Wiggins Senr his land: 1. A home lot lying on ye north quarter off ye Town Meadow 2, fiveteen acres lying at the haw-trees having Mr. Coe on ye W & William Ffoster on ye S 3. with an adition being most fresh 4. & boggs joyning to Benjamin Coe on ye S & William Ffoster on ye N 5. Ffurther a small lot at ye further east neck joying to John Hanson on ye S & to ye N George Woolsys 6. A ten acre lot westward lying on ye S side off ye rode that goes to York having Morace Smith on ye W William Smith on ye E and a high way on ye S 7. Ten acres in ye litle neck on which his son Thomas house stands having on ye east yt that Thomas Wiggin Junior bought off William Ffoster ffour acres off this ten adjoyning to his son Thomas his house the above written Thomas Wiggins Senior hath given to his son Thomas 8. Land eastward being twenty six acres joyning to John Carpenter Junior having ye sd Carpenter on ye W bounded wt ye hills on ye N on ye E by a high way on ye south near ye plains - 9. More two acres more or less yt Thomas Wiggins gave his daughter Elizebeth Smith to build upon next adjoyning to William Creeds house lot. 10. More three acres off land upon ye Hawtree Island. About 1699. !HIST: Records of the Town of Jamaica. FHL# 928518. p. 7. Jonas Wood and Samuell Ruscoe b/o Jamaica, lot of 5 acres bounded S by road, S by Thos Wiggins W by Richard Everitt & N by the hills & Samuel Ruscoe exchange to Jonas Wood lot of 14 acres Bounded N by Capt. Wollsey E by lot formerly Hope Carpenter & by Jonas Wood. 3 Jan 1699/1700. !LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:504. [p. 325]. Thomas Wiggins Senr his land: q.v. 2:505 [p. 235-6]. Thomas Wiggens Jeunor sone to Thomas Wiggens latte of Jamaica deceassed enters his land belonging to him as ye eldest sone as followeth viz: - 1. A home lott lyinge on the N qtor of ye Towne - 2. Meadow fiveten acers lyinge att ye hawtrees haveinge Mr. Coe on ye N & William Ffoster on ye S with an adition beinge most ffresh & bogges joyninge to Benjamin on ye S & William Ffostor on ye N 3. Ffurther a small lott at ye further east necke joyning to John Hanson on y South & to ye N George Wollsey - 4. Ten acers in the Little Neck haveing on ye east ye land I bought of William Ffoster upon which buld - 5. Land eastward twenty sixe acers joyninge to John Carpenter Junor haveinge ye sd Carpenter on ye W bounded wth ye hilles on ye N, on ye E - on ye E by a highe way - on ye S ner ye plaines, 6. three acers more lylinge upon ye Hawtree Island - 7. More in ye E devition lyinge in number 53 one lott 22 acers 8. More betwixt ye Little Planes & ye mill 9. One lott number 63/25 acers - more fourty acers of upland from brother William Creed for ye ten acers he had westward layd out to me. !JAMAICA: Jamaica Town Records. p. 210. about 1649. Lot by Number - the meadow divided into 20 acre lots and numbered. Messr. Woolsey lot # 13; Thomas Wiggins lot # 21. !PARISH: Ladd, Horation Oliver. THE ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF GRACE CHURCH, Jamaica, New York. The Shakespeare Press. New York. 1914. p. 287. Buried Thos Wiggins xber 12, 1728 at Jamaica. Rebecca Wiggins 8ber 19, 1731 at Jamaica.
Charles Williamson & Mary Woolsey

CHARLES WILLIAMSON & MARY WOOLSEY !MARR: New York Marriages. p. 586.. Vol 2:94. Mary Woolsey married Charles Williamson 24 Feb 1700/1701. !MARR: New York Marriages to 1784. Names of Persons for whom Marriage Licenses were Issued by the Secretary of the Province of New York, Previous to 1784. Supplementary List of Marriage Licenses - Alphabetic List of Names. p. 525. G. B. R. 3:194. 24 Feb 1701. Williamson, Charles, and Mary Woolsey. !LAND: John Woolsey made a deed to Charles Williamson, 1704. www needs to find this deed. !LAND: Charles Williamson made a deed to John Woolsey, 15 Apr 1705. www needs to find this deed. !LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:75. 13 Apr 1705. A vote by town council of Jamaica that all common lands should remain was meadow land was protested by Charles Williamson and others. !LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:394. Hope Carpenter Jr & Thomas Flewelling of Hemstid in ye Island Colony of Jamaica, Queens Co, on Nasaw Iland, for 10 pounds quit claims to Wait Smith and Nathaniel Denton their interest in house and homelot of Robert Ashman, dec'd. Bounded N by highway or Maine St of Jamaica and E & W by ye land of John Wolsy & Charles Williamson & S by a highway and also one lot of land in ye tenour & occupation of William Creed of Jamaica containing fivetene acres also one other lot in occupation of Dow Ditmars 10 acres - also 2 lots in occupation of Benjamin Thurstone 30 acres and one other lot occupation of John Wolsy of Jamaica - in right of Robert Ashman. 20 Feb 1706/07. Entered 24 Mar 1707. Wit: Sam'll Mills & Zach. Mills. !LAND: Records of the town of Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1656-1751. Ed. Josephine C. Frost. 2 microfilm reels 35mm. Microreproduction of original published: Brooklyn : The Long Island Historical Society, 1914. 3 vols Vol. 1 - 2 . FHL# 928518. Vol. 3. FHL# 928519. 2:406. Indenture 14 Feb 1706 between Charles Williamson, Cordwainer, of Jamaica and Timothy Wood, Cordwainer, of Jamaica. For 17 pounds a lot begin at the house built by Mary Harnett fronting ye maine street and bounded W by land of Chas. Wills. Entered 24 Apr 1707. Charles Williamson Wit: George Wolsey and Joseph X Carpenter. [Note by www - Cordwainer is pronounced "cordner'. A worker or trader in leather goods. The name derives from Cordovan, a resident of the Spanish town famous for its fine leather. In general its use means a shoemaker/cobbler.] !GENE: Wood, Matthew. THE DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY WOOD, OF LONG ISLAND. The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132, Number 3. July 2001. p. 186ff. "Timothy Wood (John3, Timothy2, Edmund1) was b abt 1682 and d 14 Sep 1763. His wife Judith was prob Judith Lawrence, bapt at the NY Dutch Church 23 Sep 1682, d/o William and Annetje (Edsall) Lawrence, of Newtown, Long Island. After their marriage Timothy and Judith moved from Jamaica to newton. Judith d 20 Sep 1751. - Timothy is recorded in a number of Jamaica deeds, showing tdhat he sold off his father's farmland and purchased a home lot suitable for a tradesman. - On 14 Feb 1706/07, Charles Williamson of Jamaica sold for 17 lbs to Timothy Wood of Jamaica, cordwainer, a lot of land in Jamaica "fronting ye maine streete." [Jamaica TR, 2:406-08. !LAND: Index & Deeds of Queens Co., L.I., NY, Liber A,B,C 1683-1765 by Alex Label. FHL film# 17873 B2:49. William Hallett of Hellgate in Newtowne for 5 sh. sold to Thomas Cardale of Jamaica land in Jamaica between land of Rebecca Woolsey on ye east side, ye land of Charles Williamson & John Woolsey on ye West & bounded N & S by 2 streets. 23 Mar 1705 - 25 Mar 1706 William Hallett Will Urquhart (Rector of Jamaica), Nathaniel Denton, Sam'l Hallett. !ON-LINE: Sent by Bob Tucker 7 Sep 2002. "I am researching the family of Chas Williamson. Although he is not a direct ancestor, I am hoping that he will lead to other Williamson who are. I found the following: 1. Charles Williamson and others signed a petition dated 17 Jul 1721 in the Wawayanda Patent to offer a lot to encourage a blacksmith to settle in the area. - This may or not be the same person who md Mary Woolsey but a lot of Long Islanders settled in this area. 2. From the book JAMAICA, LONG ISLAND 1656-1776: A STUDY IN THE ROOTS OF AMERICAN URBANISM by Jean Peyer. City University of NY, PhD, 1974, History, Modern. F 129J2 P48 19974A. Page 152: "Jamaica had 8 shopkeepers during the colonial period. Most notably were Edward Willet, Isabel & Josias Wiggins, Nehemiah Denton, Sr. and George Woolsey ... Lastly, the Woolsey family opened a general store and in addition to selling meat, grains, beverages, kitchen & farm utensils and sewing and building materials, the Woolseys loaned small amounts of money and made and repaired items for several townspeople ... Ref: Yale University Library. Hillhouse Family Collection, New Haven, CT. Woolsey, Capt George, 1652-1740. Acounts 1693-1703, of a General Store in Jamaica, LI kept by Caapt George Woolsey, 1652-1740; continued from 1740-1758, by his grandson Melancthon Taylor Woolsey, wife Rebecca (Lloyd) Woolsey, 1718-1796. !PROBATE: Eardeley, William A. D. "Records in the Office of the County Clerk at Jamaica, Long Island, New York, 1680 - 1781 : Wills and Administrations, guardians, and Inventories." Filmed by G.S. of Utah, 1940. Microfilm of typed mss at the Queens Borough Public Library in Jamaica, NY. Includes index Liber C:129 : Will of Rebecca Wiggins : of Jamaica : a widow : to my sister Mary wife of ____ Williamson and her two daughters, viz., Mary Williamson and Rebecca Williamson : dated 15 Aug 1731 : proved 18 May 1733 : bequest to Nicholas Bettery (?Battery?) : executor John Foster : witnesses Gabriel Luff, Jr. and Elizh. Roe (she made her mark an "A") and "Jos." Smith " Note: she was the widow of Thomas Wiggins, of Jamaica, Queens County, yeoman. q.v. !PROBATE: Records in the Office of the County Clerk at Jamaica, Long Island, New York: 1680-1781. A:202. Will of Wm Blinkley of Jamaica, 12 Nov 1707 - 22 Sep 1709. My wife ___, my (3) sons, viz, Wm Blinkley and John Blinkley and Peter Blinkley : my (3) daus Elizabeth wife of ____ Rose and Susanah wife of ___ Magoon and Hannah wife of ___ Mastin : executors my two sons-in-law Richard Oldfield and Wm Oldfield : Witnesses Charles Williamson and Samuell Denton and Thomas Cardale. [NOTE: The wife was named Margaret _____.] Richard Oldfield md Sarah Blinkley : 6 children William Oldfield md Margaret Blinkley : 10 children Sarah Oldfield md 1723 Thomas Poyer (Rev.) Phebe Oldfield md 23 Dec 1737 Richard Gildersleeve Mary Oldfield md 16 Nov 1761 Peter Dunbar Mariam Oldfield md 7 nov 1780 John Barin (Bergen?)
Daniel Whitehead Will

DANIEL WHITEHEAD - WILL - 1703 !PROBATE: Will of Daniel Whitehead. written 13 Nov 1703 - proved 30 Oct 1704. In the name of God, Amen. I Daniel Whitehead of Jamaica in Queens County. I leave to my son, Jonathan Whitehead, besides what I have formerly given him by deed, all my lands, tenements, and appurtenances in Jamaica, between the mill and Wellins path, lying westward of the mill, to John Okeys land, and southwest so far as my land runs. And also all my land on Cow neck in the Town of Hempstead. And all that my 1/4 part of the mill standing on Gildersleve Creek, in said neck. And also all my meadow on the Old Town neck in Jamaica, except that meadow I purchased of Mr. Anthony Waters, deceased, with all the herediments, To him my son Jonathan and his heirs, and in default of issue, then to my son Thomas Whitehead and his heirs. I also give to my son Jonathan, my negro man Joe. I leave to my loving wife, Abigail, my dwelling house I now live in, with the land adjoining, bounded on the south by the road to the ferry, on the west by Thomas Smith, north by Anthony Waters, And so much of my meadow as she shall have occasion for, during her life, and after her decease to my son Thomas and his heirs, and in default of such, then to my son Jonathan. I leave to my wife, my negro woman Mary, for life, and then to my daughter Deborah, wife of Thomas Hicks. I leave also to my son Thomas, all that my lot of land lying in the town of Jamaica, by the land of Colonel Henry Filkin; Also all my land on Stewards neck and Quarelsome neck in Jamaica; Also the lot of land Thomas Chambers now lives on, and my other three lots of land lying by the same, within the bounds of the Township of Flushing; Also all that my lot of land lying as well within as without the Long neck fence in Jamaica; As also all my meadow in Long neck, And all my land and meadow in Hewtree neck, in the bounds of Jamaica, with all the privileges, etc. And also my Indian by named Cupid, I leave to my grandson Whitehead Hicks, the second son of my son in law, Thomas Hicks, the husband of my daughter Deborah, all that my land and meadow lying and being with the bounds and Township of Flushing, except the four 20 acre lots given to my son Thomas, To him and his heirs, and in default of such heirs, then to my daughter Deborah and her heirs. I leave to my son in law, Anthony Waters, the present husband of my daughter Elizabeth, all that land now in the possession of my brother David Whitehead, lying on the east side of the Plain run, joining to Hempstead bounds, That is to say, after the death of my said brother; and also all that my meadow lying in Old Town neck in Jamaica, which I bought of his father, Mr. Anthony Waters, deceased; And also all that my lot of land on the Hills in Jamaica, which was formerly Joseph Thurstons, deceased, To him and his heirs. I leave to my daughter Mary, widow of Thomas Burroughs, all my land at a place called Quaspack, in Orange County, up Hudson river, with all the privileges, during her life, and then to her daughter, Mary Burroughs, and to her heirs. I leave to my son in law, Jacob Doughty, the husband of my daughter Amy 50 lbs. I leave to my wife Abigail, one third of all goods and chattels and the rest to my children above mentioned and to Mercy, wife of Thomas Betts. I leave to my friend, John Hubbard, all that my 1/3 of meadow lying at Oldfields Island, which I bought with my brother, Thomas Oakley, and John Bayley, with all the rights thereto belonging, during the time of his continuance in the work of the ministry in this town of Jamaica, and if he continue in the ministry here till his death, then to his heirs, but if not then to my son Jonathan. I give to the town of Jamaica the sum of 20 lbs, towards the maintenance of a Grammar School, for the education of youths within the said town; to be paid in three years after my decease, if there be such a school erected in said town. If not, then it is to be put at interest for three years longer, but if the school is not then established, then to go to my heirs. I leave to my brother, David Whitehead 20 lbs. To Jonathan, son of Jonathan Stevenson, of Norwalk, Connecticut, deceased 20 lbs. I give the 30 lbs which is due to me from the estate of my son in law, Daniel Denton, unto his children, and to Gabriel Lassee (Luffe) "begotten upon the body of Deborah Lassee, the present wife of Gabriel Lassee;" viz, to Daniel Denton, Abigail Denton and Deborah Denton, and to Abigail and Mary Stebbins daughters of Benjamin and Abigail Stebbins, my son and daughter in law. I leave to Catharine, daughter of my brother David Whitehead two cows. All the rest of my lands, whether in Queens County or in Nissequogue [Smithtown] in Suffolk County, or elsewhere, are to be sold by my executors. I appoint my wife and son Jonathan executors, and I leave to my loving friends, Thomas Stevenson and Lieutenant Thomas Smith, each 5 lbs. and make them overseers. "Daniel Whitehead" 1. Land in Jamaica: "to my son Jonathan, all my lands, tenements and appurtenances in Jamaica, between the mill and Wellins path, lying westward of the mill to John Okeys land, and southwest so far as my land runs 2. Land in Hempstead: "[to my son Jonathan] all my land on Cow neck in the Town of Hempstead, and all that my 1/4 part of the mill standing on Gildersleve Creek, in said neck. 3. Land in Jamaica: "to my son Jonathan and then to my son Thomas all my meadow on the Old Town neck, in Jamaica, except that meadow I purchased of Mr. Anthony Waters, deceased, with all the hereditaments. 4. Land in Jamaica: "to my loving wife Abigail, my dwelling house I now live in, with the land adjoining bounded on the south by the road to the ferry, on the west by Thomas Smith, north by Anthony Waters, and so much of my meadow ... and after her decease, to my son Thomas 5. Land in Jamaica: "to my son Thomas, all that my lot of land lying in the town of Jamaica, by the land of Colonel Henry Filkin; also all my land on Stewards neck and Quarelsom neck, in Jamaica - 6. Land in Flushing: [to my son Thomas] "and also the lot of land Thomas Chambers now lives on, and my other three lots of land lying by the same, within the bounds of the Township of Flushing [four 20 acre lots] 7. Land in Flushing: to my grandson Whitehead Hicks, the second son of my son in law Thomas Hicks, the husband of my daughter Deborah, all that my land and meadow lying and being within the bounds of Flushing, except the four 20 acres lots given to my son Thomas 8. Land in Jamaica: to my son Thomas "also my lot of land lying as well within as without the Long neck fence in Jamaica, as also all my meadow in Long neck, and all my land and meadow in Hewtree neck, in the bounds of Jamaica 9. Land in Jamaica: to my son in law Anthony Waters, the present husband of my daughter Elizabeth, all that land now in the poss of my brother Daniel Whitehead, lying on the east side of the Plain run, joining to Hempstead bounds and also all that my meadow lying in Old Town neck in Jamaica, which I bought of his father, Mr. Anthony Waters, deceased and also all that my lot of land on the Hills in Jamaica, which was formerly Joseph Thurstons, deceased
MOMMA

The Life of Abigail Schaeffer Woolsey


“MOMMA” The Life of ABIGAIL SCHAEFFER WOOLSEY As Told by Sarah Woolsey Hickerson Her Daughter by Wilford W. Whitaker August 2002 The End of the Road Wet and cold, the little group huddled closer together, seeking warmth from one another. Their somber attitude reflected the grey and lowering skies, pregnant with snow, while spits of snow and hail fitfully blew across them. They were miserable and shivering in the rarified atmosphere of the high Rocky Mountains. It was early in September, 1848. They were only one day’s journey from South Pass. They had yet to traverse up “Rocky Ridge”, where they would literally be on “top of the world”. But now they were on the headwaters of the Sweetwater River, having waded across that freezing stream for the last time, at the “Ninth” or “Last” crossing of the Sweetwater. They were following in the footsteps of their oldest brother Thomas Woolsey and Brigham Young and the Pioneers and the later companies of 1847, trying to make it to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, before winter struck them here on their last leg before crossing South Pass. But they had had to stop here, in this wind-swept prairie of bunch grass and a few stunted trees. At least there was wood for fires and good feed for the stock. John D. Lee had been ill with a heavy fever, probably the ‘rocky mountain fever’ and he was just starting to mend when Abigail, “Momma”, came down with that same “rocky mountain fever”, and soon went into a coma. Lee called for a stop here on the Sweetwater, where her family gathered around her and her daughters desperately tried to care for her. But to no avail. Abigail opened her eyes, looked lovingly on her worried, sad family and then died around midnight on the third of September 1848. And now her family and a few friends were huddled near the banks of that little stream, where ice had formed the night before, and that morning, they had to break the ice in the water buckets and basins before they could splash some of the freezing water onto their faces. Although it was almost 3:00 o’clock, p.m., it was still cold and miserable. They were here to pay their last respects to their mother and grandmother, age 62. Camp of Isereal. Sund., Sep 3, 1848. Last crossing S. water. Extremely cold & disagreeable. About midnight Abigail Lee yielded up the Ghost, after a strugle of about 48 hours. Leading the group was John D. Lee, age 36, indomitable, resolute and implacable, though his face was still shrunken from the effects of that debilitating ‘rocky mountain fever’, which, by the way, had, the previous year, also laid up Brigham Young. Lee scrounged up an old wagon box and had carefully torn it apart, saving the metal and nails, and then fashioned a crude coffin for Abigail, one of his several plural wives, though he claimed that he had married her in name only, not as man and wife, but only to give her protection on their journey across the plains. Like the Israelites of old, they traveled in their companies of TENS and FIFTIES and HUNDREDS. John D. Lee had traveled as one of the fifty-seven wagons in the third company under William G. Perkins. , although Lee had trouble finding fifty persons who were willing to travel with him. Standing next to John D. Lee was his first wife, Agatha Ann Woolsey, daughter of Abigail, who was “the wife of my youth”, age 34. Lee always spelled her name “Aggatha Ann”. In great sorrow, she had already buried four children, so Aggatha was acquainted with that awful specter Death. Agatha Ann remembered her mother’s quiet, kind acceptance of her head-strong husband and how her mother had warmly responded when they first told her about the Church of JESUS CHRIST of Latter-day Saints. Agatha remembered their jubilant feelings when they left Illinois and journeyed to Far West, Missouri, to gather with the Saints. Here they met the Prophet Joseph Smith, who John D. Lee thought “. . . carried an air of majesty that made him seem taller than his six feet.” It was here at Far West, on the following Sunday, 17 June 1838, that Lee and Agatha were baptized. Agatha trembled when she thought of the Missouri Mobs who had descended upon them, burning crops and barns and houses and “pillaged towns, killing animals for sport, rummaging houses, even violating women and girls.” Agatha still shivered, and not just from the cold, when she thought of the time, after moving to Adam-ondi-Ahmen, she had believed Lee had been killed by the mob, her home had been burned and she and her little Sarah Jane were crouching in one corner of the burned out house where she had put some boards and a piece of canvas for shelter. She had started a small campfire in the ruined house, and didn’t know what to do, so she put herself and daughter into the hands of the Lord. “Lee rode up to the place before she knew he was coming. Her joy at seeing him was so great that she could only weep and cling to him.” She remembered how Lee had packed what few belongings they had left and returned his family to Vandalia, less than a year after leaving there. Then, hearing of the new city being built on the Mississippi, Lee and Agatha removed their family to Nauvoo, Illinois, in April 1840. Still reminiscing, Agatha remembered how John D. Lee had returned from his first mission to Jackson County, Tennessee, in October 1839, and he had preached “so effectively to his wife’s people that he was able to baptize the whole family, except the father.” With all that behind her, now she was going to bury her “Momma” - who had nursed her through several sicknesses and cared for her through several pregnancies, who had accepted the Gospel with her. Her mother - upon whom she had depended so much, and had been eagerly looking forward to entering the Great Salt Lake Valley with the Saints. Her mother - who had kept the family together after the death of their father Joseph Woolsey in 1839, back in Fayette County, Illinois. Her mother - who heart and soul had encouraged her family to migrate west with the struggling band of Mormons. Her mother - who would not see the Valley. Now she was going to be laid here in a hard, cold grave in this forbidding and lonely land, far from her family and the Church, far from anywhere. Gathered around Aggatha Ann were her children: Sarah Jane Lee, age 10, who had gone through the terrible experiences in Missouri with her. John Alma Lee, age 8, born in Nauvoo, Illinois. Mary Adeline Lee, age 6, born in Nauvoo, Illinois. Joseph Hyrum Lee, age 4, clinging to his mother’s leg and wondering why they had to stand out here in this freezing cold, and why Grandma was put in that old box. Standing on the other side of John D. Lee was Rachel Andora Woolsey, age 23, a younger daughter of Abigail Schaeffer and Joseph Woolsey, who was about six months pregnant with her first child, who would be born Dec 1848, in Big Cottonwood, Utah, and named Elizabeth Abigail. [Elizabeth for Lee’s sister and Abigail for her mother Woolsey.] Rachel remembered the good times she had at home and the young men who had come “calling”. She particularly remembered the fervent conversations she had with her mother concerning the Mormon Church and their doctrine of Plural Wives. She had a particularly hard time coming to grips with that doctrine, but then, after deliberation and prayer, and upon her mother’s advice, she accepted Lee’s offer of marriage. She had been “sealed” to John D. Lee as his sixth wife, in Nauvoo, Illinois, on 3 May 1845, the same time as her mother was “sealed” to Lee as wife number five. Rachel was one of the most faithful of Lee’s wives, attending to him in his extreme need while he was incarcerated in the Utah Territorial Prison and up until he was shot by the government for his participation in the Mountain Meadow Massacre. Rachel thought of her mother, remembering the good times they had had together, as the Woolseys were “a large, sociable group”, and how Abigail had welcomed the promising young man, John D. Lee, into their family of six girls and six boys. She remembered the brief courtship of Lee and her older sister Agatha Ann and their sumptuous wedding party fifteen years ago, and how Agatha Ann had acted with enthusiasm when Lee related his experience with the Mormon missionaries to her and how quickly they had joined the Mormon Church, firing the Woolseys with their eager new way of life. And now Momma was no longer with them. Would they be able to carry on? Next to Rachel was her older sister, Sarah Woolsey Hickerson, age 28, small, but wirey and tough. Sarah had buried two children and was now about two months pregnant. Sarah remembered her mother and how she had been such a comfort when those two children had died. She remembered the good advice her mother gave her and her help and willingness to help out, in the garden, in the orchard, when canning, or soap making and the thousand and one chores that one always had on the farm. Oh, how she would miss her Momma. Would they be able to live up to her mother’s expectation and “endure to the end” as Momma had done? Next to Sarah was her husband George Washington Hickerson, age 35, a veteran of the Illinois Black Hawk War, in which Abraham Lincoln also participated. ‘Wash’ had given up a prosperous farm and his status as a Justice of the Peace in Vandalia, Fayette County, Illinois, to join the Mormon Church and move to Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. Sarah remembered the hard struggle that “Wash” had before he decided to join the Church. Would they regret that decision? What lay in the future for them? Huddled in front of them were their children: Isaac Woolsey Hickerson, age 8 Susannah Woolsey Hickerson, age 6 George Washington Hickerson, Jr., age 1 Standing a little apart from the rest of the group was Abigail’s youngest son William Andrew Woolsey (the first), age 15. The family had nearly come to blows over William when his older brother James Hopkins Woolsey insisted that their mother Abigail remain in Illinois with James and threatened to take William Andrew away from her, to try to force her to remain, and not to travel west. With his brother-in-law, George Washington Hickerson, he went to California, in 1849, “to see the elephant”, where they dug for gold without much success, and had better luck raising and selling vegetables. He was single until 1857 when he married a California girl Emily Brazier. Now the oldest of the Woolsey family and the patriarch of the family, standing behind the Woolsey girls, was Jacob C. Woolsey, Joseph’s younger brother, age 67, born in Washington County, Virginia, to Richard Woolsey and Nancy Plumbstead. Jacob C. Woolsey is an elusive character, may have been married three or four times and certainly left a large posterity, but has been most difficult to trace. The brother-in-law of Abigail, he dug her grave, which was not an easy thing to do, having to use a pick and shovel, to make any progress through the stubborn shale and caleche, especially for a 67 year old man. With him was his wife Elizabeth, age 38 (she may have been his third wife) and their children: Melinda Woolsey, age 5 William Woolsey, age 1 Some, if not most, of the wagon trains left a fairly complete roster of the people who traveled in them, and although John D. Lee had been specifically chosen by Brigham Young to keep a roster of this train, and had even told Brigham Young that the roster had been made, no list has been found, that purports to name the members of these companies. So it is not surprising that we don’t know for certain who these members were. Abigail’s two older sons, Thomas Woolsey (a member of the Mormon Battalion and also a Pioneer into the Valley of the Great Salt Lake in 1847, went back to Pottawattamie County, Iowa) in the fall of 1847 and farmed the ‘Summer Farm with his brother Richard Woolsey remained there until 1852, when they brought their large families and wives, with Lavinia Patterson Woolsey [wife of James Hopkins Woolsey] to Utah Territory. There were two others sons of Abigail who were in Utah before 1850, and most likely, came with the wagon train in 1848. Hyrum Woolsey, age about 42, was in Utah before 1850. There has been some controversy concerning him because he has become mixed up with other members of the family, in the early Church records. With him were his wife Rachel Mitchel, age about 41, and their son: Joseph Hyrum Woolsey age 22, with his wife Lucinda Jameson, age 22. James Hopkins Woolsey, age 26, had left his wife Lavinia Patterson and family with his two older brothers back in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. This family would come out with the two older brothers in 1852. But James Hopkins Woolsey had left with another woman, and had, probably, come in the train in 1848, to Utah and then headed for California. He would later come back to Utah and try to make up with his first wife but Lavinia would have none of him. John D. Lee, the patriarch of his family, and widower of Abigail, would have presided over this small congregation of Saints and family. He would have made some appropriate remarks and perhaps had called on a family member to speak, and then dedicated the grave. Consigning her body to the care of the Lord, and filling in the dirt and stones over her coffin, family members would have brought stones from the surrounding area to heap on top of her grave, to keep the animals out and protect this sacred site. Her lonely grave, presided over by a stone with her name and date of her death engraven on it, is located in the eastern Wind River Range, of Wyoming, on the headwaters of the Sweet Water River, about 10 rods North of the Uper Road at the foot of the hill and about 5 rods south E. of the river bank. Abigail had two other children who joined the Mormon Church and came west in 1852. They were the oldest son Thomas Woolsey [as stated above], who joined the Mormon Battalion, started marching with them, then was detailed to Pueblo, Colorado. He and John Tippetts were then commissioned to travel back to Winter Quarters, Nebraska Territory and then he came west with the Pioneer Company and Brigham Young, arriving in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake in July 1847. He then went back across the plains and spent the next four years working on the “Summer Farm” and preparing to bring his families to Salt Lake. [See Thomas Woolsey on the Woolsey Website.] His younger brother Richard Woolsey remained in Pottawatamie County, Iowa, working on the ‘Summer Farm’, where they chiefly raised corn for the Saints coming later, and then the two brothers headed west in 1852, accompanied by their growing families and also by Lavinia Patterson Woolsey and her children, wife of the brother James Hopkins Woolsey, who had left them to wander to Utah and California. There were four children of Abigail and Joseph who remained in the Mid-west. They were: John Woolsey, a Mexican War Veteran, married the widow of George King, Jane Haley. After John’s early death, she received his pension and remained in Fayette County, Illinois and married, as her third husband, James Tucker. This researcher has found no record of him as a member of the Mormon Church. He probably did not join the Church. Mary Woolsey married Thomas Whitson in Jackson County, Indiana, and remained there, so it is highly unlikely that she joined the Church. No record has been found for her as a member of the Church. Nancy Woolsey married Thomas A. Gateway in Fayette County, Illinois and remained there. It is quite likely that she, too, did not join the Church, as no record for her has been found. Elizabeth Woolsey married John B. Henninger of Fayette County, Illinois and remained there. No record of her joining the Church has been found. All of these children had fairly large families and descendants are still living there today. This work has drawn upon the work of Juanita Brooks, John Doyle Lee, Zealot - Pioneer Builder - Scapegoat. The Arthur H. Clark Company, Glendale, California. 1962. Cleland, Robert Glass & Juanita Brooks. A MORMON CHRONICLE: The Diaries of John D. Lee - 1848-1876. Vol. I. The Huntington Library. San Marino, California. 1955. p. 75. Cleland, Robert Glass & Juanita Brooks. A MORMON CHRONICLE: The Diaries of John D. Lee - 1848-1876. Vol. I. The Huntington Library. San Marino, California. 1955. p. 75. Head Quarters. Camp of Isereal. Sund., Sep 3, 1848. Last crossing S. water. Extremely cold & disagreeable. About midnight Abigail Lee yielded up the Ghost, after a strugle of about 48 hours. J. D. Lee procured a waggon Box & made a coffin. Jacob C. Woolsey dug her grave & she was buried about 3 p.m. about 10 Rods North of the uper Road at the foot of the Hill & about 5 Rods south E. of the River Bank. Her Name & date of her death was engraven on a stone which was placed at her head. ... Evening rather more mild. . . . This day H. C. Kimble roled out & his co. Since the camp stopped at this place 4 deaths occured, 3 in H. C. Kimble co. & the other in Pres. B. Y.'s co. [Abigail Shaffer Woolsey Lee's death] !PIONEERS: McKnight, James C. PIONEER STORIES. McKnight, Parker and Related Families. Jul 1992. [not in LDS library] from e-mail Ralph McKnight. 6 Aug 1998. "I have visited that place beside that little stream. It is still lonely, but in the summer it can be beautiful. The field where she lies is covered with grass. In season the mountain flowers bloom. I was especially pleased to see a cluster of Colorado Columbine near where I imagined her grave to be. It is at the east end of the Wind River Range, and the country is wild and jumbled. The activity of the earth as the mountains were thrust high above the plains has resulted in one of the wonders of nature. Few trees have survived so close to the river. They were probably all cut and burned for fuel by the pioneers. There are, however, many bushes along the river and in the meadows."



THOMAS WOOLSEY


THOMAS WOOLSEY
1805 - 1897)
Pioneer of 1847
Mormon Battalion
by Wilford Whitaker
To the Descendants of Thomas Woolsey - An Amazing Man


During the years 1846 and 1847, there was much more traffic across the unmarked prairies than what we usually think. There was that seemingly endless stream of immigrants on their way to Oregon, a few to California, and the Mormons, across Iowa to Winter Quarters [Council Bluffs] and then the Mormon Battalion, on their way to Santa Fe and San Diego, California. But there were also others involved in this general migration.

Apr 1846 - Brigham Young called John Brown to lead a group of Latter Day Saints from Monroe County, Mississippi - west - from Northeast Mississippi to the Platte River and rendevous there with the Nauvoo Saints. There were fourteen families and several single men -43 adults (24 men and 19 women) and an unknown number of children.

8 Apr 1846 - Five men were selected to assist Brown, to return to Mississippi and guide the families west.

26 May 1846 - At Independence, Missouri, they were joined by the Robert Crow family of 17 adults and children - with this company, the Brown Company totaled 60 adults.

Mid-June 1846 - Brown and Company were at the Platte River where they waited one or two weeks and then continued west towards Fort Laramie where they were advised to go to Pueblo, Colorado, on the head waters of the Arkansas River, where they could winter. The fort was in a sheltered valley, with a surplus of corn and other food and supplies could be found at Bent's Fort, which was about 75 miles away.

2 Jul 1846 - Thomas Woolsey, the oldest son of Joseph Woolsey and Abigail Woolsey, was an intrepid, courageous pioneer. His life deserves more attention than that hitherto given to him. He was an original volunteer for The Mormon Battalion, marching bravely off to the stirring martial music of the Pitt band, on that 2 July 1846 morning with the rest of the 500 volunteers, albeit reluctant volunteers. Like many others, Thomas Woolsey left wives and children (2 wives and 5 living children) to fend for themselves in his absence. The men had agreed to go only on conditions that their leaders provide for and protect their loved ones, that their pay of $16 per month per enlistee be retrieved and brought back to help not only their own families but the covenant poor generally, and that they be led by their own officers.

16 Jul 1846 - This date was celebrated by some as the date of enlistment of the Mormon Battalion.

Jul 1846 - The Brown Company continued along the Oregon Trail on the south side of the Platte River past Grand Island toward Fort Laramie. In July they met eastern-bound travelers near Chimney Rock, and learned there were no Mormons on the trail ahead of them. They then headed south to the Arkansas River.

7 Aug 1846 - John Brown and his group arrived in Pueblo and began building log cabins and planting crops.

1 Sep 1846 - After helping the families get settled, John Brown and his assistants left Colorado to return to their families in Mississippi.

12 Sep 1846 - These men on their eastward journey met the Mormon Battalion traveling west, at about the "Crossing of the Arkansas" and told the soldiers about the branch of the Mormon Church members in Pueblo.

(Here the dates become a little confusing, possibly because there were three actual "detachments" that were "detached" from the main Mormon Battalion. Ricketts said the Higgins Family Detachment left on the 18 Sep 1846, but it must have been as early as 12 Sep 1846, as Norman Sharp wounded himself on the trail to Pueblo, on the 16 Sep 1846. After hearing Brown's report of the LDS settlement at Pueblo, Lt. A. J. Smith, temporary battalion commander, decided to send some of the women, their husbands, and children back to Pueblo. The first detachment, known as the Higgins family Detachment (Arkansas Detachment), consisted of 11 men, 9 women and 33 children.)

12 Sep 1846 - After reaching Santa Fe, almost one-fifth of the Mormon Battalion enlistees were too ill and exhausted to complete the grueling overland march to San Diego. Colonel Doniphan, commandant at Santa Fe, and Lt. Col. Philip St. George Cooke agreed to send a "sick detachment" of 89 men, 18 women laundresses, and some children on a 300 mile detour to Pueblo, 75 miles west of Bent´s Fort. Captain Higgins, with a guard of ten men was detailed to lead this detachment, [They were actually "at the Crossing of the Arkansas" on the Arkansas River at this time.] to Pueblo, a Mexican town located farther up the Arkansas, to winter. This company and the guard, which included Thomas Woolsey, split off from the main Battalion, who were on their way to Santa Fe and traveled up the Arkansas river and across the mountains to Pueblo.

16 Sep 1846 - After four days travel up the river, private Norman Sharp accidentally shot himself in the arm. He was so badly wounded it was deemed advisable to send him back a few miles to a friendly Indian village for treatment. Thomas Woolsey volunteered to stay with Sharp and his family. The medicine man appeared very friendly and seemed almost certain he could cure him in a very few days. His treatment, however, was against his recovery. A warm fire was kept up day and night for about three days, when mortification set in and he died, a stranger in a strange land. . . . Brother Woolsey dug a grave, wrapped him in a blanket and buried him, and then took his (Sharp´s) family and brought them on and overtook the company, which had stopped to set tire irons. They proceed on to Pueblo, after negotiating a snow-bound mountain pass with much fatigue and hardships.

Sometime after this date Thomas Woolsey, alone and in a strange land, traveled from Pueblo back to Santa Fe and then on the trail of the Mormon Battalion until he caught up with them, on the Rio Grande River.

Early Oct 1846 - Higgins Family detachment arrived in Pueblo.

18 Oct 1846 - When Philip St. George Cooke assumed command of the battalion in Santa Fe, he thought there were [still] too many women, children, and sick soldiers and decided to send a second detachment to Pueblo. This group left Santa Fe 18 Oct 1846 under James Brown, Captain. This was known as the Brown Sick Detachment (Santa Fe Detachment). (Ricketts, ibid)

29 Oct 1846 - John Brown's group reached their families in Mississippi.

04 Nov 1846 - Here we (the main body of the Mormon Battalion) were overtaken by Thomas Woolsey, one of Capt. Higgin´s detachment, who went to Pueblo from the crossing of the Arkansas. He traveled from Santa Fe alone and brought us the first information we received of the accidental shooting and subsequent death of Norman Sharp. When Capt. Higgin´s detachment reached Santa Fe, Gen. Doniphan gave them the privilege of returning to Pueblo, which privilege was accepted by all except Woolsey. William Coray wrote as follows:

This evening Thos Woolsey overtook the command; he gave us the desired information concerning Pueblo, Capt. Higgins´ company, etc. They had arrived at Santa Fe a short time after we left and got on detached service to go back again to their families by order of Col. Price. He stated that there were 17 families from Mississippi at Pueblo. Bro. Woolsey showed no small amount of courage to undertake a journey lone-handed and in an enemies´ land at that.

10 Nov 1846 - Colonel Cooke sent Lieutenant William W. Willis with the last detachment at the Rio Grande River 10 Nov. This was known as Willis Sick Detachment or Rio Grande Detachment.

10 Nov 1846 - This sick detachment, under Lt. W. W. Willis, accordingly started back. Included Thomas Woolsey and John H. Tippets.

17 Nov 1846 - The Brown Sick Detachment arrived in Pueblo with 92 men, 19 women and 10 children.

Before 20 Dec 1846 - [31 Dec 1846] [Report of Lt. Wm. W. Willis - this date must not be correct because the Willis Sick Detachment arrived in Pueblo 20 Dec 1846 and because Woolsey and Tippets stated they left Pueblo for Winter Quarters "two days before Christmas".] . . . I concluded to take Thomas Woolsey and start early next morning and go ahead to Mr. Turleys and make arrangements for the sick. [Brought up the sick, and then a very difficult time over the mountains, through deep snow, to Pueblo).

20 Dec 1846 - The Willis Sick Detachment arrived in Pueblo 20 Dec 1846. [This date does not agree with the date above as reported by Lt. Wm. W. Willis.] There were 56 men and one woman in this Willis Sick Detachment.

Thus we have Thomas Woolsey volunteering to go with the Mormon Battalion to San Diego, then on the Arkansas River, being assigned to go to Fort Pueblo, Colorado, with the Higgins Family Detachment. He stayed with Norman Sharp, who had accidently shot himself, until Sharp died, then buried him. Then he took Sharp's widow and family on to Pueblo. When he arrived at Pueblo, he was sent back to travel to Santa Fe, and then he traveled, alone, south of Santa Fe until he caught up with the main body of the Mormon Battalion, on or near the Rio Grande River, made his report, where he left with the Willis Sick Detachment, [including John H. Tippets ] for Pueblo, again. Arriving in Pueblo, he started the New Year [1847] preparing to take this bold journey, with John H. Tippets, through the plains back to Winter Quarters and the main body of the Saints, carrying money and mail.

After this most perilous journey of over 600 miles, and many adventures later, through unmarked prairies and treacherous Indians, he and Tippets were reunited with the Saints in Winter Quarters, where they made arrangements to travel with the Pioneer Group under Brigham Young to the Salt Lake Valley.

23 Dec 1846 - Thomas Woolsey and John H. Tippets left Pueblo for Winter Quarters [Council Bluffs.] - First day - lost


Photo of Thomas Woolsey & John Tippetts

24 Dec 1846 - Second day, it took all day to find ourselves.

25 Dec 1846 - Next morning started again traviled till near four o clock in the afternoon, got near the crossing of the Fountain Fay Baryd (??) (Fountain Creek) where our pilote that we had to pilott us to the south fork of the Platt got turned round and bewildered and said we was not on the road so we turned to the right into the open peaie (prairie) and travild till dark and camped the wind blew heard and cold

26 Dec 1846 - Third day, on and on - We rose the next morning and our pilott Declared he would go back and we thought we had beter go back and find the road if possible we traviled till four o clock which brot us to where we camped the first night - brother Woolsey and I camped and told Serat (?) Our pilot to go to Puebelow and get information about the road and come or send the next morning and bring us word

29 Dec 1846 - Again there is confusion as to the dates here, but it appears that they returned to Pueblo to get their bearings because Tippets and Woolsey write that "on the 29 of December, 1846, we left Puehebeu (Pueblo) traveled ten miles and camped." This date seems the more reasonable.


AN ANNOTATED JOURNAL

This is a section toward the back of the book, called "UNCLE JOHN" and is a short auto-biography of John Harvey Tippets, written by himself, in the later years of his life, possibly taken from his Journals, but more probably, from memory. As the pertinent parts of this autobiography are only about one-half a page, it will be inserted at the appropriate places, in bold (bold) text.


THOMAS WOOLSEY´S FAMILY ACCOUNT

This account, prepared from the research of Laurna Jessie (Taylor) Bennett, a great grandchild of Thomas Woolsey and Mary Burrell, through their daughter Eliza, seems to follow the "Autobiography" instead of the Journal below. I will put in brackets [and italicize ] data from this account.


JOURNAL OF JOHN H. TIPPETS & THOMAS WOOLSEY

[When Thomas (Woolsey) was called to the Mormon Battalion, he left his wives, Mary (Burrell) and Julia Ann (Mitchell), and eight children in Winter Quarters - their home, a dugout; their means of support, faith and prayer.]

[During the Mormon Battalion march, records show that on 10 Nov 1846, the Colonel ordered a detachment of 56 men, under the command of Lieutenant Willis, to be sent to Pueblo. They were furnished with 26 days rations, 10 ounces of flour per day. Lt. Willis reports that they 'had one big government wagon, four yolk of poor cattle, five days ration and two dressed sheep.]

After mutch anxiety and several Days inn he stroving [? striving] we got leave of lieutenant Willis to make the adventure from Fort Puthelow (Pueblo) to Counsel Bluff where the main hdq of our breathering ware

John H. Tippets

Thomas Woolsey

Here Thomas Halsey [Woolsey] and I got leave to go to Sanpear Point on the Missouri River. We started on the

23rd of December. First day - lost

[Two days before Christmas, 1846, Thomas Woolsey and John H. Tippets left Pueblo, alone and without a guide.]

on the 29 of December - 1846 we left Puehebeu (Pueblo) traviled ten miles and camped

29 Dec 1846 [?] - Second day, it took all day to find ourselves.

[The second day they passed Pike´s Peak. When they awoke in the morning, they were under six inches of snow.

]

next morning started again traviled till near four o clock in the afternoon got near the crossing of the Fountain Fay Baryd (??) where our pilote that we had to pilott us to the south fork of the Platt got turned round and bewildered and said we was not on the road so we turned to the right into the open peaie (prairie) and travild till dark and camped the wind blew heard an cold

30 Dec 1846 - Third day, on and on.

we rose the next morning and our pilott Declared he would go back and we thought we had beter go back and find the road if possible we traviled till four o clock which brot us to where we camped the first night brother Woolsey and I camped and told Serat (?) our pilot to go to Puebelow and get information about the road and come or send the next morning and bring us word

31 Dec 1846 - Fourth day, camped near ledge of rock.

1 Jan 1847 - we rose this morning which is the first day of January 1847 wated for the word till we was tired of wating and started at aventure rode three miles and the mesinger overtook us and told us we was on the right road an that there was but the one road and told me that the Lieutenant ordered me back and that Brother Woolsey could do as he pleased about it so we road back 4 miles and met Br Holida (?) counseled with him a few minits we told him to go and consult Captain Brown and Cap Higins and Lieu Willis and send us word the next morning or they might expect we should be gone. This was the fourth nigt and only ten miles from Puebelow

Fifth morning under four inches of snow.

2 Jan 1847 - and the second Day of January we started and rode ten miles and it was so rainy and cold we could not ride and we camped

3 Jan 1847 - Sixth and

we started the next mornhing before Day and it was very cold we rode till betwen Day light and sunrise and had to stop and make a fire and warm us started again and rode till night come to what is called Jimes (?)camp it took its name by reason of aman beeing murdered there

seventh days on Cherry Creek (near where Denver is now)

[The fourth night they camped on Cherry Creek, near where Denver is now.]

4 Jan 1847 - traviled the next day to a plase cald the point of rocks camped for the night

5 Jan 1847 - in the morning we found ourselves two inches under the snow and the road was filed up so we could not folow it and we stopped for the day near the midle of the after noon there came along four strangers with eight pack meuls and porters so it was fortunate for us for they made a tract plain for us to folow

6 Jan 1847 - we started the next morning came to cherry Creek and camped on the 6 of Jenuary rode down the Creek

7 Jan 1847 - on the 7 and

8 Jan 1847 - 8 Days of the month

9 Jan 1847 - we rose on the ninth early in morning it was severely cold the sun rose with two sun Dogs as bright as the sun with a half circle above it and a purfect circle around it and one that incurcled a large portion of the sky and run through the center of each sun dog and through the center of the sun with two pale sun Dogs at a Distance each side of the bright ones the figure there bares a resemblance. This day was so cold that we could see the frost as high up as we could see the day was verry dear and we only traviled ten miles through the day

10 Jan 1847 - Eighth day, on day, on South fork of the Platte.

[On arriving at the South Fork of the Platte River, they decided to follow along the bank, and passed an old deserted Indian village. An east wind blasted their faces, and the temperature plummeted. They were forced to take shelter under the bank of the river, where they slept on the ice. The weather was so cold that six inches of the tail of one of their mules was frozen.]

10 Jan 1847 - we started on the tenth traviled to the south fork of the Plat and camped

11 Jan 1847 - traviled down the plat river past Bents and Louries trading fort

Ninth day on the Platte, near Indian Trading Fort. We kept down the river.

12 Jan 1847 - on the 12

13 Jan 1847 - on the 13 past through the Shians Indians

14 Jan 1847 - traviled comfortably along on the 14

15 Jan 1847 - and 15

16 Jan 1847 - and 16

A cold wind arose, took us in the face, had to take shelter in the bend of the river. There was no wood; so little fire. Our mules froze their tails. Ice on the river froze ten feet in width in less than half an hour.

17 Jan 1847 - on the morning of the seventeeth it was warm and comfortable the snow thawd some we roade till two o clock when we saw the wind along ways ahead of us it meting in the fase and was so cold and blew so heard we had git off from our meuls and get down in the grass we sat a while it grew so cold we dare not stay no longer fore there was no wood in sight nor within our knowlege we see we must find wood or freeze to Death we tried to go against the wind but we found it in vain so we turned back took up the bank of the river looking for flud wood and a bank to brak the wind but all was vain till we rode back three miles where we found a bank of the river near three or four feet high from the water and a little handful of wood that the Indians had left but not near anuff to make one comfortable fire the night came upon us it turned cold so fast that it froze over twelve feet of water in twenty minutes the prospect of freezing to death was verry fare for us and our animels our minds was fill with serious and meloncoly meditations feering it might bee the last night with us and leave the world unknown to any human to give any information of our fete and our bodys must be left to be Devoured by the wolves but considering there was a god and his goodness extended to them who loved him we took a bite to eate and laid down our buffalows and blankets half the length on the sand and half on the eyce and rested in hoples of seeing the returns of another Day we got quite comfortable after lying Down went to sleep being kindly preserved by our father in heaven in answer to our prayer

18 - 20 Jan 1847 - We were 200 miles out on the open Plains, strangers in a strange land. We kept on down the river, all day we rode; at night we camped. Cold so extreme we stopped three days. We were out of provisions. We tried, but failed to kill a buffalo.

The last day at sundown, a small herd came by. It was given by inspiration that THAT DAY we should get one. We did.

21 Jan 1847 - we rose in the morning in life and health but the foot of our beding was froze in the ice it was extreemly cold and we had but a verry little fire we got a bite to eate and the consequence was that we must either go back forward or freeze to Death it apeared as we must freeze the best we could do unless we could find timber and none to be seen we sadled our mewls got ready to start the minits was well imploid by me with serious reflections I thought of home I thought of wife and children I thought of the church I thought of the twelve I thought of the priest hood I thought of my garmentes I thought labe? which was all lovely to me while get ready to start I said to brother Woolsey shall we go back or forward he answered I Don´t know Jest as you say about it Said. I hardly know what to do I Drecd (?dreaded) the consequence ether way we got on our mewls

22 Jan 1847 - Started out next day. At night camped in an old Indian Wigwam. Staid over a day because of the cold. As I was going for water an old buffalo ran me back to camp. From behind a log I shot him later.

and started east at aventure we traviled twelve miles crosed the river to a couple of coten wood trees tha we see there found an Indian wig wam that some of the Shians hunters had left which made us a comfortable place to brak the cold wind we come to this place on the 18 of January here our provisions gave out we had but four canty (scanty) meals we staid here three Days and tried every day to kill a buffalow as ther was hundreds of them around us but having no guns but muskets we had no sucksess

23 Jan 1847 - [Another day in the unmarked wilderness and they found wood. The fire they were able to kindle kept them alive for three days of blizzard and cold.]

19 Jan 1847 - 19th

[They killed a buffalo, and feasted like princes while waiting for the storm to subside.]

20 Jan 1847 - 20th

[When the blizzard abated they continued their journey. The first evening, after setting camp, they started for water, but were driven back by a belligerent buffalo who was guarding the water for his herd.]

21 Jan 1847 - on the twenty first we thought me must start we went one mile and tried to cross the river back to the road we got on the ice and our mewls sliped down it was verry cold we got back as quick as we could returned to camp we thought we would venture to stay the day so we unsadled our mewls while womething whispered me if we staid through the Day we should kill a Buffalow Amediately Br Wootsey said I am going to kill a Buffalow today we tried faithfuly all Day without sucheess our provisions was now gone but a trifle and the distance we had to go we knew not some meat we had to git or starve there was a dead buffalow a half mile below us that the woolves had eaten a part of it we saw there no othr chance but to take some of it but we thought we should have to be starved to the eating of it Jest at night we took our hatchet and knives and started to git some of the woolf meat going to it we saw a hurd of Buffalow coming towards us we huried to meat them as they crossed a little below us but they got to the crossing before uz ine (?) bef still till they all crossed we took after them Br Woolsey shot at one without suchess the Shot started them towards our camp I took up the creek kep under the bank out of sight till they got in thirty rods of our camp but I was not near a nuff to shoot and I crald out on the bank an lay close to the ground and crold 20 or 25 rods and shot a cow in the point of the shoulder she started and stumbled hur calf observed the fright and win up to hur left std to suck she not willing to stand he run under hur next to hur right and back to hur left and she stoped for the calf to suck and the hurd stoped Br Woolsey cralled by me to git near anuff to shoot while my heart was raised in earnest prayer to god that he would give us a buffalow to keep us from starving in the mean time Br Woolsey shot and she droped in hur tracks our hearts was raised with thanksgiving to god for the answer to our prayers by this time it was about dark and our meat in thurty rods of our camp we took 40 or 50 pounds of it and left the rest

22 Jan 1847 - we procued our Jowrny the next morning which was the 22 day of January traviled a few days and met a large hurd as we camped and kild a calf we traviled a few days more one morning I got up and went to look for our mewls and started some deer and they run by our camp and Br Woolsey sat on our bed and shot a fine buck

we traviled on till

29 Jan 1847 - the twenty ninth of Jan an came to the Junction of the north fork of plat the whole cuntry seamed to be filled up with Buffalow

The weather turned warmer. We came to some Indian Camps, they took us in, kept us all next day, held a council over us. At noon we left at the rist of consequences, rode till dark, camped in the brush.

[They followed the river to Grand Island, where a group of Pawnee Indian braves attacked them, captured them, and took them to their camp.]

5 Feb 1847 - on the fifth of February we fel in with the Pawne Indians - there was near two hundred of them. They took us and condicted us to the chief they took our sadles and mewls guns and loading and put them in the care of the chief gave us some dinner and they was agoing to moove 5 or 6 miles down on the grand Island so we sadiled and packed our mewls went down the river a couple of miles where they crosed the branch and we was for going our way but the chief would not let us so we had to go and lodge with him through the night he invited us to eat with him in diferant lodges where his wives ware night came on se slep in the lodge with his young men and squws the chief invited us to take of couple of young squaws of his withought any thrsoy (?) to hep (?) pease (?) so we told him we would when we came back giting away was our object little before noon they cald a counsel an made a corn soup we was invited in the chief asked me to give him a rechamend to washaterra meening the states how he had kep us and fed us and we had slep with him and had treated us kindly the spokesman comensed speaking and I comensed writing as he spoke evry few minits a sanction was given all around he closed and the chief spoke a few words after he spoke he kittle of soup was carried out dores and the soup bowls fild ech one of the men took a soup spoon filed with with corn and gave it to the chief the chief gave it back to the man and he devided it and put it on the ground before to indians opiset the chief the indian raised up bowed over and made a beat with both hands over the corn turned about to us and made the same motion then the soup bolls was braught in one to each two I eate with the chief our fate we new not I thought eating would not make it none the worse and as I had the chance I improved it Br Woolsey et but litle after eting we went out I got my mewls and loaded our things out Br Woolsey watcht them after I got them all out we sadled and packed our mewls they had taken a mare from broth Woolsey worth 65 or 70 dolars and gave him a mewl a mewl worth 30 dolars we got ready to start and the chief went with us tw miles put us on our road he shook hands with us and bid us good by we traviled on saw af ew indians ahead of us we watched them closely suposing them to bee the ones tha was designated by the corn they hid and and (sic) we went on unmolested we traviled till nine o clock at night camped in some dry brush made but verry little fire et a bite and laid down

[Thomas (Woolsey) later expressed his thoughts concerning being captured by Indians on that journey. He said, "I knew we were in a trap, and only through the power of God could we hope to escape, and believe me we did send up a petition to our God. Our prayers were answered, and on 15 Feb 1847 we arrived at Winter Quarters and in time to come west with the first company of Saints led by President Brigham Young."]

We were stopped by seven of these warriors, searched and let go.

6 Feb 1847 - [The next day the Indians decided to scalp and kill them. Fortunately, the Indian Chief (Sethmalin, Pawnee Chief) returned to camp and ordered his braves to release them. Thomas Woolsey, in gratitude, later did the temple work for this Indian Chief in the Manti temple.]

7 Feb 1847 - Starte in the morning traviled five miles and saw seven in waryers of the pawnese we motioned to them to keep back and not more than two to com up they inscisted on coming we prepared to fire and the captain laid down his bow and arrows and gun came up with his pipe the all came up and shook hands and we must git dow and eate with them they kep us three hours and searched evry thing we had but my knapsack that I would not have searched they stole Br Woolseys shirt and garment they was determind to have my flanil shirt off from my back rather than strip in the cold I told them I would give them one out of my sack and done so and left them this was the seventh of February

8 Feb 1847 - Next day we crossed the Platte on ice.

we traviled three Days along the side of the iland come to abed of rushes stoped aday and ahalf to let ou mewls feed as gras was giting verry poor

Next day we crossed the Loop-Fork on the ice at great risk and came to Miller´s Trail, made the summer before.

10 Feb 1847 - Started on the tenth of the month past the pawne village about noon no indians there

Camped on a little island in the Platte river.

11 Feb 1847 - on the 11 we crossed the main river and took the north side

[They crossed the river on the ice below Grand Island, then continued eastward to the Elk Horn River.]

traviled two dais with out the sine of a road or trail

13 Feb 1847 - we found the road on the thirteenth day of the month now our meat was nearly gone and no feed but the dry grass how fur we was from our bratherin we knew not we calculated to travil as fast as we could as long as our mewls would live and make the best of it we could we had but little to eate so we hurried

14 Feb 1847 - Next night we camped in the timber and had plenty of rushes. Stayed over to let our mules feed as they were nearly starved.

we luckly found abe (a bed) of rushes on the fourteenth day of the month and we thought we could stand it with out eating as long as the mewls so we stoped a day and a night to let them feed

We came to the [Elk] Horn River, carried sand to throw on the ice so mules wouldn´t slip. Crossed on the ice. The Indians stopped us, one of them could speak English. I asked him where we were. Learned we were 16 miles from Winter Quarters. For three days we had not eaten one meal of victuals. That night rode to Brigham´s door -- they were just ready to sit down to supper, no excuse, we must eat with them, dirty as we were. After supper I found my family. It had taken us 52 days on the route.

[They packed sand in their blankets and threw it on the ice to keep the mules from slipping, and crossed the thin and treacherous ice in safety.]

[They were stopped by a band of Omaha Indians. A white man was living among them. Brother Tippetts asked him if he spoke English. When he answered 'yes´, the weeks of deprivation, loneliness and hunger spilled over, and Brother Tippetts cried, "For God´s sake, tell us where we are!"]

[They were sixteen miles from Winter Quarters, where they arrived at dark at President Brigham Young´s home.]

(Pictures of Bringham Young's Winter Home)

15 Feb 1847 - early on the morning of the fiftenth we started in hopes of giting home in 2 or 3 days came to the horn it was glare ice we made a path of sand and got over without our mewls sliping as they was not shod we came on to the omehoes indians they Detained us a few minutes took us to there camp we found a man that could talk inglish we inquired for Sanpees at Counsel point to our surprise we found we was in 6 miles and 15 miles of the breathrerin beeing over anxious to git home we hurried and got to President Youngs doore Jest at Dark on the 15 day of February being fifty one (crossed out, 49 written above it, 49 would be the correct time.) Days on the open praies.

{Bennett, Richard E. We´ll Find the Place. The Mormon Exodus 1846-1848. Deseret Book Company. Salt Lake City, Utah. 1997. p. 77. "Two totally unexpected latecomers were John Tippets and Thomas Woolsey, who made a surprise appearance in Winter Quarters during an evening of food and entertainment at Brigham´s home. Half-crazed and starving, the two men had just completed a harrowing two-month journey by mule and on foot from 280 miles south of Santa Fe, where they had left the Mormon Battalion. From there - in the dead of winter - they proceeded north to Pueblo and then west down the Platte River Valley to the Missouri, some 750 miles. They brought with them 137 letters, news of the Battalion and of the Mississippi Saints, and a desire to know the plans of the main camp. Paralyzed by blizzards, captured and robbed by the Pawnee though paradoxically saved by Pawnee hospitality, they stumbled into camp like two dazed prodigal sons. "Their arrival produced no small stir throughout the camp," said Woodruff, [Journal, 12 Feb 1847] and people came "in all directions to enquire after their friends in the Army." Despite their harrowing ordeal, Tippets and Woolsey summoned up the energy to join the pioneer camp and make the return journey back the way they had come, thereby proving an invaluable asset to the camp.}

[There are few such journeys of sheer courage and endurance recorded in the history of the Church. To travel alone, in the dead of winter, and follow a blind trail for six hundred miles was a hard and hazardous challenge - a saga of true western pioneers.]

In all, I acknowledge the hand of the Lord. We arrived home on the 15th day of February 1847.

through this adventure and ath (?after) our exposures and the providing our meat and deliverance from the Indians we atribut to the kind and afectionate care of our heavenly father in answer to our prayers learning by experience he will answer according to his word to them was (?) firy (?firm) in faith believeing that they do receive glory honor and praise be given to god the Farther son and holy ghost for our Deliverance and preservation and salvation worlds without end.

Stayed until the first of April and started with the Pioneer Company for Salt Lake Valley.

[He (Thomas Woolsey) arrived in Utah with the first pioneer company, 24 Jul 1847.]

(in another hand, on the back) John H. Tippitts & Thomas Woolsey´s Journal from the 29th Dec 1846 - to 15th February 1847. inserted 15 Feb 47 condensed gas(?)

End of Journal

Early Spring 1847 - The Robert Crow family grew impatient and started West and were waiting at Fort Laramie when Brigham Young and the Pioneer Company arrived 1 Jun 1847 and traveled with them to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake.

16 Apr 1847 - [The first company of 143 men, three women and two children (of which Thomas Woolsey was a member), as well as subsequent companies, were organized much as Moses had organized the Children of Israel for their flight from Egypt. Companies were divided into hundreds, fifties, and tens, and a captain was placed over each. Thomas Woolsey was in the Sixth Ten. Charles Shumway was the Captain. Members of the Sixth Ten, in addition to Thomas Woolsey and Andrew Shumway, were Chauncey Loveland, Erastus Snow, James Craig, William Wardsworth, William Vance, Simeon Howd, and Seeley Owen.]

In company with Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball -- another company came three days travel, camped three days to let our teams browse on cottonwood brush as there was no grass. Started our march to Missionary Station, to civilize the Pawnee Indians -- then on to Pawnee town; forded the loop fork of the Platte River, came to Wood Creek, to a place called Laramie, a distance of 501 miles. Before we came to Laramie, we crossed the north fork of the Platte, myself and Roswell Stevens. Amasa Lyman went south toward Pike´s Peak to meet our Company. We had left the December before. When we got to the dry fork of Crow Creek we lost our road, it being very blind weather all that day. Next day we came to the south fork of the Platte, forded across, came to the trail we had gone down in the winter. We could see below where we should be so we rode up the river and in the latter part of that day we came to the Old Mountain. We could see our Company had left there was on the road to Laramie. We took their track, crossed the river back again, then to Crow Creek and camped next day. Came on to our Company as they camped for the night. Next day, great rejoicing for they had heard by way of an Indian that we had been killed during the winter. (I forgot to say when we lost our way to Dry Fork on Crow Creek, we ran out of provisions and killed a pelican for breakfast. Had the good luck to shoot an antelope next day.

{Bennett, We´ll Find the Place. p. 124. "The decision to pass near the main Pawnee village was both deliberate and dangerous, and was prompted, no doubt, by those in camp who had firsthand experience with the Pawnee. James Case, a former employee at the government-operated farm near the Pawnee village who was dismissed after his conversion, had spent much of the past year at the now-abandoned farm and adjacent Presbyterian mission. Case knew the area and the Pawnee well. He also knew that his farm associates had stored a large cache of hay and provisions, which might still be hidden from the Pawnee. "Tippets and Woolsey had spent several weeks among the Pawnee as grateful, if unwilling, winter captives. Before their release, they had told the Pawnee about Mormon intentions, one of the chiefs had even pledged two of his daughters in marriage to the two sojourners. The pioneers hoped to build on this friendship."}

14 Apr 1847 - [By 14 Apr 1847 the pioneers had reached Loup Fork. They crossed Plum Creek with little difficulty, but found it difficult to cross Cedar Creek before reaching the fording place on the banks of the Loup. It was decided that they would build two rafts to make the crossing. Tarlton Lewis was assigned to build one, Thomas Woolsey the other.]

29 Apr 1847 - [By 29 Apr they had reached Grand Island, Nebraska. The cannon brought up the rear of the wagon train. Members of the gun crew were Thomas Tanner, Captain; Stephen H. Goddard, Seeley Owens, Thomas Woolsey, Horace Thornton, Charles D. Barnum, Sylvester H. Earl, George Schools and Rufus Allen.]

{Bennett, We´ll Find the Place. p. 131. "Rockwell, quick with both word and gun, was soon claiming bragging rights for having felled the first buffalo. But John Pack felt constrained to paint a slightly different version of the story: "There was considerable anxiety in the camp who should kill the first buffalo," he later wrote to his family back at the Missouri.

We had none ever killed any except Bro. Wool[s]ey and Tippets that came from the army. I said but very little for fear I might not kill one at all. One afternoon about 3 0´clock we came in sight of about 300 buffalo in one herd. 11 of us which had previously been chosen for hunters prepared for the chase on horse back . . . . We started off on a slow walk the buffalo being 3 miles off. There was much bragging by the way. I told them I did not expect to kill any. I was going along behind to skin with my big jack knife. However we got up within 1/4 mile and the buffalo started. We put spurs to our horses and as they ran around a hill I cut across and came in ahead of all the hunters and along side of the buffalo. I fired away and killed one dead on the spot.... Porter had shot at one of them once but did not touch them then rode on and left them. I spurred up my horse and came alongside and fired away and shot the largest one through the shoulder....He fell dead on the spot. This one is allowed to be much the largest of any that has been killed....I killed 2 alone and helped Bros. Kimball and J. Redden kill one. They had to all give up. But well you must know that I felt first rate."

18 May 1847 - [William Clayton was one of the camp scribes. On Tuesday 18 May, he recorded: Brigham´s horse nearly stepped on a large rattlesnake and when Thomas Woolsey came walking by moments later, the snake coiled and struck at him, missing his foot by scant inches as he jumped aside. John Higbee shot the head off the snake and the serpent was thrown into the creek, which Brigham Young named Rattlesnake Creek.]

24 May 1847 - The Pueblo Detachment and remaining Mississippi Saints under Captain James Brown left Pueblo and gained on the vanguard company until they were only a day behind at the ferry on the Platte River. Finding a blacksmith there, they stopped to get their animals shod.

1 Jun 1847 - Seventeen of the Mississippi Saints and twelve Mormon Battalion men joined the Pioneer Company at Fort Laramie. This group continued on with the Pioneer Company to the Great Salt Lake Valley. These were of the Robert Crow family.

2 Jun 1847 - [Two miles from Ft. Laramie, four men were picked by Brigham Young to travel to Pueblo, to gather some of the Saints there and bring them to Ft. Laramie, and then on the Mormon Trail to the Great Salt Lake Valley. These four men were Amasa Lyman, one of the twelve; Thomas Woolsey, John H. Tippets and Roswell Stevens.]

[Brigham Young and Willard Richards signed Amasa Lyman´s letter of authority, and also prepared a letter to Elder Thomas Dowdle, the presiding Elder at Pueblo. They then gathered 349 letters to the Battalion and gave the mail pouch to Thomas Woolsey, appointing him Deputy Postmaster. Dr. Richards instructed Brother Woolsey to bring back all the letters he was not able to deliver.]

{Bennett, We´ll Find the Place. p. 174. The Pueblo detachment had weathered the winter reasonably well, reported Crow, and most of them were presently en route from Fort Pueblo for Fort Laramie. However, because of dissension over Mormon versus non-Mormon authority within their ranks, as well as rumors and reports on how their families were faring at Winter Quarters, the detachment had so soured in morale that some were talking openly of mutiny and desertion. Almost "half of the men rebelled and entered into obligation to leave the company at Laramie, take their portion of teams and provisions and go to the States." "Nothing in the world would have held us together" wrote John Steele, a member of the disenchanted company, "but the gospel and some were fast forgetting that." Upon hearing such happy as well as disturbing news, Brigham requested that Apostle Amasa Lyman and Rosewell Stevens, plus John Tippets and Thomas Woolsey (who were enlistees in the Battalion), head south through dangerous Indian country with a large mail, intercept the oncoming party, and douse the smoldering discontent. Lyman was then to bring the detachment west, hard in the wake of the pioneer camp. On the morning of 3 June 1847 . . . ."}

3 Jun 1847 - [The four men then started on horses and mules for Pueblo. President Young, Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, and Orson Pratt accompanied them to Laramie Fork, where they held a council meeting seated on a large tree which had fallen on the bank of the river; after which they knelt down and President Young blessed the Brethren who were going on the journey and dedicated them to the Lord.]

{Bennett, We´ll Find the Place. p. 174. "Brigham read some instructions . . . . and gave them to Amasa Lyman [in which] he told the [Battalion] brethren that they had accomplished their designs in getting the battalion to Mexico but the brethren at Pueblo must not follow Brown to Mexico, but go to California. If the officers will not do right, he instructed Amasa to call out the men, and choose officers who would do right . . . and throw all the Gentile officers out of the Battalion when you come up to it.}

[Date not given - Thomas Woolsey met up with the Pueblo Saints, who were already on the road and started after the Pioneer Company under Brigham Young.] - Next morning after we came to the Company, we started our long march under the mountains. Crossed the middle fork of the Platte at Fort Laramie. Here we took the road that Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball were on with the Pioneer Companies. Went over the hill where they had camped at Independence Rock, on the Sweet Water and stayed one day. Then on up the Sweetwater to Pacific Springs, passed them and camped on the Dry Sandy. From here to Big Sandy, then to Green River, crossed and camped at Hams Fork, just a hundred miles from Salt Lake Valley, it was in August.]

4 Jul 1847 - The Pioneer Company met thirteen of the Mormon Battalion men and there was general rejoicing and thanksgiving.

8 Jul 1847 - Sgt. Williams and Samuel Brannan were sent back along the trail to meet members of the Mormon Battalion Detachment coming from Pueblo, which included Thomas Woolsey. There were 140 men in the detachment, which was seven days behind the Pioneers. Thomas Woolsey pushed ahead and caught up with the Pioneer Company sometime before they entered the Valley.

24 Jul 1847 - Thomas Woolsey arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley with the Pioneer Company.

29 Jul 1847 - {Bennett, We´ll Find the Place, p. 230. "The very next day [29 Jul 1847] the combined company of Mississippi Saints and the Pueblo detachment of the Mormon Battalion, some 240 souls in all, arrived in camp with 60 wagons, over 100 horses and mules, and some 300 head of cattle, more than doubling their ******s. Marching to fife and drum, the soldiers, now looking like mountaineers, sunburned and weather-beaten, entered the valley in smart military procession - council and officers first, infantry next with martial music, then the cavalry, with the baggage wagons bringing up the rear. 'The brethren were very much rejoiced at getting once more among their friends, ' Bullock noted, 'and a general congratulations took place.´

30 Jul 1847 - The Pueblo Saints made a campsite about ½ mile north of the Temple Lot.

31 Jul 1847 - Brigham Young took command. "Praising the Battalion boys enthusiastically, Brigham assured them that all their families were well and many of them were already on the overland road. Shouting 'Hosanna, Hosanna, Hosanna, give glory to God and the Lam,´ he congratulated the Battalion for having 'saved the people by going into the Army. If they had not gone, Missouri was ready with 3,000 men to have wiped the Saints out of existence.´ ... He closed his comments by asking the Battalion to erect a bowery 40 feet long by 28 feet wide for Sunday preaching.

"The truth of the matter was that many of the new arrivals had almost mutinied on their way to Fort Laramie, wanting to return to their families. Many were unhappy with how some of their enlistment pay and later wages had been appropriated and were convinced that their wives and families were getting less than their due. While some made secret arrangements to leave for the East in a day or two, others wanted assurances that their families were indeed part of the emigration camp (or 'Big Company´) that was following the advance camp. Some had the 'California fever´ and were anxious to follow Sam Brannan to the Pacific, there collect their muster-out pay, and set out on their own."}

Middle of Sep 1847 - We found Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball Companies. Stayed until the middle of September and started back for Winter Quarters without teams, with 15 pounds of provisions, but killed buffalo along the way and got along well. When we got to the upper crossing of the Sweetwater, we met the first company of Saints on the way to the valley. [This was the John Taylor Company, which included George Whitaker, Wilford W. Whitaker's English ancestor.]

[Thomas Woolsey left the Valley of the Salt Lake and returned East in the fall of 1847. He and his families, augmented now by two more children, settled on a prosperous farm at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, {NOTE by www: This should be at Winter Quarters} to grow produce to help the Saints to get to the Utah Territory. They continued in this special calling until 1842 {sic: This should be 1852, www}, when they, too, crossed the plains and the Rocky Mountains to Salt Lake City

.]

{NOTE: Also with them here were his brother Richard Woolsey and his wives and children, and the estranged wife and children of their brother James Hopkins Woolsey, Lavina Patterson Woolsey. www.}

[To review, Thomas Woolsey had traveled with the Battalion only to leave on assignment to go to Pueblo and then back to Winter Quarters. He then commenced the Mormon Trek with the original company headed by Brigham Young, only to be sent again to Pueblo as the Deputy Postmaster. With Mormon Battalion Saints from Pueblo, he again traveled to meet Brigham Young´s company. He was with the original company of Saints who came down Emigration Canyon into the Great Salt Lake Valley.]

30 Nov 1847 - {From John Tippetts Journal} Arrived back at Winter Quarters on the last of November (1847). Found Alvah Tippets very sick. He died three days after I got there. (Total miles from 16 Jul 1845 to 1 Nov 1847 is 5,900 [this is a fantastic figure, equivalent to crossing the continent twice.], most of it on foot. I went to work teaming to get means to return in the spring with my family. [John H. Tippets]


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