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1850 Articles and Other Items



6 DECEMBER 1850, Friday


WATCH STEALING. - On Monday last, at the Guild Hall, Falmouth, before Lieut. HILL, a seaman named Thomas COUTHER, was charged with stealing a silver watch from John HUGHES, master of the schooner "Poppleton," of Chester, then laying in Falmouth harbour. The captain stated that he came on shore from his vessel on the Saturday afternoon, leaving the prisoner and a boy on board, and on his return prisoner was gone and prosecutor's watch missing. He then went ashore and called at Mr. JACOBS's pawn shop, where he left a description of the watch, and also informed the policeman of the matter. Jane CARTER, wife of Henry CARTER, seaman, stated that prisoner called at her house and inquired for her husband, who was at sea, saying he had sailed with him; prisoner also said he had been cast away, and wanted to sell a watch that his father bought for him, and asked would she sell or pawn it for him? She went to Mr. Jacobs, and wanted 5s. for it, but Mr. Jacobs told her it was stolen and she had better bring the man. She did so, and he was taken by Julyan. The watch was produced and identified by the Captain and Mr. Jacobs, and the prisoner was committed for trial at the borough sessions.

FOWL STEALING. - On Saturday evening last, some fowls were stolen at Grampound, the property of Mrs. Richard CLEMMOW. The thieves have not been discovered.

ACCIDENT FROM FURIOUS DRIVING. - As Mr. William GORDON, of Copperhouse, was returning home from Hayle, about ten o'clock on Friday night last, he was knocked down by a horse and cart, returning from Redruth market, then proceeding at a furious rate through the town, and the wheels passed over his breast. Mr. Gordon remained on the spot, awhile senseless, but on recovering was conveyed home and medical aid obtained. It was then ascertained that his collar bone had sustained serious injury, and that two of his ribs were fractured. The patient is under the treatment of Dr. MILLETT, and in a fair way of recovery. It is hoped that this accident will be a caution to those drivers who are in the habit of galloping through the towns and villages on returning from market, as a repetition of such a course in that neighbourhood will be strictly investigated, and the offending party will incur a severe penalty.

A MAN DROWNED. - On Friday last, a man in the employ of Mr. Thomas COLMER was drawing coal for Lamarhooe mine, and had to cross the Tamar river at a place called Latchley in the parish of Calstock. Whilst crossing with his horses and cart, he fell into the river and was downed. His body was found on Sunday last.

CORONER'S INQUESTS. - The following inquests have been held before Mr. John CARLYON, county coroner: On Saturday last at the Globe Inn, Truro, before the coroner and a respectable jury, fifteen in number, touching the death of William Evans Sprague MUGFORD, aged 18 years. The deceased was a wheelwright, and it appeared from the evidence that on Thursday the 14th ult., a fellow workman called William PLUMMER, about the same age as deceased, came into the workshop where the latter was at work, and asked for a chisel. The deceased refused to let him have it, and this gave rise to some angry bickering between them which led to a scuffle, and in the end they both fell together over a spoke horse, the deceased undermost, who fell on his head in a corner of the shop amongst some loose spokes and pieces of wood. He did not appear to be much hurt at the time, and shortly afterwards resumed his work; but on the following day he complained of his head, and was not able to do much. On the next day (Saturday) he still complained of head-ache, but went out of town on business, and on his return drank his glass of porter with Plummer and others. The following morning he was much worse, and Mr. TRURAN, surgeon, was sent for, who found him in bed complaining of a very acute pain in his head. He was bled, and the following morning a dozen leeches were applied to his temples. Other means were also adopted, but as they did not afford relief, Dr. BARHAM was called in, who attended him with Mr. Truran till Friday last, when he died. The symptoms were pressure on the brain, followed by inflammation of the membranes, and this was the cause of death, as appeared by the post mortem examination. Both Dr. Barham and Mr. Truran were of opinion that the injury deceased had received by the fall in the scuffle, was the cause of his death. The coroner, in his summing up, explained the law to be, that if two parties were engaged in an angry and hostile scuffle, and one inflicted such an injury on the other, even by accident, as to cause his death, it was still in the eyes of the law manslaughter. The jury, however, after long consideration, and with one dissentient voice, returned a verdict of "accidental death."

On Monday last, in St. Ewe, on the body of Maria BARRETT, aged 43 years. The deceased had gone to a neighbour's house on Saturday evening, to assist a young woman in labour, and whilst supporting her was taken suddenly ill, and died almost immediately. Verdict, "died by the visitation of God."

CALLINGTON. - On Thursday the 28th ult., this town was the scene of much animation and festivity, consequent upon the ancient ceremony of the Lord of the Manor, the Right Honourable Lord ASHBURTON, causing the bounds of the Manor to be perambulated, an old custom fallen into disuse in this manor for upwards of forty years. After the ceremony, an excellent dinner was provided at Golding's Hotel, to which the principal neighbouring landlords, gentry, and his lordship's tenantry, were invited. At six o'clock the company assembled, Mr. J.E. KNOLLYS, his lordship's steward presiding, with Mr. H.T. SMITH, as vice-chairman. The Rev. Dr. FLETCHER, said grace. Various toasts were drank including the health of Lord Ashburton, songs and glees were sung and the evening was spent in the utmost harmony.

GRAMPOUND. - At this place on Wednesday evening last, Mr. ALLINGTON, Bible Christian Minister, of Truro delivered an able and interesting lecture on "Popery," to a numerous and respectable audience. The subjects treated on more especially were regeneration, apostolical succession and transubstantion.

THE ARMY. - Mr. George Trevelyan JOHN, of Penzance, has received his appointment as second Lieutenant of the 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

BRITISH EMIGRANTS. - On Sunday morning last, a sermon was preached in the parish church of Camborne, by the Rev. M. MARCUS, rector of the Anglo American Church, on behalf of the erection of a church and hospital in the city of New York, for the reception of British emigrants. - The collection amounted to £8 5s.

EMIGRATION TO SOUTH AUSTRALIA. - A letter lately received from W. TRELOW, a Cornishman who emigrated to Australia in 1847, contains some notice of the state of the country, and of mining in South Australia. The emigrant went out in the ship "British Sovereign." The emigrant's letter is dated from, the Burra Burra Mine, July 17th, 1850, and addressed to Mr. Richard PASCOE of Wendron: -

Dear Brother and Sister, - We are all enjoying good health. Last Christmas I bought eighty-two acres of land, which cost me £80 1s., and on the 11th instant, I went down to Adelaide, and bought eighty acres more, with all the timber and mineral on it. It is in the Kapunda district, this cost me £80 1s.; this is well wooded, and the scenery is delightful. It is fifty miles from the Burra Burra mine, and fifty miles from Adelaide. In a few years this will be a very valuable property; thank God, we have now a home for ourselves and family, for ever. My wife has enjoyed excellent health, ever since we have been here, and we have all been healthy. In regard to the mines, the Burra is still the best, and is looking as well as ever, the shares are selling at £200. An order has been sent to England for a new engine of eighty-horse power, we are now about 7000 people at this township, we have four chapels and one church, and churches and chapels are being built in every direction, as the people are increasing over the colony. We have the same laws as England. I want to know who of my friends wish to come out as by virtue of my purchase of the one hundred and sixty-two acres, I have an opportunity of naming six persons for a free passage to this colony, in a government ship. This colony is in a very thriving condition and persons coming out with a little capital, can get twenty per cent for their money on freehold security. The government gives eighty acres of land, to any white man that marries a black woman, so that, if any of your young fellows want a wife, he can have a farm into the bargain, and the colour will not fade by washing. This colony will rise in importance, as new mines are commencing in every district. What I have done will show you that we have been very prosperous.

FIRE AT HELSTON. - On Saturday night last, about half-past eleven, a fire broke out in the workshop of Mr. Thomas HARRY, carpenter, in Meneage Street. It appears that some pitch, which was melting on the fire boiled over, occasioning a furious blaze all around and caught the roof on fire, which being of thatch was very quickly all in flames. Every endeavour that the time would allow was made to check the fire from destroying the whole of the run of the building by breaking through parts of the roof, but the flames had got the ascendancy and the endeavours were fruitless. The fire, after gaining the outside of the roof, rose to an immense height, and spread with amazing rapidity, insomuch that in about a quarter of an hour from the commencement of the fire the roof of the whole building fell in. No time was lost in saving the furniture and the carpenters' tools, so that, with the exception of the building, there was little loss. Fortunately, the wind at the time was blowing in an opposite direction from some dwelling houses which were near, that might have been count had the wind blown from the contrary direction. The town engine was on the spot, and was used in putting out all appearance of fire, which would otherwise have continued for many hours. The premises belonged to Mr. Thomas RICHARDS, builder, of Helston.

ATTACK ON A FARMER. - Last Saturday night two fellows with bludgeons entered the farm-yard of Mr. ROBERTS, of Trannack, near Penzance, who on seeing them went in for his fire-arms. Being thus disturbed they made off, and Mr. Roberts went after them, and on overtaking them said if they did not stop they should have the contents of the gun in their ears. One of the fellows then aimed a most violent blow at Mr. Robert's head, which fortunately he warded off, and they then decamped, and he fired after them without effect. The farmer believes he has some clue to the parties, who will probably be brought to justice.


13 DECEMBER 1850, Friday


HELSTON - In the case of FAULL v. MICHELL, which was tried by a special jury, the sum of £10. 10s. was claimed as the amount of loss sustained by defendant's dog killing seven of the plaintiff's sheep. Mr. Hill appeared for the prosecution and Mr. Plomer defended the case. The plaintiff had had sheep destroyed at three different periods within the last two or three months. On the second time of their being killed, he sent around to defendant and other neighbours who kept dogs to Endeavour to discover whose it was that did the mischief, but there was nothing then to justify any suspicion of its being the defendant's. When the last lot were killed and worried, the same search was made as before. The defendant's dog which had broken its fastening a night or two previously, was found to have some blood about the mouth and chest. The plaintiff insisted on shooting the dog, which the defendant allowed, although he believed it was not his dog that did it. There was no evidence to prove that the dog had been seen on plaintiff's farm, or that the defendant knew it was of a savage nature. The case occupied the court five or six hours, and after the judge had summed up the evidence, the jury, after a short deliberation gave a verdict for defendant.

SHIPWRECK. Intelligence has reached Hayle of the loss of the "Jane" off Buenos Ayres, the property of Messrs. HARVEY and Co., of Hayle. The crew were all saved.

BODMIN - At this court, held on the 4th instant, there were no trials of importance. In the case of John EDDY, insolvent, late of Buryan, Mr. WALLIS, opposed on behalf of the detaining creditor, Mr. PAYNTER, and Mr. T. COMMINS, jun., supported insolvent. The insolvent and Mr. Griffith DAVIES were examined, but the case was adjourned on account of the absence of a witness.

In the case of Moses Thomas ANCELL, insolvent, late of Torpoint, inspector of shipwrights in Devonport dockyard, the object of the opposition was to get an allowance out of insolvent’s pension of £82 odd, and the Judge allowed £10 per annum.

ST. AUSTELL - This court was held on Thursday the 5th instant, when thirty cases were entered for trial, but only one was of any interest; a case in which Mr W.H. GRAY was plaintiff, and Mr. LUKE, defendant. Defendant, is a sheriff’s officer, and had an action brought against him by plaintiff for putting an illegal distress into his house; and after a trial for some hours, judgment was given for plaintiff with one shilling damages. Mr. BISHOP, of Fowey, appeared for plaintiff and Mr. CHILCOTT, of Truro, for defendant.

HELSTON - At this court, on Monday last, there were not many cases entered; amongst others the following were tried: JOHN v. BORASTON. An application was made by Mr. TYACKE for a new trial, on the ground that no custom had been proved. Mr. HILL, on the part of the plaintiff, said, he had no objection to the new trial being granted; he did not believe there were five men in Cornwall who would give a different verdict; the case was very fairly put to the jury, after a long and patient hearing, and he was anxious to leave it entirely in his Honor’s hands. The Judge said that as Mr. Hill did not oppose the new trial, he should grant it on defendant paying the costs of the first trial. Mr. Tyacke shortly after made application to withdraw the motion he had made; but Mr. Hill opposed this, stating that the new trial had been granted by the judge, and Mr. Tyacke must withdraw it in the usual way.

MINE ACCIDENTS - As a young miner called Jeremiah WILLS, of Troon, near Camborne, was at work in Stray Park mine on Wednesday last, he fell into a winze, and was seriously hurt.

As a youth called James CORIN, of Camborne, was at work in Wheal Seton mine on Wednesday last, he got entangled in some machinery, which seriously injured him.

DEATH FROM HARD RUNNING - A lad about sixteen years of age, named John THOMAS, who lived with his parents near Hayle, came to his death on Sunday last under the following circumstances. Deceased having been dispatched to a place a mile off with a special message which required urgency, he ran the whole distance which he accomplished in a few minutes. The effect was that though the lad was naturally of a strong and healthy constitution, disease of the heart was induced, which terminated fatally after an illness of only two or three weeks, notwithstanding the endeavour of medical skill to preserve life.

LAUNCESTON - This court was held on Wednesday last before Mr. PRAED, when there were thirty-seven cases entered for trial. KNIGHT v. COTTLE - was an action for damages for the value of a mare, £13 10s. Defendant is the driver of the Quicksilver Mail from Falmouth through Launceston to Exeter. On the 8th of October last, whilst driving the mail, when within about two miles from Launceston he met plaintiff on horseback. In passing each other, the plaintiff’s horse shied and turned round with its tail towards the coach, which struck the mare behind, and inflicted a severe wound caused by the splinter bar, from which wound the mare died. Mr. BRAY, cattle dealer, of Redruth, and Mr. BRICE, the guard of the mail gave evidence; but his Honor gave judgment for plaintiff, damages £12, with costs, to be paid on the 28th instant. This case occupied the court several hours.

INQUESTS - The following inquests have been held before Mr. HICHENS, county coroner:- At the parish of St. Erth, on the 6th instant, on the body of Nicholas TEAGUE, aged about 80 years. On the 4th instant, the deceased being in perfect health to all appearance, having taken his breakfast, removed to the fire-place, to smoke his pipe. The servant had occasion to go up stairs, and left the deceased alone, seated near the fire and in the act of putting tobacco into his pipe; on her return to the kitchen, after only a minutes absence, she heard the deceased breathing very loud, and on going to ascertain the cause, she found him leaning back both speechless and senseless, in which state he continued up to the period of his death which happened on the following morning. Verdict, “natural death.”

On Tuesday last in the parish of Gunwalloe, on the bodies of three persons, found on the preceding day in Gunwallow Church Cove. The bodies were unknown, but are supposed to have been part of the crew of the schooner 2Windrush," of Falmouth, Peter Samuel BREWER, master, wrecked at Gunwalloe Cove, on the 24th of November last, when all the crew perished. Verdict, "found drowned."

An inquest was held on Wednesday week, before Mr. C. Rous PENDER, (coroner of the borough and a respectable jury, at the King’s Head Inn, Falmouth, on the body of Henrietta MARTIN, aged eighty-four years. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased who had resided for some time in that neighbourhood, was found on the evening of the 3rd inst., in her room quite dead. She had been seen by the neighbours several times in the course of the day, and indeed a short time previous to her being found dead. It had been remarked that she was very cheerful, and had eaten a hearty dinner. She had at various times, had seizures of some description. The evidence having been read over by the coroner, the jury immediately returned a verdict, “died by the visitation of God.”

ROBBERY OF COMMUNION PLATE, &c. - On Sunday morning last, a robbery was committed at the vicarage of Ruan Lanihorne, the residence of the Rev. H.S. SLIGHT?, when the thieves carried off a set of communion plates in a ??? case, a communion cup and stand, three five pound notes, two pounds in silver, and a metal watch and gold keeper, set with a cornelian stone.

ROBBERY AT ST. AUSTELL. - On Saturday last, a sailor named Thomas ROWSE of Trenarren, near St. Austell, was taken before Sir Joseph Sawle Graves SAWLE, Bart., charged with stealing on the 6th instant, at Mount Charles, two jars containing about four gallons of brandy from the dwelling-bouge [?] of Mr. John INCH, innkeeper. Rowse entered into recognizances, himself in £40 and two sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer to the charge at the coming sessions.

DEPREDATIONS AT PENZANCE. - On Friday evening last, about seven o’clock, some persons entered the premises of Martha BREWER, a washerwoman, living near Queen Street, and succeeded in removing a large counterpaine, quite wet, from the line in the garden. She having had an occasion to go there, discovered it gone. She raised an alarm, and her sister, Fanny STEWART, a widow, went to see what was the matter; one of the ruffians then knocked her into a tray of water. By this time several persons had come to their assistance, and a person called Henry CARBIS, caught the end of the counterpane, which was partly over the wall of the garden over which they entered, and succeeded in rescuing it from the thieves. There is at present no clue to the depredators. There are however a number of vagrants infesting the town, and it is hoped, that under the Health of Towns bill, the Board of Health will regulate the lodging-houses and disperse these desperadoes, who must be living on the plunder obtained from the unguarded and unprotected.

On Saturday last, an old man, in the dress of a sailor, knocked at the door of the house of Dr. WILLAN, Regent Terrace, and told his tale of distress. The servant girl moved to pity by his complaint, went to the cupboard to give him a morsel; but when she returned she found him gone, and that he had carried off a leg of mutton. She immediately pursued, and raising the cry “stop thief,” she was assisted by a man called WHITE, who joined in the chase. The fellow dropped the leg of mutton, and White being foremost picked it up, and the doctor, with his known liberality, gave him the leg of mutton for his trouble, proving the truth of the old sage, that it is a “bad wind that blows nobody good.” The thief was overtaken, given into custody, and committed for trial.

ACCIDENTS. - As Mr. Samuel LAWRY, of Place Barton St. Anthony in Roseland, was last week crossing the ferry at Tolvers, over th Fal, on his road to Truro market, and had his horse with him, on leaping into the boat the horse knocked Mr. Lawry over the gunwale and went over after him. Horse and owner were then swimming in deep water together, but after some struggling both were rescued with only a few bruises.

On Thursday, a boy ten years old, son of Mrs. GEORGE, of Gearvean, St. Just in Roseland, was throwing down a bundle of straw from a stack, when unhappily he fell on a rough pole placed as a prop to the rick, and the end of the pole entered his groin to a considerable depth. His cries were heard by some men who were working near by whom he was released from his dreadful position. Mr. BOYNE, surgeon, was soon called, and it is hoped that the sufferer will survive.

ROBBERY OF COMMUNION PLATE, &c. - On Sunday morning last, a robbery was committed at the vicarage of Ruan Lanihorne, the residence of the Rev. H.S. SLIGHT?, when the thieves carried off a set of communion plates in a ??? case, a communion cup and stand, three five pound notes, two pounds in silver, and a metal watch and gold keeper, set with a cornelian stone.

ROBBERY AT ST. AUSTELL - On Saturday last, a sailor named Thomas ROWSE of Trenarren, near St. Austell, was taken before Sir Joseph Sawle Graves SAWLE, Bart., charged with stealing on the 6th instant, at Mount Charles, two jars containing about four gallons of brandy from the dwelling-bouge[?] of Mr. John INCH, innkeeper. Rowse entered into recognizances, himself in £40 and two sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer to the charge at the coming sessions.

DEPREDATIONS AT PENZANCE. - On Friday evening last, about seven o’clock, some persons entered the premises of Martha BREWER, a washerwoman, living near Queen street, and succeeded in removing a large counterpaine, quite wet, from the line in the garden. She having had an occasion to go there, discovered it gone. She raised an alarm, and her sister, Fanny STEWART, a widow, went to see what was the matter; one of the ruffians then knocked her into a tray of water. By this time several persons had come to their assistance, and a person called Henry CARBIS, caught the end of the counterpane, which was partly over the wall of the garden over which they entered, and succeeded in rescuing it from the thieves. There is at present no clue to the depredators. There are however a number of vagrants infesting the town, and it is hoped, that under the Health of Towns bill, the Board of Health will regulate the lodging-houses and disperse these desperadoes, who must be living on the plunder obtained from the unguarded and unprotected.

On Saturday last, an old man, in the dress of a sailor, knocked at the door of the house of Dr. WILLAN, Regent Terrace, and told his tale of distress. The servant girl moved to pity by his complaint, went to the cupboard to give him a morsel; but when she returned she found him gone, and that he had carried off a leg of mutton. She immediately pursued, and raising the cry “stop thief,” she was assisted by a man called WHITE, who joined in the chase. The fellow dropped the leg of mutton, and White being foremost picked it up, and the doctor, with his known liberality, gave him the leg of mutton for his trouble, proving the truth of the old sage, that it is a “bad wind that blows nobody good.” The thief was overtaken, given into custody, and committed for trial.

ACCIDENTS - As Mr. Samuel LAWRY, of Place Barton St. Anthony in Roseland, was last week crossing the ferry at Tolvers, over th Fal, on his road to Truro market, and had his horse with him, on leaping into the boat the horse knocked Mr. Lawry over the gunwale and went over after him. Horse and owner were then swimming in deep water together, but after some struggling both were rescued with only a few bruises.

On Thursday, a boy ten years old, son of Mrs. GEORGE, of Gearvean, St. Just in Roseland, was throwing down a bundle of straw from a stack, when unhappily he fell on a rough pole placed as a prop to the rick, and the end of the pole entered his groin to a considerable depth. His cries were heard by some men who were working near by whom he was released from his dreadful position. Mr. BOYNE, surgeon, was soon called, and it is hoped that the sufferer will survive.


20 DECEMBER 1850, Friday


PENZANCE LITERARY INSTITUTION - On Tuesday evening, the Rev. C. WILSON, of Helston, delivered an excellent lecture "on the origin of hero-worship," and afterwards received a vote of thanks from the audience.

LUDGVAN LITERARY INSTITUTION - At this institution on Monday evening, the Rev. H.E. GRAHAM in the chair, Mr. Richard WILLIAMS, of St. Ives, delivered a lecture on the Bible, which was greatly approved, and a wish was expressed by the audience that he would next lecture to them "on Prophecy," to which he kindly assented.

PENZANCE INSTITUTE. - On Monday evening the 9th instant, the Rev. R. YOUNG delivered a very interesting lecture on the West Indies. On Monday evening last, the Rev. F. ALLIN (Independent minister) lectured on "Mesmerism," and the lecture was followed by a somewhat violent discussion. The next lecture will be on Geology, by Mr. R.Q. COUCH.

AN UNFORTUNATE MAN - An industrious and respected miner, of the name of Richard EADE, emigrated from this county to Adelaide, Australia, in the year 1847. The money he carried out with him was prudently invested; in a few months he had considerably increased his stock and was a thriving man. In the course of his dealings, he one day changed a cheque for a hawker, payable by the company to which Eade was engaged. It purported to be for £12 7s. 11d., but as was afterwards shewn, had been altered from £2 7s. 11d. The forgery was soon after detected, and Eade was apprehended; he stated the manner in which he became possessed of the cheque, and produced the hawker’s receipt for the money. The hawker, however, had in the meantime left the colony; Eade’s story was discredited; he was tried for the forgery; declared guilty, and sentenced to ten years’ transportation to Van Diemen’s Land, and was removed thither. Twenty-one months of his time were passed, amidst sufferings, which he says, are indescribable, when one day, among a new arrival of convicts, he saw the hawker, heavily fettered, marched into the barracks. Eade immediately made the fact known to the officer in command, and the hawker was forthwith examined privately. For stealing a horse he had been transported for life from Sydney to which place he had fled from Adelaide; his punishment could be made no worse, and he frankly confessed that he had altered the cheque, and that Eade had changed it as genuine; and further inquiries having fully satisfied the Governor and Council of the colony, Eade was immediately liberated and furnished with money to return to his wife and family. But he was so utterly broken down in spirits, and in such utter despair of being respected as he was before his undeserved condemnation, as to be unable to return among them again. He has accordingly gone to Auckland, New Zealand, and taken employment as a working miner there.

CORNWALL AND DEVON CENTRAL SCHOOLS - The half-yearly examination of the children of these schools took place on Tuesday last at the schoolrooms, Fairmantle-street, Truro. The examiners were the Rev. B. BREWITT, of St. Paul’s, the Rev. WOODWARD, of St. George’s district church, and Dr. BARHAM, there being also ladies present who assisted in the examination. The children were examined in the Holy Scriptures, the Catechism of the Church of England, Geography, the History of England, English Grammar, and Arithmetic; the examiners expressed their great satisfaction at the proficiency of the scholars, and prizes were afterwards distributed to the most deserving. There are about 150 boys under the care of the master, Mr. BAGNALL, and about the same number of girls in the girls school. The examination of the pupil teachers connected with the school took place on Wednesday last.

VIOLENT GALES - On Saturday last, Helston and its neighbourhood were visited by very heavy storms of wind and rain, hail, thunder, and lightning. At Gweek, the house of Mr. Francis JOHNS, jun., was struck with lightning, which shattered the wall of the house, shifted a large marble mantel-piece, knocked grates out of the places, damaged the bell wires, took the gilt off the frame of a chimney glass, split the panels of some cupboard doors, and did a great deal of damage to some furniture. It shook the house to its foundation. None of the family who were in the house at the time received any personal injury; but they were much frightened from such a fearful visitation.

The neighbourhood of Hayle was visited on Monday night with a violent gale of wind, accompanied with hailstones. Nearly forty panes of glass were broken belonging to St. John’s chapel, Copperhouse. A rick of corn was blown down near Drannack in the parish of Gwinear, the property of Mr. H. HUTHNANCE, (Hothnance?) and a quantity of sheaves were carried off some hundreds of yards, by the fury of the gale.

MINE ACCIDENT - On Monday last, as a man named Joseph NANKIVELL was at work underground at Great Polgooth Mine, a rock fell away and but him much about the head, but we are happy to say he is in a fair way of recovery.

WESLEYAN MISSIONS - Meetings have been held during the week, at the following places belonging to the Hayle circuit, in aid of the Wesleyan Missions:- Roseworthy, on the 12th instant, when addresses were delivered by the Rev. W. APPLEBY, and Messrs. VIVIAN, REYNOLDS, and BRYANT. At Hayle Foundry, on Tuesday last, when addresses were delivered by the Rev. W. APPLEBY, chairman, and the Rev. Messrs KILLICK, NYE and GREGORY. At Praze, in the parish of Crowan, on Wednesday last, when addresses were delivered by the Revs. W. APPLEBY, KILLICK and JAMES. The proceeds were highly satisfactory at each of the services. Two sermons in aid of Wesleyan Missions, were preached in the Wesleyan chapel, Ludgvan, on Sunday last, by the Rev. B. CARVOSSO, of Helston, and on Monday afternoon by the Rev. R. YOUNG, of Penzance. On the Monday evening a tea meeting was held, but the annual missionary meeting was postponed on account of the unfavourable weather.

DAMAGE AT SEA – The barque "Triton" of Penzance, on her voyage from Swansea, to Sierra Leone, with a cargo of patent fuel, having encountered severe weather about four hundred miles to the westward, was towed into Mount’s bay on Tuesday evening, by the “Duke of Cambridge” steamer on her way to Dublin), with the lost of bulwarks, jib-boom, and most of her sails, and four water casks staved by the shifting of her cargo.

PAYMENT OF TURNPIKES – At the Torpoint Petty Sessions on Tuesday before Mr. J.C. ROBERTS and Mr. W. ROBERTS, Richard KURSLAKE, driver of a van from Plymouth to Callington, was summoned by George TEMPLE, for having, on the 4th instant., passed through the Burraton toll gate, with a horse and wagon, without paying the toll of sixpence, which was demanded of him by the collector. It appeared from the evidence that the defendant had driven a horse attached to a van from Plymouth to Callington, about six weeks, and owing to the collector not being fully acquainted with the different Acts, he had allowed the defendant to pass through the gate on his return from Callington at night, fancying he had no right to demand more that the sixpence which defendant paid in the morning. On the 4th instant., however, the defendant passed through the gate in the morning at the usual time, and paid the toll (6d.); on his return in the evening the back toll was demanded of him, which he refused to pay, and opened the gate and passed through. Defendant was told by the collector that the back toll was perfectly legal, and he had better pay it. The defendant said he had never paid it before, and he fancied it was wrong, and therefore refused to pay it. The Bench assured the defendant that it was perfectly legal, and they were therefore bound to inflict a fine on him, which they would mitigate to the smallest possible penalty. He was fined sixpence and the costs, altogether amounting to 12s. 3d.

27 DECEMBER 1850, Friday


BELLEVUE HOUSE ACADEMY, NEAR PENRYN. - At the half-yearly distribution of prizes which took place in the school-room, on Wednesday the 18th instant, the following young gentlemen were the successful competitors:- J.A. RICHARD, St. Mawes: R.M. BIRD, Liverpool: John GILL, Penryn: A.F. HODGE, Devoran, near Truro: Charles MOORSHEAD, Bellevue: John H. ROWE, Treloswell, near Penryn: John WILLIAMS, St. Agnes: Septimus Buller PHILLPOTTS, St. Gluvias Vicarage: Anthony WILLIAMS, St. Agnes: Charles TREVITHICK, Hayle Foundry: Henry LAITY, Perran Wharf: received the prizes for the most neatly written copy book.

OPENING OF AN ORGAN IN THE WESLEYAN CHAPEL, ST IVES. On the 10th instant, the Rev. R. YOUNG preached a sermon on the occasion of opening an organ in this chapel. And on Christmas-day, the Rev. E.R. TALBOT, and the Rev. W.P. BURGESS, of St. Ives, preached in connexion with the same. This instrument, which is introduced without any cost to the trustees has been erected by Messrs. Thomas HARVEY and William HARRY, who are both self-instructed. The organ will be paid for by subscription; it is pronounced an excellent instrument, and is a very great ornament to the chapel.

PROBUS CHURCH. - At a meeting of the Incorporated Society for promoting the enlargement, &c., of churches and chapels, the Bishop of London in the chair, a grant was made towards re-arranging the seats in the parish church of Probus, near Truro.

HELSTON. - The drapers of this town gave a holiday to their assistants on the day after Christmas-day, by closing their shops, as is customary with them.

HAYLE. - This neighbourhood has been infested with a gang of depredators. On Monday night last, some ducks and wearing apparel were stolen from the premises of Mr. Christopher ELLIS, ??? Copperhouse. A reward has been offered for the discovery of the offenders.
FREEMASONRY. - The Brethren of the Phoenix Lodge of "Honor and Prudence," of Truro, celebrated the Masonic Festival of St. John, at the Red Lion Hotel, in that town, on Monday last, on which occasion many of the members attended. The usual annual business commenced at noon, when Brother J. McFarlane HEARD was unanimously elected Master for the ensuing year, on the proposition of Past P.G.S.W. Reginald ROGERS, and afterwards duly installed. After the installation the W.M. invested Brother H.C. MILFORD as senior and Brother PASSINGHAM as junior wardens, and his other officers for the year. Brother ELLIS, the D.P.G.M. of Cornwall, was present on his annual visit of inspection, and took occasion to congratulate the Brethren on their Masonic proficiency and on the zeal displayed by the members of the Phoenix for the advancement of the ancient mysteries of the craft, and he also took occasion to remark that this Lodge well deserved the reputation it had attained, as being, if not the foremost, at least not second to any in the Province of Cornwall, and that he trusted its members would push on and endeavour to raise it as the cope-stone of the west, which, from the infusion of fresh blood during the last few years, he felt satisfied it must become. After the business was concluded, the brethren adjourned to the festival, on which occasion the host supplied an excellent dinner, and the wines were all that could be desired. After the banquet the usual toasts were given and responded to in the Masonic spirit. These it is not in our power to give, but we may tell the reason that on this occasion as on all others, masonry - "Never did betray - " The heart that loved her; for she can so inform - "The mind that is within us, so impress - "With quietness and beauty, and so feed - "With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues - "Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men - "Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb - "The cheerful faith, that all which we do hold - "Is full of blessings." The pleasures of the evening were much increased with several excellent songs, and with the piano, at which Brother HEMPEL presided with his accustomed science and skill. The Brethren separated at a seasonable hour, highly gratified with the rational pleasures and festivities of the evening.


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