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Subject:  more Greenberry Bishop in Audrain Co MO
Date:  01 Jan 98  From:  nllee@ktis.net (Nancy L. Lee)

Another reference to Greenberry Bishop in Audrain Co. besides court documents
was found in MISCELLANEOUS SCRAPS OF AUDRAIN COUNTY HISTORY -- STORIES OF
PEOPLE AND PLACES OF INTEREST GLEANED FROM NEWSPAPERS, prepared and Indexed
by Frances Quisenberry for the Audrain County Area Gen. Soc., 1996, taken
from "The Intelligencer" weekly paper April 11, 1907 page 2 col. 3

....On the south side of the square the only building at that time was the
courthouse. About this time the north and west side had nothing. This rings
us up to about 1838......By this time the community was getting
sufficiently concentrated for the Doan Race Tracks, two miles north of
town, to be abandoned, since they were too far away, and a new one was laid
out along Promenade Street with its eaast end at the beginning of the slope
toward the Military Academy and its western terminus at Washington street,
where the Intellingencer office now is. This was, of course, a point of
great excitement almost every Saturday in proper weather, though a race was
liable to  occur at any moment. frequently the end of the matter was a
fight or a series of them, all with the fists., of course. Occasionally a
knife was flourished, but the rule of "Knock down and drag out" was the
prevailing code. It was rare for anyone to be seriously hurt, but there
were often many bloody noses and torn shirts....
April 25, 1907 page 2 col 2/3/&4

1843 or '44...Later the race track along what is now Promenade street was
broken up at it's eastern end by being fenced as a farm, by Judge Morris.
The horesemen then went out on the east end of the Boulevard and made them
an oval mile track, with some good straight quarter-dash tracks atached.
Some good horses were run over this dirt, and Mexico even then was a noted
horse center. These races took the place of our fairs now, and were
attended from great distances.
May 2, 1907 page 4 column 5
        "Speaking of horse races," said an old citizen as the scribe
whittled a pencil, "there is an amusing incident connected with one of
these, which involved some of our people that not only did not indulge in
the sport but condeemned it generally. A man by the name of Dameron from
Monroe county came over here one day with a race mare that had a fearful
reputation for speed. He wanted to race her against any Audrain county
piece of horse flesh for any sum from $5.00 up to $100--the dash to be six
hundred yards. The chief racers withtheir stock happened not to be in town
that day. They were perhaps off at some other races. The only horse at all
in the question was one belonging to Green and John Bishop. He was not
considered very fast, and Green Bishop was afraid to run him in response to
the challenge. It seemed such a dead sure loss. Thereupon the Monroe county
man blew around like Goliath of Gath, decrying Audrain county pride, and
proclaiming a bluff on the whole community for which he expressed great
contempt. It could not furnish a stranger a horse-race.
        "The citizens were finally aroused, and Bishop proposed they run
him a race anyway, but said that he did not like to incur the whole loss;
he said that if others would chip in and make up the five dollars, he would
furnish the horse and one dollar. Mexico's patriotism was so aroused that
certain staid old church members even dropped quarters and halves into the
pot till the amout was obtained. No Monroe county blowhard could bluff them
in that way. When the Audrain horse was brought out, he was a sorry
prospect, indeed. A negro coy was on him thumping him with both heels, one
man was leading him and another was thrashing him with a ole to make him
come up to the starting point. Relays of citizens with poles were placed
along the line to charge out and shout, and to make the home steed do all
that was in him. Audrain’s pride was on hand in citizens of every
character--the Salt River Tigers were lending their aid and comfort in
force.
        "The start was just opposite Mason Creasey’s store, and the run was
to lie to the south. The southern erminus was just west of Hardin College.
At the word ‘Go’ from a standstill start, a sounding thwack was laid on the
Bishop horse and the race was on; the the citizens who had stock in the
enterprise were on the anxious seat and those along the track were on the
whoop. Out past the post office-- on through LaCrosse Lumber Co.’s old
yard--over the rise through which the railroad cuts now, on by the eastern
edge of Hardin Park the horses fled, the primitive Mexico mud flying high.
Those of us who were mildly yet financially interested stayed behind and
were under great suspense, till we saw the Monroe county man riding back
all splattered with mud. Then we knew that old "Brimmer", the Bishop horse,
had thrown the Audrain county soil into the eyes of the Monroe mare. Great
and prolonged shouting prevailed; a dividend was declared from the stakes,
and the staid citizen pocketed his’two bits’ now converted into ‘four’
without any qualms of concience whatever. Dameron left for home at once
very much crestfallen, and carrying away about as much of Audrain county’s
hardpan as any one has since extracted. He has never returned on the same
mission, for we gave him the impression, which was true, that we had beaten
him with the worst racer that we had.
        "One all this track, which was temporary, there was not a house or
fence that obstructed the way. It was at least four miles before any such
hinderance could have been encountered."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Audrain County Missouri Schedule 2- Slave inhabitants in District No 4
being in the county of Audrain State of Missouri enumerated by me, on this
the 22 nd day of August, 1850-- W. P. Harrison, Ass't Marshall
G. B. Bishop----1 slave 7 yrs old female  color  mulato
 Audrain County Missouri Schedule 4- Production of Agriculture in District
No 4 being in the county of Audrain State of Missouri enumerated by me, on
this the 21st day of August, 1850-- W. P. Harrison, Ass't Marshall  page 11
G. B. Bishop  20 acres improved 40 acres unimproved
Cash value of farm = $300.
Value of farm implements = $20.
2 Asses and Mules
Value of livestock = $100.
50 bushels of wheat produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
300 bushels of Indian corn produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
50 bushels of Irish potatoes produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
50 lbs. of butter produced during the year ending 1 June 1850

page 12 enumerated August 20th 1850
J. S. Bishop  22 acres improved  178 acres unimproved
Cash value of farm = $800.
Value of farm implements = $25.
3 horses
Value of livestock= $100.
600 bushels of Indian corn produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
200 bushels of Oats produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
35 bushels of Irish potatoes produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
70 lbs. of butter produced during the year ending 1 June 1850
Value of animals slaughtered $70.

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Land Records in Audrain Co connected to Greenberry Bishop
Book C pg.  44 -- Greenberry Bishop sold to Wm. H. See
22 Oct 1847-- E½ of NW¼ of NW¼ of Sec 22 T 51 R 9 for $75.
Book C pg.  445-- Greenberry and Ann Bishop sold to Wm H. See
31 Oct 1850-- E½ of NW¼ of NW¼ of Sec 22 T51 R 9 for $75.


Book C. pg.  497-- Green B. Bishop sold to Wm. P. Harrison & John H. Slaughter
8 April 1851-- NE¼ of SW¼ of Sec 16 T 51 R 8 (40 acres and a negro man two
yoke of oxen and a two horse wagon)  for $268.


Book F pg. 564 & 565  Mary Lander of Trigg Co. KY sold to Gran B. Bishop of Audrain Co. MO
5 July 1856--N½ of NE¼ of Sec 21 and SE½ of SE¼ of Sec 17 T 51 R 8 West
(160 acres) for $200.

[Submitted by Nancy (Hale) Lee, Jan 1998]