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Blamire-Bruin Genealogy

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The latest revision dated 02-06-07

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The entire Blamire-Jewell and the Bruin-Cannon genealogical studies are now located on the RootswebWorldConnect site. Click on the links below to go the desired study. Families in the Blamire-Jewell study include; Blamire, Browne, Kempe, Hancock, Cockcroft, Burnett, Dyson, Porter, Luke, Dale, Cornick, Woodhouse, Martin, and others all from Norfolk and Princess Anne County Virginia; Jewell, Sylvester, Pabodie, Alden, Mullins, Bartlett, Sprague, Percy, and others from New England.
Families in the Bruin-Cannon study include: Bruin, Jordan from Virginia and Cannon,Barnhart, Coe, Daubenspeck, Hepler, Pruden, Whitlock and others from Pennsylvania

Blamire/Jewell

Bruin-Cannon



The links shown below will take you to Biographical Sketches of various ancestors from the Genealogical Studies above of the Blamire-Jewell and the Bruin-Cannon Families.

Blamire Family

Bruin Family

Cannon Family

Jewell Family

Dale Family

Luke Family

Alden Family

Coe Family




Blamire Photo Gallery

Relationship shown is to William Bruce Blamire.


Jordan Douglas Barnhart
Jordan Douglas
Barnhart
GGrandson
Philip Cary Barnhart
Philip Cary
Barnhart
Grandson
Mary Ann Swain Barnhart
Mary Ann Swain
Barnhart
Grandaughter
in-law
Susan Ware Blamire
Susan Ware
Blamire
daughter
William Bruce Blamire
William Bruce
Blamire Jr.
Son
Wiliam Bruce Blamire
William Bruce
Blamire
Mary Ware Bruin
Mary Ware
Bruin
Wife
Walter Peyton Blamire Jr.
Walter Peyton
Blamire Jr.
Brother
Walter Peyton Blamire
Walter Peyton
Blamire
Father
Edna Marguerite Jewell
Edna Marguerite
Jewell
Mother
Margaret Grice Blamire
Margaret Grice
Blamire
Aunt
Edward Bruce Blamire
Edward Bruce
Blamire
GrandFather
Jeanie Dyson
Jeanie Dyson
Blamire
GrandMother
Mabel Hale Elliott
Mabel Hale
Elliott
Grandmother
Lisle Augustus Blamire
Lisle Augustus
Blamire
Uncle

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Biographical Sketches

Blamire Family

Anthony Blamire, Immigrant
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - 3rd Great Grandfather

The following is from pages 5 & 6 of Peter Coldham's Book entitled "Child Apprentices in America from Christ's Hospital, London 1617-1778".

By the second half of the 16th century the dramatic increase in the number of London poor, disabled and orphaned required urgent action and the city fathers devised a scheme which would provide, according to the lights of that time, a remedy for these social ills. A contemporary assessment identified three classes of inhabitants who were to be beneficaries. 1. Those made poor or homeless by no fault of their own, such as fatherless children, the decayed and the crippled. 2. Those improvished by disease or accident. 3. Those reduced to want by their own idleness or vice. The orphaned in the first category, provided they were legitimate children of the City of London, would be educated and given a good start in life in a new foundation to be known as Christ's Hospital, and those in the second group would be cared for in St. Thomas Hospital, and those in the third division taken into an institution, The Birdewell, where they could be restrained, corrected and put to useful work.
and from Page 10
Anthony Blamire baptised 26 May 1737, son of John B., admitted from Penrith, Cumberland, by order of Court; 26 October 1752 to his friend Mr. Thomas Blamire and Mr. William Bowden of London, merchant, to serve Mr. Anthony Walker Jr, of Virginia, Merchant.
An explanation on Anthony Walker Jr mentioned above. I can find no record of an Anthony Walker in Princess Anne County in this period of time, however the Walke family was a large landowner. From the will of Anthony Blamire, proven in Princess Anne, 20 May 1766 I quote - It is my will and devise that my very worthy friend Mr. Anthony Walke, Jun and his son Anthony Walke, now underage should take care of my son James. Later in the will Anthony Blamire appoints Anthony Walke Jun to be one of the executors of his will. From the above it appears that Mr Coldhams book is in error caused by misreading of old handwriting or from a typographical error.

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Walter Peyton Blamire
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - Father

The following is from the April 1934 issue of The Transmitter published by the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company

dadsmall In testimony of service rendered for thirty-five consecutive years a diamond service emblem was presented to W. Peyton Blamire, Traveling Auditor of the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company on February 1. Mr. Blamire's expierences during his early days as a business man might be somewhat amazing to some of the young men of today. The telephone business had been established in 1879 in Norfolk exactly 20 years when Peyton finished school and was looking around for a job. He found one February 1, 1899, in the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Companys office when J.W.Crews let it be known that he needed an office boy. Follow this lad through one days work and you will see that Peyton was no qiutter. He arrived at the office at seven o'clock in the morning and operated the long distance switchboard for two hours between the departure of the night operator and the arrival of the day operator. After nine a.m. he performed a variety of duties of office boy. At the noon hour he again relived the operator. From one to five he raced hither and thither in pursuit of office affairs and again at five he again took over the switchboard until the arrival of the night operator at seven. After gathering the accumulation of out going mail sealing and stamping it, he deposited it in the city post office and was then a gentlemen of leisure after a twelve hour tour of duty. About the same year Mr. Blamire entered the service a new two story brick building was erected on Williams street and a modern common-battery switchboard was installed. More business meant more duties but Peyton Blamire was not the type to dodge resposibilities. He handled with with care and accuracy the bits of clerical and accounting work that was placed before him, and was ready when the opportunity came to accept the appointment of Toll Collector, which job included the handling and billing of all toll accounts. During the summer season he held the position of Night Operatot at Ocean View in addition to his regular work. His expierence in toll accounting led to the next promotion. His new job was bookkeeper in the Business Office. Just a year later he was made Cashier. At that time Norfolk was the accounting center for the District, including Portsmouth, Hampton, Newport News and Suffolk. In 1912, when Southern Bell was taken over ny the Chesapeake and Potomac Company, Mr Blamires title was changed to Collection Supervisor and this position he held until July 1 1918, when he was made Travelling Auditor with Headquarters in Washington D.C. His thorough knowledge of telephone accounting makes him a source of help to all who need advice along this line. Except when spending an occasional evening at bridge or poker, Peyton dismisses figures from his mind when away from the office. He does not need accounting methods while whiling away leisure hours at his favorite fishin' hole, but occasionaly finds it necessar to figure on such issues as the World Series baseball games.

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Jewell Family


Walter Massey Jewell
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - Grandfather

The following was copied from a fading xerox copy of a newspaper clipping, presumingly from a St Michaels, Md. paper of about July, 1896.


Death of Walter M. Jewell
On Friday of last week this community was shocked to learn that Mrs. Walter W. Fairbank had received a telegram announcing the death, that day by accident, of her brother Walter M. Jewell at his home, Elizabeth City, N.C. It seems that Mr. Jewell, who is well known here, had recently gone from Berkley Va. where he for some time had worked at his trade as ship carpenter, to Elizabeth City, where in connection with a Mr. Scott had constructed a marine railway of large capacity. The plant had just been completed and a steamer, the Newberne, was to be hauled out that morning. Although there were two other railways which had been in operation for years, this was the first ship of such large dimensions that had ever been taken out of the water in that city. Naturally therefore there was much interest manifested by business men and the people in general, many of whom assembled at the yard to witness the interesting operation. The vessel was drawn out by a steam engine slowly, to allow the hands to wash the filth from her bottom with water from which she was being taken. The work was about half done when suddenly the belt on the fly wheel of the engine flew off and the ponderous hull started to roll rapidly backward. As the lives of the men at work under the vessel may have been in peril, and not a moment to be lost, it is presumed that Mr. Jewell, in the excitement suddenly produced, as he only thing that could be done to prevent loss of life or destruction of property, threw a piece of timber in the cogwheel to ckeck the machinery, Immediately the terrible accident occured. It is not known exactly how it happened, as the direction of the spectators was directed to the vessel and what was going on (in the engine?) room is mere conjecture. Mr. Jewell was found in a mangled and almost lifeless condition, while the engineer Solomon Bray had both legs cut off below the knees. Both of the unfortunate men lived but a short time. It is said that, in the history of Elizabeth City, which is a thriving city of 6000 inhabitants, no occurence has ever produced such a deep shadow of gloom as this sad event. Mr. Jewell who was 31 years old, was born in Greensboro, Caroline County where his father John M. Jewell, a ship carpenter, had removed from Maine. More than twenty years ago the elder Jewell, with his family, came to Talbot, first living in Bayside, where he built several vessels, then removing to St. Michaels where he continued to carry on ship building. In the meantime Walter was learning the trade of his father and in due time developed into a skillful, intelligent and reliable workman. As he was reared and spent his young manhood days here, he seems as one of our people. His wife was a Miss Mabel Elliott, whom, although a native of Ohio, he met and married in Plymouth, N.C. After his marriage he purchased and occupied the James Dyott property, East Chestnut Street, since purchased by Nicholas M. Le compte. Several years ago Mr. Jewell removed to Berkley, Va. where he continued to occupy a prominent place among his fellow workmen. For two or three years he was a foreman in the Gosport Navy Yard and had recently received, from the authorities, several intimations of an opening for him at that place. Several months ago however, having met Mr. Scott, a man of wealth and enterprise, the idea of constructing a marine railway of large capacity in Elizabeth City was conceived. Promptly the work was begun and vigorously it was continued until, as before told, his fondest dreams and hopes had been realized in the completion of the splendid plant.
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Luke Family

Isaac Luke
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - 4th Great Grandfather


The following is an extract from History of Norfolk by Colonel Stewart

In 1781 while the British were occupying Portsmouth, a number of officers took possession of the residence of Isaac Luke, Esq. on North Court Street, for their Headquarters. Isaac was a man of means and kept the customary wine cellar of the times. On one ocassion, the British Officers made a drunken revelry on his wine broke the bottles on the floor and compled Mr. Luke to walk barefooted over the broken glass. His daughter, Elizabeth, a young lady of seventeen years, was betrothed to Captain William Porter of the Virginia Line, in the American Army, and wore a Handsome diamond ring. A British Officer attempted to take it by force. Breaking away from him, she ran out the back porch, slipped the ring from her finger and threw it among the weeds and tall grasses growing there. It thus escaped the clutches of the Englishmen but, unfortunately it was so well concealed that she was never able to find it again.
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Isaac Luke, Jr
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - 3rd Great Uncle

The tablet to Nancy Veale, wife of Isaac Luke Jr., in Trinity Church was written up in the newspaper in 1958, as follows

A ship's captain's sorrow was responsible for one of the most beautiful monuments in the Tidewater Area. On Sept. 1, 1800, Nancy Veale, 25, wife of Isaac Luke, Jr. died of grief because of the loss of her 27 month old son. Marriage had not brought happiness to Nancy Veale Luke. She was married Nov. 7, 1793. Her first two children, both girls, died in infancy. Then a little boy was born, and it appeared the tide of sorrow would turn. Twenty seven months later, he died. Five days later, his mother followed him. The father Capt. Isaac Luke, Jr. son of a famous Revolutionary patriot of Portsmouth, was a ship captain and owner of several merchant vessels. On his next trip to London, he paid a visit to a stone carver and ordered a handsome Italian marble memorial to his wife and three children. The resulting carving was a work of art. Elaborate folds of leaves and drapery surround an urn shaped surface on which the young captain's grief was engraved for prosperity. The carving was brought back to Portsmouth and installed in that portion of Trinity Churchyard where Nancy Veale Luke and her three children were buried. During the Civil War, when Portsmouth was in the hands of Federal Troops, some soldiers torn it from the wall in order to steal the copper bolts that fastened it. In doing this, it was broken into eight pieces. After the war, the family had it repaired. It was later installed on the wall of the Church vestibule. As for Capt. Luke, he left on another voyage, and was never heard from again.
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Alden Family

John Alden
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - 9thGreatGrandfather

Source: Alden Kindred

John Alden was hired for a cooper, at South-Hampton, where the ship victuled; and being a hopfull young man, was much desired, but left to his owne liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed, and maryed here. (Bradford's History, p. 443, The Mayflower Descendant vol. 1:228) On 11 November 1620 John Alden joined with the other free adult male passengers of the Mayflower to sign the Compact whereby they agreed to make and abide by their own laws (Bradford's History, 75; New Englands Memorial, p. 15-16) That is all that is known about the origins of John Alden. Efforts to locate his birthplace and parentage have so far been inconclusive. Although he joined the Mayflower at Southampton, Co. Hampshire, England, no records have been found of John in Southampton, and he was not necessarily a native of that place.
Priscilla Mullins was the daughter of William Mullins, also a passenger on the Mayflower with his wife Alice and son Joseph. William, Alice and Joseph all died in the terrible sickness and deprivation of the first winter in Plymouth. Priscilla, who as probably still too young to be married, was orphaned, her only surviving kin her brother and sister in England. Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow celebrated the story of how Priscilla attracted the attentions of the newly-widowed Captain Myles Standish, who asked his friend John Alden to propose on his behalf only to have Priscilla ask, "Why don't you speak for yourself, John?" Most of the world draws its image of the Pilgrim story from Longfellow's epic narrative poem, The Courtship of Myles Standish.

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Dale Family

Commodore Richard Dale
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - 1stCousin Five Times Removed

Source: Department Of The Navy
Navy Historical Center
Biographies in Naval History

Richard Dale, naval officer, was born near Norfolk, Virginia, on 6 November 1756; died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 26 February 1826. He entered the merchant service at the age of twelve, and at nineteen commanded a ship. In 1776 he became a lieutenant in the Virginia navy, and was soon afterward captured and confined in a [British] prison ship at Norfolk, where some royalist school-mates persuaded him to embark on an English [naval] cruiser against the vessels of his state. He was wounded in an engagement with an American flotilla, and while confined to his bed in Norfolk, resolved "never again to put himself in the way of the bullets of his own countrymen." After the Declaration of Independence [4 July 1776] he became a midshipman [the most junior naval commissioned officer rank - literally an officer trainee] on the American brig Lexington, which was captured on the coast of France by the English cutter [HMS] Alert in 1777. Dale was thrown into Mill prison, at Plymouth, with the rest of the officers and crew of the Lexington, on a charge of high treason, but escaped, with many of his fellow prisoners, in February 1778, was recaptured, escaped again, disguised as a British naval officer, and reached France, where he joined John Paul Jones's squadron as master's mate. Jones soon made him the first lieutenant of the Bonhomme Richard, and in that capacity he fought with distinction in the famous battle with the [HMS] Serapis, on 23 September 1779, and received a severe splinter wound [caused by large flying splinters of wood blasted out of the hull by enemy cannon shot]. After the sinking of the Bonhomme Richard in that engagement [with John Paul Jones and his crew capturing the Serapis], Dale served with Jones in the Alliance, and afterwards in the Ariel. He returned to Philadelphia on 28 February 1781, and was placed on the list of lieutenants in the [Continental] navy, and joined the Trumbull, which was captured in August of that year by the [HMS] Iris and the [HMS] Monk. Dale received his third wound in the engagement. Dale was exchanged in November, obtained a leave of abscence, and served on letters of marque [this was a private ship authorized by its government in a "letter of marque" to act as a privateer and attack and capture enemy ships - this was often done by a government to augment its navy] and in the merchant service until the end of the war. He was appointed captain in 1794, but with the exception of a short cruise in the Ganges, during the troubles with France, was not in active service until 1801, when he was given command of a sqadron and ordered to the Mediterranean during the hostitlities with Tripoli [due to Tripolitan pirates capturing American ships, enslving American seamen, and demanding tribute of the United States]. Although he was greatly hampered by his instructions, so that no serious enterprise could be attempted, he prevented the Tripolitans from making any captures [of American vessels] during his command. He returned to the United States in April, 1802, and was again ordered to the Mediterranean, but, becoming dissatisfied, he resigned his commission on 17 December, and having gained a competency, spent the rest of his life in retirement. Dale enjoyed the distiction of having been praised by [Admiral] Lord Nelson [British Royal Navy], who, after critically watching the seamanship of the commodore's squadron, said that there was in the handling of those trans-Atlantic ships a nucleus of trouble for the navy of Great Britain. The prediction was soon verified [in the War of 1812]. Two of Commodore Dale's son's held commissions in the [U.S.] Navy.
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Biographical Sketches

Bruin Family

Ralph Ware Bruin
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - Father-in-Law

Extracts from "History of Vance County, North Carolina"


rwbruinlarge Throughout his career, Ralph Ware Bruin worked effectively in upbuilding of one of this region"s best known merchandising enterprises, the Rose Five, Ten and Twenty-five Cent Store's, Inc. He had advanced to the position of Senior vice president at the time of his death. His fellow citizens in all walks of life will remember him well, and perhaps somewhat in the same way as his fellow directors of the company, who in a memorial statement. conveyed something of his character in these lines:
"His courtesy, friendly humor, and kindly thoughfulness endeared him to all his acquaintances. Few men knew the "Variety Store Business" as he did and his knowledge of values, of what was sound and practical together with his ability to deal with people and obtain results made him a figure in the merchandising world, admired and respected far beyond the active scope of the corporations he served so well."
Mr. Bruin was born in Aldie, Loudoun County, Virginia, on January 11, 1900. He came to henderson, N.C. in 1923 and shortly afterwards joined the Home Office Organization of Rose Five, Yen and Twenty-five Cent Store Corporation. He had already had expierence in managing the store in Statsville. He had joined the Rose Company after working with the G.c Murphy chain in Pennsylvania. Accordingly, by the time he arrived in Henderson, he had for a young man, remarkably extensive expierence in variety retailing. In the course of his years with the Rose Organization, he gained additional expierence in nearly every aspect of its operations. Among Mr. Bruin's major responsibilities was the purchase of real estate and leasing for the stores. In the course of his years with the organization, the number of stores in the chain had reached its three figure level from the only nine stores that existed when he joined the firm. His own advancement was as steady and as rapid-paced as the growth of this great southern enterprise. When the Company wa incorporated in 1927, he was named to its Boared of Directors, and in 1946 he became one of the vice presidents. He was a senior vice president at the time of his death. He was also executive vice president of the Paul H. Rose Corporation of Norfolk, Virginia, another P.H. Rose enterprise which operated in north Carolina and Virginia.
Mr Bruin's death occured at Henderson on January 4, 1952. As a business leader it has been written of him:
He was consulted on all important business problems and his opinion and his advice was held in high esteem. After the policy was determined, his knowledge of the business, expierence, energy and ability were relied upon to do a major part in carrying out the plans of management.The same qualities of mind and character made him a useful and exemplary citizen,church and organizational worker, friend and family man.

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Cannon Family


Mary Margaret Cannon
Relationship to William Bruce Blamire - Mother-in-Law

Extract from History of Vance County North Carolina
marycannon

In 1921, it was not an easy transition for a 22-year-old Yankee to move from a small Pennsylvania town to Vance County. Mother has told us many amusing incidents that occured as she was initiated to the ways of the South. She had never heard of grits, and one of her acquaintances told her this Souithern dish was made of Dirt. She was also told that the red earth which is so in evidence in the South was stained from the blood of the Confederate soldiers. But mother so learned to cook Southern, and talk Southern, and grow roses in the good old red clay. And, today, at 84 is a proud and loyal Southern.
Mary was graduated from Grove City Pennsylvania High School and attended Grove VCity College until her marriage January 11,1921 to Ralph Ware Bruin of Loudoun County Virginia. The couple's first home was in Rochester, Pennsylvania. In November 1921, Ralph accepted a position with the Rose 5-10-25cent Stores and became manager of the Statesville N. C. store. Shortly afterwards they moved to Henderson, N.C. where Ralph became an executive in the Rose Company home office.
On moving to Henderson, Mary and Ralph became members of the First Presbyterian Church, where Ralph served as Sunday School Superintendent and Mary taught in the Primary Dept., then became Superintendent of the Cradle Roll Dept. In the work of the Women of the Church, Mary served circle chairman, vice president, circle Bible leader, Secretary of Synod's and Presbyterial,s Educational Institutions. Beginning in 1937, she served two years as President of the Women of the Church, and again in 1946 served another term as President. Ralph served as Deacon, then as Elder.
During World War II, Mary was in charge of the Henderson Blood Mobile Unit of the Red Cross, and received a five year pin for service in this field. Mary was a charter member of the Colonial Garden Club and a member of the Old Bute Chapter of the DAR, having traced her lineage back to six Revolutionary soldiers.
In January 1952, Ralph died suddenly of a heart attack. After his death Mary traveled with her friend Marion Gerber, on may trips. On one of these trips she met Col. Walter D. Koch, retired from the Army, whom she married in the First Presbyterian Church in Henderson on November 21, 1954. Mary and Walter spent a year in Florida and a year on Cape Cod. Then they choose Sarasota, Florida as their home. They became members of the Pine Shores Presbyterian Church. Walter served as Deacon then as an elder. Mary served as circle chairman and then as President of Women of of the Church. An honorary Membership in the Women of the Church was conferred on Mary in 1962. The following was said about her on that occasion. "Mary's sincere dedication, her hospitality, and all around fine christian spirit radiated to everyone as she entertained and taught, as she allowed the Lord to use her in this fine work, will be of great benefit to Mary as she and those whom she taught continue to work in His service."
Walter died on November 2, 1968. Mary continued to live in Sarasota, but each summer returned to Henderson where she has an apartment.
On May 21, 1972, Mary and Olin Lougheed were married in Pine Shore Presbyterian Church, of which he also was a member and Elder.
On June 4 1983, Olin died. Mary continues to live in Sarasota, where she has good friends and neighbors. She manages her home and yard and remains quite independent. She grows roses now in the sandy soil of Florida, but often wishes for the good red clay of Vance County.


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Bruin-Cannon Photo Gallery


This page is designed to show photographs of members of the Bruin and related familes.
Relationship shown is to Mary Ware Bruin
This page is under complete revision. All photos are being replaced
Mary Ware Bruin
Mary Ware
Bruin
Anna Mae Bruin
Anna Mae
Bruin
sister
Elizabeth Jordan Bruin
Elizabeth Jordan
Bruin
sister
Ralph Ware Bruin
Ralph Ware
Bruin
father
Mary Cannon
Mary Margaret
Cannon
mother
Hugh Bruin
Hugh
Bruin
Grandfather
Lillian Jordan
Lillian
Jordan
Grandmother
Earl Delaney Bruin
Earl Delaney
Bruin
Uncle
Delaney Bruin
Delaney
Bruin
Great GrandFather
William Arnold Cannon
William Arnold
Cannon
great grandfather
Ainse Sarepta Daubenspeck
Anise Sarepta
Daubenspeck
great grandmother
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