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CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR SOLDIER
 

John Hulick Wageman served with Company I of the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Three Years' Service. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry during the assault on Peterburg.

FEMALE SOLDIER
 

A woman named Charlotte Anderson served as a soldier with the 60th Ohio until her gender was discovered.

NATIVE AMERICAN SOLDIERS
 

Several Indians were known to have served with Company C of the 60th Ohio, Three Years' Service: Thomas Guy, Thomas Heathcock, and George W. Jeffries.

ASIAN SOLDIER
 

Charles D. Scott served with Company H of the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Three Years' Service. He was from Calcutta, India.

JEWISH-AMERICAN SOLDIERS
 

Quite a few of the soldiers who served with the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry were Jewish-American. Seven of the known soldiers were: G. Fleischman, Reuben Hahn, Isaac N. Marks, Samuel Marks, Samuel A. Marks, Jacob Meyer, and Henry Waterman.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN SOLDIER
 

George W. Jarvis served with Company E of the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Three Years' Service. He was wounded and discharged May 18, 1865 on Surgeon's certificate of disability.

SOLDIERS IN MULTIPLE BRANCHES OF THE SERVICE
 

Henry W. and Levi Riegel were brothers who were in Company E of the 60th Ohio, One Years' Service. They served in both the land and naval branches of the service during the Civil War.

CONTRABAND MAIL
 

A moccasin snake, eighteen inches in length, captured in the camp of the Sixtieth Ohio Infantry, near Petersburg, was discovered on Monday among the mail matter at Wheeling, W.V. in transit for the west. His snakeship was safely done up in a glass vial, but it being against the regulations of the department to send glass through the mail, the reptile was detained and confiscated as contraband mail matter. It is lively and enjoys itself as well as can be expected under the circumstances.

 

For more great stories, visit Joel Craig's Bivouac. Thanks for the contribution.

CAMELS IN ARIZONA   
 

Before the war the Government tried the experiment of importing 21 camels for use of the Army as transports across the deserts of Texas, Arizona and New Mexico. For some reason the experiment was not a success. Neither the soldiers nor the Mexicans took kindly to the camel, did not understand his nature, and did not want to learn. The war came on. The camels were turned loose and forgotten, but recently two of them were seen near Phoenix, Ariz. That two of them are alive is proof that camels could be used in this country; but after all, despite their ability to make long journeys between drinks, there is hardly a place for them in our economy. A place worth while sending a caravan of camels to is worth while sending a railroad to, and a railroad is cheaper and better than a caravan.

[Note: This is not a fascinating fact related to the 60th Ohio, but I had to post it as I am a native Arizonan.]

 

"Camels in Arizona." The National Tribune: Washington, D.C., July 1, 1909, page 3.

NOT ONCE, BUT TWICE
 

Samuel Mark enlisted twice during the Civil War. The first time, he enlisted in the 60th Ohio and, one month later, was captured. Later, he reenlisted in the 168th Ohio. Ironically, he was captured, again, after only one month of service.

IT'S A SMALL WORLD
 

Allen D. Johnson was a veteran of the Civil War. He served with the 4th Regiment, California Infantry. When he and his wife died, two of his children Bertha and Clara were admitted to the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphans Home. Both children were later adopted by Andrew Holt, Jr. who also was a Civil War veteran. Andrew had served with the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The story doesn't end there, however. Bertha Johnson later married Charles B. Mercer, who just happened to be the son of another veteran of the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Abraham Mercer.

HOW COLD WAS IT?
 

It was so cold that.....

"All those that were there will never forget those terrible two or three days -- how the first night it rained, and then turned as cold as Greenland. We hurriedly erected small tents to shelter us, but they were poor protection, as I saw the next morning men laying with their feet and hands in the water with half inch of ice on the water. Some of the boys had to get others to help them out after they woke up, so tightly were they frozen in." Excerpt from the History of the 60th O.V.I. of 1864 by John H. Ellis.

THE FALL OF PETERSBURG
 

"We, on the 3rd of April, entered triumphantly into the city of Petersburg, and the 60th Ohio had the honor of being the second regiment to enter the city." Excerpt from the History of the 60th O.V.I. of 1864 by John H. Ellis.





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Created:  19 Jun 2001
Modified:  13 Jul 2004
Copyright © 2001-2004, Jennifer Volker



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