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        singleleaf.gif (948 bytes) Descendants of Georg Wallner singleleaf.gif (948 bytes)

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                               Generation No. 2

1. Andreas1 Wallner was born Abt. 1745, and died Bef. 1791 in Mößling, Parish Mettenheim, Oberbayern, Bavaria. He married Salome Thalhammer Abt. 1765 in Mößling, Parish Mettenheim, Oberbayern, Bavaria. She was born Abt. 1745 in Mößling, Parish Mettenheim, Oberbayern, Bavaria, and died Bef. 1791.

According to the marriage record of his son, Andreas, to Ursula Pottinger on 10 July 1791 in Forstinning, both Andreas Wallner and his wife Salome were deceased at the time of the marriage ceremony of their son.

The town of Mößling is located 2 km north of Mühldorf, 70 km from the center of Munich and less than 30 km west of Burghausen and the Austrian border. The reference in the marriage record of Andreas' son states that the bridegroom's father was an "Eisenschmied" (Ironsmith or Blacksmith) in "Mößling, Pf. Mettenheim. Mößling is located in the Catholic Parish of Mettenheim. The town of Mettenheim itself is located a few km south of Mößling.

The surname Wallner means "from the wald" (woods or forest). Today it is a fairly common surname in Germany, although it occurs with more frequency in Austria. It has been said that at one time the name was Von Wallner.

According to the Historischer Atlas of Mühldorf 1752 there was a house/farm named Wallner in the community Eiting; it was owned by the Salzburger Propstei Wald. (Propstei is the dwelling of a provost.) The house name was Pfeiffenwallner (Pfeiffen means owned by priests or provost.) Wallner is located about 15 miles south of Mößling, where Andreas Wallner and Salome Thalhammer lived. Today this village appears on maps as Wald. Because of the meaning of the name Wallner, it's occurance in the village of Wald, and its close proximity to Mößling, at this time it is thought that this is probably where Andreas Wallner came from. The Historischer Atlas was also checked in Mößling, but neither the Wallner or Thalhammer name for a house/farm appears for 1752. It does note that there were 20 houses in Mößling at that time, one of them with the house-name Derfl was a Schmiede (Smithy). The footnote says that the Derfl-farm had been smashed. The lots went to 11 different owners, which means it was destroyed before 1752.

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                         The village of Wald is circled on the map

BAVARIA
Bavaria, or Bayern in German, is a state in southcentral Germany. It is the largest German state in area and the second largest in population. Its capital is Munich, which is Germany's third largest city. Bavaria encompasses four natural regions: the Franconian Jura, the Bohemian Forest, the Alpine Foreland (Bavarian Plateau), and the Bavarian Alps. The Danube River, which flows generally eastward, is the main waterway.

In the 8th century, Bishop Arbeo of Freising described Bavaria as a "Most splendid country, brilliant in its charm, wealthy in forests, fruitful in wine, rich in iron, gold, silver and purple; the men are tall and bursting with pride, but good and capable; the country is blessed with grain, cattle and herds, so many that they almost cover the ground; even the mountains are fruitful and ready for pasture; good herbs in superfluity;/ the woods are copiously endowed with deer, elk and auerochs, with chamoix and ibex, and with game of every type."

Politically, Bavaria has always held a special position within Germany. Before the German unification in 1871, it was much closer to Catholic Austria than to Protestant Prussia.

Early History
Baiern or Boiaria, land of the Boii, was conquered by the early empire of Rome. After the breakup of the Roman Empire, the country, which was occupied by the Teutonic tribe of Baguwarians (Germanic peoples: Bavarians) at the close of the 5th century, was ruled by dukes, first elective, then hereditary.

After a struggle of two hundred years, Bavaria, absorbed by the Franks, was ruled by Charlemagne, who left his decendents as margraves (788-900). In the middle ages there were constant quarrels between duke and emperor. During this same period the boundaries of Bavaria underwent constant change. In 1180 Frederick Barbarossa confered the duchy on Otto, Count of Wittelsbach, founder of the later royal house. Maximilian I (1598-1623) was made elector and received the northern half of Bavaria. He was a leading Catholic figure in the Thirty Years War (1618-48). After 1713, Bavaria oscillated between French and German alliances.

During the War of the Austrian Succession (1740-48) Elector Charles Albert became Holy Roman Emperor Charles VII. Bavaria suffered greatly in the fighting in this and other 18th centuriy wars.

Invaded by Moreau, who occupied Munich, in 1796; Bavaria sided with Napoleon I, who made Maximilian Joseph I king (1805-6). Bavaria was proclaimed a kingdom under French auspices in 1806, and kept this status by joining the anti-French coalition in the final defeat of Napoleon I (1814-15). In 1818 Maximilian I granted his country a constitution, abolishing serfdom, and established religious freedom.

Later History
Allied with Austria until its defeat by Prussia in the Seven Years War (1866), Bavaria then switched its allegiance to Prussia, fought in the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71) and became part of the German Empire in 1871. At the end of WWI the Bavarian monarchy was overthrown and a socialist republic was established in 1919. This regime was soon suppressed by the newly established Weimar Republic, in which Bavaria was incorporated as a state. After WWII Bavaria was in the US Zone of occupation and part of West Germany (1949-1990).

Child of Andreas Wallner and Salome Thalhammer is:

+ 2 i. Andreas2 Wallner, born Abt. 1770 in Mößling, Parish Mettenheim, Oberbayern, Bavaria; died in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria.

                                Generation No. 2 

      2.  Andreas2 Wallner (Andreas1) was christened 12 September 1763 in Mößling, Mühdorf am Inn, Parish Mettenheim, Oberbayern, Bavaria, and died 29 April 1840 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria.  He married (1) Ursula Pottinger 10 July 1791 in Forstinning, Bavaria1, daughter of George Pottinger and Anna Krammer.  She was born 17 July 1769 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria, and died 21 January 1797 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria.  He married (2) Anna Mayer 27 February 1797 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria, daughter of Simon Mayer and Anna.  She was born 17 June 1774 in Wind, Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria, and died 13 May 1798 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.  He married (3) Ursula Widmann 23 July 1798 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria, daughter of Franz Widmann and Barbara.  She was born 03 July 1775 in Berg, Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria, and died 03 April 1810 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.  He married (4) Walburga Gangkofer 31 May 1813 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria, daughter of Florian Gangkofer and Maria Kirrmayr.  She was born 19 March 1786 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria, and died 14 August 1848 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

Andreas Wallner was christened on 12 September 1763, in Mößling, parish of Mettenheim, in Bavaria. At the time of his first marriage, he was an "Eisenschmied" (Ironsmith or Blacksmith) in the town of Forstinning. His first wife, Ursula Pöttinger, was a "Schmiedtocher" (Smith's daughter) and it was very likely that he took over the blacksmith shop in Forstinning from his future father-in law, Georg Pöttinger. It is also likely that this was the reason he moved from Mößling to Forstinning.

At that time the Guild (an association of merchants or craftsmen, much like the trade unions of today) was still powerful in the German work field. To have the right to operate his own business, a man had to be a member of the Guild and meet moral and technical qualifications. He had to be of legimate birth, attend church, and have a good reputation. The Guild permitted its members to work only at a particular trade, in a particular place, and made sure that a newcomer in town became a citizen before he joined the guild. By the 15th century guilds were organized in Germany for all trades, including Ironsmiths or Blacksmiths, and flourished for two centuries. In many towns the Guild became a political power.

There were three stages of progression in a craft, apprentice, journeyman and master. As an apprentice, a young man learned the basics of a craft under the tutelage of a master. Upon achieving a certain level of proficiency, the apprentice became a journeyman, or a "Wandergeselle" and travelled for three years. offering his services to master craftsmen and laypeople. Afterwards, the craftsman settled in a community to set up shop and eventually become known as a "master".

In some areas the Guild exercised so much control over their members that they could dictate the area in which a member lived, and even who they married (preferably the daughter of another guild member).  Whether it was the influence of the Guild, or simply a matter of practicality, each and every generation of this Wallner line were Master Blacksmiths who all married the daughters of Master Blacksmiths from another town, and took over their father in laws' business there.  

View the Marriage Certificate.

Translation of the german Roman Catholic "Marriage Document" of Andreas Wallner and Ursula Pöttinger, from the records of the Archives of the Archbishops Munich & Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich, Germany:

MARRIAGE DOCUMENT

In the year one thousand seven hunded and ninety one----------------- 1791

On 10 JULY in Forstinning Church Marriage:

Bridegroom: Andreas Wallner, present Ironsmith in Forstinning, husband. Son of Andreas Wallner, Ironsmith in Mößling, Parish Mettenheim, and his wife Salome,
born Thalhammer, both already deceased.

Bride: Ursula Pöttinger, wife. Daughter of Georg Pöttinger, Ironsmith in Forstinning, and his wife, Anna Maria, both deceased.

Witnesses: Thomas Thallhammer and Johann Riechingser, farmers in Forstinning.

Speech of entry: Latin

Marriage Book: Forstinning Volume 17, Page 89

After Andreas' first wife, Ursula's, death, and after the birth (and death) of their 4th child, he remarried one month later to Anna Mayer of Wind in the parish of Forstinning. Anna died only a few months after the marriage.

Two and a half months later Andreas then married his third wife, Ursula Widmann. Ursula was from Berg, in the parish of Forstinning. Andreas and his third wife had 10 children. When Ursula died, Andreas again remarried in 1813 to Walburga Gangkofer from Forstinning. With his fourth wife he had 8 more children, a total of 22. But for only 9 of these are there records indicating that they survived their childhood. Most of the male descendants were blacksmiths and continued their family's tradition, spreading it from Forstinning to other places in the area.

In the records Andreas Wallner is described as a blacksmith. In 1798 he is mentioned as a farrier. In 1806 his status in regards to property is given as "1/8-Gütler", which means that his farm/property was about as large as one eight of an old, large farm. In his case, he didn't require more than that because his profession was not that of a farmer, but of a blacksmith. The house had the number 45, and the record expressly mentions it as the smithy.

Andreas' death record indicates he died at age 77, of senility (Altersschwäche, Nachlaß der Matir, Marasmus) on 29 April 1840. He was buried in Forstinning on 1 May 1840.

Ursula Pöttinger: First Wife

Ursula (Pöttinger) Wallner died at age 28.

Anna Mayer:  Second Wife

Anna (Mayer) Wallner died at 24 years of age, a few months after her marriage to Andreas Wallner. There were no children of this marriage.

Ursula Widmann: Third Wife

Ursula (Widmann) Wallner died at 34 years of age. The cause of death is not legible, but the date suggests that she died in childbirth. 

Walburga Gangkofer: Fourth Wife

Walburga (Gangkofer) Wallner died at the age of 62 years and 4 months.

 

Children of Andreas Wallner and Ursula Pottinger (first wife) are:

        3             i.   Paul3 Wallner, born 12 July 1792 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 15 August 1792 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        4           ii.   Walburga Wallner, born 14 July 1793 in Forstinning, Bavaria2; died 09 February 1839 in Forstinning, Bavaria2.  She married Balthasar Hugpauer 18 May 1813 in Forstinning, Bavaria2.

        5           iii.   Andreas Wallner, born 27 January 1795 in Forstinning, Bavaria3; died 19 April 1795 in Forstinning, Bavaria4.

        6          iv.   Crescentia Wallner, born 07 April 1796 in Forstinning, Bavaria5; died 31 August 1796 in Forstinning, Bavaria5.

     

Children of Andreas Wallner and Ursula Widmann (second wife) are:

        7             i.   Crescentia3 Wallner, born 24 April 1799; died 22 May 1799.

+     8           ii.   Anna Wallner (twin), born 27 March 1800 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        9           iii.   Ursula Wallner (twin), born 27 March 1800; died 28 October 1800.

+  10        iv.   Andreas Wallner, born 05 February 1802 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died in Reithofen, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        11         v.   Gerhard Wallner, born 03 September 1803. Gerhard Wallner moved to Mühldorf.

       12        vi.   Elizabeth Wallner, born 19 November 1804 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 05 October 1805 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria. Died at the age of 10 months and 5 days.

       13        vii.   Maria Wallner, born 02 April 1806 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 06 June 1806 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria. Died at the age of 2 months and 4 days. Convulsive coughs and spasms (Steckhusten und Gefraisch). 

       14       viii.   Lorenz Wallner, born 25 September 1807 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.  He married Unknown 1848. Lorenz Wallner was a Schmied (blacksmith). He moved to Zomeding.

       15        ix.   Maria Wallner, born 26 November 1808 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

       16         x.   Quirin Wallner, born 21 March 1810; died September 1814.

Children of Andreas Wallner and Walburga Gangkofer (fourth wife) are:

        17          i.   Quirin3 Wallner, born March 1814; died March 1814.

+      18         ii.   Georg Wallner, born 03 March 1815 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 12 June 1865 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        19         iii.   Quirin Wallner, born 04 June 1816 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 05 June 1816 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        20        iv.   Crescentia Wallner, born 22 October 1817 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria. Moved to Zomeding.

         21         v.   Franz Xaver Wallner, born 14 January 1819 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 26 November 1866 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria. Franz Xaver Wallner was a Schmied (black smith) in Forstinning.

         22        vi.   Karl Wallner, born 29 May 1820 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 09 June 1820 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

          23        vii.   Wendelin Wallner, born 30 September 1821 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 30 September 1821 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

          24       viii.   Florian Wallner, born 28 September 1825 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 09 July 1867 in Erding, Oberbayern, Bavaria.

                                                          Generation No. 3 

    8.   Anna Wallner3 (twin) (Andreas2 Wallner, Andreas1) was born 27 March 1800 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria.      

Children (illegitimate) of Anna Wallner (twin) and unknown Altmann are:

        25          i.   Anna4 Altmann, born 27 September 1830 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.  She married Unknown 1864.

        26         ii.   Franz Paul Altmann, born 09 February 1834 in München; died 12 June 1844 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,   Bavaria.

10. Andreas3 Wallner (Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 05 February 1802 in Forstinning, Oberbayern, Bavaria13, and died in Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria. He married Elisabeth Bauer Abt. 1829 in Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria. She was born Abt. 1809 in Probably Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria, and died in Probably Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria.

View The Baptismal Record

Transcription of german Baptism Document from the Archive of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising:

BAPTISM DOCUMENT
BAPTISED: Andreas Wallner
BIRTHDATE:
BIRTHPLACE: Forstinning
BAPTISM DATE: 5 February 1802
BAPTISED IN: Forstinning
FATHER: Andreas Wallner, Ironsmith in Forstinning
MOTHER: Ursula, born Berger, of Berg, his wife. (Should be Ursula Widmann)
GODPARENTS: Walburga Riechinger, wife of farmer, Spizl, in Forstinning
Speech of entry: Latin
Baptismal record of catholic parish: Forstinning
Volume 4, Page 331, Number 3
Munich, on 26 January 1998
Seal of Archive of Archbishops of Munich and Freising

As of 1995 the Wallner property and Smithy in Reithofen was in possession of the Brandl family.

Children of Andreas Wallner and Elisabeth Bauer are:

27 i. Maria Anna4 Wallner, born 29 November 1830 in Reithofen Bavaria14.

28 ii. Franziska Wallner, born 28 January 1832 in Forstinning, Bavaria14.

29 iii. Andreas Wallner, born 15 May 1835 in Reithofen Bavaria14; died 06 June 1886 in Reithofen Bavaria14.

30 iv. Franz Xaver Wallner, born 30 November 1840 in Reithofen Bavaria14.

+ 31 v. Josef Wallner, born 28 January 1842 in Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria; died 10 October 1911 in Munchen-Riem, Oberbayern, Bavaria, Germany.

32 vi. Johann Gaulbert Wallner, born 12 July 1843 in Reithofen Bavaria14.

33 vii. Konrad Wallner, born 26 November 1846 in Reithofen Bavaria14; died August 1891 in Pastetten Bavaria14.

34 viii. Johanna Wallner, born 22 June 1852 in Reithofen Bavaria14.

  18.  Georg3 Wallner (Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 03 March 1815 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria, and died 12 June 1865 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.  He married Elisabeth 1844. George Wallner was a Schmied (black smith). He died in either 1865 or 1863.

      Children of Georg Wallner and Elisabeth are:

        35          i.   Georg4 Wallner, born 21 March 1845 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died Aft. 1855.

        36         ii.   Creszentia Wallner, born 15 June 1846 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 15 March 1847 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        37         iii.   Andreas Wallner, born 10 April 1848 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        38        iv.   Theresia Wallner, born 25 August 1849 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 09 June 1850 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        39         v.   Joseph Wallner, born 21 January 1851 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 10 March 1852 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        40        vi.   Elisabeth Wallner, born 02 September 1852 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria; died 25 September 1853 in Forstinning, Oberbayern,  Bavaria.

        41        vii.   Katharina Wallner, born 06 August 1854.

                                    Generation No. 4

31. Josef4 Wallner (Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 28 January 1842 in Reithofen, Oberbayern, Bavaria14, and died 10 October 1911 in Munchen-Riem, Oberbayern, Bavaria, Germany15. He married Elisabeth Brunner 03 October 1871 in Pastetten Bavaria16, daughter of Lorenz Brunner and Magdelena Spanner. She was born 06 August 1852 in Pastetten, Oberbayern, Bavaria16, and died 14 February 1921 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., New York17.

Josef Wallner, the son of Andreas Wallner and Elisabeth Bauer, was a Master Blacksmith who practiced his trade in the town of Pastetten during the years 1871 to 1905. He married Elisabeth, the daughter of Lorenz Brunner, the Master Blacksmith with whom he apprenticed, in 1871. Josef was born in the town of Reithofen, but moved to Pastetten where the Brunner family resided. Pastetten is located about 10 km northeast of the center of Munich, and Reithofen is directly next to Pastetten. As it is unlikely that the very small town of Pastetten would require the services of two blacksmiths, it is assumed that Josef took over the business of his father in law, as was usually the practice.

Click here to see the DESCENDANTS OF LORENZ BRUNNER

About 1872 Josef built the Wallner family home in Pastetten that is still standing today. It is a large house with an attached barn and there is also a blacksmith shop on the property, which is still in use. (A photograph of the Smithy can be found on the VILLAGE SMITHY page.)

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In the family collection are photographs of the Wallner home and blacksmith shop taken in 1965. Also in this collection are two postcards with photographs of two different houses ca 1880/90.

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                            The Wallner House in Pastetten ca 1890?
                      
   The attached barn is on the left of the photo

The first old photograph is probably the front of the Wallner home in Pastetten.The configuration and number of windows and doors do not match the photo taken in 1965, but the 1965 photo may actually be the back or side of the house. The roof does appear to be the same.

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The other old photo does not appear to match either of these houses. It is possible this was the Brunner home, or the home of friends or other relatives. Or maybe it is the Wallner home in Reithofen.

It is possible that Josef Wallner, according to an oral tradition passed down in the family, was at one time the mayor of Pastetten. Blacksmiths were usually one of the most prosperous, influential and necessary members of a community.

                                                     Pastetten Flag.jpg (5529 bytes)
                                                   Pastetten Flag

The town of Pastetten is in the government district of Oberbayern (Upper Bavaria) which belongs to Freising. Since 1777 Pastetten has belonged to Bavaria. Previously Pastetten had been in the possession of the Wittelsbach line. With the emergence of the New Bavarian national territory between 1799 and 1815, the municipalities were again formed. Over 40,000 became approximately 7300. Today, approximately 2000 municipalities still exist.

wpe48170.gif (54489 bytes)

              The town "pole" which advertises what Pastetten has to offer
                       such as Smithy, Baker, etc.   Photo 1965

In the Wallner and Brunner family tradition, Josef and Elisabeth's sons, Josef and Ludwig, were both blacksmiths. It is unknown if the third son, Otto, was also a blacksmith, as no record of his occupation can be found.

In the very early years of Josef Wallner and Elisabeth Brunner's lives, Louis I (1825-48) had already restored the cathedrals of Bambert and Regensburg, built a national Walhalla, and adorned Munich with palaces and art galleries. He had obtained the crown of Hellenes for his son, Otto, and had to resign (1848) because of interference of his mistress into state affairs. There was an attempt on the life of Frederick William IV, King of Prussia (1844) and in 1845, the future King of Bavaria, Louis II, was born. These years also saw Francis Joseph I, Emperior of Austria, married to the Bavarian Princess Elisabeth in 1854 and in 1864 King Maximilian of Bavaria was succeded by Louis II.

As young adults, Josef and Elisabeth saw Louis II of Bavaria support Austria in the Seven Years War (1866). They watched his patronage of the composer Richard Wagner, saw his mania for building elaborate castles and palaces, and began hearing the tales of his increasing insanity.

At the time of their marriage in 1871, Bavaria was allied with Prussia in the Franco-Prussian War against France. William I, King of Prussia, is proclaimed German Emperor at Versailles, as Paris capitulates and cedes Alsace-Lorraine to Germany. This same year a treaty is signed in which Bavaria becomes part of the new German Empire. The year of their marriage also marked the beginning of the Kulturkampf against the Catholic Church in Prussia.

In 1872, the year their daughter Johanna was born, the Three-Emperors League was established in Berlin which formed an alliance between Germany, Russia and Austria-Hungary. The following years (1873 to 1896) brought a severe economic depression to Germany.

By the time their sons Josef, Ludwig, and Otto are born, there has been an attempt to assassinate Emperor William I of Germany and the Kulturkampf has been rescinded. The Triple Alliance between Italy, Austria and Germany is instituted by Chancellor Otto von Bismark in 1882, against William I of Germany's wishes.

While their children were growing up, Bismarck sought to tie Russia to the Triple Alliance by the Reinsurance Treaty of 1887, and revived the Three Emperor's League. Bismark then extended the powers of the Imperial government and adopted laissez-faire economic policies. The following year German Emperor William I died, and was succeeded by his son Frederick II, who died three months later. Frederick II was succeeded by William II, "The Kaiser" in 1888.

During the time period before the four siblings would immigrate to the United States, they saw the "Swan King" Louis II of Bavaria judged insane and placed under restraint. Louis II's brother Otto, who succeeded, was also insane, and an uncle, Prince Luitpold, then acted as regent. Louis II would  strangle his physician, and kill himself in the waters of Lake Starnberg in 1886.

At the time of the Wallner siblings' immigration, Luitpold was still regent in Bavaria. And in his foreign policy The Kaiser, William II, aiming to enhance German prestige, began expressing a strident nationalism in warlike speeches that began to alarm all of Europe. He also alarmed the Germans when he proclaimed that the laws were whatever he said they were.

The oral tradition of the family is that Josef and Elisabeth's three sons crossed the Alps to escape the Kaiser and came to America. It was actually the two oldest children, daughter Johanna and son Josef, who first immigrated to the US in 1891, from the port in Antwerp Belgium. Their son Ludwig followed in 1892, also from Antwerp Belgium. Otto, the third son, also came to America later on, in 1895 from Bremen.

It is unknown exactly why Josef and Elisabeth's children left Bavaria. Part of the oral tradition of the family is that they left to "escape the Kaiser", and William II (Kaiser Wilhelm) was alarming all of Europe at that time, so this could have been the reason. Relatives, including Elisabeth Brunner Wallner's sisters, were already in America at that time, so a family connection to America had already been established to ease the way. The economic depression may have influenced their decision. As John F. Kennedy said in his book, "A Nation of Immigrants", "There were probably as many reasons for coming to America as there were people who came. It was a highly individual decision." The practice of one member of a family going to America first, then saving to bring others over, was common. And for many, the decision to leave was a family affair.

Stream navigation on rivers and the construction of the railway system improved transportation from the old homes to the seaports in Germany, and from the landing places in America to the new homes. The introduction of packet lines with fixed routes and timetables for departures and arrivals made ocean transportation easier; it particularly shortened the waiting time in the ports. Ocean steamers, which replaced sailing vessels after the middle of the nineteenth century, meant greater comfort and faster traveling. Instead of seven weeks immigrants could reach this side of the Atlantic in two weeks. The mortality rate on board fell dramatically. Only during the last decades of the nineteenth century were ship companies able to guarantee more safety. The twentieth century finally saw the virtual end of dangers and hazards in traveling across the ocean.

Many of the German immigrating to American during the 19th century did so for religious freedom, the Harmonites, Zoarites, Amanists, Old Lutherans, and also Roman Catholics at the time of Bismarck's Kulturkampf. The German immigration in the 19th century, comparable to other migratory movements from European countries to the New World, is often interpreted as an escape from imminent poverty or from unbearable living conditions. Different motives were intermingled: religious, political, social, economic, and psychological personally oriented ones.

Of no little importance were pull factors working from the country of destination. A specific image of the new country develops that, whether right or wrong, lures the immigrant away. During the 19th century America was the country of unlimited progress, of the "self-made" man, of upward mobility from ditchdiggers to wealthy industrialists.

During this time in Germany political authorities warned, the church warned, and friends and relatives tried to talk people out of their intention to leave the country. The church was, for a long time, particularly critical. The decision to go out into the world, and be without the protection of the church seemed to be an ungodly undertaking. German state authorities did not do much to protect the immigrants, but they finally removed any obstacles in the later part of the century.

From the middle of the 19th century, every German who had sufficient financial means to go away and settle in a distant country was free to do so, provided he had fulfilled his obligations toward the home society and the home country. He had to pay his debts before leaving, and he was not allowed to evade military service. ("Eagle In The New World: German Immigration". Published for the Texas Committee for the Humanities by Texas A&M University Press)

Another part of the oral tradition of the family is that they had "crossed the Alps" to escape the Kaiser. That Josef and Elisabeth's sons were evading military service, and took a circuitous route southward over the Alps before heading back north, also remains a possibility, as sons Josef, Ludwig and Otto all independently left Bavaria while each was still age 17, but each in the same year they turned 18, and would have then been eligible for military service. On both Josef and Ludwig's ships records, their ages are listed as 18, although they actually were both only 17 at the time. Otto's record indicates correctly that he was 17 years old. Josef celebrated his 18th birthday a mere 16 days after his arrival, Ludwig 3 months after his arrival, and Otto turned 18 approximately a month after his arrival in the US.

Another family oral tradition is that Otto did not like America, and returned to Pastetten. In the family's possession are several postcards addressed to Otto at his parents home in Bavaria, the earliest is dated 12 April 1899, so it is assumed that Otto had returned to Bavaria before this date. Also in this collection is a postcard from Otto addressed to his father Josef which is written in german in very faint pencil, and the message cannot be deciphered. The postcard is a photograph of the steamship "Nordd", and also included on the photograph is the name of the steamship line, Lloyd, and the port, Bremen. The postmark is from the English port of Southampton and is dated 6 August 1898. As the Ellis Island records indicate that Otto arrived in New York on 25 January 1895 on the ship S.S. Lahn from Bremen, it is assumed he returned to Bavaria aboard the Nordd in 1898.

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Otto contracted tuberculosis and Josef and Elisabeth's youngest son died in Pastetten in 1905 at the age of 28. Three of their daughters had died young, and the three remaining living children were now all in America. At this time the Wallner home and property was sold to Johann Maurer, a blacksmith. After the sale, Josef and Elisabeth Wallner moved to Munchen-Riem, where they remained until Josef's death in 1911.

Josef Wallner died 10 October 1911 in Munchen-Riem and was interred 12 October 1911 in the cemetery of Kath. St Martin Church in Pastetten. Some time after Josef's death, Elisabeth (Brunner) Wallner then immigrated to the United States to care for their son Ludwig's children.

Elisabeth Brunner:
Elisabeth Brunner was the daughter of Lorenz Brunner and Magdelena Spanner. Lorenz Brunner was born in Gänsberg, in the parish of Haunnersdorf, Bavaria on 30 August 1814. Magdelena Spanner was born in Sommershausen, in the parish of Oberhausen, Bavaria on 19 November 1816. Lorenz and Magdelena were married on 3 June 1851 in the town of Ergolding. Lorenz Brunner was a Schmidmeister, or Master Smith (Blacksmith). According to the record from the Kath. St. Martin in Pastetten Bavaria, he was a native of Gänsberg in the parish of Haunnersdorf and Magdelena Spanner was a "Bauerstocher" (farmer's daughter). Magdelena Spanner gave birth to six children in the town of Pastetten. Her eldest daughter, Katharina born 19 November 1834 is listed as illegitimate on the church records, and the father is unknown. There were five other children with Lorenz Brunner: Elisabeth born 6 August 1852, Franziska Romana born 15 February 1857, Johanna born 6 May 1858, Maria born 15 December 1859, Jeanette born May 1861and "Anonymous" born and died 26 March 1862. Lorenz Brunner died 24 July 1893 in Pastetten, and Magdelena (Spanner) Brunner died 24 February 1895 in Pastetten.

Elisabeth Brunner was married to Josef Wallner of Reithofen in "her home" (the home of her parents) at Number 6 Pastetten Bavaria on 3 October 1871. Pastetten is a small village located outside of Munich, and due to the size of the village, the houses only had numbers and no other identifiers, such as street addresses.

Numerous postcards in the family's possession addressed to Elisabeth after her marriage are all are addressed to "Wohlgeboren Elisabeth Wallner." Wohlgeboren means well-born in german, and was used as a formal form of address for persons considered to be of a higher social status. German society operated on very strict class distinctions at that time, and Wohlgeboren was the class immediately below Hochgeboren, which designated a royal connection. The Wohlgeboren class was considered high enough that it included the minor nobility. As people did not typically marry outside of their class, it could be that both the Brunner and Wallner families were Wohlgeboren. It is said that Elisabeth's husband, Josef Wallner, was the mayor of Pastetten. This too might also account for the manner of address on the postcards.

One of the most often repeated, and most consistent, oral traditions of the family relates that Elisabeth was extremely conscious of her Wohlgeboren class and extremely proud of her "royal" connections, through the Prince of Eagles, Prinz von Adler, who served under Bismarck. It is assumed that, if there is such a connection, that it is the Brunner family who was related to Prinz von Adler. To date, no information has been located to verify Elisabeth's claim

It is interesting to note that after naming their first born son for his father, Josef and Elisabeth's next sons were named Ludwig and Otto, names which do not run in either family. These names however, were the names of the Bavarian royalty during this period. (Ludwig II and Otto were the sons of Frederick William IV, the King of Prussia who became the King of Bavaria. Both Ludwig II and Otto would become Kings of Bavaria, and history would later record them both as being insane.) The choice of names could be due simply to the popularity of these names at the time due to a Bavarian national pride, but it is wondered if the names might have been Elisabeth's choices because of the royal connotation they evoked.

Her eldest children, Johanna and Josef, immigrated to the United States on 7 October 1891 from Antwerp Belgium to New York City on the S.S. Friesland. Her son Ludwig then immigrated on 8 June 1892 aboard the S.S. Westerland from Antwerp to New York City. At the time, Elisabeth's sisters, Franziska Romana (married Josef Zoeller) and Jeanette (married Emanuel Zoeller) were already living in the United States. Her last living child, Otto, went to the United States in 1895 aboard the S.S. Lahn from Bremen, after his siblings were already established there. The oral tradition of the family is that Otto didn't like New York and he returned to live with his parents in Pastetten Bavaria. Somewhere during this period he contracted Tuberculosis, which caused his death in 1905.

The Wallner family home in Pastetten was sold in 1905 to Johann Maurer, (the same year of their son Otto's death) and Elisabeth and her husband then moved to Munchen-Riem, where she remained until her husband's death in 1911.

Elisabeth Brunner Wallner immigrated to the United States to care for her son Ludwig's children some time after the death of his wife, Wilhelmina Wentzlow Wallner, in 1910. Ludwig's children were being cared for by Wilhelmina Wentzlow's mother for several years after her daughter's death, and it was Ludwig's mother in law's death that necessitated Elisabeth's immigration. Elisabeth did not immigrate until sometime after the death of her husband, Josef, in 1911 and the actual date she came to the US has not be located.

The 1920 Federal Census record for 96 Sackman Street, in the Borough of Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York lists Elisabeth, age 68, living with her son Louis (Ludwig) Wallner and his two daughters at this time. This census record also indicates her date of immigration was 1915, and she is listed as an "alien". However, a postcard in the family collection from an Anton Brunner, (relationship unknown), is addressed to Elisabeth Wallner at 96 Sackman Street in care of Henry Dollack. Henry Dollack was the husband of Elisabeth and Josef Wallner's daughter Johanna. The postcard is dated 1913. It is thought that the 96 Sackman Street residence was the home of the Dollacks in 1913 and after the death of Henry Dollack in 1919 then was rented to Ludwig Wallner. It is also unknown if the 1913 date indicated by this postcard was a time when Elisabeth was visiting the United States, or if she actually immigrated two years earlier than indicated on the census record. There is no naturalization record, and she is listed as an alien on the 1920 census record, so it appears she never become a citizen of the US.

The oral tradition of the family says that Elisabeth was very unhappy in the US. In her small town in Germany she had been accorded the recognition and treated with the special respect that was shown to the Wohlgeboren social class. She deeply resented what she viewed as her superior social status being ignored, and being treated as just another member of the large German community in the Brooklyn area.

Elisabeth Brunner Wallner died on 14 February 1921 in Ridgewood New York and was interred in St. John's Cemetery, 80-01 Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village, New York on 17 February 1921. The cemetery plot was registered to Henry Dollack.

Children of Josef Wallner and Elisabeth Brunner are:

42 i. Elisabeth5 Wallner, born 06 March 1872 in Pastetten Bavaria18; died 22 April 1872 in Pastetten Bavaria18.

+43 ii. Johanna Wallner, born 15 December 1872 in Pastetten Bavaria; died 31 August 1947 in Glendale, Queens Co., NY.

+ 44 iii. Josef Louis Wallner, born 23 October 1873 in Pastetten Bavaria; died 08 February 1953 in New Hyde Park, North Hempstead, Nassau Co., New York.

+ 45 iv. Ludwig Wallner, born 18 September 1874 in Pastetten Bavaria; died 10 March 1960 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., New York.

46 v. Franziska Wallner, born 24 January 1876 in Pastetten Bavaria18; died 06 August 1877 in Pastetten Bavaria18.

47 vi. Otto Wallner, born 03 March 1877 in Pastetten Bavaria; died 12 November 1905 in Pastetten Bavaria18.

Otto Wallner:
Otto was the youngest son of Josef and Elisabeth (Brunner) Wallner. He was born on 3 March 1877 in Pastetten. According to the records of the Kath. St. Martin, Otto did not marry. As no record can be found, it is unknown if his profession was blacksmith, like his two older brothers, Josef and Ludwig. There has been some speculation that all three brothers were avoiding the military, and their arrivals of in the US just prior to their 18th birthdays, lends some credence to the theory.

Otto Wallner immigrated to the United States, arriving in New York on 25 January 1895, aboard the ship S.S. Lahn from Bremen. His Ellis Island record gives his name as Otto "Mallner" and indicates he was 17 years old.

In the family's possession are several postcards addressed to Otto at his parents home in Bavaria, the earliest is dated 12 April 1899, so it is assumed that Otto had returned to Bavaria before this date. Also in this collection is a postcard from Otto addressed to his father Josef which is written in german in very faint pencil, and the message cannot be decipered. The postcard is a photograph of the steamship "Nordd", and also included on the photograph is the name of the steamship line, Lloyd, and the port, Bremen. The postmark is from the English port of Southampton and is dated 6 August 1898. It is assumed this was Otto's journey back to Bavaria.

Otto contracted tuberculosis and Josef and Elisabeth's youngest son died in Pastetten in 1905, at age 28.

48 vii. Elisabeth Wallner, born 12 May 1878 in Pastetten Bavaria18; died 13 July 1882 in Pastetten Bavaria18.

Generation No. 5

43. Johanna5 Wallner (Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 15 December 1872 in Pastetten Bavaria18, and died 31 August 1947 in Glendale, Queens Co., NY19. She married Henry Dollack Bet. 1891 - 1892 in probably Brooklyn, New York20. He was born June 1866 in Germany20, and died Abt. 11 March 1919 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY21.

Click here for JOHANNA WALLNER's family information and photographs.

Children of Johanna Wallner and Henry Dollack are:

49 i. Elizabeth J.6 Dollack, born Abt. March 1893 in probably Brooklyn, New York22; died 08 January 1919 in probably Brooklyn, New York23. She married Walter E. Fentzke.

+ 50 ii. Lillian Dollack, born 21 February 1896 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY; died 07 February 1960 in Glendale, Queens Co., NY.

51 iii. Elfrieda V. Dollack, born Abt. 1907 in probably Brooklyn, New York; died October 1969.

Elfrieda V. Dollack was born in 1907 according to the year inscribed on her stone, and would also indicate that Elfrieda did not marry. It is inscribed "Elfrieda Dollack 1907-1969. Elfrieda died sometime in late October 1969 at age 62. She was interred 31 October 1969 in St. Johns Cemetery, Middle Village, NY.

44. Josef Louis5 Wallner (Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 23 October 1873 in Pastetten Bavaria24, and died 08 February 1953 in New Hyde Park, North Hempstead, Nassau Co., New York25. He married (1) Elfrieda Huch 17 April 1898 in St. Joseph's RC Church of Yorkville, 404 E. 87th St, New York, NY 1002826. She was born 19 February 1878 in City of Hannover, Hannover, Prussia27, and died 16 May 1907 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., New York28. He married (2) Wilhelmina Augusta Kraft 02 September 1911 in Our Lady of Lourdes RC Church Rectory, 11 DeSales Place, Brooklyn, NY 1120729. She was born 08 September 1879 in Albany, NY30, and died 21 August 1954 in Nassau Hospital, No. Hempstead, Mineola, Nassau Co., NY30.

Click here for JOSEPH LOUIS WALLNER'S family information, documents, and photographs

Children of Josef Wallner and Elfrieda Huch are:

+ 52 i. Hildegard Elizabeth6 Wallner, born 09 October 1898 in New York City, NY; died 30 January 1986 in Glendora, CA.

+ 53 ii. Albert Joseph Christopher Louis Wallner, born 16 February 1901 in 345 South First Street, New York City, New York; died 30 November 1972 in Borough of Lincoln Park, Pequannock Twp., Morris Co., NJ.

54 iii. Joseph Wallner, born 23 November 1903 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY31; died 25 November 1903 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY32.

Joseph Wallner died at 2 days old, and was interred at Most Holy Trinity Cemetery, 675 Central Avenue, Brooklyn NY, Block 35, Row 8, Grave 26.

55 iv. Elsa Wallner, born 07 May 1907 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY; died 07 May 1907 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY.

Elsa died at birth and was interred 10 May 1907 at Most Holy Trinity Cemetery, 675 Central Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, Block 35, Row 8, Grave 26. The records of the cemetery are listed under Joseph Wallner, her father's name. The name Elsa does not appear in the cemetery records, or on the gravestone. The only record that can be located naming this child as Elsa is in the Stammbuch das Johann Christof Huch, in which Elsa's maternal grandmother, Agnes (Diedrich) Huch recorded her birth and death in this family record book. Her death date matches Most Holy Trinity's records for the interrment in this grave.

Child of Josef Wallner and Wilhelmina Kraft is:

+ 56 i. Irma Elizabeth6 Wallner, born 06 January 1913 in Brooklyn, NY; died 01 February 1977 in New Hyde Park, NY.

45. Ludwig5 Wallner (Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 18 September 1874 in Pastetten Bavaria33, and died 10 March 1960 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., New York. He married Wilhelmina Wentzlow Abt. 1900. She was born Abt. 1882, and died 27 January 1910 in Brooklyn, NY.

Click here to see LUDWIG WALLNER'S family information and photographs.

Children of Ludwig Wallner and Wilhelmina Wentzlow are:

+ 57 i. Johanna Wilhelmina6 Wallner, born 03 October 1902 in Brooklyn, NY; died 09 December 1948 in Brooklyn, NY.

58 ii. Anna Elizabeth Wallner, born 28 July 1906 in Brooklyn, NY; died 20 September 1975 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., New York. She married Edwin B. Austin Abt. 30 May 1949 in NJ; born Abt. 1901 in Machias, Cataraugus Co, NY; died in Clavarack NY.

Generation No. 6

50. Lillian6 Dollack (Johanna5 Wallner, Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 21 February 1896 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY34, and died 07 February 1960 in Glendale, Queens Co., NY34. She married Martin Noeth Aft. 1920. He was born 16 May 189635, and died November 1984 in probably Holiday, FL35.

For more information on LILLIAN DOLLACK see JOHANNA WALLNER.

Child of Lillian Dollack and Martin Noeth is:

59 i. PRIVATE

52. Hildegard Elizabeth6 Wallner (Josef Louis5, Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 09 October 1898 in New York City, NY36, and died 30 January 1986 in Glendora, CA. She married (1) John Sylvester Hewitt 06 October 1919 in St Pancras RC Church, 72-22 68th St, Glendale NY37, son of Unknown Hewitt and Josephine. He died Abt. 1985. She married (2) Barney Joseph 30 December 1930 in Borough of Brooklyn, New York38, son of Anna E.. He was born 07 March 1890 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY, and died 03 January 1979 in Glendora, CA.

Click here to see HILDEGARD ELIZABETH WALLNER'S family information and photos.

Child of Hildegard Wallner and John Hewitt is:

60. i. PRIVATE

53. Albert Joseph Christopher Louis6 Wallner (Josef Louis5, Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 16 February 1901 in 345 South First Street, New York City, New York39, and died 30 November 1972 in Borough of Lincoln Park, Pequannock Twp., Morris Co., NJ. He married Helen Barbara Catherine Schaefer 21 January 1931 in St. Matthias RC Church, 58-15 Catalpa Avenue, Ridgewood, Queens Co, NY 1122740. She was born 11 November 1903 in Wyckoff Ave & Summerfield St, Evergreen, Borough of Queens, City of New York, NY41, and died 11 January 1977 in Pompton Plains, Pequannock Twp, Morris Co., NJ42.

Children of Albert Wallner and Helen Schaefer are PRIVATE

Click here for ALBERT JOSEPH WALLNER'S family information and photographs

Click here for HELEN BARBARA SCHAEFER'S family information and photographs in DESCENDANTS OF GEORGE SCHÄFER

56. Irma Elizabeth6 Wallner (Josef Louis5, Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 06 January 1913 in Brooklyn, NY43, and died 01 February 1977 in New Hyde Park, NY43. She married Clifton Charles Dauphin 23 November 1935 in Covenant Lutheran Church, Ridgewood, Queens Co., NY, son of Charles Dauphin and Marie Young. He was born 28 December 1906 in Brooklyn, NY44, and died 26 November 1982 in McAllen, TX45.

Click here to see information on IRMA ELIZABETH WALLNER in DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM KRAFT.

Click here to see information on CLIFTON CHARLES DAUPHIN in DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM DAUPHIN.

Child of Irma Wallner and Clifton Dauphin is:

66 i. PRIVATE

57. Johanna Wilhelmina6 Wallner (Ludwig5, Josef4, Andreas3, Andreas2, Andreas1) was born 03 October 1902 in Brooklyn, NY, and died 09 December 1948 in Brooklyn, NY. She married Henry Joseph Michael O'Kane Abt. 1924 in St. Matthais RC Church, Ridgewood, NY, son of John O'Kane and Margaret Fox. He was born 25 November 1894 in probably New York City, NY, and died 12 February 1958.

For more information on Johanna Wallner see LUDWIG WALLNER

Children of Johanna Wallner and Henry O'Kane are:

67 i. John Louis7 O'Kane, born 08 February 1926 in Brooklyn, NY; died 17 February 1926 in Brooklyn, NY.

68 ii. Henry Daniel O'Kane, born 06 June 1927 in New York City, NY. He married PRIVATE. He died 15 April 2000 in Ridgewood, Queens Co., NY and is interred at St. Johns Cemetery, Middle Village, NY.

69 iii. James Albert O'Kane, born November 1929 in Brooklyn, NY; died May 1934 in Brooklyn, NY.

70 iv. Robert Frederick O'Kane, born 07 June 1933 in Brooklyn, NY; died February 1973 in Ford Ord, CA. He is interred in Arlington Cemetery, Washington DC. He married PRIVATE. Information on children is PRIVATE.

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Endnotes

1. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Marriage Book Record dated 10 July 1791, Vol. 17, Pg 89

2. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol 4, Pg 255

3. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 269

4. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol 4, Pg 269

5. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 280

6. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 303

7. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 311

8. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 353

9. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 4 Pg 375

10. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 6, Pg 3

11. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 6., Pg 5

12. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Record Vol. 6., Pg 7

13. Archives of the Archbishops of Munich and Freising, Karmeliterstrasse 1, Munich Germany,Forstinning Family Book Record Vol. 4 Pg 331 and Birth Certificate/Baptismal Record from Catholic Parish of Forstinning Vol 4, Pg 331, #3

14. Letter of Archives of Archbishops of Munich & Freising to Pastetten Parish St Martin, Haupstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, dated 17 August 1995, Ref:AZ 551/743 Wallner Family

15. Kath.St. Martin, Hauptstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, Germany Familien-Buch Record, Pgs 222/223and letter dated 29 August 1995

16. Kath.St. Martin, Hauptstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, Germany Familien-Buch Record, Pgs 222/223

17. St John's Cemetery, 80-01 Metropolitan Ave, Middle Village NY Record for Section 14, Range Q, Plot 24, No. 3 registered to Henry Dollack

18. Kath.St. Martin, Hauptstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, Germany Familien-Buch Record, Pgs 222/223

19. Record of St John's Cemetery, 80-01 Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village, NY, Record of George Werst Inc. 71-41 Cooper Ave, Glendale NY, and record of St. Matthias Church, Ridgewood NY

20. 1900 Federal Census, Borough of Brooklyn, Kings Co NY, Superv Dist 2, 28th Ward, Enum Dist 505, Sheet 2, Line 48, for 210 Wyckoff Avenue.

21. St John's Cemetery, 80-01 Metropolitan Ave, Middle Village NY Record for Section 14, Range Q, Plot 24, No. 3 registered to Henry Dollack

22. 1900 Federal Census, Borough of Brooklyn, Kings Co NY, Superv Dist 2, 28th Ward, Enum Dist 505, Sheet 2, Line 48, for 210 Wyckoff Avenue.

23. St John's Cemetery, 80-01 Metropolitan Ave, Middle Village NY Record for Section 14, Range Q, Plot 24, No. 3 registered to Henry Dollack

24. Kath.St. Martin, Hauptstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, Germany Familien-Buch Record, Pgs 222/223

25. Death Certificate #53-0046, Town of Hemstead, Manhasset, Nassau Co., NY and Certificate ofDeath #1584, NY State Dept of Health

26. Cert. of Marriage #6172, Borough of Manahattan, City of NY, State of NY dated 17 April 1898 andMarriage Certificate and Record of St. Joseph's RC Church of Yorkville, 421 E. 86th St, New York, NY 10028dated 17 April 1898

27. Birth and Baptismal Record, K. Pr. Standesamt D. Kon Residenzstadt, Hannover, and the Stammbuch das Johann Christof Huch, NY 1889

28. Record of Most Holy Trinity Cemetery, 675 Central Avenue, Brooklyn, NY from Catholic Cemeteries, 80-01 Metropolitan Ave, Middle Village NY.

29. Marriage Certificate #8662, 2 Sept 1911, State of NY, City of NY, Borough of Brooklyn.

30. Death Registration #247, Dist #2908, Inc. Village of Mineola (Nassau Co.) NY

31. Record of Birth, 23 November 1903, Stammbuch das Johann Christof Huch

32. Record of Death, 25 November 1903, Stammbuch das Johann Christof Huch.

33. Kath.St. Martin, Hauptstr. 5, 85669 Pastetten, Germany Familien-Buch Record, Pgs 222/223

34. Record of George Werst Inc, 71-41 Cooper Ave, Glendale NY dated 7 February 1960

35. Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 2, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from M through Z, Date of Import: 18 Sep 1998, Internal Ref. #1.112.4.31772.40

36. Baptism Record 11 December 1898, St Joseph's RC Church of Yorkville, 404 E. 87th St, NYC NY10128

37. Marriage Certificate #26559, Borough of Manhattan, NYC, NY 6 October 1919

38. Marriage Certificiate #485, 30 December 1930, Borough of Brooklyn, NY

39. Birth Certificate #338, Dept of Health, City of New York, NY Registered #3497 dated 16 February 1901 and Baptismal Record dated10 March 1901, Church of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 259 North 5th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211

40. Certificate of Marriage dated 21 January 1931, St Matthias RC Church, 58-15 Catalpa Avenue, Ridgewood NY 11227

41. Birth Certificate #3310, dated 11 November 1903, City of New York, Dept. of Health, Bureau of Vital Records, New York, NY;Certification of Birth #Q109237;Baptismal Record dated 22 November 1903, St Brigid RC Church, Linden St & St Nicholas Ave, Brooklyn,

42. Record of Vander May Funeral Home, 567 Ratzer Rd, Wayne, NJ 07470; Obituary in Herald News 13 January 1977.

43. Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: 23 Sep 1998, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.56016.140

44. Baptismal Record, dated 24 February 1907, First Presbyterian Church, RIdgewood, Queens Co., NY

45. Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: 23 Sep 1998, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.56016.65