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Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua

From Ratcliffe, Middlesex County, England to Poquoson, York&Henrico County, VA

mailto:SpoonForker@yahoo.com

Roy H Huddleston
326 MC 6012
Yellville, Arkansas 72687

The Bona Nova Voyages~1618 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Ship and Passenger Information: Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia: Hopson, Thomas~Age 12 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Walters, William~Age 27 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Departed in August, 1619, with 120 passengers. Sent by the Virginia Company. (Source: The Voyage...To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate) November, 1619 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Source: "Hotten's Lists" Burthen: 200 tons (Source: The Voyage...To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate) Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia: Barry, William (Sgt.)~See name in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Brocke, John~Age 19 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Calder, Thomas~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Claxon, John~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Crowder, Mr. Hugh~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Dickson, Stephen~Age 25 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Evands, William~Age 23 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Gaskoyne, Thomas~Age 34 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Goodman, Robart~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Gyffith, Ambrose~Age 33 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Hattfild, Joseph~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Hill, Francis~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Hobson, Edward~See name in Virginia Muster, January 23, 1624/5 Levett, George~Age 29 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Mansfeild, David~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Morris, John~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Osborne, Ralph~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Osborne, Thomas (Lt.)~See name in Virginia Muster, January 23, 1624/5 Rimwell, Adam~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Rookines, William~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Seirson, Cutbert~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Sherley, Daniell~Age 30 in Virginia Muster, January 23, 1624/5 Smith, Susanna~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 (Her husband, John, arrived on the Elsabeth in 1611) Vaghan, John~Age 23 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Weldon, William~See name in Virginia Muster, January 23, 1624/5 Wynwill, Christopher~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 1620 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia Banum, Elizabeth~Age 43 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Barrett, Walter~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Davis, Richard~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Dorie, Gregory~Age 36 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Gany, Anna~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Gayne, William~Age 36 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Hall, Thomas~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Hampton, William~Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Hill, John~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Knight, Benjamin~Age 28 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Lane, Alice~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Longe, Elias~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Mitchell, Maudlin~Age 21 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 More, John~Age 36 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Mountney, Lenord~Age 21 in Virginia Muster, February 7,1624/5 Penrise, Robart~Age 12 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Pilkinton, William~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Popeley, Richard~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Robisonn, Richard~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Salford, Mary~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Smith, Osmond~Age 17 in Virginia Muster, January 24, 1624/5 Spilman, Hanna~Age 23 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Stockton, Jonas~Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Stockton, Timothey~Age 14 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Thrasher, Robart~Age 22 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Tyos, John~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 White, Edward~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Willcockes, John~See name in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 1621 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia. (The Bona Nova departed Virginia May [16], 1621.2) Sources: (1) "Hotten's Lists", Virginia Musters (2) Letter, dated May [16], 1621, from Jabez Whittaker, in Virginia, sent to Sir Edwin Sandys, London, on the departing Bona Nova. (S.M. Kingsbury, "Records of the Virginia Company", 1933, v.III, page 297) Ship and Passenger Information: Browne, John~Age 28 in Virginia Muster, January 21, 1624/5 Dore, James~Age 19 in Virginia Muster, January 21, 1624/5 Hampton, William~Age 34 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Lauckfild, John~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Smith, Nicholas~Age 18 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5~Entered in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 April, 1622 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia: Ship and Passenger Information: Boyse, Allice~See name in Virginia Muster, January 24, 1624/5 (Her husband. Luke, arrived on the Edwin in May, 1619) Chamberlin, Rebecca~Age 37 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Chambers, John~Age 21 in Virginia Muster, January 20, 1624/5 Forth, John~Age 16 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Harwood, Paule~Age 20 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Upton, Georg~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, January 20, 1624/5 Worlidge, William~Age 18 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Before 1624/5 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia before February 4, 1624/5, but voyage date not specified: Addams, Robert~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Barrett, Francis~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Benett, Thomas~See name in Virginia Muster (his wife Margery arrived in the Gift or Guift) Browninge, William~See name in Virginia Muster Campion, Robert~See name in Virginia Muster Crouch, Thomas~Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Floid, Nathaniell~Age 24 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Jefferson, John~See name in Virginia Muster Jones, Thomas~Age 35 in Virginia Muster Leak, Augustine~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 (His wife, Winifred, arrived on the George in 1623) Marloe, Thomas~See name in Virginia Muster Moore, Leonard~See name in Virginia Muster Ottowell, Thomas~Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Phillips, Thomas~See name in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Raughton, Ezekiah~See name in Virginia Muster (his wife Margrett arrived in the Warwick) Rogers, Georg~Age 23 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5 Russell, John~Age 19 in Virginia Muster Shelley, John~Age 23 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5

Hudleston /Huddlestone/ (I have found many variations of the Surname-usage interchangeable, i.e., Origin or Meaning of Hiddleston 1. "one who came from Huddleston", a park township in the parish of Sherburn, West Riding in Yorkshire. 2. "Huda", Hun", originally denoted "a fence or encloseure" which became "enclosure round a house, a homestead, village of town. The surname of HODEL was a locational name 'of Huddleston' a part township in the parish of Sherburn in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Local names usually denoted where a man held his land, and indicated where he actually lived. The name was derived from the Old English 'hudawell'. The name is also spelt HUDDLE, HODDLE, HUDLESTONE, HUDDERSTON and HUDDLESON. Early records of the name mention HUDRESWELLE (without surname) who was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. HUDELESTON (without surname) recorded in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the year 1030.

Update: Also Hudelestuna (Latin for Huddleston) For example: l8o EARLY YORKSHIRE CHARTERS 216. Grant by Richard de Hudeleston to Avenel of his chief dwelling- place in Clementhorpe, being of equal width towards the land of Gamel Stute as towards the water (of Ouse ?) for 2s. yearly and, when the donor comes to town, by rinding fire, candle, salt and straw ; if there be war in the land Avenel shall deliver the house with its chamber to the donor to uphold and shall be quit of service whilst the donor dwells in the town and shall dwell in other houses in the court and shall have entry and egress to the water through the house. 1175-1189. Charters of St. Clement's, York ; Dodsw. MS. xciv, f. ind. Sciant omnes has literas videntes et audientes tarn futuri quam presentes quod ego Ricardus de Hudelestuna dedi Avenello et heredibus suis terram que est capitalis mansio mea in Clemen- thorp, tenendam de me et heredibus meis in feodo et hereditate, tarn latam apud terram Gamelli Stute quam apud aquam, salvo introitu pomarii sui et mei, reddendo annuatim ii.s. Et quando ipse Ricardus in villam veniet predictus Avenellus inveniet ignem et candelam et salem et stramenta. Et si ita contigerit quod werra in terram venerit le[vari], predictus Avenellus domum et cameram que ad domum pertinet deliberabit predicto Ricardo ad manutenendum, et ipse Avenellus ab omni servitio dum ipse Ricardus pro werra in villam manebit quietus erit, et ipse Aven- ellus in alias domos in curia manebit ubi voluerit et apud aquam habebit introitum et exitum per mediam domum. His testibus, Petro sacerdote, Malgero milite de Stivetun et Hugone filio ejus et Albino fratre ejus, Willelmo de Dai, Ricardo de Barchstune, Willelmo de Beningburc, Waltero filio Galfridi, Willelmo Barri, Gervasio filio Griffini et ipso Griffino, Geraldo filio Willelmi Palmarii, Roberto le Balne, Godefrido filio Sewardi, Willelmo filio Ketalli, et pluribus aliis, Petro insano et Willelmo filio ejus, Willelmo filio Quenild, Hugone filio Henrici. 1 Equestrian seal, the rider with sword drawn.

http://www.archive.org/stream/earlyyorkshirech01farruoft/earlyyorkshirech01farruoft_djvu.txt

When you look at the trips of the Bona Nova, you find a trip from England to Virginia was made almost yearly. 1618 (1618 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia), 1619 (Departed in August, 1619, with 120 passengers. Sent by the Virginia Company. (Source: The Voyage ... To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate), 1621 ( 1621 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia. (The Bona Nova departed Virginia May [16], 1621.2) Letter, dated May [16], 1621, from Jabez Whittaker, in Virginia, sent to Sir Edwin Sandys, London, on the departing Bona Nova. (S.M. Kingsbury, "Records of the Virginia Company", 1933, v.III, page 297), 1622 (April, 1622 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia) but the last trip known of the Bona Nova from London to Virginia is showned to be-Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia before February 4, 1624/5, but voyage date not specified. Ships and Passengers from London, England to the Americas Ship Index 300 Ships from England to New World, 1587-1688. The history of education in Virginia during the seventeenth century., Neill, Edward D. (Edward Duffield), 1823-1893. Page 11 Capt. Huddlestone arrived at Jamestown sixteen days after the first great massacre of the whites by Indians. In June, 1622, he was fishing off the coast of Maine, and sent a boat to the Puritans of Plymouth Rock with a letter containing the sad news. He said, " I will far inform you that myself with many good friends in the Southern Colony of Virginia have received such a blow, that 400 persons large will not make good our losses." See-Bradford. 1622 April Bona Nova 200 tons Capt. John Hudleston

(We know Captain John Huddleston knew Allice Boyse from April 1622 when she boarded the Bona Nova till the court date of 19th. of February 1626)

There have been Huddlestons in London for a long time. Bell Yard WC2 UG: Temple Bus: 4 11 15 23 26 76 171A Bell Yard runs directly along the east side of the Law Courts, from Fleet Street at the southern end to Carey Street at the northern. Only just inside the City of London, Bell Yard is a thoroughfare where the dimensions are of sufficient width to accommodate the passage of single file vehicles, although as Fleet Street offers no exit its use is for access only. The Yard dates back to the early 15th century when a tavern or inn known as 'Le Belle' stood at the southern end. It was pulled down around 1580 and some years later was replaced by another tavern also called the Bell, but that too has long since gone.

In Annette Hudleston Harwood's 'Lines of English Hudleston' John Hudleston, knight 10b of Millom shows up in London in Procat Records

C 1/45/125 Thomas Wyssheton, servant to Sir John Huddelston, knight. v. The mayor and sheriffs of London.: Arrest of complainant at the suit of the landlord of the `Belle,' Fleet Street, on an obligation given him as an indemnity for the loss of certain plate which was ultimately found to have been stolen by his own servants. 1386-1486 C 1/172/11 John Tomson, late servant of John Huddelston, knight. v. Christopher Ursewyk, clerk, and Robert Southwell, knight, executors of the said Sir John.: Unpaid wages. 1486-1529 C 1/202/49 Harry Frenshe v. Sir John Huddelston, knight.: Detention of 100 marks, given by Dame Katerine, late the wife of Sir Richard Harcourt, to Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Harcourt, for her marriage, and delivered in trust to defendant. 1486-1529 C 1/298/29 William Clayton, clerk, cousin and heir of Oliver Huddelston. v. William Urchynnette: Detention of deeds relating to land in Lincoln.: Lincoln. 1500-1515 C 1/1004/29 Richard, son of William HARTILPOOLE, attendant on the earl of Surrey, v. Richard, son and executor of John COPLAND, and the sheriffs of LONDON.: Action on a bond for a loan to carry on a suit for lands against the master and brethren of Rotherham College, which loan was not made. 1538-1544

Based on the Patent information by the House of Commons Journals, Records of the Virginia Company based on those same Pattents and that Sir Ferdinando Gorge was William Huddleston and Elizabeth Hartepoole's neighbor in 1605, I believe Captain John Huddleston was the son of William Huddleston and Elizabeth Hartepoole. We can place Anthony Huddleston and his wife Marie Barentyne in London between 1556-1558 C 1/1437/8-11 John HARCOURT and Francis STONER, knights, v. Anthony HUDDELSTON, Mary his wife, and others.: Reviver of a suit on a counterbond for a debt of Francis Barentyne, deceased, whose goods have come to complainant's hands.: LONDON. 1556-1558. C 1/1233/35 William HEYWARD of Santhurst and Joan his wife v. Anthony, son and executor of Sir John HUDDELSTON.: Price of corn bought of Giles Banaster, former husband of the said Joan.: [GLOUCESTER.]. 1544-1551 This would make Anthony Huddleston son William Huddleston son Captain John Huddleston.

John MATHEWS lived at Blunt Point at the mouth of Deep Creek, Warwick County. While under age he received a patent, 29 March 1678, for 2944 acres on Deep Creek as grandson and heir of Samuel Mathews, Exq. He was still under age, 24 Jun 1679 when William Cole, Esq was "Guardian to Mr John Mathews, but had reached his majority by April 1682 when he served as a member of the House of Burgesses. Copyright 2003 by Mary Love Berryman. All rights reserved.

When you join two these passages together; You find Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova in 1624 and Thomas Huddleston in 1764 which is 120 years being almost in the same place in Virginia. It is merely bridging that gap in geneaology.

As given by Bradford, the story is as follows: Amidst these streigths, and ye desertion of those from whom they had hoped for supply, and when famine begane now to pinch them sore, they not knowing what to doe, the Lord (who never fails his) presents them with an occasion, beyond all expectation. This boat which came from ye eastward brought them a letter from a stranger, of whose name *Capt. John Huddleston commanded the ship Bona Nova, of 200 tons, and performed many voyages to Virginia in the interest of the Virginia Company. He patented lands in Virginia in the "territory of Tappahannock over against James Cittie", and at Blunt Point, near Newport News. In 1624, he was reported as dead.

Samuel Morgan Sr. was established in Amelia County as early as 1754 when he bought 200 acres upper side Winticomack Creek, from Robert Coleman. (deed bk 5/6 p 188) In 1764 a Thomas Huddleston is listed as living below Deep Creek in Raleigh Parish. Samuel Morgan Sr. is also listed as living below Deep Creek in Raleigh Parish in 1762. Sandra Baxter ssbaxter@txucom.net

The reference in Hening (II, p 14) to the "orphan heir of Col Mathews" must have been to him (John) whose guardian till 1671, when she died, was Mrs. Anna Bernard. Then Peter Jenings was guardian, and in 1679 William Cole, Esq, was guardian. He had arrived at age before 1682. Copyright 2003 by Mary Love Berryman. All rights reserved. Although the tract had been known as Denbigh Plantation as early as the beginning of the eighteenth century, its period of historical importance had ended nearly fifty years before. At that time it seems to have been named Mathews Manor, it was owned by Samuel Mathews (c 1600-c 1657), who settled in Virginia before 1622 and eventually became one of the most prominent men in the colony. He was a long-time member of the council, and in 1635 was one of the leaders of the popular mutiny that ousted Governor Sir John Harvey. In the spring of 1637 Mathews and three others were sent home to England to stand trial for Treason in the Court of Star Chamber, but the charges were eventually dropped and Mathews returned to Virginia in 1639. Meanwhile, Harvey had been reinstated as governor by Charles I and had seized and dispersed much of Mathews' property, and also sanctioned the ransacking of his house. But when Mathews returned, his property was restored to him by order of the King, and Harvey was evicted.

Samuel MATHEWS, Jr, Governor of Virginia, was born in Virginia about 1630 to Samuel MATHEWS and Frances GREVILLE. He attained the military rank of Lieutenant Colonel by 1652 and was appointed to the Council in 1655, a position he held until 1657. He was married and had one child: 1. John, died before 1 May 1706, VA; married Elizabeth TAVERNOR, 24 Mar 1684. http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marylove/Mathews/Mathews.html

Robert Johnson belittled Indian cultures in Nova Britannia in order to articulate a mandate for the English presence in Virginia. In his formulation, the Indians would welcome an English presence in exchange for lessons in "civilization." Even though stockholders in the Virginia Company saw Jamestown as an experiment, many were nonetheless disappointed that they were making no profits from the colony. Lack of profits was an even greater issue in the Company's attempt to raise additional funds to support Jamestown and to send more colonists. In 1609, they therefore began what we might call a "media blitz." Nova Britannia was one pamphlet written as part of this public relations campaign. Nova Britannia: Offering Most Excellent Fruites by Planting in Virginia Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts. 1606-1737. Susan Myra Kingsbury, editor. Records of the Virginia Company, 1606-26, Volume III: Miscellaneous Records Page 23 Whereas Peticon hath made by the friends of John Tavernor Capemarchant of the forte and store in Virginia for his retorne vppon some vrgent occasion and for some time into england we require you to license him so to do if it be his desire when you ariue there, And we do nominate and appointe Thomas Wittingham into his Roome and office beinge one in whose sufficiency and honesty we haue greate confidence:

Alderman Robert Johnson. Declaration of the Prosperous State of the Colony. Early in 1623 (?). By 1616, Smythe, a London alderman, had been sometime governor of the East India, Muscovy, French and Somers Islands companies. His son-in-law was Robert Johnson, a director of the Levant and East India companies who became a governor of the Bermuda Company. Smythe became one of the leading merchants of the Virginia Company of London, but he remained interested also in the East India Company. The Rich family, Earls Warwick, had a large interest in Bermuda; and second Earl Warwick became governor of the Bermuda Company in 1628. Alison Olson, Making The Empire Work: London and American Interest Groups, 1690-1790. London, Harvard University Press, London. 1992., p. 17. Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts. 1606-1737. Susan Myra Kingsbury, editor. Records of the Virginia Company, 1606-26, Volume III: Miscellaneous Records Page 4 The military offensive was accompanied by a propaganda war: Alderman Robert Johnson published Nova Britannia in 1609 which compared Native Americans to wild animals - "heardes of deere in a forest". While it portrayed the Powhatans as peace loving, it nevertheless threatened to deal with any who resisted conversion to Anglicanism as ennimies of 'their' country. (Johnson was the son-in-law of Sir Thomas Smith, leader of one of the court factions within the Company in London.) Encyclopedia

Author: Osgood, Herbert L./td Title: The American Colonies in the Seventeenth Century. Citation: New York: Columbia University Press, 1904. Subdivision: Volume I. Part I. Chapter IV. Page 80 VIRGINIA AS A PROPRIETARY PROVINCE. THE ADMINISTRATIONS OF SANDYS AND THE EARL OF SOUTHAMPTON The Argall incident contributed toward an important change in the administration of the company. It strengthened the resolve of Lord Rich to remove the merchants Smith, Johnson, and their friends from its control. This for the time was favorable to the prospects of Sir Edwin Sandys, who by his ability had risen to be the leader among those in the company who favored a liberal policy toward the plantation. With him were associated the Earl of Southampton, Lord Cavendish, who was also at the head of the Somers Islands company, John and Nicholas Ferrar, and many other prominent and able men. Sandys and his associates were also closely identified with the so-called “country party,” the opposition in parliament. There they worked against the corrupt policy of favorites, undue Spanish influence, monopolies and impositions, and strove to counterbalance in all ways the large power of the crown. This fact brought them into opposition to Sir Thomas Smith and Alderman Johnson, who at this time identified themselves to an extent at least with the court. Sir Thomas Smith, who was already well advanced in years, accepted the office of a commissioner of the navy. He had already served for ten years in succession as treasurer of the London company. These facts, together with his many other interests, caused him to decline reëlection for the year 1619, and to desire that his accounts might be audited and fully adjusted before he died. His wish was gratified by the company, the friends of Rich and Sandys cooperating toward the result. Sandys was elected treasurer, with John Ferrar as deputy in the place of Alderman Johnson. The auditors were set to work

German Sawmill Wrights at Jamestown in 1620 by Gary C. Grassl, President The German Heritage Society of Greater Washington, D.C. The records of the Virginia Company of London for June and July 1620 show that four unnamed but "very skillful" sawmill wrights came from "Hambur rough" [Hamburg] to London for service in the Jamestown Colony. "Men skillful for sawmills were procured from Germany and sent to Virginia at the Company's great charge," wrote Alderman Johnson. By 1620, the Colony had advanced beyond Jamestown, leaving small settlements up and down the James River. The Company was anxious to establish sawmills in the Colony so that planks and boards could be cut for building houses and constructing ships. However, Captain Thomas Nuce wrote from Virginia in May 1621 that the Germans were facing great difficulties. Swift streams were required to power the wheels of a sawmill, and the sawmill wrights had difficulty finding any in Tidewater Virginia. The natives, who were poised for a general uprising, still controlled the upstream areas, which made them dangerous for colonists. In addition, the Germans had great difficulty finding people to help them construct the sawmills. They even had difficulty obtaining sustenance. [It may be added that the elegant volumes on the Berkeley family, prepared by John Smyth, of Nibley, show that Captain Thomas Neuce, who had charge of the company's lands at Elizabeth City, in Virginia, married Anne Seymour, daughter of Sir Thomas Seymour, who was descended from the Berkeleys. Berkeley Manuscripts; Wm. and Mary Qrtly., Vol. 6, No. 3, 1898]

Captain Nuce complained that the Germans couldn't build the sawmills and at the same time "look after their own livelihood." The company bade Governor Sir Francis Wyatt of Virginia "to take care of the Dutch sent to build sawmills, and seat them at the falls [of the James river], that they may bring their timber by the current of the water." The Company told the governor in July 1621, "And here we earnestly commend unto your care the Dutchmen sent for erecting of sawing mills, a work most necessary, since the materials for housing and shipping cannot otherwise without much more trouble, pains and charge be provided." The Company repeated its entreaty to the Governor and Council of Virginia to aid the German sawmill wrights: "... we commend unto your care our Saw Mills, a work of such importance as it deserves your special furtherance, and therefore we desire the Dutchmen sent for the fabric of them may be extraordinarily well used, and carefully provided of apparel out of the new Magazine, which we would have paid for by the Company's tobacco. As for such necessaries as they want, especially beer, which we can now be shipped for want of time and tonnage, we have desired Sir Francis Wyatt to supply them with, which shall be repaid, and thus supplied we hope they will be encouraged to bring that so much desired work to perfection." In August 1621, the Company reiterated its appeal.

The sawmill wrights from Hamburg faced dauntingly difficult conditions in Virginia. The colonists were barely able to subsist, and many died from diseases against which their bodies had developed no immunities. As a matter of fact, 4 out of 5 colonists died within a few years of their arrival. "How so many people sent hither of late years have been lost, I cannot conceive unless it be through water and want ...." wrote Captain Nuce. Alderman Johnson reported that the men "procured from Germany ... spent 7 or 8 months to find out a convenient place to set the mills on, which at last being found, the poor Dutchmen being disheartened by their unkind entertainment [treatment] in Virginia and almost famished by their mean provisions and being utterly disabled to bring that work to perfection without the help of many hands which an order of Court [of the Virginia Company] made here [in London] could not help them in Virginia. They oppressed with these and many other difficulties too great for them to overcome fell grievously sick of the diseases incident to the country...."

We learn from the records of the Virginia Company that "whereas they hired heretofore certain Dutch carpenters of Hamburrough for making of sawmills in Virginia, whither they being sent, died within a short time after (and only one returned) having effected nothing in that business ...." The one who returned was the son of one of the mill wrights who had died in Virginia. He asked to return to Europe when he was the only one of the four left alive. The German widows of the three men who perished in Virginia after a stay of about a year asked for compensation, and the Virginia Company paid them altogether 27 pounds.

This was also a problem faced by the Germans at Fort Germanna. The company bade Governor Sir Francis Wyatt of Virginia "to take care of the Dutch sent to build sawmills, and seat them at the falls [of the James river], that they may bring their timber by the current of the water. This is also the general site of the first iron furnace. John Blankenbaker www.germanna.com

Chesterfield County, Virginia was formed from Henrico County in 1749 and received its name from the Fourth Earl of Stanhope, England's famed Lord Chesterfield. Chesterfield has historically been a leader in industry. Falling Creek was the birth place of two great American industries, iron and coal. The first iron furnace in the United States was built in Chesterfield. Opechancanough's Indians put an end to the Falling Creek iron works in the Great Massacre of 1622 in which iron workers and their families were killed and the iron furnace was destroyed. [John Berkeley was sent by the London company of England to establish iron works at the Falling Creek, which empties into the James River not far below Richmond. But in 1622 the works were broken up by the Indians, who killed Berkeley and all his employees, except a boy and girl, who managed to hide in the bushes. (See Proceedings of the Virginia Company of London, Virginia Historical Collections, Vol. I., p. 9, 50, 60, 61, 62, 63, 122, 123, 168, 170 and Vol. II., pp. 148, 252)] William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 3. (Jan., 1898), pp. 135-152. The iron works site remained a wilderness until 1928 when DuPont erected its $10 million fibers plant nearby. The first recorded commercial coal mines in North America were operating in the northwestern part of the county by 1709. This is the first record in the United States of coal being mined for purposes other than local use.

Page 81 on Smith's accounts, but they found them so defective and intricate 1 as to make it impossible to disentangle them. As late as 1623 Smith was urging their settlement, but it was then declared to be an impossibility, and no proof is extant that they ever were cleared up. Though apparently the transfer of control from Smith to Sandys was made with ease, it laid the foundation for prolonged strife. The attitude of Sandys toward Argall, combined, it is probable, with many other causes, soon broke the temporary union with the Rich or Warwick faction, and formed a natural alliance 2 of the latter with Smith and Johnson. As time passed their union with the court became more intimate, and all important measures of the company came to be affected not only by the struggle between these factions, but by English politics as well. The complications, however, to which this led belong to another division of the subject. It remains at this point to trace the policy of the Sandys-Southampton party in so far as it immediately affected the colony.

The records show that Sir Edwin Sandys was an almost ideal administrator, and not a little of his wisdom appears in the fact that he fully recognized the merit of Gates and Dale. 3 Sandys at the outset devoted himself to the task of reclaiming “the public” or company”s land from the exhausted condition in which Argall had left it. This he considered the root or body of the tree, and private plantations the branches. 4 In pursuing his object he sought in all directions for tenants with whom to people it. 1 Recs. of Va. Co. II. 84, 220. 2 Brown, First Republic, 356, 522; Neill, History of the Virginia Company, 120. 3 Recs. of Va. Co. I. 21. 4 Ibid. 20 et seq., 64 et seq.

To understand the significanse of John Tavernor we return to page 226 of the 'Records of the Virginia Company' James Citty Nouembr 11th 1619 and find the Capemerchant witnessed the breakup of the 600 bushells sent on the Bona Noua and Captain Weldon was a passenger on the Bona Noua. Then on page 227 we find the first mention of Captain Mathewes in the 'Records of the Virginia Company.

yt is most convenient to seat Captaine weldinge wth his remayinder at Harrowtox in Consortship wth Captaine Mathewes, both for his ease in buildinge ther beinge two howes allready builte to his hand and for his securitye against Indians tell he haue better strenthe and meanes to seatt vpon the Colledge land for wch purpose he went to the same place wth Captaine Mathewes on Tewesday Night Nouemb 15: 1619: Lieftenant whitakers Nouembr 16th went wth his remainder to seat himselfe vpon the Companies land some fower milles from James Citty westward toward the mouthe of the Chickahominie riuer: [the next day John Jefferson, passenger aboard the Bona Noua, President Thomas Jefferson's ancestor was one of the four chosen to set the price of tobacco as a tobacco tester]

Captain John Huddleston born 1587 of Ratcliffe, Stepney, Middlesex, London, England till after 1642 of Nevis Island wife Marriage Microfilm 0375028 24 SEP 1616 Saint Gregory By Saint Paul, London, London, England Name Church of England. Parish Church of Stepney (Middlesex) Titles The marriage registers of St. Dunstan's Stepney, in the county of Middlesex Memorials of Stepney parish : that is to say the vestry minutes from 1579 to 1662 ... Miscellaneous records from Christ Church, Spitalfields, Stepney in the county of London ... The parish registers of Stepney, Middlesex Parish registers of the Stepney parish church,1568-1929 Barbara Poulter of Stepney. William Huddleston born before 1640 of Jamestowne, Virginia till after 1666 of Onancock, Accomac county, Virginia could have possibly had the wife Anne Bishop of York county, Virginia who was the widow of Henry Bishop.

William1 and wife Ann Bowen, and children, Mary, William2, and David. William Bowen found in Accomack/Northampton Co first in 1643. He died there in 1660 in Hungars Parish, VA. In 1661 Ann remarried to Lt Henry L. Bishop. IGI shows Henry Bishop to be born about 1636 of Hungars Aof. Could William Huddleston, servant be born the same time in 1636? Ann Bowen Birth: 1640 Hungars Aof, Northampton, Virginia marriage to Henry Bishop 12 MAY 1662, Northampton, Virginia. Film or fiche number 0822893

An Elizabeth 'Ridley' Morgan was in Germanna, Spotsylvania, Virginia in 1720, according to the IGI. Elizabeth Ridley Morgan 3 [1782.3.8], called “Ridley,” married Thomas Tabb Willis in Amelia County 14 June (bond) 1774. Amelia County, Viginia, Marriage Bonds John Morgan, Simon Morgan, and Charles Wilson witnessed Samuel’s consent for his daughter to marry. • Elizabeth Morgan 3 [1782.3.9] (20 April 1732) married — Huddleston Bristol Parish Records and I believe that was Constable Robert Huddleston's first wife. Copyright © 2001-2004, John W. Pritchett. All rights reserved. June 13 1774, Thomas Tabb Willis, Elizabeth Ridley Morgan, Amelia County, Dad Samuel Morgan Virginia Marriage Records. Jan. 1. 1770 to Dec. 31. 1774

I believe that with the marriage of Constable Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Morgan that the son Robert Huddleston shown actually born in 1734 (2 years after the Constable was married) as evident by the birth of his wife Elizabeth Carter in 1738 and they married in 1759. John, as the inheritor, must have been older probably 1732 because he shows up early in the Spotsylvania deeds.

In Film or fiche number 1553493 Batch Number: F511832 THOMAS HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1736, Virginia Spouse: MILLY TANNER Birth: About 1740 Of, Virginia Marriage: 12 Apr 1774 Raleigh Parish, Amelia, Va wife Mildred 'Millie' Tanner.

I believe that by 1759 Constable Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Morgan's first son Robert Huddleston born 1734 and wife Elizabeth Carter of Saint George Parish was in Amelia County, Virginia because the grandson of Constable Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Morgan was born there and later the grandson was called Robert Huddleston, the Revolutionary Soldier. Thomas Huddleston, Jr born about 1778 son of Thomas Huddleston, Sr and Milly Tanner of Amelia county, Virginia who died after 1860 wife Marriage: 10 Aug 1799, Amelia, Va Martha 'Patsy' Tanner. Confederate Captain John Branch Huddleston born about 1816 of Amelia county, Virginia who died in 1891 Prentiss, Mississippi wife Amelia Rowland Marriage: 1837 in Mississippi who moved from Virginia to Marshall county, Mississippi. Robert Elam Huddleston born September 22, 1853 of Itawamba county, Mississippi who died in 1933 wife Marriage: 18 Dec 1878 Fulton, Itawamba, Mississippi Cyrena Josephine Ryan. Elbert Elam Huddleston born February 1884 of Itawamba, Mississippi wife Marriage: 22 Oct 1901 Booneville, Prentiss, Mississippi Mary Belle Timmons. Flavus Forest Huddleston born 21 Jan 1903 of Booneville, Prentiss, Mississippi who moved from Mississippi to Alabama and died in Red Bay, Alabama May 1959 wife Marriage 1924 Lillie Palmer. Staff Seargeant James Hayward Huddleston born February 17, 1931 in Hamilton, Alabama who died in El Paso, Texas in 1997 wife Margaret Milton.

Samuel MATHEWS was born in about 1600 probably in England. He came to Virginia before 1618 as a servant to Sheriff Johnson of London. He was first in James Towne but went to live in Sherley hundred. 'But one of the best seats is already planted by Captain Mathews for the vse of Sr Thomas Midleton & Alderman Johnson & another Chalenged by Thomas Dows by a graunt from Captain Argoll one of them beinge now ready for the plough & the other most conuenient for pasture both of them nere the place of my plantation & most fittinge for presnt vse.'

Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621. the depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliff, Middlesex, master of the Bona Nova; William Jackson of Ratcliffe, gunner of the Bona Nova; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe; mariner. The depositions state the deponents were in Virginia during the period January-June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.

Five years later, Captain Samuell Mathews' divided planted. Captain John Hurleston's [Huddleston's] dividend planted. And then the council action-21 July 1626-King Privy Council Action: An order was directed to the Governor of Virginia to assess the value of the Estate of Captain Nathaniel Powell, decd., and to send value of it in tobacco to England, a petition having been made by Thomas Powell, brother and admistrator of said Powell, decd, stating that in consideration of the poverty of said Powell's brothers and sisters, that proceeds of the said Captain's Estate should be paid unto them. The Virginia Company had certified that one William Powell, no way kin to the decedent, had taken out Letters Of Administration of the said Captain's Estate and had seized the goods of Captain John Huddleston in Virginia. The said William Powell then died, and Nathaniel Powell's Estate came into the hands of Mr. [Edward] Blaney who married William Powell's widow. Thomas Powell, eldest brother of the said Nathaniel Powell, dced had taken out Letters Of Administration for the decedent in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. [(Acts of the Privy Council of England (1613-1631), as cited by Coldham, 1:72

What are Letters of Administration? It is a Court Order authorising the person(s) named in it to administer the estate of the deceased person in accordance with the law and customs. Letters of Administration are granted by a Surrogate Court or probate registry to appoint appropriate people to deal with a deceased person's estate where property will pass under Intestacy Rules or where there are no executors living (and willing and able to act) having been validly appointed under the deceased's will. Traditionally, letters of administration granted to a representative of a testate estate are called "letters of administration with the will annexed" or "letters of administration cum testamentio annexio" or "c.t.a.". This is important when we look at William Huddleston servant of Jamestown. Why, you may ask. Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova was between ships; The Bona Nova and the Thomas and John. He might have not been able to to act. But lets take a look at this. On page 75 of Volume III of 'Records of the Virginia Company' on October 20, 1617 Captain Argall appoints William Powell as Captain of his guards in Jamestown, Virginia. Margaret Stitt was the maiden name of Mrs Margaret Powell; Captain William Powell's wife. Edward Blaney married Mrs. Margaret Powell, widow of Captain William Powell, who was killed by the Indians in Jan 1623. Francis West was married to a Margaret Powell. There was a child Huddleston, who had been left in the care of a resident of Jamestown, the court reported that the boy was not being provided for properly and unless the guardian met the requirements the court would see to it that the boy was taken care of handsomely, and it would cost the guardian dearly.-Copied from a book of Virginia Records. Book in genl court office marked No. 1, 1639 to 1652 p 83 to 148. Id 122, Id 126,7 , Id 343 11th. of Dec., 1640 Whereas William Huddleston servant unto Mr. Canhow [or Cantrow ?] hath complained to the board against his master for want of all manner of apparel, the Court hath herefore ordered that the said Mr. Canhor [or Canyrow ?] shall before Christmas next provide and allow unto the said Huddleston such sufficient apparel of linen and wollen as shall be thought fit by Captain West Esq or otherwise that the said Captain shall have power to dispose of the said servant until the said Canhow [or Cantrow ?] do perform this order.

Edward Blaney, or Blayney, came from England to James City, Virginia, in 1620 on the "Francis Bonaventure", a vessel of 240 tons sent by the Virginia Company of London with 153 passengers and a magazine of goods in charge of Blaney, who was then about 25 years of age, for barter to the colonists for tobacco. The vessel sailed the last of April or the first of May and arrived after the middle of June. Having disposed of most of this magazine of goods and collected the greater part of what was due for it, Mr. Blaney returned to England in May 1621 on the "Bona Nova," leaving the disposition of the remainder of the goods and the collection of what little debt was due to a Mr. Keyme. Mr. Blaney was sent out again in Sept 1621. On 11 April 1623, George Sandys, the treasurer in Virginia, wrote to John Ferrar, formerly deputy treasurer in London: "Mr. Blainie is now married in Virginia ..." Edward Blaney married Mrs. Margaret Powell, widow of Captain William Powell, who was killed by the Indians in Jan 1623. Edward Blaney was a member of the House Of Burgesses of Virginia in 1623 as a representative of the "Marchants," and again in 1625 as a representative of the "Plantacions Over ye Watter," the name by which the early settlements on the southerly side of the James River opposite James Island were known. According to the Virginia census of 1624-25 Edward Blaney was the owner of one of these plantations. ...(All of the above is extracted from a 20-page paper on "Edward Blaney of Virginia" written by my husband's grandfather, Charles Crosby Blaney.)

Followed by the court case: A COURT at James Citty the 19th. of February 1626, being sent Mr. Doctor Pott. Capt. Smyth. Capt. Matthews. Mr. Secretary. Mr. ffarrar. It is ordered that there shall be a warrant sent up unto Sherley Hundred in ye Maine, that John Ewins & Jane Hill should be sent downe to James-Citty, & there to be examined concerning such leud behavior as hath bin betweene them. Patrick Kennady marriner sworne & examined sayth that as concerning those words which Mrs. Allice Boyse taxeth Capt. Hudleston to have accused her with at Capt. Martins plantation, viz that he say Capt. Hudleston should there say that Capt. Epes had the use of her body that night that he lay in James Slights house, or else said he never had the use of his owne wife, more then Capt. Epes had of her yt night; this deponeth sayth he did not heare Capt. Hudleston speake the same words, but that Capt. Hudleston sayd there was very unfitting behavior between them.

April 6, 1626 is the last day of the last letter of the book, 'Records of the Virginia Company'. For Martin-Brandon, Captain John Martins Plantation Charles E. Hatch, Jr., America's Oldest Legislative Assembly and its Jamestown Statehouses - Appendix II Proceedings of the Virginia Assembly, 1619, National Park Service Interpretive Series History No. 2, Washington: Revised 1956.

When you read Mary's page one can wonder who Jane Hill is in Captain John Huddleston's case by Mary Hill and Thomas Hill on Captain Samuel Mathews's case. Samuel was first married to Frances GREVILLE after 24 Mar 1627. Frances was born in England and came to Virginia in the Supply when she was less than 20 years old in 1620. She was first married to Nathaniel WEST by whom she had a son named Nathaniel and later to Abraham PIERSEY. Samuel and Frances had two sons: 1. Samuel, Jr, born about 1629, VA; died Jan 1659/60, VA 2. Francis, died 16 Feb 1674/5, VA; married ____BALDWIN Frances died by 1633 when Mary Hill was appointed administratrix of the estate of her father Abraham PEIRSEY, the executrix, his late wife, having died. Thomas Hill and his wife Mary charged Samuel Mathews with having altered the estate of Peirsey after his marriage to the widow. The case was dismissed. (Thank you so much Mary for letting us add the information to our web page.)

De Hudlestons
Cumbria Record Office and Local Studies Library, Whitehaven: Pennington Family of Muncaster Gosforth FILE- Charter from Isabella del Howe granting to William de Huddleston all her lands and tenements in Bolton with appurtenances-ref. D PEN/BUNDLE 24/3-date: 1402 4th Jenry IV Cumbria Record Office, Carlisle Headquarters: Lowther Family of Lowther, Earls of Lonsdale [D LONS/L3-D LONS/L5/1] Threlkeld deeds FILE-Marriage settlement-ref. D LONS/L5/1/50/5-date: 1343\_ [from Scope and Content] John de Huddleston, lord of Millom\_ [from Scope and Content] Marriage of John de Threlkeld and Alice de Huddleston Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers[DD/FJ/1/196-DD/FJ/1/298] DEEDS OF TITLE. YORKS: MILFORD (SOUTH): also LUMBY (see also Steeton) FILE [no title]-ref. DD/FJ/1/247/3-date: n.d. (c.1250)\_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich. de Hudleston, Sir Rob. de Barkeston and Sir. Hen de Stikeswald, kts., etc. FILE [no title]-ref. DD/FJ/1/247/4-date: n.d. (c.1250)\_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich de Hudleston, Wm. de Widendon, steward, Wm. de Winchecumb, bailiff of Sherburn, etc. FILE [no title] - ref. DD/FJ/1/247/5 - date: n.d. (c.1250)\_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich. de Hudleston, etc. Tyne and Wear Archives Service: Williamson of Whitburn and Monkwearmouth\_ [from Scope and Content] Incomplete. First skin only of a series recording all extracts from historical records relating to the family which have been recorded by the College of Arms. This skin records the text of a letter sent by the Earls and Barons of England, including John de Hudleston, Lord of Aneys, to the Pope, concerning "the affair of Scotland" in 1301 West Yorkshire Archive Service, Yorkshire Archaeological Society: Newman and Bond Collection of Barnsley Deeds Brampton, p. Wath FILE-Feoffment-ref. MD244/65-date: n.d. medieval\_ [from Scope and Content] Witnesses-Adam de Novo, merchant, Henry his brother, Thomas de Reinevilla, Robert de Lasayeeas, Ralph le Francis, Ralph de Waht, Lot de Wath, Alexander de Adewic, Peter de Hudleston et al Cumbria Record Office and Local Studies Library, Whitehaven: Pennington Family of Muncaster Waberthwaite FILE-Charter of William de Waybuthwayt Rector of the Church of Waybuthwayt- ref. D PEN/BUNDLE 14/4-date: 1386 10th Richard II\_ [from Scope and Content] Granting unto Sir John de Hudleston all the lands and tenements of the said William and the moiety of his Salt pits of Esk which he had of the Gift and Feoffment of John de Vaybuthwayt his father within certain bounds and Divisions of the said Manor of Waybuthwayt Cumbria Record Office and Local Studies Library, Whitehaven: Pennington Family of Muncaster Bretby FILE-Quit Claim from Adam de Singleton to Richard de Hodleston-of all right and claim to all the lands and tenements called le Gretynes in the Town of Bretby-ref. D PEN/BUNDLE 28/2-date: 1372 46th Edw.III C 143/376/22 Peter Belasise, John de Huddleston, and Nicholas de Cameryngham of Lincoln to grant messuages and rent in Lincoln to a chaplain at the altar of St. Mary in the church of St. Peter-at-Pleas there, the said Peter and John retaining messuages and cottages in Lincoln. 45 EDWARD III. DL 10/380 Exemplification of the recovery, 8 Edward III, by the prior of Cartmel against Richard son of John de Huddlestone of the advowson of Whittington, co. Lancs. Westminster, 1419 DL 25/2823 Richard de Hudleston to Henry de Lascy, Earl of Lincoln : Grant of land in Saltfleetby : (Lincs) DL 25/385 John de Hodleston, knight to Furness Abbey: Renunciation of his right in Angerton Moss, except in the tenements which Adam son of Ralph de Kirkby held therein: (Lancs) 25 Edw.I DL 25/461 Agreement, indented, by John de Hodleston, son of Sir Richard de Hodleston, to pay to Furness Abbey, as rectors of Millom church, 2s. yearly in lieu of a tithe of fish: (Lancs) 1338

The Bona Nova
Sir Ferdinando George helps to explain it; Henry Earle of Southhampton, Sr Edwin Sandy knight, John fferar, Thomas Knightley, Gabrielle BarboR and John Delbridge sent it, Sir Ferdinando Yates wrote about it and Captain John Huddleston was the master and Governor of it.

'Sir Edwin Sandys reporteth from the Committee, being but a sub-committee for the Matter of Money.' Sir Edwin Sandys, a leading force in the Virginia Company, strongly supported the headright system, for his goal was a permanent colony which would enlarge British territory, relieve the nation's overpopulation, and expand the market for English goods. Sir Thomas Smith, as the Company's Treasurer, had a different dream: the Virginia Company's mission was to trade and to make a profit. Jamestown Historic Briefs. One has to appreciate Sir Edwin Sandy's insight into the Fishing monopoly. It certainly gets to the heart of the matter. page 591 House of Commons Journal Volume 1 25 April 1621 Sponsor: History of Parliament Trust Publication: House of Commons Journal Volume 1 Author: Year published: 1802

From the same journal on page 598 01 May 1621 Merchant Adventurers. Mr. Delbridge:-That the Sub-committee, appointed to consider of the Merchant Adventurers Patent, &c. may have liberty to send for any other publick Books, or any Merchants, to inform them; and particularly, the Book of Impositions. -And Ordered.

SANDYS, Sir Edwin, English statesman, born in Worcester in 1561; died in Northborne, Kent, in 1629. His father, of the same name, was bishop of Worcester, and afterward archbishop of York. The son was educated at Oxford, supported the claims of James I. to the English throne, and was knighted in 1603. He became an active member of the first London company for Virginia, led in reformatory measures, and introduced the vote by ballot. He was elected treasurer (the chief officer of the company) in 1619, and established representative government in the colony, whose security and prosperity he did much to promote. Through Spanish influence, King James, in violation of the charter, forbade his re-election in 1620, but his successor, the Earl of Southampton, continued his policy. He published "Europa Speculum, or a Survey of the State of Religion in the Western Part of the World" (best ed., 1637). His brother, George, poet, born in Bishopsthorpe in 1577: died in Boxley abbey, Kent, in March, 1644, was educated at Oxford, and in 1621 became colonial treasurer of Virginia, where he built the first watermill, promoted the establishment of iron-works, and in 1622 introduced ship-buihling. His translation of the last ten books of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," which he accomplished during his stay (London, 1626), is the first English literary production of any value that was written in this country. In his dedication to Charles I. he says it was "limned by that imperfect light which was snatched from the hours or nig'ht and repose." He returned to England in 1624. Sandys is well known as a traveller from his "Relation of a Journey" in the countries on the Mediterranean sea and the Holy Land (London, 1615), and he also published metrical versions of the Psalms (1086), the Song of Solomon (1089), and other parts of the Scriptures. A collected edition of his works has been published (2 vols., London, 1872). See his life by Henry a. Todd, prefixed to selections from his metrical paraphrases (1839). Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM Sandys, Sir Edwin 1561-1629, English statesman, leading promoter of the colony in Virginia; son of Archbishop Edwin Sandys. He studied law and was first returned to Parliament in 1586. His Europae Speculum (1605), published after an extended tour abroad beginning in 1593, revealed a remarkably tolerant attitude toward Roman Catholics for an Englishman of that period. Sandys was knighted (1603), reentered Parliament (1604), and became a leading figure in the parliamentary opposition to King James I. He was a member of several chartered companies, including the London Company, of which he became treasurer in 1619. As leader of the liberal faction within the company, Sandys was responsible for many of the progressive features that characterized the last years of the company's control over Virginia, including the introduction of representative government in the first house of burgesses (1619). The king prevented his reelection as treasurer in 1620, but despite opposition from this and other formidable quarters he continued to wield great influence until the king annulled the company's charter in 1624. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ?1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.

We have established that the Sandys and Huddleston families were neighbors at one time. Sir Edwin Sandys sent the Bona Nova and is on Captain John Huddleston's commission. Bishop Sandys and Sir Edmund Huddleston both spent time in Marshalsea prison. Sir John Huddleston and Bishop Sandys were both in John Foxes' Book of Martyrs. Richard Huddleston of Elford through the Neville side was distantly related to Elizabeth Edith Sandys. William Huddleston and Elizabeth Hartepool had Sir Ferdinando George as a neighbor. Sir Ferdinando George and Sir Edwin Sandys were at the House of Commons. Richard Huddleston, Treasurer was son of Lord Richard Huddleston of Elford. Lord Richard Huddleston was brother to John Huddleston of Sawston. Their line goes back to the Millom Huddlestons. Bishop Sandys (also named Sir Edwin Sandys) had another son named George Sandys. Richard Huddleston, treasurer's wife maiden name was Williams who was the daughter of Lord Williams. House of Lords' records show her to be married to Richard Huddleston, treasurer as Lady Weynerman and as Weyman and as Wenman in 1576. George Sandys got his brother's old job that his brother had gotten from Sir Thomas Smythe. Sir Edwin Sandys was the treasurer in 1619 and Sir Thomas Smythe was the treasurer until 1618. Together Smythe and Sandys got into trouble with the King over their books. SANDYS, GEORGE (1578-1644), English traveller, colonist and poet, the seventh and youngest son of Edwin Sandys, archbishop of York, was born on the 2nd of March 1578. He studied at St Mary Hall, Oxford, but took no degree. On his travels, which began in 1610, he first visited France; from North Italy he passed by way of Venice to Constantinople, and thence to Egypt, Mt. Sinai, Palestine, Cyprus, Sicily, Naples and Rome. His narrative, dedicated, like all his other works, to Charles (either as prince or king), was published in 1615, and formed a substantial contribution to geography and ethnology. He also took great interest in the earliest English colonization in America. In April 1621 he became colonial treasurer of the Virginia Company and sailed to Virginia with his nieces husband, Sir Francis Wyat, the new governor. When Virginia became a crown colony, Sandys was created a member of council in August 1624; he was reappointed to this post in 1626 and 1628. In 1631 he vainly applied for the secretaryship to the new special commission for the better plantation of Virginia; soon after this he returned to England for good. In 1621 he had already published an English translation of part of Ovids Metcimorpizoses; this he completed in 1626; on this mainly his poetic reputation rested in the I7th and 18th centuries. He also began a version of Virgils Aeneid, but never produced more than the first book. In 1636 he issued his famous Para phrase upon the Psalms and Hymns dispersed throughout the Old and New Testaments; in he translated Christs Passion from the Latin of Grotius; and in 1641 he brought out his last work, a Paraphrase of the Song of Songs. He died, unmarried, at Boxley, near Maidstone, Kent, in 1644. His verse was deservedly praised by Dryden and Pope; Milton was somewhat indebted to Sandys Hymn to my Redeemer (inserted in his travels at the place of his visit to the Holy Sepulchre) in his Ode on the Passion. See Sandys works as quoted above; the travels appeared as The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. iio, in four books (1615); also the Rev. Richard Hoopers edition, with memoir, of The Poetical Works of George Sandys; and Alexander Browns Genesis of the United States, pp. 546, 989, 992, 994-995, 1032, 1063; article, Sandys, George, in Dictionary of National Biography. http://18.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SA/SANDYS_GEORGE.htm Captain John Huddleston married Barbara Poulter at St. Dunstan on September 24 1616 and Edwin Sandys was at St. Dunstan on September 14 1616 when he was the sherriff Edwin Sandys. Edwin Sandys possibly met Captain John Huddleston then days before John Huddleston and Barbara Poulter got married.

SP 46/62/fo 96 William Nelson to Sir Edwin Sandys. His arrearages. Slating of the chancel. Repairing of the houses. Wishes to be re-admitted as his tenant. Kyrkby Wharfe. 15 Aug. 1608. SP 46/62/fo 98 Richard Woodward to Sir Edwin Sandys. Requests respite of Nelson's rent arrears. Repairs to chancel and his houses. Uskell. 20 Aug. 1608. Note added by Nelson. Explains how he will pay rent. The glebe husbandry. Wishes to continue as his tenant at Kyrkby and Uskell; offers security. SP 46/62/fo 222 Thomas Leedes to Sir Edwin Sandys. Sends vine roots, and pear and apple grafts. Explains his request for one year to be added to his lease. Wapping. 8 Mar. 1609. SP 46/63/fo 150 Richard Wainde to Sir Edwin Sandys. Reports state of payment of arrearages by divers persons. Foullerice. 27 Apr. 1613. Worcestershire Record Office: Quarter Sessions [1 James I - 14 James I] Quarter Sessions Rolls FILE-8 James I: Sheriff Sir Richard Grevis Knight. [no ref.]-date: 1610 item: Recognizance before Sir Edwin Sandys by George Riddinge alias Lillie of Morton Underhill Bartholomew Riddinge alias Lillie of Inkberrow and Bartholomew Blake of Fladbury for the appearance of the said George and Katherine his wife and for their keeping the peace towards John Joyner.-ref. 1/1/5/39-date: 24 August 1610 East Kent Archives Centre: Sandwich Borough Reference: Sa/ZB/2/64-68 Virginia papers (Transcribe in A. Brown, Genesis of the United States (1896)) Creation dates: 1611-1612 Scope and Content Including letter from letter from Sir Thos. Smith's house seeking financial backing for the Virginia Company, copy of registered list of adventurers with sums invested [about 300 names], list and numbers of tradesmen to be sent out with Sir Thos. Gates and two letters from Sir Edwin Sandys, one referring to £25 promised by the town Reference: Sa/ZB/2/74,75 Letter from Sir Edwin Sandys offering himself for choice as Burgess and a letter of recommendation for him Creation dates: 1628 Centre for Kentish Studies: Kent Quarter Sessions [QM/SI-QM/SIq] Indictments FILE-Since [William Blaydon], carpenter, having burgled the dwelling house of [ - ] Spracklyn, gentleman, at St. Dunstan's [Canterbury] was taken before Sir Peter Manwood, a justice of the peace and was committed by him to the custody of Warham Williams of St. Dunstan's, yeoman, keeper of the gaol at Canterbury Castle and in the custody of the sheriff, Sir Edwin Sandys, and on 14 Sept [1616] at St. Dunstan's escaped from custody, afterwards on 4 Oct [1616], Thomas Mabb, gentleman, under-sheriff, Thomas Kitchin and William Warham arrested William Blaydon at Deptford but allowed him to escape at Swanscombe. [Endorsed as coming before Epiphany Sessions at Canterbury 8 Jan 1616/7]-ref. QM/SI/1617/2-date: 4 Oct 1616 E 134/21Jas1/Hil12 Sir Richard Norclif, Knt., lord of the manor of Langton. v. Richard Lindley: Piece of ground called "The Carr," within the lordship of Langton. Right of common of pasture in Carr. Meets and bounds of Langton and Birdsall Manors. [The possessions of Christopher Lindley (defendant's father), and Sir Edwin Sandys, Knt. 21 Jas 1 1623 E 134/7&8Chas1/Hil8 Sir Robert Heath, knight (Attorney-General) v. Dame Katherine Lady Sandys, widow, executrix of the last will and testament of Sir Edwin Sandys, knight, deceased, James Eveleigh.: Prebend of Wetwang in the cathedral church of York and its possessions in Fymmer, Fridaythorp, Elloughton, Kirkby, and Uskelfe, &c. 7 & 8 Chas 1

Unlike Sir Edwin Sandys the brother George Sandys went to Virginia. The Virginia Company's treasuror, George Sandys had a plantation and a well-fortified stockade with 30 guns, a "peece" of ordnance, 20 swords, "powder, lead and shott and invluded armor Steele Coats and Coats of Male." I assume that this was necessary for the company's "bank." Bill and Linda [bilinbo@aol.com] found the following..."The 1624 Jamestown Census contains information that we have not seen in most published sources. There are a number of columns--name, age, status, head of household, location, ship, and dates--so it is necessary to scroll to the side of the page to read them all. In 1624, there were only about 450-500 people in Virginia, and most of these were men and boys. Twenty-four people lived on the plantation of George Sandis/Sandys. On the plantation there were only three heads of household: George Sandis, Robert Sheppard, and Zachary Cripps. We counted nine people in the household of George Sandis, all of them male servants, including one "hired" servant. There were two freemen in the household of Zachary Cripps, and nine freemen and one freewoman in the household of Robert Sheppard. William Benge, who arrived on the Marygold, was one of the freemen listed in the household of Robert Sheppard. http://www.users.mis.net/~chesnut/pages/wmbenge.htm Document Number: AJ-084 Author: Title: Tragical Relation of the Virginia Assembly, 1624 Source: Tyler, Lyon Gardiner (editor). Narratives of Early Virginia, 1606-1625. (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1907). Pages 421-426. Pages/Illustrations: 8 / 0 Citable URL: www.americanjourneys.org/aj-084/ Author Note The first Virginia Assembly gathered on July 30, 1619 under Governor George Yeardley. The Assembly was involved in the legislation of the colony with the Virginia Company until the company’s charter was revoked in 1624.

The members of the Virginia Assembly responsible for the document were: Francis Wyatt, George Sandis, John Pott, John Powntis, Roger Smith, Raphe Hamor, William Tucker, William Peerce, Rawley Croshaw, Samuel Mathews, Jabez Whittaker, John Wilcom, Nicholas Marten, Edward Blany, Isack Madisone, Clement Dilke, Luke Boyse, John Utie, John Chew, Richard Stephens, John Southerne, Samuel Sharpe, Henry Watkins, Nathanell Causey, Richare Bigge, Richard Kingswell, John http://www.americanjourneys.org/aj-084/summary/index.asp

GEORGE SANDYS IN 1621 the Virginia Company found it necessary to set up a new office—a resident treasurer—in the colony to look after financial matters and to direct and to supervise the development of staple commodities. George Sandys, brother of Sir Edwin Sandys, was named to this post. And forasmuch as ther hath ben in theise late yeares great fault or defect in nott putting in execucon our orders of court and counsell for the setting upp & upholding those staple Comodities which are necessarie for the subsisting and Encrease of the Plantation which hath happned in part by the our [order] Chargeing the Governor with toe much buissnes, wee have uppon espetiall approvement of the industry and sufficiency of George Sandis esquire as also for his faithfullnes and plenaire intelligence of our intendments and counsells here (wherunto hee hath from time to tyme bein privie, not only elected and athorised him to bee Treasurer in Virginia, butt also committed to his spetiall and extreordinarie care the execution of all our orders Charters and instructions tending to the setting upp, Encrease and maytaininge of the said Staple Comodities: VIRGINIA COMPANY—INSTRUCTIONS TO THE GOVERNOR AND COUNCIL IN VIRGINIA. JULY 24, 1621.

George Sandys, a man of much energy, tried his hand at many enterprises while in Virginia, not the least among them being the translation of Ovid's METAMORPHOSES into English poetry. Much of this work he did at Jamestown, where his duties as treasurer and councilor confined him most of the time. The program, which he directed, for the introduction and development of "Staple Comodities" (iron, ship building, silk, glass, etc.) was not rewarded with a high degree of success. Virginia was, as yet, not able to maintain these enterprises, as the report of the glass project indicates. The ill successe of the glasse workes is allmost equall unto this [that of the shipwrights]: first the covering of the house, ere fully finished, was blowne downe, by a tempest noe sooner repaired but the Indians came uppon us, which for a while deferd the proceedinges. Then they built up the furnace, which after one forthnight that the fire was put in, few in peeces; yet the wife of one of the Italians (whom I have now sent home, haveinge receaved many wounds from her husband at severall times, & murder not otherwise to bee prevented, for a more damned crew hell never vomited) reveald in her passion that Vincentio crackt it with a crow of iron: yet dare wee not punish theise desperat fellowes, least the whole dessigne through theire stubbornesse should perish. The summer cominge on, Capt: Notron dyed with all saveinge one of his servants, & hee nothinge worth: The Italians fell extremely sicke: yet recoveringe in the beginninge of the winter, I hyred some men for that service, assisted them with mine owne, rebuilt the furnace, ingaged my selfe for provisions for them, & was in a manner a servant unto them. The fier hath now beene six weekes in the furnace, and yett nothinge effected, They complaine that the sand will not run. (though themselves made choise thereof, and likt it then well enought) & now I am sendinge up the river to provide them with better, if it bee to bee had, but I conceave that they would gladly make the worke to appeare unfeasable, that they might by that meanes be dismissed for England.

A LETTER FROM GEORGE SANDYS TO MR. FARRER, MARCH, 1622/3. http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/source/sb5/sb5p.htm

THE END OF THE VIRGINIA COMPANY
FOR a number of years before 1624 there was definite dissatisfaction with the policies and work of the Virginia Company of London. The movement gained momentum in England and in Virginia. This agitation culminated in the revocation of the company charter in 1624. With this Virginia became a royal colony directly under the Crown. It was on August 26, 1624, that King James I issued a statement setting forth the dissolution. And whereas our Commissioners after much care and paines expended in execucion of our said Commissioners did certifie us that our subjects and people sent to enhabite there and to plant themselves in that Country were most of them by Gods visitacions sicknes of bodie famine and by massacres of them by the native savages of the land dead and deceased and those that were living of them lived in necessitie and want and in danger by the savages but the Country for anie thing that appeared to the said Commissioners to the contr[ar]y they conceaved to be fruitfull and healthfull after our people had bin sometyme there, And that if industry were used it would produce divers good and staple comodities though in the sixteene yeares government past it had yealded fewe or none, And that this neglecte they conceaved must fall on the governors and companie here whoe had power to direct the plantacions . . . But because the said Treasurer and Companie did not submit their charters to be reformed our proceedings therein were stayed for a tyme untill uppon a quo warranto brought and a legall and judiciall proceeding therin by due course of laws the said charters were and nowe are and stand avoyded, and because wee were and are still resolved to proceed unto the perfecting of that worke which wee have begunne for the good of the said plantacion by a newe Charter to be made in such manner as shalbe found most fitt and convenient . . .COMMISSION TO SIR FRANCIS WYATT, GOVERNOR. AUGUST 26, 1624. http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/source/sb5/sb5s.htm

Sir Ferdinando Gorges GORGES, Sir Ferdinando, proprietor of Maine, born in Ashton Phillips, Somerset, England, about 1565: died in England in 1647. He was engaged in the conspiracy of Essex, and testified against the latter at his trial for treason in 1601. During the war with Spain he served in the royal navy with distinction, and in 1604 was appointed governor of Plymouth. Being a friend of Sir Walter Raleigh, he became interested in the latter's plans for colonization in the New World; and when Weymouth returned from New England in 1605, bringing five Indians, Gorges took three of them, Manida, Sketwarroes, and Tafquantum, into his home, and after instructing them in the English language gained much information relative to their country, and determined to become a proprietor of land beyond the Atlantic. His efforts resulted in the formation of the Plymouth, which with the London company was incorporated in 1606. Between these was divided the territory extending fifty miles inland from the 34th to the 45th parallel of north latitude. Plymouth company had the northern portion, which was styled North Virginia. The patentees were authorized to maintain the government for twenty-one years, with permission to impose taxes, to coin money, and to exercise all the power of a well-organized society. After several unsuccessful expeditions, two ships were despatched from Plymouth in 1607, bearing a party who erected a fortified storehouse, near the mouth of the Kennebec, in Maine, which they called Fort George. Owing to the severity of the climate and many hardships, this colony was abandoned in the following spring. In 1614 Gorges engaged Captain John Smith, who had visited New England in the service of the Plymouth company. He set sail in March, 1615, with two ships. His own becoming dismasted, he returned to port, and the other made the voyage alone, but soon returned.

After other unsuccessful attempts, Gorges sent out a party under Richard Vines, in 1616, which en-camped on the Saco during the winter. In 1619 Dermer made a second voyage. The London company had now incurred the resentment of King James, and Gorges and his party formed a new corporation on 3 November, 1620, under the name of the "Council established at Plymouth, in the County of Devon, for the planting, ruling, ordering, and governing of New England in America," which was the foundation of all the grants made in New England. This corporation consisted of forty patentees, most of whom were persons of distinction, including thirteen peers. Gorges was styled the "father of colonization in America." He took grants with John Mason of the district called Laconia, and attempted settlements. In 1635 the council resigned its charter to the king ; but Gorges obtained a new charter in 1639, which constituted him lord-proprietary of the province of Maine, with extraordinary governmental powers, which were to be transmissible with the property to his heirs and assigus. He prepared to visit New England, but the company became embarrassed for funds, and was obliged to sell the ship and pinnace which had been built. Sir Ferdinando had also become interested in the Puritan colony of New Plymouth. Through the influence of his father and of Lord Edward Gorges, ROBERT, the youngest son of Sir Ferdinando, was commissioned lieutenant governor of New England. He had just returned from the Venetian wars, and was a share-holder in the grand patent. He also had a personal grant of a tract of land on the northeast side of Massachusetts bay, which had been made to him in consideration of his father's services to the company. He came to Plymouth in 1623, bringing with him an Episcopal clergyman, William Morell. He attempted to form a settlement at Wessagusset, which ended in a dispute with Weston, who had begun the colony there, and returned to look after it. Robert Gorges, having power to "restrain interlopers," began proceedings against him. He returned to England in less than a year, and his people dispersed--some to England, some to Virginia.

In 1631 a grant of land was made to several persons, including Ferdinando Gorges, a grandson of Sir Ferdinando. This territory was situated on the Acomenticus River, and several settlements were made there. These were subjected to no external government until the arrival of Captain WILLIAM as deputy governor of the province, which was called "New Somersetshire." The first meeting of the commissioners was held on 25 March, 1636, in Saco. then containing 150 inhabitants, and was the first provincial government for this section of New England. The charter of Maine covered the same territory as that of New Somersetshire, and Sir Ferdinando issued a commission for its government, and sent his nephew, THOMAS, to be deputy governor. The first general court of this government, which exercised the powers of an "executive, legislative, and judicial body in the name of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, late proprietor of Maine," was held in Saco, 25 June, 1640. After the Gorges government was established, in 1641, the borough of Acomenticus and the town of Gorgeana were incorporated. Thomas Gorges arrived in 1641, and settled in this town. He sailed for England in 1643, leaving Richard Vines at the head of the government. In that year the four New England colonies formed a confederacy, excluding the settlements of Gorges, for they "ran a different course both in their ministry and civil administration." On the death of Sir Ferdinando, the estate was left to his son, JOHN, who totally neglected the province. After writing repeatedly to the heirs and receiving no replies, the Gorges colonies formed themselves into a body politic for the purpose of self-government, and submitted to the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. Sir Ferdinando's grandson, Ferdinando, born in Loftas, Essex, England, in 1629 ; died in England, 25 January 1718, petitioned the king against the usurpation of Massachusetts, and commissioners were sent out to adjust the affairs of the government. In 1677 he sold his rights to Massachusetts for £1,250. He published "America Painted to the Life" (London, 1659). Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Somerset-PRO Reference Title/Scope and Content Covering Dates C 1/264/8 Thomas Hodylston, haberdasher, of London. v. The mayor and bailiffs of Cambridge; John Wode.: Actions on obligations relating to the purchase of English saffron at Fulborne. Certiorari and subpoena.: Cambridge, London. C 1/368/32 William Urchynnett, of Lincoln, mercer, executor of Robert Hodylston, [mercer]. v. George Browne, of Lincoln, goldsmith.: Detention of deeds relating to a messuage and land in St. Peter's parish, Lincoln, and others therein, devised for repairs of St. Peter's church. C 1/928/10 Christopher Walter of Prestbury, yeoman. v. John Hodylstone and Richard Lyggyn, sheriff, both knights.: Imprisonment on an outlawry obtained against complainant in a false name, the said Sir John being unable to obtain a verdict against him in his true name. 1538-1544 STAC 2/22/84 PLAINTIFF: John Hodylston DEFENDANT: The abbot of Wynchcombe, Richard Comley, John ap Thomas, John Hykkes, John Vele, and William Slaughterman PLACE OR SUBJECT: Messuage and land in Langley Field, Winchcomb COUNTY: Gloucester 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 2/24/167 PLAINTIFF: Richard, abbot of Winchcombe DEFENDANT: John Hodylston PLACE OR SUBJECT: Riot COUNTY: Somerset 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 Lancashire Record Office: Stanley, Earls of Derby (of Knowsley) [DDK/1-DDK/44] Grants, Family Deeds, &c FILE-The King to Thomas Earl of Derby-ref. DDK/2/8-date: 25th February. 4 Henry VII., A.D. 1488-9 \_ [from Scope and Content] Manors of (co. Somerset): \_ [from Scope and Content] The reversion of all the lands, tenements, rents, reversions and services lately forfeited by John Broughton, Esq., and held by Henry Huddleston for the term of his life: FILE-The King to George Stanley, Knight, Lord de Straunge-ref. DDK/2/12-date: 8th Mar., 4 Henry VII., A.D. 1489 \_ [from Scope and Content] Hasilbeare, Manor of (co. Somerset).

From Rosemary-St-legermay JOHN BROOKE was born in of Haselour, and died June 1571 in Haseler, Staffordshire. He married (1) ANNA SHIRLEY. She was born in of Staunton. He married (2) LUCIE HUDDLESTON 1557, daughter of RICHARD HUDDLESTON and MARGERY SMYTHE. She died Bet. 1557-1560. He married (3) ALICE Aft. 1557, daughter of JOHN CROKER. She died 1560 in Elford, Staffordshire. Notes for JOHN BROOKE: This John Brooke is described as the son of Sir Robert Brooke, knt., of Lapley in "The Antiquities of Staffordshire" but I have not yet found any proof of this. It is known that amongst his 17 children, Sir Robert Brooke did have a son and heir called John. Degge says that the first Brooke of Haselour was a "serving-man," and was promoted "from the stable to his young mistress's bed." The Manor of Haselour came to John Brooke through his marriage to Lucie Huddlestone, who had inherited Haselour from from her mother's family. She was co-heiress with her sister Anne, who inherited the manor of Elford. The Arms of Brooke of Haselour (1583) are described as: Or a cross Engr. party p' pale sa. and b. {? Argent, a cross engrailed per pale Sable and Gules, in the first quarter an annulet of the last}. The notes supplied by Grazebrook to the 1663-4 Visitation of Staffordshire seem to show that the correct surname of the family was "Brookes". The pedigree entered does not attempt to prove any connection with the Brookes of Norton, Cheshire, yet the Arms of that well-known family were allowed to the Haselour Brookes, differenced merely by an annulet gules in the dexter quarter. So it appears that they may well have been connected. In 1508 John Stanley died leaving no male heir, and for many generations the manor of Haselour passed through female inheritance. Finally it descended from the Huddlestones to the Brookes, when Lucy Huddlestone, who was co-heiress, married John Brooke in 1557. Her sister, the other heiress, married Sir John Bowes, taking as her share of the inheritance the manor of Elford. So the two manors became finally separated. The Brookes, who held Haselour for over 200 years, were there at the time of the Civil War.(Source: Notes on Staffordshire Families).

House of Commons Journal Volume 1 18 March 1581 Privilege-Order respecting Halle's Imprisonment, Sir James Crofte, Knight, One other of her Majesty's most honorable Privy Council, and Treasurer of her Highness's most honorable Houshold. House of Commons Journal 1 05 June 1604 (2nd scribe) Continuances of Statutes committed unto the former Committees, and unto all the King's Privy Council ... Sir Herbert Crofte. We have an older Sybill Crofte and a younger Sybill Crofte. The older one born 1451-1454 was the daughter of Richard Crofte and Elinor Bare and her spouse was Sir George Herbert. Sir George Herbert was the child of Sir William Herbert and Ann Devereaux. The younger Sybill Crofte 1490-1523 of Croft Castle married Richard Huddleston and was the daughter of Richard Crofte and Catherine Herbert. Film number 184621 Richard Croft married Catherine Herbert in about 1508 at Croft Castle. He was born about 1484 and died 01 Jan 1484. Catherine Herbert was born about 1486 at Blackhall, Montgomery, Wales. Richard Crofte parents were Edward Crofte and Joyce Skull.(C) Certificate of Muster Masters (1539)
This is the certificate of Sir George Gresley, knight, John Vernon and William Wyrley, esquires, three of the king's commissioners ... appointed for the trial and the view of all persons armed within the hundred of Ofelaw in the county of Stafford, above sixteen years, as well horsemen, footmen, bowmen, and billmen within the said hundred, whose names with their surnames and their weapons severally appeareth; and have given monition to every of them ... to be ready with their horse and harness, and to have their harness according to the king's statute thereof made. In witness we have subscribed our names and set to our seals the 27th day of April, 1539....[2] Elford and Hasulhowre Richard Huddilston — horse, harness, bill; able John Hervy — harness, without a horse, a bill; able Richard Wryght Rauf Massye Petur Foleshist John Janens — bowmen, able; without horse or harness John Melburne Thomas Smyth Alexander Hodson Philipp Wright — a bowman, not able Collections for a History of Staffordshire, 1901, p. 217.

AO 1/292/1097 Roll 1097 R. Huddlestone (per administrator), Treasurer at War of the Forces in the Low Countries. 11 Aug. 1585-1 June 1586. AO 1/292/1096 Roll 1096 R. Huddlestone (per administrator), Treasurer at War of the Forces in the Low Countries. 2 Aug. 1585-1 Feb. 1586/7 Cruickshank, C.G.. ELIZABETH'S ARMY. Oxford University Press, 1966 (2nd ed.). pp. 290-303 No. I o. Warrant for Paymcnt SIR P. SYDNY, knight. Theis are to require you to paie unto Sir Phillip Sidney knight captaine of a cornet of c. Iaunces for his owne enterteignment at viii- per diem, his Lieutenant at iiij per diem, his Guydon at ij- per diem, one Trumpet, one Clarcke and one Surgeon at xxd per diem le peece, fourscore ten launces, and ten dead paies at xviijd per diem ' Harl. MSS. 168, f. Iog. cr. s.P. Holland, Elu. 18, f. Io4b. ' Add. MSS. 5753, r. 177. 296 APPENDIXES le peece for iijcxxxiiij daies, beginning the xijth day of November, 1585, and ending the xjth day of October last past the some of two thowsande eight hundred twentie twoe pounds six shillings sterling. Provided allwaies that yow doe not only dcfaulk the some of Thir-teene shillinges and foure pens sterlinge checked within the said tyrne, but allso all former Imprests to him delivered and all victualls and munition, together with all other deductions defaulcable upon this Account by certificate from the ministers thereof approved by the captaines hand. And theis together with his Acquittance con- fessing the receipt of the same shalbe your sufficient warrant in that behalf. Geven at Gravenhage the viijth day of November Anno Reginae Elizabeth xxviijo R. LEYCESTER. To Richard Huddilston esquier, her majesties Threasurer at Warres. Ex. Tho. Digges. jkmviijcxxijli sixe shillings.1 Ex p. Edmond Hunte. No. II. Receipt for Payment2 RECEYVED by me Captayne Edwarde Cromwell at the hands of the ryght worshipfful Rycharde Hudleston esquyre treasurer at wares for her majesty in the Lowe Countryes the some of thirtye and eyght pownds ster. monye to be deffaulked owt of the first paye or impreste made to me and the companye under my leadynge wyttnes whereof I have suhscrybed this guyttance with my owne hand. Datted the daye of September anno dom. 1586. ED. CROMWELL. SP 46/34/fo 277 Henry, lord Norreys to Myldmay: Place conveyed his interest in Buck prebend to Richard Huddleston, whose estate Norreys has, but Place keeps the house. Will put in his bill if lord Henry Seymour will answer him; 29 Nov. 1587. Longleat House: Dudley Papers Plea of Sir Christopher Blount, Knt., and Lettice, Countess of Leicester, his wife, in answer to charges in the accompts of Richard Huddleston, Esq., and Sir Thomas Chester, Treasurers-at-war in the Low Countries, against Robert [Dudley], late Earl of Leicester, of £3619, moneys of the Queen not accompted for down to 30 Nov. 1587. [See above, DU/VOL III, art.24]. Without date.

Captain John Huddleston was born during the reign of Queen Elizabeth (29th year of her reign =29 Eliz or 1587) and was in England till the death of King James I. Mary Queen of Scotts, Elizabeth's sister was executed 1587. As shown by the trips of the Bona Nova, Captain John Huddleston's first trip was in 1618. 1618 was the beginning of the 'Thirty Years War'. From the Catholic Enclopedia: The Thirty Years War (1618-48), though pre-eminently a German war, was also of great importance for the history of the whole of Europe, not only because nearly all the countries of Western Europe took part in it, but also on account of its connection with the other great European wars of the same era and on account of its final results.

Stepney Docks St Katherine's Dock
When the St Katherine's Dock was built 1250 houses were purchased and destroyed and 11,300 inhabitants removed, many being turned on to the streets. Few received compensation since they were renting their accommodation.
A vast fire, in 1794, had burnt down much of Ratcliffe, Shadwell and Stepney. It was on ground still half covered with the tents supplied by the Government's military stores at the Tower of London that the new slums of Stepney, Shadwell and Ratcliffe started to rise alongside the old.'
Many famed people lived in the parish including adventurers and explorers and many of these sailed from Stepney. Sebastien Cabot (1450-1498) who lead the search for the North West Passage in 1499. Sir Walter Raleigh's half brother, Sir Humphrey Gilbert (1537-83), a navigator, was born at Buxham and lived, at one time, in Limehouse. He was the first Englishman to sail the Atlantic and founded the first English colony. Henry Hudson embarked upon his voyages from St Katherine's Dock and his final voyage and last attempt in April 1610 in the 70 ton 'Discoverie' to find the North West Passage was made from Blackwall. Martin Frobisher (1535-94), who helped defeat the Armada, left from Ratcliffe Cross in 1576 with 35 men on the 'Gabriel' and 'Michael', on his way to search for the North-West passage. Sir Hugh Willoughby, in 1553, sailed from Ratcliffe with a fleet of 3 ships to find a north east trade route to Cathey and India. He, along with the crews of 2 of the ships, were shipwrecked off Lapland and died. The third vessel, the 'Stephen Bonaventure', with Captain Stephen Borough at its head, found a passage to the White Sea and landed at Archangel. Following this the Muscovy Trading Company was formed. William Adams of Ratcliffe (died 1620) and John Saris of Aldgate were the first Englishmen to sail to Japan. They sailed in Dutch ships and Adams was never allowed to return to England. He left a wife and two children in Stepney and took a new family in Japan.

The St Dunstan marriage register 1609-1639 starts with the following note 'This book was bought by Mr Richd Phillips, Churchwarden, Ano 1612. Also hee and Mr Gisby built new of their owne chardges the weste Church porch of bricke & stone. He boughte also a new bible & a great parchment book for Christninges besides many other things. He deserveth great comendacons.' Richard was a yeoman of Limehouse, and a deputy churchwarden for Mr Richard March.
The St Dunstan vestry minutes of 1613 show that John Brockbancke the late clerk, perhaps through illness, had not recorded all the christenings, marriages and burials and Peter Wright was asked if he would bring them up to date by the following Easter for a payment of four pounds.

Stepney Folk The Black Death, the Plague and Churchyard
In 1617 it had been decided that in future there would be chosen in every hamlet 'two fit aged women to search and vew the bodies of everie one deceasing for the prevention of infection'. The searchers were to receive two pence for every body they viewed and searched.
The Plague of 1625-By July 1625 the order passed in April regarding burials in the churchyard had to be rescinded. Mary Oswell and Elizabeth Scott of Ratcliffe and Joane Hassam and Rose Write of Limehouse were chosen to be searchers of dead bodies 'in case & feare of Contagion of sicknes now suspected'. They would receive fourpence apiece for every body they viewed and searched. Robert Bell One of the earliest and chief members of the Honourable East India Company and very active in its affairs. The vestry was not happy with the way he was conducting vestry business in 1626 and he left the parish in disgrace. However he continued to be well thought of elsewhere and he was knighted in 1630. He had built ships for the Navy and helped crush piracy and at Court had been appointed a gentleman of the Privy Chamber. He had the 'privilege' in 1619 of lending money to Prince Charles (Charles I). Problems in 1626 Robert Bell was the subject under discussion at the April 30 1626 vestry. He was the churchwarden for Ratcliffe and had taken in money for Church duties which had been charged to help pay for the cost of the re-earthing of the churchyard. Because he would not part with the money the work had to stop. The parish would have to bear the cost of presenting a suit against him at the High Commission Court and Robert had to leave the parish with all his goods and moved to Rotherhythe.

St Dunstan and All Saints, Stepney-St Dunstans church remains an almost completely medieval church, the only one in the area. Until the 13th century the church served the whole of the Stepney area and stands half a mile in from the Ratcliffe shore. Fine houses once surrounded the church.

Stepney Notes-The River, the Barges and the Watermen-For centuries the traffic of goods to and from the City and surrounding area was mainly riverborne. 3500 river craft conveyed cargoes to and from the shore. The Pool was often filled with so many ships that boats could not get across. Barges carried goods along narrow rivers and canals down to the Thames where they offloaded their goods for the City or loaded ships. Barges have square section flatbottoms which give them a light draught in shallow waters. Originally they were very much like a punt. This allowed the carriage of maximum cargo and the flat bottoms allowed them to be beached upright between tides. Many were built in Kent and Essex and they were a common sight on the Thames and had been used for centuries to carry cargoes up shallow creeks direct to farm, quarry and dock. They required only a small crew and could get up a reasonable speed. Some, with sails, were able to navigate the Channel whilst others relied upon the tide. Those who steered these vessels, and some on the river today continue to do so in the same manner, knew the ways of the river and were able to gauge which way the ebb and flow, and the currents and eddies would take their craft. Coaches were introduced into England between 1555–80. In 16th-century England, poets described coaches as ostentatious vehicles employed by wantons and rakes, and the Thames watermen (boatmen), whose living suffered, also complained bitterly of them. The Thames watermen, who had been regulated since the 14th century, formed their own guild or company by 1603.

A Census of 1583 said there were 5000 aliens in the City of London and there were far more outside the walls. More and more of the Stepney area began to built on to house them and their skills were at first welcome for their standards were high but soon they began to rival the City of London and resentment from them and local traders and craftsmen grew.

At the end of the 16th century there was a period of rapid growth in population with the development of the riverside and eastern suburbs of the City. For civil purposes Stepney had been divided up into four hamlets - Ratcliffe, Limehouse, Poplar and Mile End, but because of the increase in buildings and inhabitants new hamlets were created. Bethnal Green (in 1597), Shadwell (in 1645), Spitalfields (in 1662), St. George in the East (in 1670), Mile End New Town (in 1691) and Bow (in 1719). Whitechapel and Bromley St. Leonard were already separate parishes.

RATCLIFF-A natural landing place on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping marsh and the Isle of Dogs, the reddish colour of the soil perhaps inspiring the Saxon name of "red cliff". The northern part of the hamlet of Ratcliff, which contained the parish church of St. Dunstan's Stepney, was quite rural until the 19th century; the southern part grew rapidly at an early period because of its position on the riverside. In the early 14th century the the village became devoted to the fitting out, repairing and victualling of ships rather than ship building. In Tudor times many voyages of discovery began at Ratcliff, notably those by Sir Hugh Willoughby in 1553 and Martin Frobisher in the 1570s. By 1610 Ratcliff was the most populous of the hamlets of Stepney with about 3,500 inhabitants. Ratcliff became part of the Borough of Stepney in 1900.

The center of the Tower of London consists of the original White Tower. The White Tower is a square structure with turrets on all four corners and a pepper-pot design on the top of the turrets. Surrounded by lesser towers, the White Tower has a very formidable appearance. A moat runs on three sides of the Tower and the Thames runs by the fourth. Anyone approaching London by river would have been awed by the majesty of the Tower (Rowse, 9). A great mystique surrounds the Tower. It was a common myth in early times that the Tower was built by the Romans. Shakespeare refers to that myth in Richard II when he writes "Julius Ceasar's ill-erected tower." In fact the Tower was designed and built by a Norman expert, Gundulf, who was brought by William I to build this great fortress (Rowse, 10). Probably the most familiar function of the Tower is that of a prison and a place of execution. Dudley also wrote a brief elegy to the people put to death at the Tower, "Martyrs: Here repose those victims of tyranny and religious persecution: John Fisher, Thomas More, Anne Bullen, Catherine Howard, Thomas Cromwell, Rob't Deveraux, Edward Seymour, Jane Gray, her husband, his father and grandfather. I'll mention no more. How many have bled on the fatal Hill!" (Dudley, 3). The Babington plot from which was written Tichborne's elegy was inspired by Mary Stuart. Anthony Babington set in motion a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth, the plot failed, and Babington and his co-conspirators were executed for treason. Mary was also executed for giving her consent to the assassination (Rowse, 86). One of the most unique features of the Tower is the Tower Ravens. A throw back to the time when the Tower served as a zoo, the ravens have their own myth-- as long as the ravens stay in the Tower, London will never fall. The ravens are not friendly and often bite visitors. One story says that in the 1930s a Nazi official unfavorably compared London's ravens to Germany's eagles and was subsequently bitten by one of the ravens (Rowse, 255).

Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace near London. Her father was England's King Henry VIII; her mother was the king's second wife, Anne Boleyn. Elizabeth had an older half-sister, Mary, who was the daughter of the king's first wife, Catherine of Aragon. Information taken from Queen Elizabeth, The Unwanted Queen Reigned 1558-1603
Although she returned the Church of England to power, she showed tolerance toward Catholics at first. Despite Catholic conspiracies to overthrow her and place Mary Stuart on the English throne, Elizabeth hesitated to execute her fellow queen. Mary became Elizabeth's prisoner in 1568, but it was not until 1587 that Elizabeth, confronted with evidence of Mary's participation in the Babington Plot to assassinate Elizabeth, signed Mary's death warrant. By this time Elizabeth had become more brutal in suppressing Catholics, although she continued to believe, in her words, "There is only one Christ Jesus and one faith; the rest is a dispute about trifles." In 1588 Spain's King Philip II, Elizabeth's brother-in-law and one-time suitor, assembled a great fleet of ships, the Armada, and tried to invade England. The ensuing battle between the Spanish and English fleets lasted nine days. At last the English routed their enemy, and most of the fleeing Spanish ships were destroyed by a storm. Mary was finally beheaded on 8 February 1587.
King James VI and I James was the son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Lord Darnley. He was born in 1566. The following year, his mother abdicated and he became King James VI of Scotland. In 1603, his mother's cousin Queen Elizabeth I of England died and James inherited her throne, uniting England and Scotland under one crown for the first time. In English history he is called King James I. He died in 1625 and was succeeded by his son, Charles I.

Hi Roy, I spent some time in Kendal Public Records Office in Westmoreland, England over the weekend, and had the opportunity of of looking at the Visitations of the county of Cumberland, the offical record of the Hudleston family pedigree. Arms; - A chevron between three bulls heads cabosed (untinctured). This is an ancient Cumbrian Family. At the beginning of the 17th century, George Clifford, Earl of Cumberland would have been their overlord. The north of England was still run on feudal lines in 1600. In 1588, George Clifford was put in command of the "Elizabeth Bonaventure", a ship of the Royal Navy, (i,e, in belonged to the Queen) of six hundred tons, in which he set out against the Spanish Armada, and after the decisive action off Gravelines, he is said to have carried news to the vicory to the Queen in the camp at Tilbury. The family pedigree shows; fferdinando Hudleston of Millom Castell = Jane, d. of Sr Raffe Gray of Chillingham Knt. in Com' Northumberland. William Hudleston = Bridgett,d/ of Joseph Pennington of Muncaster in Comb'land 1637 I A sonn A daughter named Mary ux. Christopher Philipsonn of Twatterden Hall in Com' Westmoreland Looking at all of the evidence you have supplied, including a marriage to ....... of Hartlipoole (a commoner) and the high living antics of the Earl (he separated from his wife because of affairs, was a gambler, big spender and was forced to sell a lot of his estates to pay for his voyages incl the voyage 1597-8 where they plundered various ships at the Canaries and Azores, going on to Dominica and thence to Porto Rico. (He was known as the Privateering Earl), plus the navigational skills of John Hudleston, I would suggest the "sonn" in the above pedigree is John Hudleston who went to sea with George Clifford (it would be regarded as an honour) as a boy and never got back to Cumberland. It is unusual to find the words "a sonn" in official family pedigrees. This Pedigree was written in 1666, after the Civil War during which tens of thousands of Royalists were killed 1640-1660. I am pretty sure that some of the passengers on John Hudlestons voyage 1622 to Virginia had passengers on board from County Durham, County of Yorkshire, and particularily from Darlington, Stockton, Hartlepool areas. Do you have the passenger list? Regards, Eric William Lamberton

July 9, 1610
Feature Name:Blunt Point Feature Type: cape State: Virginia County: Newport News (city) Latitude: 37.05556 Longitude: -76.51889 Old Kecoughtan, Elizabeth City County, VA - Old Records; Wm. & Mary Qtrly, Vol. 9, No. 2 OLD KECOUGHTAN. Page 83 There are in the records of Elizabeth City county the details of a suit in ejectment, which are interesting not only for the legal phases that illustrate the course of law in the colony, but for the information they give about the early settlement of Elizabeth City county. When the first emigrants arrived in Virginia, they found an Indian village near Point Comfort, called Kecoughtan, or Kicoughtan, or Kiccotan. There was in the neighborhood a large open country of two or three thousand acres in which the Indians raised their corn, beans and tobacco. Only July 9, 1610, because the Indians of Kecoughtan captured and killed Humphrey Blunt at the point on James River in Warwick county, Page 84 which still bears his name, Sir Thomas Gates set upon the Indians, whose chief was Pochins, a son of Powhatan, and drove them away from their habitations. To secure his new conquest, he erected, at the mouth of Hampton River, two small stockades, "about a musket shot apart," and about two miles from the fort, called Fort Algernon, already established in 1608 at Point Comfort, and called them Fort Charles and Fort Henry. Notes for EDWARD WATERS: Lieutenant EDWARD WATERS (1585-1630) left England, June 1609, in the service of Sir George Somers, accompanying him on the Seaventure, shipwrecked off the Somers Islands and was among those who reached Virginia, 1610, in the Patience built on the Islands. He is not to be confused with the "condemned man" Robert Waters a sailor, charged with mutiny and left behind with a companion Christopher Carter. The following year Edward Waters Accompanied Sir George Somers to get "hogs and other good things in the Bermudas," as much needed supplies for Virginia. Somers died there; his men embalmed the corpse and set sail for England, leaving Chard and Edward Waters on the islands with with Christopher Carter. Robert Waters returned to England, Entered the East India service and died at sea, 6 August 1614. The three men, Chard, Edward Waters and Carter, during explorations of the islands came upon a piece of ambergris, worth a fortune and the eventual source of much dissention. But, thereby, the Bermuda Company was formed in England and the ambergris was sent over in parcels at intervals when supplies and men to settle the islands were shipped from England. Waters was of the Council of six left to govern the islands, 1614. Two years later he sailed for Virginia to get supplies and never returned to the islands.

In the census of 1623, Waters, his wife and son are listed at Elizabeth City. In the meantime the Massacre of 1622 had occured and Edward Waters was listed as dead along with four others at his plantation of 100 acres near Blount Point. Instead of being murdered, Waters and his wife, who was Grace O'Neil, who came on the Diana in 1618, and married Waters about 1620, were taken prisoners and held among the Nansemond Indians on the south shore of the James River, but eventually escaped. The Original Waters plantation of 100 acres of record, 14 August 1624, lay in the area adjacent to the present Mariners Museum in the now city of Warwick. However, on 8 January 1626 Waters was granted permission to move his "seat" to the area of Elizabeth City which is now the location of the Kecoughtan Veterans Facility and his patent of 100 acres being "part of the Strawberry bancks," adjacent to the "look-out tree near John's Creek is of record 20 October 1628. Waters served as member of the Commission for holding monthly courts at Elizabeth City, 1623-1629, church warden of the parish, 1624, member of the House of Burgesses, 1625 (convention), 1627-28 and as Commander of plantations from Southampton River to Fox Hill. He made a trip to England, 1629 or 1630 and died there before 18 September 1630, at which time his brother John Waters was granted administration of his will. The will dated 20 August 1630 at Great Hornemead, Hertfordshire, recites he was of "Elizabeth City in Virginia" and mentions his wife, Son and daughter.

Report of the 1622 Anglo-Powhatan War In Virginia: A Promotional Tract (A scribal copy of a report "By his Majestys Counsell for Virginia" found in the Samuel Hartlib Papers, folio 61/3/1A-25B. Hee [Governer Wyatt] and the Counsell write further (which our selues also assuredly beleeue) That allmighty God hath his greate worke to doe in this Tragedy, and will thereout drawe honour & glory to his greate name, safety & a more flourishing estate to themselues, & the whole Plantacions there, and the more speedy conversion . . . of those Sauags to himselfe, since he soe miraculosly preserued soe many of the English; whose desire to drawe those people (vnworthy of breath or to be termed a people) to Religion, semeth by the careles neglect of their owne safeties to haue ben the greatest cause of theyr owne destruction; And therefore not altogether displeasing to his Majesty. . . "It pleased him to vse them [the Indians] as Instruments to saue many of their [the English colonists'] liues,. . . as at Iames Citie, at Sandy Point, at Blunt-Point, And the Pinnace trading in Pamunke River, All whose liues were saued by converted Indians disclosing the Plott in the instant. The letters of Mr. George Sandys, a worthy gentleman and Treasurer there, likewise haue advertized [that is, informed] vs, besids the relations of many of late returned in the Sea Flower, The Shipp that brought vs this vnwelcome newes. . .That whilst all their affayres were full of successe, and such familiarity, as if the Indians and themselues had Bin of one Nation, Those treacherous Natiues, after 4 yeares peace by a generall combination plotted to subuert their whole Colony in one day Some entring their howses vnder colour of trucking, and some taking their advantage, others drawing our men abroad upon fayre pretences, and the rest suddaynly falling vpon those that were at there labours . . .
1624
Chronological History of Warwick County Virginia
The following information was abstracted from the book "Newport News Virginia, 1607-1960" by Annie Lash Jester published 1961
1610 July 9- Humphry Blunt killed by a band of Indians on the James River. This location there after was known as Blunt/Blount Point
1611 Captain Newport's last voyage to Newport's News bringing Sir Thomas Dale who was responsible for reorganizing the colony
1619 Nov. 11- Records of the Virginia Company of London identify the colonists settlement as Newport's News
1622 March 22- Newport News was defended by Daniel Gookin and 35 men following the Great Indian Massacre
1624 Richard Stevens is involved in a dual that fatally wounded Lt. George Harrison
1624 August 14- Edward Waters patented land on Waters Creek, now Lake Maury in the grounds of the Mariners Museum.
1626 Bolthrope, a tract of some 500 acres is patented by Richard Stevens
1627 Earliest record of a church building (Mulberry Island) located adjacent to Thos. Harwood's plantation, Queen's Hith, in Stanley's Hundred on Baker's Neck.
1628 An area of land, known as "The Forest" is patented by Zachariah Cripps. This land later acquired by the Cary family and became part of an area called Richneck.
1628 The plantation at Merry Point, the home of William Parker, is first recorded.
1629 Denbigh, best known of the Warwick Plantations was so named and was the seat of Capt. Mathews, who in 1626 is recorded as having taken up land in the Blunt Point area, calling his plantation "Mathew's Manor". He served as governor of Virginia from 1657-1660. A portion of the Denbigh plantation is now the Newport News City Farm.
1631 Monthly court first established in the Warwick River area. The following commissioners were named: Capt. Samuel Mathews, Capt. Richard Stephens, Capt. Thomas Flint, John Brewer, Zachariah Cripps and Thomas Ceeley
1930 June 2- The Mariners Museum founded by Archer M. Huntington began acquiring some 880 acres in Warwick fronting the James River to establish a park and museum.

James City County, VA Williamsburg, The Old Colonial Capital; Wm. & Mary Qrtly; Vol. 16, No.1 Transcribed by Kathy Merrill for the USGenWeb Archives Special Collections Project Williamsburg The Old Colonial Capital William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 16, No. 1. (Jul., 1907), pp. 1-65. Page 1
I. MIDDLE PLANTATION.
For twenty-three years after the landing at Jamestown, the English settlements in Virginia were confined to the valley of the James and to the Accomac peninsula. Nevertheless, the need of a colony on York River, to act as a curb to the Indian tribes, seated on a branch of the York River, known as Pamunkey River, had long been recognized. As far back as 1611, Sir Thomas Dale, then governor, in a letter to the Earl of Salisbury, recommended the establishment of a fortified settlement at Chickiack, some twenty miles from Point Comfort. But probably on account of the peace concluded in 1616 with the Indians by Dale, nothing was immediately done in furtherance of the suggestion. Chiskiack attracted attention again after the appalling massacre of 1622, when, of the settlers in Martin's Hundred, situated opposite on the James, seventy-three were slain, and the plantation there was so alarmed and weakened that it was temporarily abandoned. Then, in 1623, Governor Wyatt and his council wrote to Earl of Southampton that they had under consideration a plan of "winning the forest" by running a pale between the James and York from Martin's Hundred to Chiskiack.

In March, 1624, when the royal commissioners, sent over by the king to report upon the colony, enquired of the authorities in Virginia "what places in the country are best and most proper to be fortified or maintained," their reply was that "the running of a pale from Martin's Hundred to Chiskiack, which is not above five miles, and planting upon both rivers, would be the best means to protect the Colony."

Page 2 In 1626, Samuel Mathews, of Denbigh, and William Claiborne, of Kecoughtan, offered to build the palisades, and construct houses, at short intervals, between Martin's Hundred and Chiskiack. They placed the whole cost at L1,200 sterling, and the annual expense of maintaining the work at L100. As a condition of their contract, they required that a grant be made to them of six score yards, on both sides of the palisades.(1) While it is not believed that the offer was accepted, the general assembly, in February, 1630, upon the arrival of Sir John Harvey as governor, passed an act to send and maintain a company of men to plant corn at Chiskiack. At a meeting held at Jamestown, October 8, 1630, Sir John Harvey and his Council, "for the securing and taking in a tract of land called the forest, bordering upon the cheife residence of ye Pamunkey King, the most dangerous head of ye Indyan enemy," did "after much consultation thereof had, decree and sett down several proportions of land for such commanders, and fifty acres per poll for all other persons who ye first yeare and five and twenty acres who the second yeare, should adventure or be adventured to seate and inhabit on the southern side of Pamunkey River, now called York, and formerly known by the Indyan name of Chiskiack, as a reward and encouragement for this their undertaking." Under this order houses were built on both sides of King's Creek, and extended rapidly up and down the south side of York River. During the very next year after Chiskiack was settled, William Claiborne, with one hundred men, settled Kent Island, 150 miles up Chesapeake Bay from Jamestown, and at the general assembly which met at Jamestown, February, 1632, Captain Nicholas Martian took his seat as the representative of "Kiskyacke" and the Isle of Kent. By September, 1632, population on the south side of the York River had become considerable enough to claim two representatives in the assembly. The region on the York was divided into two plantations -- one retaining the old name, Chiskiack, and the other styled "York," settled by Sir John Harvey at the mouth of Wormeley's creek, about three miles below the present Yorktown. (1) Bruce, Economic History of Virginia, I., 300.

Page 3. The plan of running a palisade across he Peninsula was no longer deferred, and Dr. John Pott blazed the way by obtaining, July 12, 1632, a patent for 1,200 acres at the head of Archer's Hope Creek, midway between Chiskiack and James River. September 4, 1632, the general assembly directed that the encouragement of land offered two years before to inhabitants at Chiskiack, should be granted to all persons settling between Queen's Creek and Archer's Hope Creek. Then in February, 1633, it was enacted that a fortieth part of the men in "the compasse of the forest" east of Archer's Hope and Queen's Creek to Chesapeake Bay should be present "before the first day of March next" at Dr. John Pott's plantation, "newlie built," to erect houses and secure the land in that quarter. Under this encouragement, palisades, six miles in length, were run from creek to creek, and, on the ridge between, a settlement called Middle Plantation, (afterwards Williamsburg), was made. Sir John Harvey's enterprise is described (2) in the following extract from a letter written in 1634, from Jamestown, by Captain Thomas Yonge.

When the Governor came first hither, he found James River only inhabited and one plantation on the eastern side of the Bay, but now he hath settled divers good plantations upon another river which lieth northerly from James River and hath caused a strong palisade to be builded upon a streight between both rivers and caused houses to be built in several places upon the same, and hath placed a sufficient force of men to defence of the same, whereby all the lower part of Virginia have a range for their cattle, near fortie miles in length and in most places twelve miles broade. The pallisades is very neare six miles long, bounded in by two large Creekes. He hath an intention in this manner to take also in all the grounde between those two Rivers, and so utterly excluded the Indians from thence; which work is conceived to be of extraordinary benefit to the country and of no extreame difficulty in case he may be countenanced from England in his good endeavours by the State of England and assisted by the inhabitants heere, who for the present are very destitute of all manner of Arms and munitions for the defence of the country.

Dr. John Pott, who received the first patent for land at (2) Massachusetts Hist. Society Coll., ix (fourth series), III.

Page 4. was a skilful physician, and doubtless recognized the sanitary advantages of the country around. As the ridge between the creeks was remarkably well drained, there were few mosquitoes and but little malaria, and the deep ravines penetrating from the north and south made the place of much strategic value. The only possible road down the Peninsula is over this ridge, and this road is easily defended. Not much is known of the early years of the settlement beyond the fact that it was kept walled in with strong palisades, and served as a place of refuge from Indian attack. In 1639, Middle Plantation was commanded by Lieutenant Richard Popeley, who patented 1,250 acres west of the palisades. He was born in 1598 in the parish of Wooley, Yorkshire, England, and in 1620, came in the Bona Nova to Virginia, where, in 1624, he was living at Elizabeth City. Though of little book education, Popeley won a high position in the colony by his valor and decision; and upon the request of the governor the council gave him, in 1627, 1500 pounds of tobacco, "he being a man, that both heretofore and is still ready to do good service to the colony." When Claiborne made his settlement at Kent Island in 1631, Popeley, who at the time was living near Claiborne's house at Elizabeth City, was one of his company of a hundred men; and a small island, now called Poplar Island, near Kent Island, was honored with his name.(3) In 1637, he was again residing at Elizabeth City; but in 1639 he was captain at Middle Plantation, where he died before 1643, leaving a widow, but no children to lament his loss.

Popeley, Richard~Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 (Information from the passenger list of the Bona Nova-top of page) At this time William Huddleston, servant of Jamestown appears in the records in 1640. continuing on with text

On April 27, 1644, occurred the second Indian massacre, and in consequence Captain Robert Higginson was directed, in 1646, to run a new pale at the settlement, as the old was out of repair. In June of that year the court of York County entered an order, referring the difference between Captain Robert Higginson and one John Wethersford to the next court,"in regard ye dangerousness of the tyme will not permitt him (i.e. Higginson) to leave the charge and Care of his underkinge (3) Maryland Archives, v. 225.

Page 5. at the Middle Plantation pale this prsent Court." And on October 26, certain persons living at the lower end of York Parish were ordered to pay each 35 pounds of tobacco to Captain Higginson for "not sending up a man to the Middle Plantation for that genrall worke in setting up a pale there according to former order." Captain Higginson was the son of Thomas Higginson, of London, and was a man of importance. It is recited in a grant for 100 acres at Middle Plantation, that it was allowed him "for some certain service by him performed to the Country Anno. 1646." It is, moreover, stated on Lucy Burwell's tombstone in Gloucester County, that she was the daughter of "the gallant Captain Robert Higginson, of the ancient family of the Higginsons, one of the first commanders that subdued the country of Virginia from the power of the heathen."

From the records in the land office in Richmond, and the deed and will books of Yorktown, we learn the names of some of the first residents of Middle Plantation. Among them was John Clerke, or Clark, nephew of Sir John Clerke, of Wrotham, in Kent County, England, of whom there is a long pedigree in the "Visitation of 1621." He purchased 850 acres from Lieutenant Popeley, but died in 1646, without any heirs in Virginia. Two other settlers were Edward Wyatt and his brother, George, sons of Rev. Hawte Wyatt, minister of Jamestown, and nephews of Sir Francis Wyatt, governor of Virginia in 1621-1626, and again in 1639-1642. Stephen Hamlin had 400 acres at the head of Queen's Creek adjoining the land of Lieutenant Popeley, while George Lake had 250 acres at the head of Archer's Hope Creek, adjoining another portion of Popeley's land.

Southwest upon George Lake, northeast upon Captain Popeley's land, and southeast upon the palisades, Henry Tyler, ancestor of President John Tyler, patented 254 acres, occupying the present site of the "Mattey School" of William and Mary College, and extending westward so as to take in the property called "Northington," lately owned by Judge R. L. Henley, now deceased.

Page 6. In 1643, Richard Kempe, Secretary of State, patented 4,332 acres on both sides of Archer's Hope Creek, consisting of several former grants, viz.: 1,200 acres called "Rich Neck," formerly the property of George Menifie, Esq., situated on the west side of the creek, and four tracts adjoining, of 100, 840, 2,192 and 500 acres respectively. The whole is described as partly on the east and partly on the west of the creek, bounded "East-south-east upon the said creek and the palisades, north-east-by-east and South east-by-east upon George Lake's Land, north upon the horse path, north-west-by-north upon the branches of Powhatan swamp, and South upon the Secretarie's Land,"(4) In the Virginia Historical Society rooms is preserved a plat of this land, which shows a portion of the palisades making up from Archer's Hope Creek, as also the horse path along the ridge, where, at present, runs Duke of Gloucester Street.

About 1660, this property, which comprised the present college land, passed to Thomas Ludwell, Esq., one of Kempe's successors in the secretary's office. He lived at "Rich Neck", where some old brick tiles mark the site of his habitation. In 1644, Henry Brooke, merchant of London, purchased from Captain Popeley 500 acres, which, in 1646, he sold to Nicholas Brooke, Jr., who, in 1649, conveyed the land to his father, Nicholas Brooke, Sr., which last, in 1652, sold 200 acres to Sam'l Fenn, of Martin's Hundred, describing it as beginning "att the creek upon the old pallasadoes, for length unto the land of Captain Robert Hickenson (Higginson) claimed, and for breadth unto the forrest."

After the restoration of Charles II., in 1660, we find resident at Middle Plantation such men as Peter Efford, whose daughter Sarah married Major Samuel Weldon; Otho Thorpe, who was of the same family as George Thorpe, massacred by the Indians in 1622; Colonel John Page, who ws founder of the distinguished Page family of Virginia; and James Bray, a prominent merchant and later member of the council. In Bacon's Rebellion, which happened in 1676, Middle Plantation figured next to Jamestown as the theatre of politics. (4) The "Secretarie's Land," comprised 600 acres on Archer's Hope Creek, between Jockey's Neck and Archer's Hope.

1625
A census for this year records that there are ten Africans living on Jamestown island. March 5. King James I dies and is succeeded by Charles I. May 13. King Charles declares Virginia, the Bermuda Islands, and New England to be royal colonies directly dependent upon the crown. The Jamestown Assembly petitions Charles I for permission to retain their legislature and is refused.

May 1625 On this date Sir Francis Wyatt sends to England a list of land titles in Virginia (which appears to be somewhat out of date). It lists both of John Baynham’s holdings. In the “Teritory of Tappahanna over against James Citty” are listed John Baynham (200 planted), Mr. George Sandys (300 planted), and Edward Grindon (150 planted), all “by Pattent”. At “Blunt Point” is listed “John Baynham 300 by patent”. [Kingsbury, Volume IV, p555 and p557.]
12 Dec 1625 Capt. Ralph Hamer counseller of estate desireth of the courte to have five hundred acres of land scytuate on the northe side of Blunt Point river, about three miles upp the saide river & abbuttinge westerlie upon a creek dividing it from the land of John Baynum gent., and thence extendinge easterlie two hundred and fiftie pole along the bank of the said Blunt point river…[McIlwaine, p79.] This is a fairly precise description of the location of John Baynham’s land.

22 Feb 1625/6 Ordered that Mr. John Baynam shall bringe the accoumpts to Mr. Weston [owner of the ship Sparrow] and deliver unto him such goodes and depts [debts?] as the said John Baynam by order from Maunder [purser of the Sparrow] hath received in this countrey. [McIlwaine, p96.]
8 May 1626 Court orders a patent of 500a for Mr. William Cleybourne “towards the head of Blunt poynte river and abuttinge southerly on the land of John Baynum…” {McIlwaine, p103.]

7/8 Aug 1626 Monthly courts were this day established at Charles Hundred and Elizabeth City “for the determinge of pettie controversies not excedinge the value of 200 lb. of Tobacco and for the punishinge of pettie offences… Comissioners nominated for Elizabeth City court: Capt. Tucker, Capt. Martin, Mr. Jonas Stogden, Livt. Purfrey, Mr. Edward Waters, Mr. John Baynam, Mr. Salforde. [McIlwaine, p106.]
12 Oct 1626 Court record: John Hart had posted a bond as security for “delivery of one man unto John Bainham gent at or uppon the 25th day of Decemb 1625”. The man was not delivered, and the court ordered George Menefy, a Jamestown merchant, to retain 400 pounds of tobacco belonging to Hart. The servant man was “now alledged to bee sent & shipped on a ship from Ireland, Mr. Fells master.” The court ordered that, if the man was not delivered to John Bainham by 25 December 1626, “then the said 400 lb of Tobacco be paid to the said Mr. Bainham in full satisfaction of said bond.” [McIlwaine, p118.]

11 Jan 1626/7 Whereas by the complaint of Thomas Weston, merchant, it doth appeare to the court that John Bainham of Elizabeth Citty hath paid unto James Carter, master of the Anne deceased, seventy and fowre pounds of Tobacco which was of the estate of Edward Maunder now in England & was appointed by order of the court to be paid unto the said Thomas Weston as to him belonging of right, therefore the court hath ordered that the said Bainham, in reguard that the said payment made to James Carter was without any warrant or order, shall repay againe the said seventy fowre pounds of Tobacco to the said Mr. Weston. [McIlwaine, p133.]

At this court was proved the will of John Bainham, deceased, by the oaths of Rowland Graine, minister, and Jaques Pastall, planter, and that the said John Bainham was in perfect sense and memory at the making thereof. Alsoe at the same tyme Mr. Robt. Sweete brought in the inventory of the said John Bainham’s estate & desired to renounce the executorshipp of that estate, whereupon a letter of administration was graunted unto Elizabeth Bainham the widow and relicte of the said John Bainham. [McIlwaine, p185.] Although we can’t tell for sure, it would appear that John Baynham died in late 1628 or early in January 1629 since there was time for his partner to make an inventory. There is no further mention of Elizabeth, although she surely remarried. The will itself is lost. Same court: Lt. Edward Waters testifies that “the inventory of Capt. Crotias now brought into this court … is the true inventory of the said Capt. Crotias and that the said inventory was taken by him this deponent and John Bainham deceased”. [McIlwaine, p186.]
Captain Rawley Croshaw (the more common spelling) had come to Virginia in 1608 (and his wife had arrived with Elizabeth Baynham in the Bona Nova in 1620, according to his patent of 1623). He served as a Burgess from Elizabeth City. Exactly when he died is unknown, but it would appear from this entry that John Baynham had probably died within a few weeks of this court date. Copyright © 2001-2003 Robert W. Baird, All Rights Reserved

The earliest record of this surname is from 1200, Richard de Hudelsdun is recorded in the "Curia Regis Rolls" of Yorkshire . William Hudleston was residing in Yorkshire in 1379. In 1587 William Hudleston is mentioned in the "Lancashire Wills at Richmand". The marriage of John Huddleston and Elizabeth Holy is registered in St. James Clerkenwell in 1711 ). Huddleston Family Tables by George Huddleston ISBN: 083289236X Title: Huddleston Family Tables Author: George Huddleston Publisher: Higginson Book Company Edition: Hardcover Huddleston Family Tables by George Huddleston ISBN: 0832892378 Title: Huddleston Family Tables Author: George Huddleston Publisher: Higginson Book Company Edition: Softcover HUDDLESTON FAMILY TABLES COMPLIED BY GEORGE HUDDLESTON (b182) BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 1933 Printed In The United States Of America At The Rumford Press, Concord, N. H. Permission granted by George Huddleston's daughter Mrs. Nancy Huddleston Packer COPYRIGHTED FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY Huddleston Family Tables by George Huddleston 1933, reprinted 1973. 1998 by Don Cordell, 1221 Herzel Avenue, Lancaster, CA 93535.

Captain John Huddleston master of the Bova Nova, who served the Virginia Company in 1620 had tracts of land in Jamestown, Virginia and also Nevis Island, in the Carribeans. Hudleston, John, Captain, 26V246; 28V324.

Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland Record Office: Braunstone Estate Documents MIDDLESEX
Reference: 16 D 66/461 Creation dates: 16th June, 1603 Scope and Content Declaration of uses. William Huddleston, sen., of Little Haseley, Oxon., gent. Recital: 4th June, 1595. Bargain and sale. (i) William Hartilpoole of St James', Clerkenwell, Middlesex, gent., son and heir of the late Richard Hartilpoole. (ii) Richard Bell, yeoman, now servant to William Huddleston, sen. Property: 2 messuages in St James', Clerkenwell, occupied by Sir Ferdinando Gorge, Kt., and Isabel Percey. To the use of William Huddleston, jun., son of William Huddleston, sen., and his male heirs, George Huddleston, another son of William Huddleston, sen., and his male heirs, Elizabeth, mother of William, jun., and George, and any more sons of her and William Huddleston, sen., and Elizabeth Huddleston, daughter of William Huddleston, sen. Confirmation of the above uses (including a third son, Barantine, after George), as William, jun., George, Barantine, and Elizabeth are the natural children of William Huddleston, sen., by Elizabeth, whom he has now married. Piece details: STAC 2/25/337 : quick reference PLAINTIFF: Richard Hartipoole DEFENDANT: Richard Poole, vicar of Thatcham, John Sendall, and others PLACE OR SUBJECT: Title to the vicarage of Thatcham COUNTY: Berks 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 5/H58/29 Hartipool v Smith & Goodcole, and others 12 Eliz.

LANCASHIRE CLERGY. Creation dates: 1604 The Names of the Parishes. Dalton - A Viccaridge; the Patron, the Chancellor of the Duchye. The Incumbent, Mr. Gardner, noe Preacher. The farmor there, Mr. Joseph Hudleston, gent. Croston - A Viccaridge; the Patron, Sir Edmund Huddleston, Knight; the incumbent, a preacher. The farmor, the said Sir Edmund Huddleston, Knight. Boulton in the Moores - An Impropriation belonging to the Lord Bishop of Chester, who is patron; the Incumbent, Mr. Sanderson, a preacher. There is allsoe Mr. Gosnall, a preacher, maintained by the parish. Sanderson, John, of Hardhornend Newton; 232. Mr., a preacher; 11. ID: I96 Name: Agnes SANDERSON Sex: F Birth: in Dalton In Furness, Lancashire, England Note: Lancashire Record Office: Lancashire County Quarter Sessions [QSB/1/201 QSB/1/250] FILE-Recognizance Roll: Lancaster, Epiphany, 1638/9 ref. QSB/1/208 date: 1638/9 item: DALTON-in-FURNESS Agnes Sanderson likewise ref. QSB/1/208/9 date: 1638/9 Marriage 1 Thomas HUDDLESTON b: in Dalton In Furness, Lancashire, England 7 OCT 1582 Lincolnshire Archives: Reeve Deeds removed from Leadenham bundle REEVE 1/1/2. FILE-Marriage settlement.-ref. REEVE 1/3/7/2-date: 30 Nov. 2 Chas., 1626 \_ [from Scope and Content] Property: all those 30ac. of land, meadow, and pasture with appurtenances in Fulbeck which he purchased of William Huddleston the son of Robert Huddleston late of Fulbeck deceased. Leicestershire, miscellaneous. FILE-Copy of abstract of title- ref. REEVE 1/16/1/1-date: no date \_ [from Scope and Content] De la Fountaine, Meres, Pettus, Sherard, Sanderson, Sedley

SP 46/183/fo 139 Draft bond of Thomas Huddlestone, haberdasher, William Tumlinson, goldsmith, and Thomas [torn] an, tailor, all of London, to the Earl of Ormond in 5 marks, to be paid by 24 June following. 1504 14 Feb

We will read about Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua and how Captain Nuce saw him in Captain Nuce's letter to Sir Edwin Sandy starting on page 455 to page 458 in the Records of the Virginia Company, later.

Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts, 1606-1733 CLXXIII. Privy Council. Order Regarding Freedom of Fishing Page 459 June 18, 1621 Privy Council Register, James I, Volume V, Page 58 Document in Privy Council Office, London List of Records No.251 Att Whitehall the 18th of June. 1621 Present Lo: Archbishopp of Canterburie, Lo: Treasurer, Lo: Privie Seale, Lo: Steward, Lo: Admirall, Lo: Chamberlaine, E. of Arundell, Lo: Vic. Doncaster, Lo: Vic. Falkland, Lo: Carew, Mr Secretarie Calvert, Mr Chancellor of th'Excheqr, Mr of the Rolles, Mr of the Wards & Mr Deane of Westminister Whereas there was a peticon ehibited vnto his Matie in the name of the Pattentees and Adventurers in the plantation of New England concerning some differences between the Southerne & Northerne Colonies, the wch petition was by his Matie referred to the consideration of the Lords. Their Lopps vpon the hearing & debating of the matter att large and by the consent of both Colonies did establish and confirme two former orders,

Page 460 the one bearing date the 16th of March 1619 agreed vpon by the Duke of Lenox and the Earle of Arundell (to whom the busines was referred by the Board) the other of the 21st of July 1620 ordered by the Board, whereby it was thought fitt, that the said Colonies should fish att Sea wthin the Limitts and bounds of each other reciprocally, wth this Limitation that it bee onely for the sustentation of the people of the Colonies ther, and for the transportation of people into either Colonie (as by the said order more att large appeareth) And further it was ordered att this present by their Lopps, that they should haue freedom of the Shore for drying of their netts, and taking and saving of their fish, and to haue wood for their necessary vses, att (crossed out) by the assignment of the Governors att reasonable rates. Lastly that the Patent of the Northerne plantation shalbe renewed, according to the premises, And those of the Southerne plantation to haue a sight thereof before it be ingrossed, And the former Patent to be delivered into the hands of the Pattentees.

Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1666 Abstracted and Indexed by Nell Marion Nugent Copyright, 1963 by Genealogical Publishing Company originally published Richmond, 1934 page 44 Capt. Christopher Calthropp, 100 acs., being a second devdt., according to a graunt signed by Sir Georg Yeardly to John Hudleston, Marriner, 26 Apr. 16, 1621 & assigned by Richard Cox, Atty. to sd. Hudleston, to sd. Calthropp. 5 July 1636, p. 368. Adj. to the first devdt., whose bounds were, viz: W. upon Waters his Cr. E. upon land of Robert Hutchins, S. the river & N. into the woods. Same. 100 acrs. Chas. Riv. Co., same date & page. Within the new Poquoson at the head of Powells Cr., Nly. upon sd. Cr., Ely. to land formeley graunted to him. Trans. of 2 pers: Christopher Watts, Senr., Christopher Watts, Junr

Early Virginia Immigrants, pg 346 Watts, Christopher (Junior), 1636, by Capt. Christopher Calthropp, Charles River Co. Watts, Christopher (Senior), 1636, by Capt. Christopher Calthropp, Charles River Co.

The Plymouth Colony had not over one hundred and fifty settlers, and these were in a starving condition, from which they were rescued by the ship of Captain John Huddleston, a member of the Virginia Colony. The letter of the noble Captain*, which was carried ashore, and his conduct in sharing his scanty store with the Pilgrims, is worthy of all praise, and yet I do not remember ever seeing this beautiful incident, which connects the two colonies, referred to in any of the modern histories of the Plymouth Colony.

As given by Bradford, the story is as follows: Amidst these streigths, and ye desertion of those from whom they had hoped for supply, and when famine begane now to pinch them sore, they not knowing what to doe, the Lord (who never fails his) presents them with an occasion, beyond all expectation. This boat which came from ye eastward brought them a letter from a stranger, of whose name *Capt. John Huddleston commanded the ship Bona Nova, of 200 tons, and performed many voyages to Virginia in the interest of the Virginia Company. He patented lands in Virginia in the "territory of Tappahannock over against James Cittie", and at Blunt Point, near Newport News. In 1624, he was reported as dead. Page 54. they had never heard before, being a captaine of a shop come ther a fishing. This leter was as followeth. Being thus inscribed.

"To all his good friends at Plimoth, these, &c. Friends, cuntrimen, & neighbors: I salute you, and wish you all health and hapiness in ye Lord. I make bould with these few lines to trouble you, because unless I were unhumane, I can doe no less. Bad news doth spread it selfe too farr; yet I will so farr inform you that my selfe, with many good friends in ye south-collonie of Virginia have received shuch a blow that 400 persons large will not make good our losses. Therefore I doe entreat you (allthough not knowing you) that ye old rule which I learned when I went to school may be sufficiente. That is, Hapie is he whom other men's harmes doth make to beware. And now againe and againe, wishing all those yt willingly would serve ye Lord, all health and happiness, in this world, and everlasting peace in ye world to come. And so I rest, Yours, JOHN HUDDLESTON."

By this boat ye Govr returned a thankfull answer, as was meete, and sente a boate of their owne with them, which was piloted by them, in which Mr Winslow was sente to procure what provissions he could of ye ships, who was kindly received by ye foresaid gentill-man, who not only spared what he could, but writ to others to doe ye like. By which means he gott some good quantitie and returned in saftie, by which ye plantation had a double benefite, first, a present refreshing by ye food brought, and secondly, they knew ye way to thos parts for the venifite hereafter. But what was gott, & this small boat brought, being HOW THE PLANTERS FROM VIRGINIA SAVED THE PLYMOUTH COLONY; Wm. and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. 12, No. 1

When, in December, 1619, in the court of the London company, John Delbridge applied for permission to fish at Cape Cod,1 Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who was also a member and was present, objected on the ground that the petitioner should have applied to the patentees of the northern colony. Sir Edwin Sandys, then treasurer, declared in reply not only that the sea was free to both companies, but that it was clear from the letters patent that each might fish along the coasts of the other. Gorges affirmed his belief that the rights of each were exclusive, and offered to submit the point to the council of both companies. This was agreed to, and the council, the majority of whom in attendance may quite probably have been members of the London company, supported the view of Sandys. License was thereupon given to the society of Smith”s Hundred “to go a-fishing.” But certain of the patentees of the northern colony were not satisfied, and insisted upon considering the question further. It seems to have been referred to the Duke of Lenox and the Earl of Arundel, who failed to reach a decision satisfactory to either party. 1 Recs. of Va. Co. I. 27.

Chancery Records. Town Depositions Public Record Office Class 1630-1631 Pages 1 & 2 No. 50 John Hart c. John Deldridge. See C2 Charles II H 26/62 & D 23/70 CLASS C 24/565 Depositions on behalf of hart: 1p Tristram Conyman, July 6, 1630, Describes the voyage of the "Bona Nova" to Canada to fish in November 1623. Not sure if any tobacco was laden aboard in Virginia. Page 2 p.5 Thomas Biare, April 2, 1631, Was employed by Mr. Farrar, Mr. Barker and Delbridge to fit out the "Bona Nova" for a fishing voyage. Praises the part played by Hart in the fitting out. p.6 Humprey Barrett, April 6, 1631, Hart managed the whole business of setting out the ship. p.7 Gabriel Barbor, April 12, 1631, Describes arrangements for the voyage of the "Bona Nova", "Hopewell", and the "Darling". "Bona Nova" returned in September 1622 and fitted out for a second voyage to Canada.

Chancery Proceedings. Series I. Charles I Public Record Office 1628-1629 CLASS C2 Charles 1 H42/64 John Hart c. John Delbridge did in May 1622 agree to set forth several ships for a fishing voyage to New England. They approached Hart to organize the voyages and to keep the accounts. Afterwards Mr. John Ferrar became partner with Delbridge and Barbour, each having a one-third share. It was agreed that Hart should be paid L40 for his services. Ferrar and Barbour have each paid him L15 but he has not received the L10 from Delbridge. In November 1633 he was again employed in settling out the "Bona Nova" for fishing in New England.

Chancery Depositions. Elizabeth I to Charles. Public Record Office 1630/31 Page 2 of 2 Survey Report No. 10719 1p Depositions on behalf of Delbridge. Nicholas Delbridge. In 1622 he and Hart were employed in fitting out the "Bona Nova" from Plymouth to Canada on a fishing voyage. Believes Hart was employed by John Delbridge.

Page 516 & 517 CXCVII. Council And Company For Virginia. A Commission Granted To John Huddleston November 21, 1621 Additional Manuscripts, 14285, Folios 75a-76a Document in British Museum, London List of Records No. 277 [75a] A Comission graunted by the Counsell and Company for Virginia to John Huddleston for a Voyadge to Virginia and for a free fishinge on the Coast of America. To all whome these present shall come to be seen or heard the Counsell and Company for Virginia send greetinge whereas the right HONOble Henry Earle of Southhampton Sr Edwin Sandy knight John fferar Thomas Knightley Gabrielle BarboR and John Delbridge haue for the advancement and supporte of the Colonie in Virginia furnished and sett out the good Shippe called Bona Noua of the burden of 190 tun to transporte and carrie ouer into Virginia fortie fiue persons there to plant and inhabite together with sundrie necessarie prouisions aswell for the said Passengers as also for the benifitt and advancement of the Colonie and haue ordained John Huddlestone to be the GouernoR and Captaine ouer the said Shippe and Marriners as also of all the Passengers ...

Sir Ferdinando George
House of Commons Journal Volume 1 14 November 1621 American Fishing Mr. Granvyle moveth, to speed the Bill of Fishing upon [the] Coasts of America; the rather, because Sir Fer. Gorge hath executed a Patent sithence the Recess.-Hath by Letters from the Lords of the Council, stayed the Ships ready to go forth. Mr. Neale, accordant.-That Ferd. hath be sides threatened to send out ships, to beat them off from their free fishing, take considerations hereof. Sir W. Neale;-That this true; but my Lord Treasurer hath given Order, that the Ships shall go forth presently, without Stay. Edw. Coke:-That the Patent may be brought in. And Sir Tho. Wentworth:-That the Party may be sent for.(The Bona Nova departed Virginia May [16], 1621.2) Sources: (1) "Hotten's Lists", Virginia Musters (2) Letter, dated May [16], 1621, from Jabez Whittaker, in Virginia, sent to Sir Edwin Sandys, London, on the departing Bona Nova. Page 441 & 442 of 'Records of the Virginia Company'. (S.M. Kingsbury, "Records of the Virginia Company", 1933, v.III, page 297) Page 109 & 110 'Records of the Virginia Company' (Source: The Voyage...To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate) November, 1619 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Source: "Hotten's Lists" Burthen: 200 tons Records of the Virginia Company)Page 516 & 517 CXCVII. Council And Company For Virginia. A Commission Granted To John Huddleston November 21, 1621 Additional Manuscripts, 14285, Folios 75a-76a Document in British Museum, London List of Records No. 277 [75a] A Comission graunted by the Counsell and Company for Virginia to John Huddleston for a Voyadge to Virginia and for a free fishinge on the Coast of America.

The Plymouth Company
WHILST French and English colonists from free Holland were planting settlements on the Delaware and Hudson Rivers and the borders of Cape Cod Bay, a seed-time had again begun on that portion of the soil of New England now covered by the States of New Hampshire and Maine. Sir Ferdinando Gorges was the chief promoter of this cultivation. He had been the controlling spirit in the Plymouth Company from the beginning, and the chief instrument in procuring the despotic charter for the Plymouth Council. For its existence and powers he contended fearlessly before the hostile Parliament, standing firmly upon the king's prerogative. In that contest he had a powerful coadjutor in Sir George Calvert, a representative of Yorkshire, and who afterward became the founder of Maryland. Educated at Oxford; taught wisdom by travels; fostered in public life by Sir Robert Cecil, and through him advanced to the honors of knighthood; employed as one of the Secretaries of State when the Pilgrims were preparing to depart for America, and being possessed of a handsome person, winning manners and fluency of speech, he was very popular among all classes, and had been elected to a seat in the House of Commons by an immense majority. He had sought refuge from controversy (privately at first) in the bosom of the Roman Catholic Church. As that Church paid all due deference to the king as sovereign, it was not regarded with disfavor by James, and Sir George was an ever-welcome guest at the palace, for he was a thorough courtier.

It was a notable scene in the House of Commons, then convened for the first time in seven years, when Gorges appeared before that body to show cause why the charter should not be annulled, or its despotic powers abridged. The King was present to defend his prerogative if it should be assailed. Gorges and Calvert were opposed by Sir Edwin Sandys, the wise statesman and friend of Virginia, and by the then venerable Sir Edward Coke, who had been Lord Chief-Justice of England. Coke was a member of Parliament and of the Privy Council, and he then began his famous contest with the king, which resulted in a curious exhibition of wrath and despotism on the part of James. Coke had procured the opposition of Parliament to the proposed marriage of the Prince of Wales to a Spanish princess, as dangerous to Protestantism in England. The angered king denounced the address which the House of Commons presented to him on the subject as an unlawful interference with his prerogative; mentioned the name of Coke, the author of it, as a culprit; and in a letter to the Speaker, declared his intention to "punish any man's misdemeanor in Parliament as well during the sitting as after." This threat was aimed at Coke, who immediately moved a protestation for the privilege of the House, setting forth the right of every member to freedom of speech, and like "freedom from all impeachment, imprisonment or molestation," on account of anything said or done in Parliament. It was carried and entered in the journals. On hearing of this act, the king immediately prorogued or dissolved Parliament, sent for the journals of the House, and with his own hand tore out the offensive record. Then he caused the arrest of Coke and others, in execution of his threat, and confined him in the Tower several months, when he was released on the petition of Prince Charles.

In the matter of the charter, Sandys pleaded for the freedom in fishing and of general commerce, which was then becoming the staple of wealth for England. "The fishermen hinder the plantations," replied Calvert; "they choke the harbors with their ballast, and waste the forests by improvident use. America is not annexed to the realm nor within the jurisdiction of Parliament; you have therefore no right to interfere." "We make laws for Virginia," said another member; "a bill passed by the Commons and the Lords, if it receives the king's assent, will control the patent." Sir Edward Coke argued with numerous references to the statutes of the realm, that as the charter was granted without regard to pre-existing rights, it was necessarily void. This attack upon his prerogative aroused the angry monarch, who was sitting near the Speaker's chair, and he blurted out some silly words about the "divine right of kings," when the Commons, in defiance of his wrath, passed a bill giving freedom to commerce in spite of the charter. That bill had not gone through all the forms of legislation when the king broke up the Parliament for reasons just mentioned.

James, in the exercise of his prerogative, issued a proclamation forbidding any vessel to approach the shores of North Virginia without the special consent of the Plymouth Company. The Company commissioned Francis West admiral of New England, and sent him to protect their chartered rights. His police force was too feeble for so wide a domain, and the fishermen, in their fast-sailing shallops, eluded his grasp. The next Parliament proceeded to perfect what the former one had begun. The House was led by Coke, lately released from the Tower. "Your patent," he said to Gorges from the Speaker's chair, "contains many particulars contrary to the laws and privileges of the subject; it is a monopoly, and the ends of private gain are concealed under color of planting a colony." In debate, he said, "Shall none visit the sea-coast for fishing? This is to make a monopoly upon the seas, which want to be free. If you, alone, are to pack and dry fish, you attempt a monopoly of the wind and sun." The bill passed, but never received the signature of the king. The monopolists, discouraged by the opposition of the Commons, lowered their pretensions, and many of the patentees withdrew their interests in the Company. Those who remained, like Gorges, now did little more than issue grants of domain in the north-eastern parts of America.

This was the first debate on American affairs in the British Parliament; and it is a singular fact that in the course of it the supreme authority of the National Legislature over the American colonies was plainly asserted, the attempted exercise of which, in the matter of taxation, led to the old war for independence, one hundred and fifty years afterward, and the dismemberment of the British empire. Return to Our Country, Vol. I

Coke, Sir Edward

(kk) (KEY) , 1552–1634, English jurist, one of the most eminent in the history of English law. He entered Parliament in 1589 and rose rapidly, becoming solicitor general and speaker of the House of Commons. In 1593 he was made attorney general. His rival for that office was Sir Francis Bacon, thereafter one of Coke’s bitterest enemies. He earned a reputation as a severe prosecutor, notably at the trial of Sir Walter Raleigh, and held a favorable position at the court of King James I. In 1606 he became chief justice of the common pleas. In this position, and (after 1613) as chief justice of the king’s bench, Coke became the champion of common law against the encroachments of the royal prerogative and declared null and void royal proclamations that were contrary to law. Although his historical arguments were frequently based on false interpretations of early documents, as in the case of the Magna Carta, his reasoning was brilliant and his conclusions impressive. His constant collisions with the king and the numerous enmities he developed—especially that with Thomas Egerton, Baron Ellesmere, the chancellor—brought about his fall. Bacon was one of the foremost figures in engineering his dismissal in 1616. By personal and political influence, Coke got himself back on the privy council and was elected (1620) to Parliament, where he became a leader of the popular faction in opposition to James I and Charles I. He was prominent in the drafting of the Petition of Right (1628). His most important writings are the Reports, a series of detailed commentaries on cases in common law, and the Institutes, which includes his commentary on Littleton’s Tenures. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Copyright © 2003 Columbia University Press
We know that Sir Edmund Huddleston's son, Henry Huddleston was implicated in the Gunpowder Plot but exonerated.

Trial, Execution and Aftermath: The details of how the other conspirators were rounded up need not concern us here. One by one they admitted their part. Dragged through the crowd, they were to be hung, drawn and quartered at Westminster on 30th and 31st January 1606, excepting Tresham who died of illness in the Tower of London. The show trial of the conspirators took place in Westminster Hall, Sir Edward Coke, Attorney-General, prosecuting for the King. The King indeed observed the trial from a secret hiding place. All were condemned. Coke fulminated at the conspirators: they stood no chance of being spared. On 30th January 1606, Sir Everard Digby was the first to mount the scaffold, then Robert Wintour, John Grant, Thomas Bates. Tom Wintour and Guy Fawkes, Ambrose Rookwood and Robert Keyes followed on 31st. One by one the conspirators had been interrogated and tortured by manacles or by the rack. They all, except Bates, had denied any priestly involvement, but Bates’ testimony involved a Fr Garnet, a Jesuit, who had ministered under various pseudonyms, for many years in England and who had learnt in terrible consternation under the seal of Confession, what was to happen, but was powerless to do more than to counsel him forcefully against it; he had no success.

Questions were asked, as ever, about Jesuit involvement. Why had none been produced in the show trial of the conspirators which followed in the January of 1606? Finally Fr Garnet’s safe place of hiding was discovered. Along with the chaplain of Hindlip House, he had been hiding in a confined space, fed with soup through a straw pushed through a stone in the wall in the most appalling conditions. He was taken to London in stages but treated with care. At his trial on 28th March 1606, he pleaded not guilty. Coke, the prosecutor again said "I will name it the Jesuits’ treason as belonging to them." He dragged up Queen Elizabeth’s excommunication, the Spanish Armada, Spain, indeed anything he could. Fr Garnet declared: "I have always abhorred this wicked attempt." He was accused of misprision (knowing about a crime - the plot - but doing nothing about it). He was executed on Saturday 3rd May 1606. Fr Garnet had been a native of Heanor in Derbyshire.(See note 10) http://www.innotts.co.uk/asperges/fawkes/fawkes4.html Sir Edward Coke (pronounced "cook") (1 February 1552 - 3 September 1634) was an early English colonial entrepreneur and jurist whose writings on the English common law were the definitive legal texts for some 300 years. He is credited with having established the legal basis for slavery in the English colonies. Between becoming a Member of Parliament in 1589 and again in 1620, he served as England's Attorney General (1593-1606) under Elizabeth I of England and as its Lord Chief Justice (1613-1616) and a Privy Councilor (1614-1616, 1617-1620) under James I of England. His speeches, in the House of Commons, against governmental abuses of the people's rights so angered King James that he held Sir Edward prisoner in the Tower of London for nine months in 1622. In 1606, Coke helped write the charter of the Virginia Company, a private venture granted a royal charter to found settlements in North America. He became directory of the London Company, one of the two branches of the Virginia Company. As director, he proposed a means by which slavery could be legalised in the new Virginia Colony. Fearing opposition if the issue was publicly debated, Coke was responsible for Calvin's Case in 1608, which ruled that "all infidels are in law perpetual ennemies". Here he was borrowing from a legal tradition rooted in canonical law and apologetics for the crusades. In this way Coke played a significant part in the development of New World slavery. On January 2, 2003, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom refused to make a public apology for the long history of slavery under the British Empire on the basis that it was legal at the time. Writing via assistant private secretary Kay Brock, she said "Under the statute of the International criminal Court, acts of enslavement committed today . . . constitute a crime against humanity. But the historic slave trade was not a crime against humanity or contrary to international law at the time when the UK government condoned it." Copies of Coke's writings arrived in North America on the Mayflower in 1620, and both John Adams and Patrick Henry cited Coke's treatises to support their revolutionary positions against the Mother Country in the 1770s. Under Lord Coke's leadership, in 1628 the House of Commons forced Charles I of England to accept Coke's Petition of Rights by withholding the revenues the king wanted until he capitulated. Quotes The quote is believed to have led to the "castle exception" of self-defense: "A man's house is his castle - for where shall a man be safe if it be not in his own house?" His famous quote about the common law: "Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. . . The law which is perfection of reason." (First Institute) Resources The Lion and the Throne, a biography (ISBN 0-316-10393-4) of Coke by Catherine Drinker Bowen, won the National Book Award.

Records of the Virginia Company)Page 516 & 517 CXCVII. Council And Company For Virginia. A Commission Granted To John Huddleston November 21, 1621 Additional Manuscripts, 14285, Folios 75a-76a Document in British Museum, London List of Records No. 277 [75a] A Comission graunted by the Counsell and Company for Virginia to John Huddleston for a Voyadge to Virginia and for a free fishinge on the Coast of America.
American Fishing. Sir Edw. Coke reporteth from the Committee for Grievances.-Have condemned One, viz. Sir F. Gorge his Patent, for a Plantation in New England.-Their Counsel heard, the Exceptions being first delivered them. Resolved, by Consent-The Charter dated 3o Nov. 18o Jac.-That the Clause in the Patent, that no Subject of England shall visit the Coast, upon Pain of Forfeiture of the Ship and Goods :-The Patentees have yielded, the English Fishermen shall visit; and will not interrupt any Fisherman to fish there: For he no new Discoverer ; Fishermen of this, and other Nations, having fished there before his Patent. Drying of Nets, Salting of their Fish, &c. Incident to their Fishing: Whereunto he also agreed. After he was gone, after Debate, over-ruled, the Fishermen might take Timber for Repair of their Ships : 1. Quia incident: 2ly, Taken so before his Patent: 3ly, Fishermen never take any Timber with them: 4ly, Bring in great Store of Money for their Fish.-Resolved, English Fishermen shall have Fishing, with all Incidents of drying Fish, Nets, Timber, &c.-2ly, That the Clause of Forfeiture, being only by Patent, and not by Act of Parliament, void. Resolved, upon Question, That the House thinketh fit, the Fishermen of England shall have fishing there, with all the Incidents necessary, of drying Nets, and salting, and packing. Upon the second Question, in the Opinion of this House, una voce, the Clause of Confiscation void, and against Law. Upon the third Question, in the Opinion of this House, the Fishermen of England may take necessary Wood and Timber, for their Ships and Boats Use of Fishing there, [a]. From: British History Online Source: House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 17 March 1624. House of Commons Journal Volume 1, (1802).

From: British History Online Source: House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 25 May 1624. House of Commons Journal Volume 1, (1802). © Copyright 2003 University of London & History of Parliament Trust American Fishing.The Debate concerning the Fishing in New England, renewed. Sir W. Earle, - for the Planters ; who more beneficial to the Commonwealth, than the Fishers. A Proviso, in Parchment, tendered to this Bill : Which read. A second Proviso tendered by Mr. Guy: Which read. Sir Edw. Coke :- Sir F. Gorge his Patent condemned, for the Clause, that none should visit with fishing upon the Sea Coast. This to make a Monopoly upon the Sea, which wont to be free. A Monopoly attempted of the Wind, and the Sun, by the sole Packing and Drying of Fish. Mr. Secretary :-That free Fishing, prayed by this Bill, overthroweth all Plantations in these Countries. That Liberty by this Bill to cut down Wood within One Quarter of a Mile of a Dwelling house ; which exceeding prejudicial to the Planters. So for Newfound-land. Mr. Glanvyle :-The first Stage worth Ten of the rest. The Provision for Timber, in New found-land, omitted, because that an Island, having no Rivers : But New England hath divers Rivers into it. Both the Provisoes, upon Question, rejected.The Bill, upon Question, passed.

From: British History Online Source: House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 24 May 1624. House of Commons Journal Volume 1, (1802). © Copyright 2003 University of London & History of Parliament Trust American Fishing. L. 1a. An Act for the freer Liberty of Fishing, and Fishing Voyages, to be made and performed on the Sea-coasts and Places of Newfound-land, Virginia, New England, and other the Sea-coasts and Parts of America. Concealments. Mr. Glanvyle:-To have a new Day for the Bill of Concealments, now sine die; and to have some more Committees added to the former. All the Lawyers of the House added to this Committee: And this Committee to meet at Two of the Clock this Afternoon, in the Exchequer Chamber. Grievances. Mr. Neale;-Five Ships of Plymouth under Arrest, and Two of Dartmouth, because they went to fish in New England. This done by Warrant from the Admiralty.-To have these Suits stayed, till this Bill have had his Passage.-This done by Sir Ferdinando Gorge his Patent. Ordered, This Patent shall be brought in to the Committee of Grievances, upon Friday next.

From: British History Online Source: House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 25 February 1624. House of Commons Journal Volume 1, (1802).© Copyright 2003 University of London & History of Parliament Trust American Fishing. Sir Edw. Coke reports from the Committee of Grievances, a Petition by the Fishermen, against Sir Ferdinando Gorge his Patent.-Their Counsel heard. Resolved by the Committee, That the Fishermen may freely fish there, and take sufficient Wood and Timber for their Fishing, and Repairing of their Ships. And resolved also, That this Clause of the Patent, that no Englishman shall visit that Coast, upon Pain of Confiscation of Ship and Goods, was against the Law.-They desire to have this approved by the Opinion of the House. Resolved, upon Question, as the Opinion of the House, That our Fishermen ought to have free Liberty of Fishing in New England, with all Incidents thereunto. Resolved, also, upon a second Question, as the Opinion of the House, That the Clause of the Patent, of Confiscation of Ships and Goods, is a void Clause in Law. Resolved also, upon a third Question, as the Opinion of the House, That our Fishermen may take necessary Timber and Wood for their Fishing there. Conference. A Message from the Lords, by Serjeant Davies and Attorney-general:-The Lords signify to this House, that the Duke is returned from the King, and hath brought, his Majesty's Pleasure concerning that, which was delivered by him on Sunday last; and therefore desire a present Conference with the Committee of this House, in the Painted Chamber, if it may stand with the Pleasure and Leisure of this House. Answer: This House will presently give a Meeting, as is desired. Ordered, That no Members of this House shall go out, till the Committee be gone up. The Committee sent up to the Lords. Mr. Solicitor to make report from this Conference.

ELIZ HARTEPOOLE Spouse: WM HUDDLESTON Marriage: 1601 Great Haseley, Oxford, England Record extracted from Oxfordshire Marriage Transcripts, 1538-1837, compiled by J. S. W. Gibson. (The index was based on the groom index, film numbers 54,396 to 54,397.) Elizabeth Hartepoole Birth: 1545 Thwaite Hall, Yorks, England

RICHAD HERTTYPOOLE Spouse: URSLEY NEWMAN Marriage: 16 JAN 1581 Saint Margaret, Westminster, London, England 6903677 Number of Fiche: 3 "THWAITE'S HALL, a farm house in the township of Hunderthwaite, and parish of Romaldkirk; 6 miles from Barnardcastle, (Dur.)" [Description(s) edited from Langdale's Yorkshire Dictionary (1822) and Baine's Directory of the County of York (1823)]

ANTHY HUDLESTONE Spouse: MARIE BARRANTINE Marriage: 1541 Great Haseley, Oxford, England Record extracted from Oxfordshire Marriage Transcripts, 1538-1837, compiled by J. S. W. Gibson. (The index was based on the groom index, film numbers 54,396 to 54,397.) The index has no additional information. Anthony Huddleston Birth: 1519 Thwaite Hall,Yorks, England Death: 05 JUN 1598 Father: JOHN HUDDLESTON Mother: JOAN SEYMOUR

C 1/320/51 Jane Huddelston, late the wife of John Huddelston, knight. v. John Daston, trustee: Refusal to take possession of the manor of Temple Guiting and of messuages and lands in Poer Dowdeswell, Pekellysworth, Maisey Hampton, Wormington, Shipton Sollars, Barton, Kynton, Elkstone, Weston-on-Avon, Hareford, Frampton-on-Severn, Dumbleton, Notgrove, Gretton, Alston, Winchcombe, and Cornwell. 1500-1515

John HUDDLESTONE Birth: Abt. 1467 Spouse: Jane SEYMOUR Birth: Abt 1469 Of, Wolfhall, Wiltshire, England

STAC 2/17/109 PLAINTIFF: Charles Pennyngton DEFENDANT: John Huddelston PLACE OR SUBJECT: Amercements COUNTY: Cumberland 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 2/18/227 PLAINTIFF: John Huddelston DEFENDANT: Richard, abbot of Wynchcombe PLACE OR SUBJECT: Messuage and lands COUNTY: Gloucester 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 2/18/65 PLAINTIFF: John Huddelston DEFENDANT: Richard, abbot of Wynchcombe PLACE OR SUBJECT: Messuage and lands COUNTY: Gloucester 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 2/32/50 PLAINTIFF: Charles, bishop of Hereford DEFENDANT: John Huddelston and Kenelm Wetherby PLACE OR SUBJECT: Forcible entry and killing of deer in Prestbury Park, breaking of a pound, &c. COUNTY: Gloucester 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 3/10/65 PLAINTIFF: John Pennyngton DEFENDANT: John Huddelstone PLACE OR SUBJECT: Assault and building a house on plaintiff's land in Monkmore (Interrogatories) COUNTY: Cumb 28/01/1547-06/07/1553 STAC 7/4/32 Plaintiff: Postellthwaite, Elizabeth. Defendant: Anthony Huddelston. Place or Subject: Caldbeck: Forcible ejection from tenancy in the manor of Swinside, and seizure of hay. County: Cumb 17/11/1558-24/03/1603

1. Anthony Huddleston 1518-1598 marr. 1541 Marie Barentyne of Haseley Oxfordshire They had 5 children: Francis 1545 d. infant; 2 daus also d. inf. William b.c 1549 Joyce bc. 1557 marr. Sir Edward Lawrence. 0f the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset. Also an illegit. dau Albina, probably dau. of his half sister, Anne. 2. William bap 25 July 1549 at Haseley. Marr. Mary Bridges of Gloucestershire (she d. 1601 M) At least 13 children several of whom were illegimate. Ferdinand bap. 10 July 1577 H d.c.1646 Anthony bap. 1578 at H Barentyne bap. 1580 H d.1636 M sp William bap.1580 H d.1625M sp Other children included Thomas d. 1663 M; John b and d. 1605 M; George bap. 1594 H d. 1628 M Daughters: Dorothy b and d.M Frances bap 1600 H d.1680 M Mary (marr. Christopher Philipson) and d. 1670 M Margaret m. Anthony Latus 1614 M and d. 1631 M Ellen mar. Anthony Lamplugh pre 1625 and d. c.1678/80 Albina bap 1602 H d. 1653 M

"Oxford Church Depositions 1592-1596..."...church wardens of Haseley qnd curate Thomas Jones...had been summoned by Hudleston to baptise a child in his house...Jones had since been told....now commonally reported...that the child had been unlawfully begotten by Hudleston on Elizabeth a single woman who had had other children by him..." William, his wife Mary, and mistress Elizabeth had a "menage a trois" at Haseley, until his father Anthony died , when they moved to Millom. Mary (nee Bridges) d. 1601 at Millom. William died 1628 at Millom. Elizabeth Hartepole (now Hudleston) marr. 2ndly 1631 Samuel Knipe William Huddleston [birth 1549 death 4 March 1627][(All information above) From "All The Days of my Life" by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr-An Autobiography-1913 D. Appleton & Company; lists him as William Hudleston, Esq., Knight of the shire in the 43 Elizabeth, who married Mary, daughter of Bridges, Esq., of Gloucestershim][Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as .13 William 1549-1628 marriage 1.) Mary Bridges of Glousc. d. 1601 Several children 2.) Elizabeth Hartepoole, his mistress. Several children.] & Elizabeth Hartepoole [birth about 1545]-marriage date about 1566 of Thwaites Hall, England.

Mary Bridges Birth: About 1552 Avening, Gloucester, England Spouse: William Huddleston Marriage: <1573>William Huddleston Death: 04 MAR 1627

The copyhold manor of Thwaite, which is united with Hunderthwaite, anciently belonged to the Fitz Alans, lords of Bedale. Matilda, daughter and co-heir of Brian Fitz Alan, married Sir Gilbert de Stapleton. After four descents, it was conveyed, by the marriage of an heiress to Sir John Huddleston, and it remained in the possession of this family 400 years. In 1741 it was purchased by G. Bowes, Esq., of Streatlam Castle, from whom it has descended to the Earl of Strathmore. On this estate, in 1784, a leaden jar containing a large quantity of old English pennies was found by some workmen who were engaged in turning up the sward of an ancient pasture. Many of the coins were cut into halves and quarters, which were legal tenders before the issue of halfpence and farthings. Singularly enough, a dim tradition of some hidden treasure had induced several persons to dig about the place previously. Thwaite Hall was one of the seats of the Huddlestons, whose principal residence was Millom Castle.

ff.38vo-4040ro. 11 May 1620. Evidence given by William Wye of Limehouse, sailor, aged 25, son William plaintiff. Statement similiar to others. ff.67vo-70ro. 17 June 1620. Similiar evidence given by John Johnson of Limehouse, Nauta. ff.67vo-70ro. 18 June 1620. Evidence of John Cuff, London Merchant, aged 40. ff.71vo-72ro. 18 June 1620. Evidence of Richard Wiseman, London Merchant, aged 31. ff.72ro-73vo. No date. Further examination of Thomas Hopkins ff.73vo-75ro. 22 June 1620. Similiar evidence of William Bens of Somers Island, aged 35. f.75ro. 22 June 1620. Similiar statement from William Ewens of Limehouse, Nauta, aged 40. ff.75ro-75ro. 22 June 1620. Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor, aged 33. Survey Report No. GL.5 References Crick and Alman Guide, pp.64-65. Vol.V No.65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621. the depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliff, Middlesex, master of the Bona Nova; William Jackson of Ratcliffe, gunner of the Bona Nova; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe; mariner. The depositions state the deponents were in Virginia during the period January-June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.

New River Notes WILLIAM TRACY of Berkeley Hundred, Va. was a Council Member in 1620 Born in England. Killed, March 22, 1622. in Indian Massacre.

In 'Records of the Virginia Company', on page 145 William Wye received his commission June 17, 1619 and on page 620 of the same book, he was in court proceedings May 6, 1622, Virginia Company vs Wye, Defense of Wye. Since Captain John Huddleston's birthdate is base on this, the dates become important.

Procat Records E 134/11Jas1/East29 Otho Mawditt v. Thomas Lord Delawarr, Sir John Crofts, knight.: Mortgage of the farm of Middleton made by Thos., late Lord Delawarr, to plaintiff.: Southampton 11 Jas 1 1612-13 E 134/11Jas1/Hil19 Otho Mawdit v. Thos. Lord Delawarr: Redemption of a lease of the farm of Middleton. Repair of premises.: Southampton. 11 Jas 1 1613 E 134/5Chas1/Mich3 George Widley, clerk, Robert Drew, John Kent. v. Lady Cicely Delawarre, Lady Isabel Delawarre, widow, George Stronge, William Roseblade, senr., Henry Dowling, John Bente.: Rectory and parsonage of Goode and Goodworth Clatford (Southampton), seized for a debt to the Crown due to James I. 5 Chas 1 E 134/5&6Chas1/Hil20 George Widley, clerk, Robert Drew, John Kent. v. Cicely Lady Delawarr, Isabel Lady Delawarr, Geo. Strong, William Roseblade, senior, Henry Dolyn, John Bent.: Rectory and parsonage of Good and Goodworth. Clatford (Southampton) seized by the Crown for debt. 5 & 6 Chas 1 E 134/13Geo3/Mich5 Interrogatories, Depositions taken at Kingsclere 2 Nov 13 Geo 3 ,1772. Charles Powlett, Clerk. v. Thos. Bates, Wm. Flower, Richd. Peirce. Depositions for Plaintiff and Defendants. Concerning the Rectory Impropriate, Vicarage and parish of Kingsclere (Hampshire) and farms in said parish occupied by the Defendants called Perch farm, Sandford Farm, and Cannon Court Farm, formerly in the possession of James Seward, Farmer Gunnell and Thomas Smith. 13 Geo 3 Mich
STAC 2/24/336 PLAINTIFF: Lord Delawarr and other justices of the peace DEFENDANT: Francis Dyngley, John Grygge, John Coke, and Edward Palmer PLACE OR SUBJECT: Embracery COUNTY: Sussex 22/04/1509-28/01/1547 STAC 5/D2/17 Delawarre v Cleydon, Haugh, Bowker, Travis, Dosterdyne. 17 Eliz STAC 5/D29/3 Delawarre v. Fylde, Cooper and Billingweste 29 Eliz STAC 5/D30/19 Delawarre v. Grey, Newman and Cromwell and others 13 Eliz STAC 5/D39/8 Delawarre v Grumell, Prickett. 12 Eliz

VI 11 Virginia Council. "Instructions orders and constitucons to Sr Thomas West knight Lo: La Warr," 1609/10(?). 24 (Records of the Virginia Company Volume III page 24) In this article, Lord La Warr is identified as Sir Thomas West and he is to become the first Governor of Virginia. He becomes responsible for three ships. The commission bears the date February 28 1609. Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts. 1606-1737. Susan Myra Kingsbury, editor. Records of the Virginia Company, 1606-26, Volume III: Miscellaneous Records On page 30 we learn that he still holds both titles because he is called Lord Governor.

House of Lords Record Office: House of Lords [HL/PO/PB/1/1509/1H8n16-HL/PO/PB/1/1695/7&8W3n81] Catalogue Ref. HL Creator(s): House of Lords Records of the Parliament Office, House of Lords Records of the Private Bill Office, House of Lords House of Lords: Private Bill Office: Original Acts [Access Conditions] Open. All the Acts for 14 & 15 Hen. VIII and for 21 Hen. VIII have been lacking from the class since the 16th century. Certain other Acts have been lacking since at least 1850. For conservation reasons, a surrogate (ie microfilm or printed version) will be supplied to researcher in the first instance where one exists, rather than the original manuscript. Private Acts, 32 Henry VIII FILE-Private Act, 32 Henry VIII, c. 74-ref. HL/PO/PB/1/1540/32H8n69-date: 1540 \_ [from Scope and Content] An Act concerning the Lord La Warr. Private Acts, 18 Elizabeth I FILE-Private Act, 18 Elizabeth I, c. 13-ref. HL/PO/PB/1/1575/18Eliz1n30-date: 1575 \_ [from Scope and Content] An Act for the Confirmation of an Arbitrament to be made by certain Persons, touching a Controversy between Richard Huddleston, Esquire, and Dame Isabell Weyman his Wife on the one Part, and Francis Weyman, Gentleman, on the other Part.

History of the Croft family
1086: At the time of the Domesday Survey Croft was held by Bernard under William of Ecouis. The family were called de Croft for 400 years and it is now thought that they were Normans introduced to Herefordshire before the conquest. 1243: The earliest recognised Croft is Hugh de Croft, who helped rescue Prince Edward from Simon de Montfort and deliver him to Wigmore. Williams’ brother Herbert was dean and bishop of Hereford, and his son was granted baronetcy as recognition of the sacrifices made by the Crofts. 1296-1727: The Crofts were also represented in Parliament, mainly for the Shire of Hereford or the Borough of Leominster. 1462: the Battle of Mortimer’s Cross was held nearby on land belonging to the Croft family. This battle was decisive in putting the Yorkist King Edward IV (a Mortimer) on the throne. Sir Richard Croft, who fought at the battle, was a Knight for the Shire and Sheriff of the County of Hereford. 1471: Richard Croft captured Prince Edward at the battle of Tewkesbury and was made a Knight Banneret upon the field of Stoke by Henry VI. Under Henry VII Richard was made Receiver-General of the Earldom of March and Knight Banneret at the Battle of Stoke (1487). He was also Steward to the young Prince Arthur and Treasurer to the King’s Household. Edward IV and Richard III appointed Thomas Croft as ranger of Woodstock Park; he was deprived of this honour in 1491 because he had committed a ‘ detestable murder’ in the Marches of Wales. 1535: In Leland's Itinerary vlo V he describes the castle as: "…the manor of the Crofts, sett on the browe of a hill, somewhat rokky, dychid and waullyd castle like." 1542: James Croft was MP for Herefordshire. 1551: James was made Lord Deputy of Ireland by Edward VI, he retained this position for 1 year. 1552: He was made Deputy Constable of the Tower of London, most probably at the favour of Lady Jane Grey. Edward removed him from this position in 1553 because he had been foremost in demonstrations in favour of Queen Jane. In 1554 he was a prisoner at the Tower but he escaped with his life and was released on the 1st of January 1555. Queen Elizabeth appointed James Croft Governor of Berwick. At the siege of Liege he repelled the foe but in a 2nd advance the English were worsted and James was blamed and ousted. Queen Elizabeth kept him as privy counsellor and controller of her household. 1558: Sir James Croft is buried in Westminster Abbey under a plain gravestone. The House of Croft-O.G.S Croft, 1949. Croft Castle, Herefordshire-Diana Uhlman, National Trust, 1978.

"Hic iacet Johanna Croft una dominorum de la Holt in comitatu Wigorn". Habington has been unable to read the date of her death, but in a note he suggests it should be 1463, which is probably correct, for in 1472 we find dealings with the manor of Holt by Thomas Croft and Elizabeth, his wife (F. of F. Div. Cos., 76/82). From the A2A-FILE [no title]-ref. ZMI/B23/VII/7-date: 16th April, 3 Hen. IV. 1425 [from Scope and Content] Wit.: William Fraunde, Kt. Henry Morley, John Hardebene, Robert Formane, Robert Manly, Thomas Crofte and others. Seal: 1 red wax on tag. (Papers of the Middleton family of Belsay. Catalogue Ref. ZMI Creator(s): Middleton family of Belsay [Access Conditions] ZMI B1/II/1-ZMI B1/II/10 Missing since 1962 FILE [no title]- ref. [from Scope and Content] Grant of a toft in Caneby, and other lands belonging to him. Wit.:Thomas Wadde of Norton, John Acgent of Herpeswell, Thomas Croft, John Wastne of Glentham. (Parchment) From Procat Records we get: SP 46/28/fo 220 The Council to the Treasurer and Chamberlain: since Sir Ralph Sadleir, treasurer of wars in the north, has made up his account Sir George Bowes' allowance for service in the rebellion with men at Barnarde Castle, is to be paid by the Exchequer; Hampton Court; 16 June 1570; Signed by Bedford, Clynton, Howard, Knollys, Croft and Cecill; with Mildmay's minute to Petre; SP 46/35/fo 235 Petition to Burghley by William Bradricke, citizen and embroiderer of London, nephew, and Jane Sigswithe, daughter, of Matthew Sigswithe, for an injunction for possession of lands in Hudswell, co. York, held of the honour of Midlamn Castle. On Matthew's death the lands passed to Sir James Croft's patentees, with whom they compounded, and preferred a bill against the tenant, Edward Maxwell; 28 Apr. C 1/731/26 William Barbor of Siefton [in Culmington], yeoman. v. Thomas Croft, constable of Wigmore castle.: Price of 63/4 yards of feathers (?), and loan.: Salop. 1538-1544. Possible parents of Sybil Crofts could be Thomas Croft and Joanna. Gratley Manor, and properties in Bristol Catalogue Ref. 8016 Deeds concerning properties in Bristol FILE [no title]-ref. 8016/1-date: [1479] [from Scope and Content] Lease of two closes of land in the suburbs of Bristol, next to the church of St. Michael, Bristol-Edward Grey, Lord de Lisle and Elizabeth, his wife to Thomas Croft, 23rd February 18 Edward IV.

Thame Local History
Elizabethan Dates (1560 - 1603) 1572 Queen Elizabeth I made Sir Henry Norreys Baron Norreys at Rycote Palace. Sir Francis Knollys erected mansion in Thame High Street. Sir Richard Wenman, son-in-law to the late John Williams, died. 1596 Richard Wenman, grandson of John Williams' son-in-law, knighted at Cadiz. Thame supplied one of the leaders of an abortive agrarian revolt. Vol VII, 1962, p 160 also p 190 refers to high price of corn, an armourer from Thame being a ringleader, and Lord Norreys of Rycote being a target of the revolt. The years after 1588 saw many food riots in England, due to the price of corn. Locally enclosure of land for pasture was also a cause for grievance. Commonly referred to as the 'VCH', the Victoria County History of Oxfordshire is widely regarded as the definitive academic reference. It draws on the work of archaeologists, archivists and historians and includes a wealth of footnotes and references. Volume VII, Dorchester and Thame Hundreds, published by Oxford University Press in 1962 is a major source of historical information for Thame. Local History Research Group Thame, Oxfordshire, England Information@ThameHistory.net

Isabella WILLIAMS Born: 1522, Rycote, Oxfordshire, England Died: 1587, Carswell, Berkshire, England Father: John WILLIAMS (1º B. Williams of Thame) Mother: Elizabeth BLEDLOW Married: Richard WENMAN (son of Thomas Wenman and Ursula Giffard) Children: 1. Thomas WENMAN (Sir) (b. ABT 1550-d. 22 Jul 1577) (m. Jane West) 2. Henry WENMAN 3. Francis WENMAN (We see him as Francis Weyneman in House of Commons Records and in 'Records of the Virginia Company') 4. Elizabeth WENMAN 5. Margaret WENMAN 6. Frances WENMAN. We notice that Thomas Wenman married Jane West.

Jane WEST Born: 1558 Died: 1606, Norfolk, England Notes: Sir Ralph Shelton was fourth husband of Jane West. She was about two years older than Sir Ralph. Father: William WEST (1º B. De La Warr) Mother: Elizabeth STRANGE (B. De La Warr) Jane West's brother family is interesting, too. Thomas WEST (2° B. De La Warr) Born: ABT 1556, Wherwell, Hampshire, England Died: ABT 24 Mar 1602 Father: William WEST (1º B. De La Warr) Mother: Elizabeth STRANGE (B. De La Warr) Married: Anne KNOLLYS (B. De La Warr) 19 Nov 1571, Wherwell, Hampshire, England Children: 1. Walsingham WEST 2. Anne WEST 3. Helena WEST 4. Catherine WEST 5. Leticce WEST 6. Elizabeth WEST 7. Robert WEST 8. Thomas WEST (3º B. De La Warr) 9. Penelope WEST 10. Francis WEST (Gov. of Virginia) 11. John WEST (Gov. of Virginia) 12. Nathaniel WEST (Lt. Col.)

From the book, "All The Days Of My Life" by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr published by D. Appleton and Company; Mary Huddleston, daughter and heiress of FERDINAND Huddleston (#16), married Charles West, Lord Delawarr, 5th heir to the title. This couple had no issue. So on her father’s death, the family representation passed to her cousin, SIR RICHARD Huddleston (#16), son of Colonel John Huddleston. [Colonel John was the 2nd son of FERDINAND Huddleston (#14) and Jane Grey and his brother was Colonel William Huddleston who is shown in the House Of Common Records: 18 November 1643 Colonel William Hudleston House of Commons Journal Volume 3 18 November 1643 page 314 ].

Thomas, Lord De La Warr, First governor of Virginia. He was born July 9, 1557 and was married at St. Dunstan's in the West, Nov. 25, 1596 to Cecily, daughter of Sir Thomas Shirley of Sussex. This 3rd Lord De La Warr was made Governor of Virginia in 1609 and he owned large grants called Shirley and Westover but these had passed out of the possession of his descendants long before the colonial mansions of these names, now in existence, had been built. He died on his third voyage from England off the coast of Delaware, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Henry who became 4th Lord De La Warr. Thomas' children remained in England. Henry, Lord De La Warr was born Oct. 3, 1603 and died June 1, 1628. He married Isabella, daughter of Sir Thomas Edmunds in March, 1624/5. He was succeeded by his son, Charles, Lord De La Warr, 5th heir to the title, who was born in Feb., 1625/6. He died Dec. 22, 1687. His wife was Anne Wild whom he married Sept. 25, 1642. Information for the above outline has been obtained from: Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. The Complete Peerage by Vicary Gibbs, Vol. 4. Of Sceptered Race by Annah Robinson Watson, pp. 191, 219.

Henry WILLIAMS (Sir Knight) Born: 1516 Died: 1551 Buried: 20 Aug 1551, London Notes: undoubtedly owed his knighthood of the shire for Northamptonshire in 1547 to the influence of his father who was present at the election: the father owned or was steward of several manors in the southern part of the county, and himself sat in this Parliament for Oxfordshire. When returned, the son was young and inexperienced; he may have been the Henry Williams of the stable who served in the army against France in 1544 but he had played no part in civil affairs, so that it was doubtless his father who as ‘Mr. Williams’ had several bills committed to him. In Aug 1548 Henry Williams and his younger brother Francis were in Padua, but he may have returned to England in time for the second session of the Parliament as in Oct he was named an overseer of the will of Robert Burdett. He died of the sweating sickness, s.p., and was buried in London on 20 Aug 1551, ‘with banners of arms, coats of armour and four dozen escutcheons’. His brother's death in the same epidemic left their father without a male heir. An epitaph on Henry Williams was written by Thomas Norton. It is not known who replaced him in the House. Father: John WILLIAMS (1º B. Williams of Thame) Mother: Elizabeth BLEDLOW Married: Anne STAFFORD Margery WILLIAMS (B. Norreys of Rycote)Born: 1521, Rycote, Oxfordshire, England Died: Dec 1599 Father: John WILLIAMS (1º B. Williams of Thame) Mother: Elizabeth BLEDLOW Married: Henry NORREYS (1º B. Norreys of Rycote) BEF 1544

John Williams was buried with great pomp at Thame on 15 Nov 1559, and his tomb remains in the church. His sons having predeceased him, the barony became extinct and the heirs to his property were his sons-in-law Henry Norreys and Richard Wenman. To his wife Williams left several manors, his house at Elsingspital and cups given by the Queen, the Duchess of Norfolk and Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford, at the christening of one of her children; she later married in turn William Drury and James Croft. To Bedford he left his personal armour and to Sir Robert Dudley a black mare called ‘Maud Mullford which mare I take to be the best mare in England’. Several rectories were assigned for the endowment of a free school at Thame and provision was also made for the restoration of the footway between Oxford and Botley and the support of Botley road upon stone arches: a bill for the amendment of causeways and highways had been committed to Mr. Williams, either Sir John or Thomas Williams, a Member for Oxford, in the Parliament of Oct 1553. The executors included Sir Walter Mildmay and the supervisors the Earl of Bedford and Sir William Cecil. Sources: Elton, Tudor Revolution in Government C. A. J. Skeel, Council in the Marches of Wales.

House of Commons Journal Volume 1 10 March 1576 Lady Weyneman, &c. Mr. Doctor Barcley and Mr. Powle do bring from the Lords the Bill touching the Confirmation of an Abitrament to be made between Richard Huddlestone Esquire, and Dame Izabell Weyneman his wife, on the One Part; and Francis Weyneman Gentlemen of the other Part; are sent up to the Lords by Mr. Secretary Smythe and others. (Three times before this Lady Weyneman's Bill was read and she shows up the 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 13 of March 1576) A Sir Rich. Weyneman is admitted to the commons one day and sent to the Tower later and so is a Sir Tho. Weyneman sent to the Tower. House of Commons Journal Volume 1 01 May 1621.-To carry him to the Fleete, and whip him.-And hopeth, upon Search of his papers, to find Matters to hang him. PRO Reference Title/Scope and Content Covering Dates E 115/405/5 Wayneman, Wainman, Waynman, Wenman, Weyneman, [Lady Ann]: Oxford. Records of the Virginia Company XX, Shareholders in the Virginia Company From 1615 To 1623 Volume III Page 62 June 28, 1620 Sir Ferdinando Weynman allowed upon Acc to his daughter for 100 adventured wth Lo: Lawarr 4 shares January 29, 1621 Mr Geo: Sandis to Francis Weyneman 2 shares.

In considering Captain John Huddleston's parents to be Isabel Williams Weyneman (Wenman) (who died the year he was born) and his father, PCC Richard Huddleston Esq. of Thame Park, Oxon, the administration given to Henry Norris Kt. Lord, of Rycote Park, Oxon (near Thame) in 1590 and again 1598. Richard Huddleston "Her Maj, Treasurer of War" in 1586, died three years later; we are left with a problem. Isabel Williams Wenman Huddleston was 65 years old when Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova was born.

According to the LDS there was a Mathewe Huddleston who had a son John Huddleston who was christened 1592. [JOHN HUDDLESTONE Christening: 10 DEC 1592 Saint Katherine By The Tower, London, London, England Father: MATHEWE HUDDLESTONE P001441 1584-1695 0845261, 0845262 Film 6903590 Film IGI Individual Record. Definition: [n] giving a Christian name at baptism; noun the Christian sacrament of baptism or the ceremony in which this is conferred Source: The Collins English Dictionary © 2000 HarperCollins Publishers. MATHEW HUDELSTON Spouse: CHRISTIAN STORME Marriage: 02 APR 1581 Saint Mary The Virgin Aldermanbury, London, London, England 6903665 Number of Fiche: 1 Extracted from microfilm copies of parish registers and parish register transcripts on film nos. 0374991, 0845245 it. 3-4 (v. 61-62), 0845246 it. 1 (v. 65) or book no. 942 B4ha v. 61-62 and 65. Also known as St. Mary Aldermanbury. England, London, St. Mary Aldermanbury-Church records-Indexes 1539 John, Matthew, Peter, William, Robert and Bartholomew are tenants of Whitby Abbey in Robin Hoods Bay. 1565 Same names appear in documents selling Abbey possessions to the Cholmleys. 1603 First reference to a Storm, Robert d.1603, in Parish Records begun 1600. Derived from the book STORM AND COMPANY by ALAN STORM MA., B.Com., PhD who is also the author of:-FAMILY AND MARITIME COMMUNITY: ROBIN HOODS BAY c1653-c1867 now in the library of Leicester University. The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Aldermanbury Twice destroyed by fire, is part of the Winston Churchill Memorial. The Church, which dates from the 12th century, was redesigned by Sir Christopher Wren in 1677, after the Great Fire of London. Nearly three centuries later a German incendiary bomb left it in ruin. Slated for demolition, Wren's graceful masterpiece was saved by a bold idea. The structure would be rebuilt on the campus of Westminster College as a permanent reminder of Churchill's visit to the college and his prophetic speech. Stone by stone, architects and craftsmen dismantled the Church and painstakingly reconstructed it again at its present site. Today visitors from around the world may enter Wren's beautiful, light-filled sanctuary. Located on the campus of Westminster College in historic Fulton, Missouri. Ludlow Broad Street and Brand Lane

FILE [no title]-ref. 2705/12-date: 10 February 1624 \_ [from Scope and Content] Whereas by an indenture 31 October 1604 Edward Fox, esq., Jane his wife, Edmond and William their sons, demised to Mary Hughes a tenement (late Thomas smith, cutler) Nicholas Rawlings sadler, and the garden backside and appurtenances in Broad Street, Ludlow, between the messuage called by the sign of the Crown on the north and the tenement of John Candlend gent on the South, and extending to Narrow Lane, to hold for 80 years, for yearly rent of 20/- and 2 hens, which said lease was made by Richard Stirme at his cost to Mary Hughes. She then alienated it to David Moris, John Andris and Richard Edwards, not withstanding the trust reposed in her not to do so, so the property reverts to Richard Storme. The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Shropshire Archives. Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2003. The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Shropshire Archives.

CHRISTIAN STORME Christening: 01 DEC 1552 Aldringham, Suffolk, England Mother: MGARETT STORME Parish register printouts of Aldringham, Suffolk, England ; christenings, 1551-1782 Film or fiche number 1238657

We can assume Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua was Catholic based on study of the English Huddlestons. From his letter to Jamestown, Virginia we can infer he was religious and had went to school.
Stepney in Other Days From "The Copartnership Herald", Vol. II, no. 19 (September 1932) It is not easy to imagine either the appearance of the riverside or the rural condition of the mother parish of Stepney four hundred years ago, when it was possible to view afar over field, meadow and marsh the little ships of sail passing up and down the silver reaches of the Thames, with the green hills of Kent and Surrey beyond. To-day most of that which is seen in the streets of East London has been developed since the making of the great docks early in the nineteenth century and the building of wharves and warehouses. The beginning of the change that altered the character of the whole district occurred, however, in the second half of the sixteenth century, in the days of Queen Elizabeth, when England, awakened by the spirit of adventure, took to the sea, and laid the foundations of its maritime power, the Indian Empire, and the oversea Dominions. In this great enterprise Stepney played no mean part. In the words of honest John Strype: "It is further to be remarked that the Parish of Stepney, on the Southern Parts of it especially, that it is one of the greatest Nurseries of Navigation and Breeders of Seamen in England, the most serviceable Men in the Nation; without which England could not be England for they are its Strength and Wealth." Previous to this era there was, between the Precinct of St. Katherine's by the Tower and Blackwall (just under six and a half miles) nothing but marshland, having a sparse population, except at Ratcliff, where from time immemorial people had gathered and carried on waterside occupations.

DUDLEY PAPERS. Catalogue Ref. DU Creator(s): Dudley, Robert, Earl of Leicester, 1532-1588 DU/Boxes I-IV Deeds, etc., of Lettice, Countess of Leicester, and of Sir Christopher Blount her third husband, viz. FILE [no title]-ref. DU/BOX IV/82-date: nd \_ [from Scope and Content] Plea of Sir Christopher Blount, Knt., and Lettice, Countess of Leicester, his wife, in answer to charges in the accompts of Richard Huddleston, Esq., and Sir Thomas Chester, Treasurers-at-war in the Low Countries, against Robert [Dudley], late Earl of Leicester, of £3619, moneys of the Queen not accompted for down to 30 Nov. 1587. [See above, DU/VOL III, art.24]. Without date. FILE [no title]-ref. DU/VOL. I - date: 1559-1572 \_ [from Scope and Content] 80. Leonard West, on the "unnaturall dealenges" of his nephew Lord La Warr; London, 13 May, 1571. f.234. FILE [no title]-ref. DU/VOL. II-date: 1571-1588 \_ [from Scope and Content] 30. William [West, Lord] De La Warr, protesting his ability to serve Leicester in Hampshire as well as either Mr. Horsey or Mr. Wallop; White Friars, 27 June, [1572]. f.113. The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Longleat House. Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2003.

Captain John Huddleston carried over President Thomas Jefferson's ancestor John Jefferson in the Bona Noua and President Thomas Jefferson saved this information which later became to be known as 'Records of the Virginia Company' and Series 8: Virginia Records, 1606-1737. According to the Jefferson website, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Jefferson believed that the Court Book ended up in the hands of the Earl of Southampton, a member of the Company and an ally of Edwin Sandys, treasurer during the period covered by the Book, and that it was then purchased from Southampton's executor in London by one of the Byrd family. It was a part of the third William Byrd's library when he died in 1777. With that as a question to be answered, I believe the House of Commons Journals covering 1544 to 1650 to be a prerequisite to Series 8 and that the 'Records of the Virginia Company, 1607-1737 is the sequel to those 'House of Common Journals'. John Jefferson shows up on page 154 as a representative for Flowerdew Hundred in Volume III in July 30, 1619. On February 4 1624/25 he shows up in the Virginia Muster. (The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia before February 4, 1624/5, but voyage date not specified.) Volume I is a published edition of the manuscript volume 16, the Court Book, Part A, and volume II is of the manuscript volume 17, the Court Book, Part B. Volumes III and IV publish documents from manuscript volume 20, Miscellaneous Records, 1606-26, and documents from many other repositories in the United States and Great Britain. "While the Court Book of the Virginia Company, published as Volumes I and II presents minutes of the meetings of the corporation," Volumes III and IV "vivify its decisions and decrees, explain the difficulties met and overcome by that redoubtable group of adventurers, reveal the petty jealousies of the administrators, and especially record the controversy between the company and Crown that resulted in the dissolution of the corporation and the creation of the first crown colony of Great Britain" (Kingsbury, page vii). (What Susan Kingsbury calls petty jealousies can also can be called family squables; When you see how these folks are related.)

1. Port Book. Port of London. Collector of Public Record Office Class 1618-1619 Survey Report No. 3658 f.57v. page 2 On 31 July 1619, in the BONA NOVA of London, John Huddlestone being its master, bound for Virginia, Sir Edwin Sands, treasurer, and company shipped 1/2 ton of lead in eight pigs, 400 pairs of shoes for women and children, 18 "snapp hance" birding pieces, 16 pairs of boots, 130 iron hoes, 70,000 "head" nails, 40 small locks for chests, 50 hinges, 70 pairs of hooks and hinges, 26 pairs of "crosse garners"' 50 bolts and keepers, and 4 cwt 90 lbs of copper for trade, in 14 rundletts and 2 barrels. The value of the consignment was L72-12s-8d, and the duty paid L3-12s-7d.
2. Port Book. Port of London. Surveyor of Public Record Office Class 1620-1621 Page 4 of 4 Survey Report No. 3660 f.218 5 October 1621 10. In the BONA NOVA from Virginia, John Hudleston being its Master, Hue Hopkins imported 20 lbs. of pudding tobacco valued at L10, the duty in each case being 10s.
3. Letter: Abraham Piersey to Sir Edwin Sandys Magdalene College, 24 May 1621 page 1 of 1 CLASS Ferrar Paper Box IX, No. 362 He expects he has now safetly received his last letter which he sent by "The Tryall" of London. Title Letter: Abraham Piersy to Sir Edwin Sandys from James City, by "Bona Nova"
4. Letter: John Pory to Sir Edwin Sandys, from Magdalene College, 13 January 1619/20 Page 2 of 2 By "The Bona Nova" he sends copies of such grants of lands as they have passed that they may amend the form if they do not like it.
5. Letter: John Pory to Sir Edwin Sandys, from Magdalene College, 14 January 1619/20 page 1 of 1 CLASS Ferrar papers, Box IX No. 856 Title Letter: John Pory to Sir Edwin Sandys, from James City. Until the last moment he had forgotten to send a list, both of the Colony men and the passengers which came in "The Bona Nova"...Captain Welden says that the Company gave him passage for Thomas Smyth and Edward Kerby, gentlemen, but the Governor will not take this sufficient warrant without certificate from the Company.
6. Letter: John Rolfe to Sir Edwin Sandys. From. Magdalene College, January 1619/20 Survey Report No. C.52 page 2 of 3 4 November "The Bona Nova" arrived at James City by way of the West Indies, with all her passengers well. The proportion of victualls brought for these 100 men fell so short that the Governor and Council advised 50 should be boarded out at the rate of 3 barrels of corn and 55 lbs. of tobacco per man. By these means the men will be able to proceed to their own business next year nd can reach neewcomers. About 25 men have gone with Captain Mathewes 3 miles from Henrico, 25 with Mr. Whithakers within 4 miles of James City on the company's land.
7. Letter: Sir Edwin Sandys to John Ferrar Magdalene College, 20 September 1619 Ferrar papers, Box X No. 965 Title Letter: Sir Edwin Sandys to John Ferrar. From Northborn He asks him not to swerve from his former order of payment, viz: first for the "Bona Nova", secondly freight and wages for "The Diana". thirdly old debts for "The Diana"...
8. Jabez Whittaker. Letter to Sir Edward Sandys. Magdalene College, [16] May 1621 CLASS Ferrar papers, Box XI No. 1044 Title Jabez Whittaker. Letter to sir Edward Sandys. From Virginia by "The bona Nova", to Edwyn Sandys, St. Martin's Lane, London; endorsed by Nicholas Ferrar, who lists the main points.
9. Sir George Yeardley. Letter to {Sir Edward Magdalene College, [1619] page 1 of 2 Survey Report No. C.91 CLASS Ferrar papers Box XII No. 1249 Title Sir George Yeardley. Letter to [Sir Edward Sandys]. Captain Nuce and his men have arrived safely at Elizabeth City, whither Yeardley has gone to help them to settle and persuade the resident settlers to vacate their houses and build on the land allotted to them. A report on the affairs of Captain Argall has been sent and a final report is promised by the "Bona Nova".
10. Letter. Sir Edwin Sandys to John Ferrar Magdalene College, 18 September 1620 CLASS Ferrar papers Box No. 972 Title Letter. Sir Edwin Sandys to John Ferrar. From Northborn. He writes to describe the greatest peril of his wife in child-bed. On Thursday, 7 September, when the "Bona Nova" sailed from the Downs and was met beyond the Nesse, her travail began and continued until Sunday morning, when she was delivered of a dead boy.
11. Sir George Yeardley. Letter to Sir Edwin Magdalene College, 16 May 1621 Page 1 of 1 Survey Report No. C.94 CLASS Ferrar papers Box XII No. 1252 Yeardley states that he placed Sir Lawrence Hyde's servants, Sir Lawrence's brother Nicholas, and their mean and provisions, with John Boys, warden of Martin's Hundred. Endorsed by John Pory: "It agreeth wth th' original"; Copie of Sir G. Yeardleyes letter to Sir Edwin Sandys, in answer to that of Mr. Nicholas Hyde, &c. sent for England by the "Bona Nova", 16 May 1621.
12. Sir George Yeardley. Letter to the New Magdalene College, 16 May 1621 Page 1 of 1 Survey Report No. C.95 CLASS Ferrar papers Box XII No. 1253 Title Sir George Yeardley. Letter to the New Magazine Company. Yeardley, in reply to the New Magazine Company's letter of 20 April 1620 regarding the sale of their goods sent with Mr. Blaney states that Blaney intends to return to England by the present ship (The Bona Nova), leaving only one debt (one belonging to Mr. Deputy Ferrar) uncollected. endorsed by John Pory: "Copie of Sir George Yeardleyes letter to the newe Magazin Company by the Bona Noua 16 Maij 1621."
13. Sir George Yeardley. Letter to Sir Edwin Magdalene College, 16 May 1621 Page 1 of 1 CLASS Ferrar papers Box XII No. 1254 Title Sir George Yeardley. Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys. From James City by "The Bona Nova" 16 May 1621 to Sir Edwin Sandys
14. The expulsion of tenants that came by The Bona Nova Magdalene College, 11 and 12 November 1619 Page 1 of 2 CLASS Ferrar papers Box 'Virginia' No. 1367 Marginal Note: Aboard "The Bona Nova" were shipped 600 bushells of English meal, of which 36 were sent to Smith's Hundred and 20 to Mr. Ferrar's plantation, leaving only 544 bushells for the two companies of Captain Weldon and Lieutenant Whitaker. Concerning the 100 new men sent by "The Bona Nova" (50 under the command of Captain Welding and 50 under Lietenant Whitaker): as their supply of 544 bushells of english wheat would last (at 2lbs. per man per day) no more than 5 1/2 months, and to ensure that they keep well and be properly housed, it was agreed by the Governor and Counsil that Weldon and Whitaker be advised to rent out most of their people for a year as from Christmas for 3 barrells of Indian corn and 55 lbs. of tobacco per man.
15. Letter. George Thorpe to John Ferrar. From Magdalene College, 15 May 1621 Page 1 of 1 CLASS Ferrar papers Box X No. 1022 P.S. The Cooper of the "Bona Nova" is willing to bring over some of his trade to settle. He asks Ferrar to procure him a passage, as coopers are very necessary men.
16. Smyth of Nibley Papers Public Libraries, 1619, 1621 Page 1 of 1 Survey Report No. GL.5 Title Smyth of Nibley papers Vol.V No. 65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas,17 November 1621. The depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, master of the "Bona Nova"; William Jackson of Ratcliffe' gunner of the "Bona Nova"; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe, mariner. The depositions state that the deponents were in Virginia during the period January - June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. william Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.
Main Entry: [2]gent Function: noun Date: 1564 : GENTLEMAN Pronunciation Key © 2001 by Merriam-Webster, Incorporated Merriam-Webster Privacy Policy Main Entry: gen·tle·man Pronunciation: 'jen-t&l-m&n, 'je-n&l-, in rapid speech also 'jen-t&-m&n, 'je-n&- Function: noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English gentilman Date: 12th century 1 a : a man of noble or gentle birth b : a man belonging to the landed gentry c (1) : a man who combines gentle birth or rank with chivalrous qualities (2) : a man whose conduct conforms to a high standard of propriety or correct behavior d (1) : a man of independent means who does not engage in any occupation or profession for gain (2) : a man who does not engage in a menial occupation or in manual labor for gain
17. Chancery Records. Town Depositions Public Record Office Class 1622 Page 4 of 4 Survey Report No. 9947 1p Thomas Greene, May 22, 1622, Describes agreement between Brett and Shackell. Small parcel of tobacco sent back on the "Bona Nova" for payment of Brett's wages. Brett went to Virginia on the "Sampson" which is now the "Temperance".
18. Chancery Records. Town Depositions Public Record Office Class 1630-1631 Pages 1 & 2 No. 50 John Hart c. John Deldridge. See C2 Charles II H 26/62 & D 23/70 CLASS C 24/565 Depositions on behalf of hart: 1p Tristram Conyman, July 6, 1630, Describes the voyage of the "Bona Nova" to Canada to fish in November 1623. Not sure if any tobacco was laden aboard in Virginia. Page 2 p.5 Thomas Biare, April 2, 1631, Was employed by Mr. Farrar, Mr. Barker and Delbridge to fit out the "Bona Nova" for a fishing voyage. Praises the part played by Hart in the fitting out. p.6 Humprey Barrett, April 6, 1631, Hart managed the whole business of setting out the ship. p.7 Gabriel Barbor, April 12, 1631, Describes arrangements for the voyage of the "Bona Nova", "Hopewell", and the "Darling". "Bona Nova" returned in September 1622 and fitted out for a second voyage to Canada.
19. Chancery Proceedings. Series I. Charles I Public Record Office 1628-1629 CLASS C2 Charles 1 H42/64 John Hart c. John Delbridge did in May 1622 agree to set forth several ships for a fishing voyage to New England. They approached Hart to organize the voyages and to keep the accounts. Afterwards Mr. John Ferrar became partner with Delbridge and Barbour, each having a one-third share. It was agreed that Hart should be paid L40 for his services. Ferrar and Barbour have each paid him L15 but he has not received the L10 from Delbridge. In November 1633 he was again employed in settling out the "Bona Nova" for fishing in New England.
20. Chancery Depositions. Elizabeth I to Charles. Public Record Office 1630/31 Page 2 of 2 Survey Report No. 10719 1p Depositions on behalf of Delbridge. Nicholas Delbridge. In 1622 he and Hart were employed in fitting out the "Bona Nova" from Plymouth to Canada on a fishing voyage. Believes Hart was employed by John Delbridge.
21. Manchester Papers Public Record Office Class 1616-1647 Page 14 of 52 Survey Report No. 1101 page 14, 16 & 20 of 53 Survey Report No. 1101 page 14 3 May 1619. A commission for the "Bona Nova" to go to Virginia, the first ship sent by Sandys. page 16 [First half of 1620?] Postscript [to a letter of Governor Nathaniel Buttler's], which mentions the voyage of the "Treasurer" to the West Indies and of the "Bona Nova" to Virginia. The latter was carried southwardby contrary winds as far as the Savage Islands, where there was an exchange of 14 negroes. page 20 1620. "A Note of the shipping, men and provisions, sent and provided for Virginia, by the Right Honorable, the Earle of Southampton, and the Company, this yeare, 1620." The ships despatched between August 1620 and February 1620-1 were the "Bona Nova", the "Elizabeth", the "Mayflower", the "Supply", the "Margaret and John", and the "Abigall", carying 600 persons in all.

In studying the books of "The Records of the Virginia Company" we can notice that it is a a four volume work; the first volume covering years 1606 to 1626. [Right Honorable means the Earle of Southampton was a member of the House of Lords.] But the official end of it is later according to the Thomas Jefferson time line. In May 1624, The Virginia Company of London loses its charter. Since 1606, approximately seventy-three hundred emigrants have sailed for the colony, and 6,040 have died either en route or after arrival. However, the Privy Council argues that that the colony has had a net increase of only 275 people since its founding. The colony suffers from chronic food shortages and seems unable to get a subsistence from its own efforts. The greatest death rate has occurred between 1621 and 1623, during the period of the Great Migration. The causes of the colony's low condition are numerous: over-cultivation of tobacco; conflicts with the Powhatans, caused or aggravated by the colonists' dependence on them for food; poorly coordinated arrivals of colonists and supplies; and an unhealthy location and bad water supply that causes chronic ill health and high death rates. The Company is bankrupt and divided between factions led by Sir Edwin Sandys and Sir Thomas Smith. In sum, the problems are complex and various, and the Company, riven by factional fighting, is unable to resolve them. Despite the loss of its charter, the Company lingers on until 1630. Series 8: Virginia Records, 1606-1737. Volume I is a published edition of the manuscript volume 16, the Court Book, Part A, and volume II is of the manuscript volume 17, the Court Book, Part B. Volumes III and IV publish documents from manuscript volume 20, Miscellaneous Records, 1606-26, and documents from many other repositories in the United States and Great Britain. "While the Court Book of the Virginia Company, published as Volumes I and II presents minutes of the meetings of the corporation," Volumes III and IV "vivify its decisions and decrees, explain the difficulties met and overcome by that redoubtable group of adventurers, reveal the petty jealousies of the administrators, and especially record the controversy between the company and Crown that resulted in the dissolution of the corporation and the creation of the first crown colony of Great Britain" (Kingsbury, page vii).

Early Huddleston Tudor Connections
Sir John Huddleston (1517-1557) Privy Councillor (1553–1557)(Bindoff, Commons) One of the signatories to a letter, dated 27 November 1554, sent from the Privy Council to Bishop Bonner, informing him that Queen Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout the diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76). Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Foxe calls him 'John Huddilstone'.
Second Book of Common Prayer and Beyond The 1552 Book finally banished all prayers for the dead. Theologically speaking, the dead were only spoken about and not directly to, since there is no basis for purgatory in Scripture. The final, major act of the Second Book of Common Prayer was to order the monasteries, churches, abbeys, and chantries to give to Edward all the remaining Church plate in England “for...the King’s Majesty had neede presently of a mass of money.” Despite the rules of this book, many parishes refused to cooperate or got away with whatever they could without incurring consequences from the government. John Huddlestone refused to take part in the commission as he had in 1549, and the commissioners for Lincolnshire waited until 18 June 1553, less than three weeks before Edward’s death, to act. But whatever the efforts of certain individuals, the process moved forward relatively quickly. And just in time for Mary’s ascension to power, the houses of God were empty of the rich Catholic heritage and tradition, including most, if not all, of the religious pieces indispensable to Catholic worship. Inventories of Church Goods for Yorkshire, xiv, cited in Duffy 476-477.

John Huddleston of Sawston c.1517-1577 1. "Eamonn Duffy" "The stripping of the Altars" pg.477, pub. 1992 Yale Univ. Press "John Huddleston, whose family was to have a long history of recusancy helped to compile the Cambridgeshire inventories of 1549 but refused to assist in the confiscations" (n. 65 "Huddlestone signed all the 1549 certificates for Cambs. but none of the subsequent acts of the commission") These inventories were of all the church possessions during the "Dissolution of the monasteries" and consquent requisition by the government of the day under Edward 6th. 2.)On the accession of Queen Mary (1553) Sir John was appointed a Privy Councillor and later Vice Chamberlain and Captain of HM's guard (King Philip of Spain, when married to Mary. He was made a KB in 1553:was MP for Cambridgeshire Oct. 1553; April 1554 and Nov,. 1554, Apparently did not attend a meeting of the Privy Council after July 10th. 1556. He died Nov. 1557. Married pre April 10th.1542 Bridget, dau. of Sir Robert Cotton of Lanwade. Three children: Edmund (his heir) William (d.1563) Alice, marr, to Sir Thomas Lovell of East Harling, Suffolk. Lady Bridget died 1577, at the home of her daughter, Lady Lovell. Annette Hudleston Harwood

The House of Common Journals: Mary Tudor is soon introduced. Mary realized that a plot was being hatched to place Jane on the throne. She had been urged by some friends to flee the country since they feared her life would be in danger. Mary knew that if she fled, she would forfeit all chances of becoming Queen and returning England to Catholicism, so she chose to remain and make a stand for her crown. Edward died on Jul 6, 1553. Shortly afterwards, Duke of Northumberland informed Jane at Syon house that Edward had left the crown to her and that she was now Queen of England. Mary, meanwhile, was in East Anglia. Northumberland and three of his sons went to take Mary into custody. Mary was at this time moving around with a growing army of supporters. She knew that he must have confirmation of her brother's death, because it would be treason to declare herself Queen otherwise. She received news from a reliable source that Edward was indeed dead, and promptly sent proclamations throughout the country announcing her accession to the throne. Mary went to Framlingham Castle in Suffolk, which was better fortified. Her number of supporters was increasing and Mary took time to inspect her troops personally. The people of Suffolk were flocking to Mary and many of the leaders who were supposed to take her into custody instead went and begged for her pardon. By this time, the Privy Council in London realized their error in going along with Northumberland's plot and declared Mary the true Queen of England. She left Framlingham for London on Jul 24. Queen Jane ostensibly mediated the reconciliation between the princess Mary and the king. In the correspondence which ensued between the father and daughter, about twenty days after the marriage of Jane Seymour, she is frequently mentioned by the princess as "her most natural mother the queen:" she congratulates her on her marriage with the king, praying God to send them a prince. These letters were chiefly dictated by Thomas Cromwell, whose son afterwards married a sister of the new qneen. Mary certainly regarded Jane Seymour as her friend; nevertheless, the terms were so cruel on which Mary was restored to her father's presence, that her majesty had not ventured very far in her intercession between them.

From one of Mary's earlier letters, it is evident that she had known Jane Seymour previously to her marriage, and had been treated kindly by her. [Hearne's Sylloge] The Roman catholic historians have mentioned queen Jane with complacency, on account of her friendliness to Henry's ill-treated daughter; the Protestants regard her with veneration as the mother of Edward VI. and the sister of Somerset; and thus, with little personal merit, accident has made her the subject of unlimited praise. Her kindness to Mary bears an appearance of moral worth, if the suspicion did not occur that it arose entirely from opposition to Anne Boleyn. The princess Mary was permitted to visit her step-mother at the palaces of Richmond and Greenwich, 1536-7. That season was saddened to queen Jane by the loss of her father, Sir John Seymour. He died in his sixtieth year, the preceding December, leaving his family at the very pinnacle of exaltation -- his eldest daughter the triumphant queen of England; his eldest son created lord Beauchamp, and lord chamberlain for life. The queen's aunt, Joanna Seymour, [Lysons' Cumberland] was the wife of Andrew Huddleston; their son Andrew obtained a command in Henry VIII.'s guards, called gentlemen at-arms, and riches, favour, and honour were showered profusely on every member of the house of Seymour.

Andrew Hudleston of Faringdon c.1532-1601 Andrew was the younger son of Sir John Hudleston of Millom (Cumb) (d. 1547)and Southam (Glos)and his 3rd. wife Joyce Prickley of Worcestershire. Sir John's 2nd. wife was Joan Seymour, aunt to the (later) Queen Jane Seymour. Andrew knew Sir John of Sawston and his son Edmund...(they were 2nd. cousins)indeed had recommended to Queen Mary that she rested at Sawston when she was being pursued by the forces of the D. of Norfolk and Lady Jane Grey in 1553. When Andrew married Marie Hutton in 1564, he had been living with his elder brother Anthony(son of Joan Seymour) at Millom. His sister Bridget (widow Askew)now married to William Pennington of Muncaster, gave him her house at Seaton (formerly a Priory). Several of Andrew's children were born there,and at Millom and other houses on the Cumberland coast belonging to Millom, but in c. 1583, he was offered on a perpetual lease on a house and estate at Farington Hall, Lancashire, near Preston, which belonged to his cousin Edmund of Sawston. This estate was sold c.1605/6 to pay the debts of Sir Edmund, and was bought by the son of Andrew, Joseph, who later acquired the estates of Hutton John from his uncle Thomas Hutton. Bridget Pennington was a staunch Catholic, while her brother was a "temporiser" or "crypto Catholic". The family remained Catholic till after the Restoration of Charles 2nd. while the Sawston Huddlestons remained Catholic till the 20th. cent. Annette Hudleston Harwood

The story of Elizabeth's entry into the Tower is an interesting one. She was deathly (pun intended) afraid of the Tower, probably thinking of her mother's fate in that place, and when she was told she would be entering through Traitor's Gate, she refused to move. She had been secreted to the Tower in the dark so as not to raise the sympathy of supporters. That night was cold and rainy, and the Princess Elizabeth sat, soaking wet, on the stairs from the river to the gate. After her governess finally persuaded Elizabeth to enter, she did so and became yet another famous prisoner of the Tower of London. Elizabeth stood in grave danger as her very existence was considered a threat to the Queen and to the Spanish marriage. Renard urged her execution. But the lack of evidence against Elizabeth, Wyatt’s declaration of her innocent as he went to the block, and Elizabeth’s increasing popularity (the crowds greeted her with warm cheers and gifts) worked in her favor. Elizabeth was no longer seen as a significant threat when Mary had become pregnant, and she decided that Elizabeth should no longer be kept in the Tower of London in 1554 she was sent to the palace at Woodstock starting on 19th May. The first night of the journey was spent at Richmond, the second at Windsor and the third at West Wycombe with Sir William Dormer. The following night was spent at Rycote with Sir John Williams of Thame and she arrived at Woodstock on 23rd May. On the return journey from Woodstock to Hatfield Elizabeth may have spent the night at Ascott Manor again under the auspices of Sir William Dormer. Mary Tudor was nearly 40 years old when the new of her "pregnancy" came. After a few months, her belly began to swell, but no baby was ever forthcoming. Some modern historians think that she had a large ovarian cyst, and this is also what lead to her failing health and eventual death in Nov 1558. On her deathbed and at her husband’s request, Mary reluctantly accepted Elizabeth as heir to the throne. After Elizabeth, the most powerful claim to the throne resided in the name of Mary, Queen of Scots, who had not long before married Francois, the French heir to the throne and enemy of Spain. Thus, although Elizabeth was not Catholic, it was in Felipe and Spain’s best interest to secure her accession to the throne, in order to prevent the French from obtaining it. http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/aboutElizabeth.htm (It is hard not to feel the love in this family. Mary's father threatened her with execution. Mary put her own sister, Elizabeth in the Tower and Jane Seymour was executed.)

But rememembering Andrew Huddleston's wife was aunt to Queen Jane Seymour. From the text above we about Elizabeth: The following night was spent at Rycote with Sir John Williams of Thame and she arrived at Woodstock on 23rd May. John Williams of Thame was the father of Isabel Williams. Isabel Williams Married: Richard WENMAN (son of Thomas Wenman and Ursula Giffard). She later married Richard Huddleston of Thames. Getting back to Sir Edmund Huddleston, we find him in this inquistion with an Andrew Huddleston. Inquisition Post Mortem 1584 D.L. 7/14. Award delivered in the Chancery 21 Nov. A.D. 1584... Lancaster. Indented inquisition taken at Leyland in the county aforesaid on Thursday namely the third day of September in the 26th year of the reign of Elizabeth, by God's grace Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc., before William Farrington, esq., Andrew Huddleston, esq., and Gilbert Moreton, Gent., Foedary of the lady Queen in the county aforesaid, committed by the said lady Queen by virtue of a commission of the same lady Queen in the nature of a writ of Mandamus after the death of Robert Wearden, gent., deceased, directed to the same commissioners and annexed to this inquisition, (by) the oath of John Cureden, gent., William Banester of Wrightington (?), gent., William Craston, gent., Richard Farrington, gent., Richard Walton, gent., John Singleton of Ingolhard (?), gent., John Diconson, gent., William Sonnes, gent., James Stopforth, gent., Robert Farrington, gent., Thomas Wearden, gent., Roger Farrington, gent., and Richard Kellet, gent., jurors. Who say on their oath that the aforesaid Robert Wearden... on the day of his death was seised in his demesne as of fee tail, namely to him and the heirs issuing from his body, of and in one messuage, one cottage, 7 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and ( ) with appurtenances in Clayton in the county aforesaid. And of and in one messuage, 6 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, and 6 acres of pasture with appurtenances in Cophull in the county aforesaid. And of and in 3 acres ( ) of meadow and 2 acres of pasture with appurtenances in Leylonde in the county aforesaid. And the foresaid Robert Wearden, being so seised of all and singular the premisses with appurtenances, died seised thereof of such estate. And further the jurors aforesaid say on their oath that the aforesaid messuage and rest of the premessis with their appurtenances in Clayton aforesaid are held at the time of the death of the aforesaid Robert Wearden were held of Edmund Huddleston, knight, and Dorothy, his wife, as of their manor of Clayton, by what service the jurors foresaid are utterly ignorant. http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~worden/inquisition_post_mort.htm From Lines of English Huddleston, Sir Edmund Huddleston (13) of the Sawston Line knew Andrew Huddleston, esq (12) of the Hutton John Branch. http://huddleston.bravepages.com/history/lines.html

John Huddleston Monk of the Order of St. Benedict;
b. at Farington Hall, Lancashire, 15 April, 1608; exact date of death unknown; buried at London, 13 September, 1698. He was the second son of Joseph Huddleston of Farington Hall, Lancashire, and Hutton John, Cumberland. All that is known of his youth is contained in his statement made on applying for admission to the English College, Rome, in 1632. This document is given in full in Foley's "Records of the English Province S.J.", but Foley, following Dr. Oliver, confuses Dom John Huddleston alias Sandford, O.S.B., with Father John Stafford, S.J., and has accordingly largely reconstructed the Huddleston pedigree to fit in a "Fr. John Huddleston alias Sandford S.J." who never existed; for the true pedigree see Jackson, "Papers and Pedigrees relating to Cumberland and Westmoreland" (2 vols., Kendal, 1892). In his statement Father Huddleston mentions that he was educated at the school of Great Blencow, near Hutton John, until his fifteenth year. In his twentieth year he was sent to St. Omer's College, and on 17 October, 1632, entered the English College at Rome. It has been stated that he served for some time in the royalist army as a volunteer; in reality it was another John, his second cousin, the son of Ferdinando Huddleston of Millom Castle, Cumberland, who served under King Charles. On 22 March, 1637, Dom John was ordained priest in St. John Lateran's, and left Rome for England on 28 March, 1639. Dodd declares that he was educated and ordained priest at Douai College, Flanders; but his name does not appear in the "Douay Diaries".

There is a tradition that on arriving in England he acted as chaplain at Grove House, Wensleydale, Yorkshire (Barker, "Three Days of Wensleydale", 96). In 1651 he was residing at Moseley, Staffordshire, as chaplain to the Whitgreave family. After the defeat at Worcester on 3 September, 1651, Charles II was conducted by Colonel Gyfford to Whiteladies, where he was sheltered by the Penderell family, and it was while seeking for some safer hiding place for the king that John Penderell happened to meet Father Huddleston. Accordingly Charles was disguised as a peasant and removed to Moseley during the night of Sunday, 7 September. To guard against surprise Huddleston was constantly in attendance on the king; his three pupils were stationed as sentinels at upper windows and Thomas Whitgreave patrolled the garden. On Tuesday, 9 September, Cromwell's soldiers came to search the house. The king and Huddleston were hurriedly shut away in the priest's hiding place, and the troops, after first seizing Whitgreave as a fugitive cavalier from Worcester, were eventually convinced that he had not left the house for some weeks and were persuaded to depart without searching the mansion. That night the king left for Bentley, after promising to befriend Huddleston when restored to his throne. Some time after this Huddleston joined the Benedictines of the Spanish Congregation, being professed while on the mission in England. This event took place before 1661, in which year he was elected to the titular dignity of cathedral prior of Worcester by the General Chapter of the English Benedictines held at Douai. In the next general chapter, held also at Douai, in 1666, he acted as secretary.

At the Restoration in 1660, Huddleston was invited to live at Somerset House, London, under the protection of the Queen Dowager, Henrietta Maria, shortly after whose death in 1669 he was appointed chaplain to Queen Catherine, with a salary of 100 pounds a year besides a pension of like amount. In 1671, with Dom Vincent Sadler, O.S.B., he visited Oxford, where he made the acquaintance of the eminent antiquary Anthony a Wood. During the disturbances produced by Titus Oates's pretended revelations the House of Lords, by a vote on 7 December, 1678, ordered that Huddleston, Thomas Whitgreave, the brothers Penderell, and others instrumental in the preservation of his Majesty's person after the battle of Worcester, should for their said service live as freely as any of the king's Protestant subjects, without being liable to the penalties of any of the laws relating to Popish recusants. Barillon and Burnet state that Huddleston was exempted by name from all Acts of Parliament against priests, but this is a mistake, though such an exemption is found in a bill drafted at this period, which, however, never became law.

When Charles II lay dying "upon Thursday the fifth of February, 1684-5, between 7 and 8 o'clock in the evening" the Duke of York brought Huddleston to his bedside, saying, "Sire, this good man once saved your life. He now comes to save your soul." Charles received him gladly, declaring that he wished to die in the faith and communion of the Holy Roman Catholic Church. Huddleston then heard the King's confession, reconciled him to the Church and absolved him, afterwards administering Extreme Unction and the Viaticum. On the accession of James II, Huddleston continued to reside with the Queen Dowager at Somerset House. Shortly before his death his mind failed and he was placed in the charge of "the Popish Lord Feversham", one of the few persons present at Charles II's reconciliation to the Church, who managed his affairs as trustee. To this arrangement is probably due the unusual circumstance that the probate of his will was obtained the day before his funeral.

He was buried in the churchyard of St. Mary le Strand (Parish Register, MS.). Snow's "Necrology of the English Benedictines" gives 22 September as the date of his death, but this is obviously wrong. Numerous contemporary writers, including Anthony a Wood and Samuel Pepys, mention Huddleston with respect and there seems no reason for Macauley's statement that he was ignorant and illiterate. He published "A short and Plain Way to the Faith and Church" (London, 1688), a little treatise written by his uncle Richard Huddleston, O.S.B., and read by Charles II in manuscript while hiding at Moseley. The volume also contains the famous "Two papers written by the late King Charles II", found in his closet after his decease, and "A briefe account of Particulars occurring at the happy Death of our late Sovereign Lord King Charles II". At the end, under a separate title page, is "A summary of Occurrences Relating to the Miraculous Preservation of our Late Sovereign Lord King Charles II after the Defeat of his Army at Worcester in the Year 1651. Faithfully taken from the express testimony of those two worthy Roman Catholics, Thomas Whitgreave. . .Esq., and Mr. John Huddleston, Priest of the Order of St. Bennet". The whole work was reprinted by Dolman (London, 1844) as vol. II of the "English Catholic Library" edited by Canon Tiernay, and again later (London, 1850). The account of the death-bed of Charles II is also reprinted in the "State Tracts" (London, 1692-3); its truth in every detail is confirmed by the rare contemporary broadside "A true Relation of the late King's death, by P(ere) M(ansuete) A C(apuchin) F(riar), Chaplain to the Duke".

Several portraits of Huddleston exist; the best, by Houseman, 1685, "aetatis suae anno 78", is still preserved at Hutton John; another at Sawston Hall, Cambridgeshire, was engraved for the "Laity's Directory" of 1816. Father Huddleston seems to have spelled his name with a single or double "d" indiscriminately, and at times to have used the name "Denys" (Dionysius) after John, having presumably adopted it on receiving the Benedictine habit. BRITISH MUSEUM, MSS. Additional, 5871, f. 27b; HUDDLESTON, Short and Plain Way (London, 1688); BLOUNT, Boscobel (London, 1660); re- edited with valuable notes by THOMAS (London, 1894); Account of the Preservation of King Charles II after Worcester (London, 1666), dictated by himself to S. Pepys, with notes by the latter, obtained at personal interviews with Father Huddleston and others, reprinted in THOMAS'S ed. of BLOUNT, Boscobel; DOLAN, Weldon's Chronological Notes of the English Benedictine Congregation (privately printed, Stanbrook, 1881); OLIVER, Collections Illustrating the. . .Catholic Religion in Cornwall, etc. (London, 1857), 518; HEARNE, Thomae Caii Vindiciae (Oxford, 1730), II, 598; FOLEY, Records of the English Province S. J. (London, 1879), V; A WOOD, Autobiography, ed. BLISS (Oxford, 1848), I, 176; SNOW, Necrology of the English Benedictines (London, 1883), 78; Catholic Magazine and Review, V, 385-394; Laity's Directory for 1816 (London, 1815); BARKER, The Three Days of Wensleydale; HARLEIAN SOCIETY, Visitation of Cumberland (London, 1872); JACKSON, Papers and Pedigrees Relating to Cumberland and Westmoreland (Kendal, 1892); HUGHES, Boscobel Tracts (Edinburgh, 1857); FEA, The Flight of the King (London, 1897); Catholic Record Society: Proceedings (London, 1905), I; see also the standard histories for this time. G. ROGER HUDLESTON Transcribed by Herman F. Holbrook In memoriam: David James Martin, Priest, of the London Oratory. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VII Copyright © 1910 by Robert Appleton Company Online Edition Copyright © 2003 by K. Knight Nihil Obstat, June 1, 1910. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York

The Two Jane Seymours
Jane SEYMOUR Born: ABT 1469, Wolfhall, Wiltshire, England Father: John SEYMOUR Mother: Elizabeth DARRELL Married: John HUDDLESTONE
Jane SEYMOUR (Queen of England) Born: ABT 1505, Wolf Hall, Savernake, Wiltshire, England Died: 24 Oct 1537, Hampton Court Palace, Richmond, England

Born ABT 1525, first son of Henry Norreys of Bray by Mary, dau. of Thomas Fiennes, 8th Lord Dacre of the South. Kntd. 6 Sep 1566. Official of royal stables by 1546; gent. privy chamber by 1547; butler, port of Poole 1553; j.p. Berks. 1558/59, Oxon. 1561-91; sheriff, Oxon, and Berks. 1562-3; ambassador to France 1566-70; 1566-70; cr. Lord Norreys 1572; keeper of the armoury and porter of the outer gate, Windsor castle 1578; high steward, Abingdon c. 1580, Wallingford 1588; jt. ld. lt. Oxon. and Berks. c.1585-99; capt. of light horse, the Queen's bodyguard Jul 1588. The Norreys family owed its eminence to Sir John Norreys, keeper of the great wardrobe to Henry VI. He acquired the manor of Yattendon through his wife and bought many neighbouring estates. These lands descended through his son Sir William to his various grandchildren, of whom three died comparatively young, so that much of the inheritance was reunited under Sir John Norreys, Sir William's eldest son by his second marriage. John had already received Yattendon, where he lived, while his younger brother Henry, father of the Member, was making his way at court. After attracting Henry VIII's favour, the elder Henry Norreys rose rapidly, only to be arrested on 1 May 1536, on a charge of adultery with Anne Boleyn, and beheaded on the 17th. He left one son and one daughter by a wife who had died five years earlier. The early years of this son, the younger Henry, are obscure. His patrimony was restored to him by an Act of 1539 (31 Hen. VIII, c.22), and in Dec 1542 his uncle Sir John Norreys of Yattendon, who was childless, was licensed to settle his estates in reversion on Henry, who was his ward, and on Margery, the younger daughter of Sir John Williams, and their heirs. The couple must therefore have been betrothed by this date, and by 26 Aug 1544 they were married. Norreys was then described as a royal ‘servant’, and since Margery was to become the coheir of her wealthy father, who in the same year became treasurer of the court of augmentations, his prospects were bright. The couple received several properties, all but one formerly monastic, and as Williams was continuing to acquire land in Berkshire, as well as Rycote in Oxfordshire, the deaths of his uncle and father-in-law would greatly increase Henry Norreys's already considerable wealth. These advantages notwithstanding, Norreys's youth and inexperience made him an unusual choice as knight of the shire for Berkshire in 1547. He is not known to have been a partisan of the Duke of Somerset, although his cousin Sir William Wroughton was described by the Duke as a kinsman and had been a ward of Sir John Seymour, and he seems to have taken no part in local administration under Edward VI and to have received no land or office. He is not known to have sat in the Parliament of Mar 1553, for which the names of many Members are lost, but on 21 Jun he was among the King's gentlemen who witnessed the device settling the crown upon Lady Jane Grey. After the succession crisis Mary did not hold this act against him as she approved his appointment as butler of Poole in the autumn, but he was to take little part in public affairs during her reign save for an interlude in 1554 when he is said to have helped to guard the Princess Elizabeth at Woodstock. Norreys was to prosper under Elizabeth, who took the view that his father had died for his loyalty to Queen Anne and who bestowed her friendship on him and his wife. On the death of Lord Williams in 1559 he received much Oxfordshire property, and settled at Rycote, where he died on 27 Jun 1601.

The state of Virginia's assembly from the dissolution of the company in 1624 until 1639 is difficult to trace. It appears that until 1637 the King governed Virginia through committees in the Privy Council. During this period there were various efforts to derive a system of administration for the colony. It would appear that the royal commission set up to make recommendations concerning Virginia in 1631 assumed that an assembly was functioning in the colony. Even though assemblies convened after 1628, the planters, it would appear, were none too sure of their rights in this matter. Charles M. Andrews, in his study of the evolution of the assembly in The Colonial Period in American History, has concluded that the Virginia planters themselves were largely responsible for the establishment of self-government in the royal colony of Virginia. Charles I did not purposely intend to deprive Virginia of its assembly, yet he seemed reluctant to give it his seal of approval. The colonists, acting without direct or explicit consent, yet with something of an implied sanction, proceeded to keep the assembly alive through regular meetings—through action and then explanation. Over a 15-year period a precedent was established, and the King came slowly to a decision. The case was settled in Wyatt's instructions of January 1638/39 when he was instructed "Once a year to call a General Assembly and the Governor therein to have a negative voice." For 20 years before 1639 the General Assembly had been functioning in Virginia, but there was as yet no especially designated building to house this body. The colony was still without a capitol building—still without a statehouse. The explanation for this fact may lie, in part, in the early insecurity and uncertainty of the assembly itself, for it should be remembered that at an early date provisions had been made only for accommodating the permanent features of the colony, such as church and governor.

THE FIRST STATEHOUSE
In a relatively short time this double building, the western section of which became the first statehouse, was officially known as the capitol building. It was referred to in the land records and became a landmark at Jamestown. The fact that this structure had been used for court meetings before acquisition and had in all probability witnessed council meetings, even assembly meetings, over a period of years, may be the reason that it had already become fixed in the minds of the colonists. The acquisition of this statehouse was merely a change in title and not so much one of actual use. It evidently remained the colony's statehouse for the next 14 years. From 1641 until 1656 it can be assumed that the first statehouse functioned as the center of government for the colony—the place where assemblies met, courts were held, and council sessions were called. Although considerable activity must have taken place before 1641, during the interval that followed all important events of the day must have been associated with this brick statehouse. From it must have come the "Remonstrance of the Grand Assembly" against the recharter of the old company in 1642, the repeated legislative acts to encourage western exploration, and heated reverberations of the Virginia-Maryland boundary dispute. History No. 15: The Oldest Legislative Assembly in America & Its First Statehouse THE ASSEMBLY, 1620-39

The creation of legal distinctions between blacks and whites served to further effectuate the diminution of blacks to the status of chattel. Foreshadowing the slave codes, blacks were denied the important right and obligation to bear arms in 1640. Also in 1640, the first statutory indication of outright enslavement appeared in Virginia when three runaway servants, two white and one black, were recaptured after absconding to Maryland. The General Court ordered the white servants to serve their master for one additional year and then the colony for three more. The black servant, however, was sentenced to "serve his said master or his assigns for the time of his natural life here or elsewhere."1 Thus, thirty-three years into Virginia's existence, the law affirmed a practice in which many Virginians were already engaged. "After 1640, Virginia county court records began to mention Negroes, and" sales for life, often including any future progeny, were recorded in unmistakable language."2 1. Henry R. McIlwaine, ed., "Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia p. 466," http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/practise.html 2. Jordan, 312-313.

SIR Thomas Smith, Knt. was treasurer and Governor of the Company during the first twelve year which ended the 18th of November, 1618. The administration of Sir Thomas Smith must be understood as confined to a presidency of the council and company in England while the affairs of the colony were managed by one council resident there. He was never actually governor in Virginia −−− (see Burk's his. Virg. vol. I. pa. 92) During the time that Sir Thomas Smith was Treasurer and president of the company in England, the following were the presidents of the council, and governors in Virginia: 1st president of the council, Edward Maria Wingfield. 2d. John Radcliffe. 3d. John Smith. 4th. George Percy. 1st. Governor, Lord De la War. 2d. Sir Thoams Dare. 3d. Sir Thomas Gates. 4th. Sir Thomas Dale. 5th Capt. George Yeardley. 6th. Capt. Argall. Hening's Statutes At Large

In 1623/24, courts were kept in Charles City, Elizabeth City, and James City. In February 1631/32, the General Assembly added five more shires. The eight original shires were: {1} Charles City {2} Henrico {3} James City {4} Elizabeth City {5} Warwick River {6} Warrosquyoake, later Isle of Wight {7} Charles River, later York {8} Accawmacke (Accomack). The creation of the shires, which later became known as counties, was to make the administration of justice more easily accessible to the colonists. There were six kinds of courts in Virginia: {1} Magistrate’s court {2} Parish court {3} Monthly court {4} General court {5} General Assembly {6} Court of Admiralty. As the settlements expanded, courts were needed closer to the people, and new counties continued to be formed. The House of Burgesses first created official local governmental units in 1634. The decision reflected the population growth of the colony, which created a need for official decisions that were local and not of concern to the entire House (or appropriate to delay until the next session of the House of Burgesses). The local units of government were called "shires" only in the original act. Ever since, they have been described as "counties." The original eight shires included Charles City, James City, Elizabeth City, Accomacke-became Northampton 1643, Henrico, Warwick, Isle of Wight and York. Credits: The Library of Virginia, Signs of History - Georgetown College, Kentucky Historical Society Kentucky Atlas & Gazetteer, Mercer On Line, Franklin-Simpson County Chamber of Commerce, How It All Began For Trimble County by Dr. Richard A. Edwards, Lexington Herald-Leader 01/01/2000, The Rockbridge County, VAGenWeb Project, Whitley County Kentucky Genealogy, Ralph Eddie Coppage - Harrison County County Clerk, Cynthiana-Harrison County Museum, Thelma Taylor

Life in Plymouth Colony
The Pilgrims received legal rights to settle at Plymouth under a patent granted by the Council for New England in 1621. Governor Bradford received a new patent, the Warwick Patent, in 1630. It granted him all the land south of a line between Narragansett Bay and Cohasset. Under this patent, Bradford could have claimed ownership of the entire colony, but he shared control with the other settlers. He turned the patent over to all the freemen (voters) of the colony in 1640. A few years later, surveyors marked off an area corresponding to the present counties of Bristol, Barnstable, and Plymouth as the colony of Plymouth. In November 1621, the ship Fortune arrived with 35 new colonists. Other ships brought additional settlers but the population grew to only 300 settlers in 10 years. Some of the colonists decided to move from Plymouth to better lands. Some went north and established the towns of Duxbury, Marshfield, and Scituate. Others moved west to Rehoboth, or farther east on Cape Cod to settle Sandwich, Barnstable, Yarmouth, and Eastham. The Massachusetts Bay Colony's superior harbor at Boston helped draw trade and settlers from Plymouth Colony. Boundary and trade disputes increased among the colonies that had formed in the area. The Pilgrims also faced the danger of attack by nearby Indians and Dutch and French colonists. In 1643, Plymouth Colony joined the Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, and New Haven colonies in forming the New England Confederation. This alliance worked to settle disputes and provide for the common defense. Contributor: Joan R. Gundersen, Ph.D., Prof. of History, California State Univ., San Marcos. SOURCE: IBM 1999 WORLD BOOK In Winter, 1626/1627 The "Sparrowhawk" is wrecked on Cape Cod, and its passengers are given refuge in Plymouth. © Plimoth Plantation, Inc. 1999

Survey Report No. 1101 page 14 3 May 1619 A commission for the Bona Nova to go to Virginia, the first ship sent by Sandys. Survey Report No. c.52 page 2 4 November 1619/20 4 November The 'Bona Nova' arrived at James City by way of the West Indies, with all her passengers well. The proportion of victuals brought for these 100 men fell so far short that the Governor and Council advised that 50 should be boarded out at the rate of 3 barrells of corn and 55 lbs. of tobacco per man. By these means the men will be able to proceed to their own business next year and can reach newcomers. About 25 men have gone with Captain Mathews 3 miles from Henrico, 25 with Mr. Whitakers within 4 miles of James City on the company's land. Survey Report No. 116 page 16 (First half of 1620?) Postscript [to a letter of Governor Nathaniel Butler's], which mentions the voyage of the 'Treasurer' from Virginia to the West Indies and of the 'Bona Nova' to Virginia. The letter was carried southward by contrary winds as far as the Savage Islands, where there was an exchange of 14 Negroes. Virginians are mentioned as "extraordinary and unlooked for Guests" when they arrived on board the 'Garland', together with the 'Treasurer's' company, the 14 Negroes and the Dutchmen of the wreck. (These survey reports are the edited works of Dr. Kingsbury found at the Library of Virginia and in the 4 books volumes of 'The Records of the Virginia Company'.) Note on translations The Portuguese "Ilhas Salvagens" translates as "Savage Islands" in English. However, this is often mistranslated as "Salvage Islands" in English-language citations. © 2002 Don Macnaughtan. Island Bibliographies no. 2 Niue[n´] Pronunciation Key, coral island (1990 pop. 2,532), c.100 sq mi (260 sq km), South Pacific, freely associated with New Zealand. Alofi is the capital. The inhabitants are mainly Protestant Polynesians. Niue, once known as Savage Island, has fertile soil and exports coconut milk, copra, honey, and fruit. The island has an autonomous internal government. Pacific Islands Political Geography. From Cabo Finisterre, the NW tip of Spain, the course to Cape Verde, the westernmost tip of Africa, passes through the Canary Islands, but before arriving there it passes a tiny group of islands of volcanic origin, the Ilhas Selvagens (the "Savage Islands"), a 160 nautical miles (300 km / 185 statute miles) SSE of Madeira. Information obtained partly from Nautical Publication Nr. 1, Africa Pilot, Vol I, 13th ed. 1982 and Supplement 7th ed. 1999, British Admiralty, Hydrographer of the Navy, Ministry of Defense, Taunton, England

I asked Isolde Martyn about her book: Historical novels: The Maiden and the Unicorn (Bantam, USA) The Lady and the Unicorn (Bantam, Australia) Winner of the Rita for 'Best First Novel' USA and 1999 Romantic Book of the Year in Australia. She researched Sir Richard Huddleston and Margaret Neville and the novel is based on them. I haven't had a chance to read the novel but asked her about her research. I thought I would share some of her email to me by putting her words in quotations. "Much of my information has been from ferreting over the years as the Yorkists have always been one of my major interests. There are potted bios of Margaret Neville and Richard Huddleston in The Coronation of Richard III (most university libraries would have a copy) which is where I first came across mention of them both. I had an amateur sleuth do some research for me in Cumbria and I also had an article from the Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society on the family's connection with Millom castle. I can give you the reference if you wish. I guess ease of accessing the info depends on where you are living. A lot more is known about Richard's brother, John, than about Richard. I discovered after my novel was published that Richard's younger brother did change loyalties at Barnet and died fighting for Edward IV. Margery died around 1498-99. Her son, abducted by his future mother-in-law, Lady Dacre, only outlived his mother by a few years and had no children of his own. His married sisters, Margaret Salkeld and Joan Flemying were his heirs. Mention of Sir Richard Huddleston ceases after 1485 so he may have died that year possibly on Bosworth Field. Margaret Huddleston remarried. It is possible that there is a branch of the Huddleston family that may have more detailed family archives but, if so, the Richard III Society has never published anything. Maybe that's a future PHD for someone. Kind regards, Isolde Martyn"

The Visitation of Cheshire in the Year 1580, Made by Robert Glover, Somerset Herald, for William Flower, Norroy King of Arms, with Numerous Additions and Continuations, Including Those From the Visitation of Cheshire Made in the Year 1566, by the Same Herald, with an Appendix, Containing the Visitation of a Part of Cheshire in the Year 1533, Made by William Fellows, Lancaster Herald, for Thomas Benolte, Clarenceaux King of Arms, and a Fragment of the Visitation of the City of Chester in the Year 1591, Made by Thomas Chaloner, Deputy to the Office of Arms Edited by John Paul Rylands, F. S. A. London 1882 Edited from London, British Library, MS Harley 1424, fol. 77b and MS Harley 1505, fol. 81 [Rylands, p. 130] Elizabeth, daughter to Adam Birkenhed: See Adam Birkenhead in The Visitation at Cheshire of 1580: Birkenhead of Huxley. Alice, vxor Richard Nuthall of Cattenhall: See Alice, sister to Richard Hurlton in The Visitation at Cheshire of 1580: Nuthall of Cattenhall. Isabell, daughter to Sir Thomas Poole of Werrall: See Isabell vxor Hurlton or Hudleston in The Visitation at Cheshire of 1580: Poole of Poole, in Werrall. Grace, daughter to Sir Edward Fitton of Goseworth: See Sir Edward Fittton of Goseworth The Visitation at Cheshire of 1580: Fitton of Goseworth. Isabell vxor~Hurlton or Hudleston: This was Humfrey Hurlton. See Isabell, daughter to Sir Thomas Poole of Werrall in The Visitation at Cheshire of 1580: Hurlton, alias Hurlston, of Picton Edited from London, British Library, MS Harley 1424, fol. 77b and MS Harley 1505, fol. 81 [Rylands, p. 130]

On page 27 of this book http://www.scfhs.org.uk/visitations/BookVC1580/p017.htm We find Richard Huddleston and his wife Margery with daughter Lucy Huddleston who marries John Brooke as well as information on Anne Wilbraham which is also mentioned as Wilbram.
The ridge of high land on which Brierley stands separates the valleys of the river Aire to the north, and the river Don to the south. These rivers together with the marsh land of Thorne Moor in the east and the Pennine hills to the west, mark out an area that formed the southern section of the Celtic kingdom of Elmet, which extended northwards to the river Wharfe. Elmet was a small kingdom formed at the fall of the Roman Empire. It survived until the battle of Winwaed in AD. 654/5. This was the last in a series of battles which saw Elmet become part of the expanding Kingdom of Northumbria. The site of the battle is lost but it may have been in southern Elmet, probably on the banks of the small river Went which runs east from Nostell. Brierley to 1086 http://www.brierley59.freeserve.co.uk/ Huddleston Forum information that helps to bring in Captain John Huddleston: Lucie Huddleston (who married John Brooke) was the daughter of Richard Huddleston (b. 1490) and his wife Margery Smythe. Also, it was Lucie's sister Anne Huddleston who married Sir John Bowes of Elford. Sir John Bowes' second wife was Susannah Cave and their daughter was Elizabeth Bowes who married Sir Nicholas Heveningham. Lucie inherited the Haselour estate, which had no doubt devolved on her father Richard Huddleston from his wife Margery Smythe, whose grandmother was Margery Stanley. Anne Huddleston was co-heiress with her elder sister Lucie and inherited the Elford estate which then devolved to the Bowes and Heveningham families. Both Elford and Haselour had previously been Stanley properties of which family Lucie Huddleston was descended.

Since Captain John Hudleston of the Bona Noua is mentioned with the Ferrar Family, it seems logical to see if there was mention of any Ferrars at Elford: Reference: MS 3878/57 Exemplification of Recovery by Humphrey Ferrers, esq., George Gresley, esq., William Chetwyn, esq., George Griffith, esq., John Vernon, Edward Boughton, gent., Henry Lee, gent., and Edward Ferrers, gent., plaintiffs, against William Wyrley of Hondesworth Handsworth, gent., deforciant, being tenant to the praecipe of William Smyth, the first vouchee, of the Manor of Elford and lands and appurtenances in Elford, Haslow and Okeley Oakley all in co. Staff. Seal of Court of Common Pleas. Creation dates: 25 November 1522 Reference: MS 3878/61 Bond from Walter Smyth of Elford co. Staff., esq., and Humphrey Ferrers of Tamworth co. War., es., to Richard Huddleston esq., to secure performance of covenants. Creation dates: 8 March 1529/30 Reference: MS 3878/66 Testimony of Sir Humfry Ferrers, Sir George Graysley and others in a dispute between Geoffrey, late Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and William Smyth, esq., late Lord of the Manor of Elford, co. Staff., concerning a meadow called Wylford meadow in Elford, co. Staff., With map of the Manor of Elford, attached. Creation dates: 2 August 1534 Reference: MS 3878/78 Grant from Walter Devereux, knt., Lord of Ferrers and Chartley, to John Bowes, esq., Dorothy, his wife, and John, their son, of a meadow in Okeley, Co. Staff., the said Walter appointing Paul Gressham, gent., and Richard ?Standynought, clerk, attorneys to deliver seisin. Creation dates: 4 September 1546

Remembering John Bowes is the husband of Anne Huddleston and John Brookes is the husband of Lucy Huddleston: Reference: MS 3878/93 Bond from John Broockes co. Staff., gent., to John Bowes, of Elford, co. Staff., esq., to secure possession of lands in Elford and Haselor, co. Staff. Creation dates: 5 November 1559 Reference: MS 3878/94 Covenant between John Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., esq., and John Brookes of Hassellor, co. Staff., gent., concerning the division and partition of land in Elford, Tamworth, Hassellor and Okeley co. Staff., and Lughborowghe and Querne, co. Leic. Creation dates: 10 April 1560 Reference: MS 3878/95 Copy of an agreement between John Bowes of Elford, esq., and John Brookes of Hassellor, co. Staff., gent., to partition the manor of Elford, co. Staff. Creation dates: 10 April 1560 Reference: MS 3878/96 Lease for life from John Boas of Elforde, co. Staff., esq., to John Brokes of Asullor, Staff., gent., of 2 pastures in Elforde, co. Staff. Creation dates: 2 March 1560/1 Reference: MS 3878/97 Grant from John Brokes, gent., to Stephen Verney, esq., and William Asker, gent., of a manor or capital messuage in Haselor Haselour, Co. Staff., and a water mill called Elford mylne in Elford, together with meadowland, and free fishing rights in the River Tame. Creation dates: 15 September 1561 Reference: MS 3878/99 Bargain and Sale from John Brokes of Haselor co. Staff., gent., and James Weston and Robert Thicknes gent., of lands in Okeley and Croxall co. Staff. Creation dates: 20 Sept 1563 Reference: MS 3878/106 Quitclaim from Thomas Smythe of London, gent., and William Stoke of Wolvey co. War., gent., to Roger Toone of Elford co. Staff., husbandman of a cottage and land in Elford co. Staff. Creation dates: 25 August 1568 Reference: MS 3878/124 Exemplification of a fine between William Glossop, plaintiff, and John Brocke, and Lucy, his wife, deforciants, of the moiety of two messuages and lands in Leicestre, Loughborow, Querne, Sylebye, Prestwolde, alias Prestold, and Burton, co. Leic. Creation dates: 23 January 1579/80

We know that researching the book the Virginia Company that a Thomas Smythe is involved and the Ferrer Family is involved, too. Sir Thomas Smythe of the line of William Smythe is the same Sir Thomas Smythe who was the treasurer of the Virginia Company. We start with page 33 of Volume III of the 4 book series Records of the Virginia Company. Volume III is also part of the works of President Thomas Jefferson which he saved. IX. Sir Thomas Smythe. A letter to Sr Raphe Winwood April, 1611 Duke of Buccleuch and Queensbury Manuscripts, Winwood Papers, volume 9 (Courtesy of Duke of Buccleuch) Document of Buccleugh at Boughton House. Right HonBLE I have receyed yoR Lynes, but aquainted the Lords, (And the rest of the Counscell for Virginia) wTh them we made members (Whereof yU are made a member) who all do roturne their kind thanks, for yoR loue and affection to this worthie plantation, and for yoR readye willingnes to contrybute to the same, the cH I haue receyed to the some of 75ll and delyered a Bill of Adventurers for the same. And we do entreate yoR Lo: solicitacon, and best furtherance, to styrre vpp ye rest of those worthie c[omman]ders that as we haue the hopes of good successe to be raysed amongst them; so we may enioye the fruites of ther g[ood] wishes in due tyme, to the vphoulding of the most HonBLE worke, wCH no hath nede of the assistaunce of such or[t]h[i]e spirittes, who desire the enlargmT of Christian religion, to yE glorye of God, and renowne and honR of oR King and Englishe NatU Ad the wishing yU an increase in all honoR and happynes I rst YoR LoRS euer readye to do yU seruce Tho: Smythe London, Aprilis 1611. Transcript by Maj. C. A. Markham, of Northampton November 30, 1613 XVIII. Virginia Company Vs. William Levenson. the answer of William Levenson to the Bill of Complaint Chancery Proceedings, James 1, bundle U, Nos 2/55 Document in Public Record Office London List of Records No. 29 (The document starts on page 52 but doesn't apply to Sir Thomas Smythe until page 53) On page 53 taken from context: Sir Thomas Smithe tresurer of the said Companye On page 59 March 6 1615/16-June 9, 1623 May 28 1619 Giuen vnto Sr Thoms Smith for a gratificacon On page 68 In so doing both ourselves shall have a grea cause to thank you and the Plantation to acknowledge your love and kindness towards the same. Thomas Smythe (There is more about Sir Thomas Smythe but I am covering the highlights but as treasurer he as partly responsible for the lottery. One sees that this money is for the business of the Virginia Company and getting people from England to Virginia.) On page 70 John Hudson sometimes Provost MarshLL General for diverse crimes this Colony & Comen weale was at 2 Marshall & misdemeanors comitted agT the just & sacred Articles laws & Goument of Courts comdem'd to die and according to Lers from Sr Tho: Smith TreasR foR yE CompA to Sr Thom: Dale GovR reprieved in hopes of Amendmt And now has been guilty of more Errors therefore to prevent ye danger in HarbRS so ungratefull a Viper in the young & tender bosom of this so religious & lawful an action He is Exiled & banished & if he returns to be put to death without further Judgmt 7 June 1617

Reference: MS 3878/167 Lease for 21 years from Richard Bowes of Elforde, co. Staff., esq., and John Bowes, his son, to Thomas Smith of the same, husbandman, of a messuage and land in Elforde. Creation dates: 12 March 1610/11 Reference: MS 3878/101 Mandamus from Mathew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury to secure the presence of Paul Gresham, one of the executors of the Will of John Bowes, late of Hackney in London, in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury to prove the said will. Creation dates: 8 February 1564/5 Physical characteristics: Seal of the Archbishop of Canberbury. broken, good impression. (We know Captain John Huddleston was born in Middlesex, England) Reference: MS 3878/161 Revocation by Richard Bowes of Elford co. Staff., esq., son of John Bowes, knt., deceased, of a bargain and sale to Sir Jerome Bowes of the parish of St. Martin in the Field co. Middlesex, the manor of Elford co. Staff. with all lands rights, courts and appurtenances. Creation dates: 13 May 1609 Reference: MS 3878/162 Covenant between the Rt. Hon. Robert, Earl of Salisbury, Lord High Treasurer of England, Master of the Kings Court of Wards and Liveries, Sir Roger Wilbraham, Knt., surveyor of the said Court of Liveries, and Richard Bowes esq., concerning a special livery to be granted to the said Richard of the lands inherited from his father Sir John Bowes. With a survey of the said lands in Elford, Okeley and Hasley, co. Staff, attached. Creation dates: 23 October 1609 Reference: MS 3878/167 Lease for 21 years from Richard Bowes of Elforde, co. Staff., esq., and John Bowes, his son, to Thomas Smith of the same, husbandman, of a messuage and land in Elforde. Creation dates: 12 March 1610/11 Reference: MS 3878/172-173 Indenture between Richard Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., esq., Joan, his wife, Sir John Ferrers of Tamworth co. War., knt., Robert Nichols of Seckington, co. War., gent., and others being a deed to lead the uses of a recovery to be suffered of the Manors of Elford and Okeley, co. Staff., together with the advowson of the churches there and all lands belonging to the said Richard in cos. Staff., and Derby. Another copy of MS 3878/172 Creation dates: 3 November 1612 Reference: MS 3878/174 Indenture between Richard Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., esq., Joan, his wife, Sir John Ferrers of Tamworth, co. War., and others, being a deed to lead the uses of a fine to be levied on the Manor of Elford and Ikely, co. Staff. Creation dates: 3 November 1612 Reference: MS 3878/176 Letters Patent of James I being a licence of alienation from Richard Bowes esq., and Joan, his wife, to John Ferrers knt., and Robert Nichols gent., of the Manor of Elford, lands in Elford, together with the advowson of the Church. Creation dates: 1 December 1612 Reference: MS 3878/183 Counterpart of indenture between Richard Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., esq., Joan, his wife, Sir John Ferrers of Tamworth Castle, co. War., knt., Robert Niccholls of Seckington, co. War., gent., Richard Frampton of London, esq., Thomas Ashmole of London, gent., being a deed to lead the uses of a recovery of the Manors of Elford and Oakley, co. Staff., together with lands of the said Richard Bowes in cos. Staff. and Derby. Creation dates: 23 May 1620 Reference: MS 3878/184 Indenture between Sir John Ferrers of Walton upon Trent co. Derby, knt., Robert Nicholls of Seckington co. War., Richard Bowes of Humberston co. Leic., esq., John Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., gent., and William Phillipps of London, Taylor, George Nicholls of Seckington, being a deed to create a Tenant to the precipe for a Recovery to be suffered on the manors of Elford and Okley, co. Staff. Creation dates: November 1622 Reference: MS 3878/185 Indenture of mortgage between Richard Bowes of Humberston, co. Leic., esq., Sir John Ferrers of Walton upon Trent, co. Derby, knt., Robert Nicholls of Seckington co. War., gent., and George Nicholls of Seckington, gent., and John Bowes, of Elford, gent., son of the said Richard, of the moiety of the manor of Elford. Creation dates: 4 December 1622 Reference: MS 3878/187 Appointment by Richard Bowes of Humberstone, co. Leic., esq., John Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., gent., Sir John Ferrers of Walton upon Trent, co. Derby, knt., and Robert Nicholls of Seckington, co. War., gent., of Henry Pigott of Walton upon Trent, gent., as attorney to deliver seisin to William Edwards and Robert Dale, both of Elford, yeomen, the manors of Elford and Okeley, co. Staff. Creation dates: 19 January 1622/3 Reference: MS 3878/188 Counterpart of a lease for 21 years from John Bowes of Elford, co. Staff., esq., to Thomas Smyth of Elford, husbandman, of a messuage and land in Elford. Creation dates: 23 March 1623/4 Among the post-restoration monuments to be noted is that to William Brooke of Haselour, grandson of Lucy Huddlestone of Elford, dated 1641. This may be seen above the Staunton effigy in the Sanctuary.

http://www.measevalley.org.uk/elford.htm St. Peter's Church, Elford It is of passing interest that this mill site has a long history-Birmingham Central Library contains a manuscript which is a Grant from Leouca, Lady of Elleford to the monks at Mirau (Merevale, Warks) of the mill about 1140 A.D. This manuscript has the distinction of being the oldest document held by the Library.

We can connect Captain John Huddleston with the Shirley Plantation with the court document mentioning Allice Boyse and Sir Thomas Smythe with the sale of the Huddleston Farm. We can connect Captain John Huddleston with the Virginia Company and Sir John Ferrer with the Elford Huddlestons.

Isabel Williams bc.1530 d.1587 dau. and coh. of John, Lord Williams of Thame c.1500-1559 (created 1554) Politician and courtier married 1) Sir Richard Wenman a wealthy wool merchant of Witney, Oxon. Children: Thomas, Henry and Francis also 3 daus. Francis alive 1575 described as "gent" therefore younger brother of Sir Thomas, who was father of Sir Richard Wenman, 1st Viscount of Thame Park 1573-1640 (created 1628) who marr. Agnes Fermor (a devout Catholic implicated in the Gunpowder Plot of 1604-1606 though her husband was a Protestant.) As yet I have no dates for this 1st. Sir Richard or his sons Thomas and Francis and Henry, though he must have died pre 1573/4/5---hence the lawsuit of 1575 probably regarding the property at Thame Park (inherited by Isabel) Therefore Isabel must have married 2.) Richard Huddleston as her 2nd. husband---the Cambridgeshire Visitation of 1615 being incorrect - after c. 1573.It is doubtful if Richard and Isabella had any children Margery Williams, sister of Elizabeth and coh. marr. Henry Norris of 1525-1601, (son of Sir Henry Norris who was executed , accused of adultery with Queen Anne Boleyn)created Baron Norris of Rycote Oxon 1573 (Thame Park and Rycote are very close ) Hence "PCC administration 1590 and 1598 of estate of Richard Huddleston Esq. of Thame Park Oxon" to Henry Norris Knt., Lord ,vice (instead of /on account of) John Norris Knt. decd.(son of Sir Henry)"d.b.n.grant of 1598 (dbn =died bona notabilia, ie. considerable goods) Sir John Norris ?1547-1597 military commander Ireland and the Low Countries. Died in Ireland. He probably knew Richard Huddleston "Treasurer of War 1585/6/7 Low countries." Dead by 1590 The administration PCC infers that Richard died without heirs, and Thame Park passed to Sir Richard Wenman. Richard probably held it in right of his wife Isabel Williams.

The Gunpowder Plot (1604-1606)
Lady Agnes Wenman of Thame Park, site of the former Cistercian abbey, was also in trouble as a result of the Gunpowder Plot. Her husband Sir Richard Wenman was a Protestant, but she was a member of the Catholic Fermor family and related to Elizabeth Vaux, a great supporter of the Jesuit superior, Fr Henry Garnet. (Interestingly, Fawkes is a variant of the name Vaux.) A letter Elizabeth Vaux had written to Agnes Wenman implied inside knowledge of Jesuit operations. Unfortunately it was found by her mother-in-law, who passed it to the authorities. Subsequently Elizabeth Vaux and Agnes Wenman met to discuss their position. The venue was the home of Elizabeth Vaux's son-in-law, Sir George Simeon, at Brightwell Baldwin (3 miles W. of Watlington). This was presumably the former residence of Sir Adrian Fortescue.

James I: Volume 16 November, 1605 Author: Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) Year published: 1857 Nov. 8. 1605 31. Examination of Henry [Huddleston alias] Hurleston, of Paswick, Essex, son of sir Edm. Huddleston, as to his previous proceedings; visit at Lady Vaux's; meeting with John Wright, Catesby, and Percy, & c. Nov. 10. 1605 Elizabeth Vaux to Sir John Roper, her father. Is amazed at his suspecting her of knowing anything of the Plot. Confident that none of her letters can implicate her. Her son would have gone to London about his match with Lady Suffolk's daughter, had not Sir George Fermor and his lady brought news of "this pitifull and tragicall intendment." [G. Plot bk., No. 226.] Nov. 10?] The same to Rich. Verney, Sherriff of Warwickshire. Earnestly entreats him to give a pass for Lancashire to two gentlemen from her house, whom she describes, and who, she fears, are apprehended. His niece Mary would rather give her portion than have the younger of them called into question. Mrs. Huddleston, who is with her, begs that her husband may go up to London with the Lord Lieutenant. [Ibid., No. 227.] Nov. 12. 1605 53. Justices, &c., of Warwickshire to Salisbury. Have apprehended and sent up Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Percy, and the wives of other conspirators. Divers servants of rebels taken, also Mr. Huddleston, and some persons known to be priests. Nov. 18. 1605. 88. Anne Lady Markham to [Salisbury]. Hen. Huddleston can tell him best about Gerald, and Sir Everald Digby about Walley. Knows not where Mrs. Vaux is. Chris. Parker, and embroider, and Brian Hunston a painter, removed with Gerald or imprisoned. The "Plot hath taken deep and dangerous root; " many will not believe 'that holy good man' [Gerald] was an actor in it. Death of her father. Nov. 18. 1605 Examination of Elizabeth Vaux. Does not know Gerald the priest. The visitors at her house were Rob. Catesby, Sir Ever, Digby, Hen. Huddleston, Sir George and Lady Fermor, and Greene and Darcy, priests: heard of the broils in London by G. Fermor and Sir Griffin Markham's brother's servant; wrote to Lady Wenman laster Easter, and said that "Tottenham would turn French, " &c. [G. Plot kk., No. 103.] Nov. Copy of the above, annotated [Sir Edw. Coke.][Ibid., No. 104.] Nov. 18. 1605 Declaration of Lady Tasburgh. Mrs. [Eliz.] Vaux wrote the letter to Lady Wenman, bidding her to be of good comfort, for there should soon be toleration for religion; Sir Rich. Wenman was dis-pleased with his wife's acquaintenance with Mrs. Vaux. The National Archives Publication: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I Author: Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) Year published: 1857 Description: Supporting documents: Pages: 695-721 1 James I: Volume 17 - December, 1605 From: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I. Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857) December, 1605. "...m that Mr. Talbot said the rising was a foolish attempt; never named the Plot to Huddleston; particulars of the Plot. [Ibid., No. 146.]..." 2 James I: Volume 16 - November, 1605 From: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I. Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857) November, 1605. "...31. Examination of Henry [Huddleston alias] Hurleston, of Paswick, Essex, son of Sir Edm. Huddleston, as to his previous proceedings; visit at Lady Vaux's; meeting with John W..." 3 James I: Volume 26 - January-March, 1607 From: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I. Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857) January-March, 1607. "...me to Salisbury. Concerning the grant to Sir John Leigh of the forfeiture of — — Huddleston, of Essex, recusant...." 4 James I: Volume 19 - March, 1606 From: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I. Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857) March, 1606. "...nge [to the Lords Commissioners]. The first news of the Plot was brought by Hen. Huddleston to Harrowden, on 4th November, Mr. Jarret [Gerard] and Mr. Singleton present; he left Harrowden and went to Henlip...." Index D-K Huddleston, Sir Edmund Huddleston, (or Hurleston), Henry, Dorothy Supporting documents: Pages: 695-721 The National Archives Publication: Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I Author: Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) Year published: 1857

James 1; Volume 17 december 1605 Dec. 6. 1605 Serjeants' Inn Examination of Hen. Huddleston, alias Hurleston. Particulars of his journey to and from London; was overtaken by Catesby, John Wright, and Percy; met Gerald alias Brooke, Singleton alias Clifton, and Strange alias Fischer, and Greenway, priests, were there sometimes; Mrs Vaux told them from Sir George Fermor; on Nov. 7th, he, with Strange, singleton, and Batley, left Mrs Vaux's, and were taken to Kenilworth. Dec. 7? Dorothy Huddleston to Salisbury. begs favour for her husband, a prisoner in the Marshalsea, and to be allowed access to him. Dec. 7. Easton-neston Sir George Fermor to Lord Chief Justice Popham. Has answered his interrogatories. Lady Fermor wrote to Lady Wenman for Mrs Vaux's letter, but could not get it. [G. Plot Bk., No. 148.] Incloses, 1. Interrogatories by Popham, with Fermor's replies. Lord Vaux sent for him on Nov. 6; Mrs Vaux wished him to attend her son to London, but altered her mind, on account of of hearing of the broils; young Mr. Huddleston was there, but left the next morning; knew nothing of the treason intended, till his son Robert came to Mrs Vaux's, and told him; Mrs Vaux seemed not to have heard of it before. [Ibid., Nos. 149 and 150.]

FILM 92116 PREROGATIVE COURT OF CANTERBURY 20 RIDLEY MARY FARMER (DAME) OF ESTON NESTON 1625 EXTRACT To my grandchild Anne Wenman all my buttons made of seed pearl and my other of gold and pearl and forty shillings to buy her a ring To have and to hold unto them the said Sir Thomas Wenman, Francis Saunders, Richard Trist and Thomas King immediately from and after my decease for and during the term of fourscore and nineteen years, from thence next ensuing, to be complete and ended, upon special trust and confidence notwithstanding and to the intent and purpose that they and the survivors of them and the Executors and Administrators of the survivors of them shall out of the rents, issues and profits of the said Manors and by the sale or otherwise of such other lands as I have appointed for that purpose, first satisfy & pay all such just debts as shall be by me owing at the time of my decease And to my daughter Killagree the hundred pounds formerly bequeathed unto her & such part of the four hundred pounds unpaid by me at the time of my decease to my son Sir. Richard Wenman Knight which I am bound to pay him in part of the portion of the said Lady Lister To my well beloved son Sir Thomas Wenman Knight one of my "Pursland" cups set in silver and gilt for a remembrance of my love and twenty pounds in money to buy him a gelding I give to his wife the young Lady Wenman six of my little plates of silver which are for sweet meats and six of my bigger silver plates Item I give to my grandchild Mr Edward Wenman all the books of Italian and French which were his grandfathers and my good George's, Sir George Farmor. And more I give him, ten pounds of lawful English money to buy him a gelding Item I give to Mr Phillip Wenman, youngest son to my daughter Wenman, if he shall then be living at my death, ten pounds of lawful money of England Item I give to my Goddaughter and my grandchild Marie Dinham, eldest daughter to my son Sir John Dinham ten pounds to buy her a ring to wear in remembrance of her grandmother. And I give her more, the blue sapphire which was her good grandmother's, my daughter Wenman's And whereas by one other deed indented dated the first day of August in the said one and twentieth year of the reign of our said late king over England, I have demised, granted, bargained and sold unto my said well beloved grandchild Sir Thomas Wenman, and to my said friends Francis Saunders, Richard Trist and Thomas King my wood or wood ground at Westoning aforesaid and all my messuages, lands and tenements in Helliden in the said county of Northampton for the term of diverse years to have commencement from and after my decease upon trust and confidence likewise for the payment of my just debts such legacies as I shall give by my last will and testament in money if my goods and chattles other than such as I do by my said will give away and dispose of in particular shall not be sufficient to satisfy and discharge the same The rest to my daughter the Lady Sanchar, and I appoint my well beloved daughter Dame Marie Sanchar, wife to the said Sir Barnaby Bryen knight my well beloved son in law, my said well beloved grandchild Sir Thomas Wenman knight and my aforesaid beloved friend and cousin Francis Saunders of "Sysim" aforesaid Esquire, executors of this my last will and testament entreating their care and pains in the performance of the same In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal dated the day and year first above written Mary Farmer, signed sealed and published the eighth day of April Anno Dom 1627 in the presence of Barnaby Brien, Christopher Sherland, Richard Lane, Edward Bruett, Owen Geltham, Wil. Rushton, Christopher Crouch, Humfrie Parkes, Edward Loggas* And whereas since the date of my will I have by one other deed given to my Lord North and others, diverse parcels of silver plate and other things in trust for my daughter Sanchar I do hereby likewise ratify and confirm the said gift Mary Farmor Probate granted 10th April 1627 *This name appears to be Boggas or Loggas

Local History Research Group Thame, Oxfordshire, England Information@ThameHistory.net Isobel Williams, daughter of Sir John Williams, married Sir Richard Wenman, a wealthy wool merchant from Witney. The name Wenman is said to derive from the family's early associations with wool wagons, or wains. The family was among many sixteenth century yeoman traders who rose to great wealth and power through the wool trade. Sir Richard and Isobel Wenman moved into Thame Park. Thame Park House consisted at this time of the Abbot's lodging and the somewhat delapidated ancient Abbey. Parts of the east wing of the house, adjoining the Abbot's lodging, date from the sixteenth century. Sir Richard's grandson, also called Richard Wenman, saw military service on behalf of Queen Elizabeth, and for this he too was knighted, at Cadiz in 1596. In the wake of the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 both Sir Richard Wenman and his wife Agnes were questioned on their part in the conspiracy. No action was taken, as it appears that Agnes Wenman may have had several innocent dealings with Roman Catholics involved on the margins of the plot to assassinate the King and Parliament. In fact, under Charles I in 1628 Sir Richard was created the first Viscount Wenman. Thame Park, south east of Thame, has a long and remarkable history. It is reputed to contain some of the oldest enclosed parkland in England. Thame Park was home for four hundred years to a Cistercian Abbey, and a community of monks, founded at the time when the famous order of white monks was enjoying great wealth and power. It became the property of Lord Williams of Thame at the Reformation, and passed through his daughter into the Wenman family.

Reference: MS 3878/60 Indenture between Richard Huddleston, esq., Margery his wife, daughter of William Smyth knt., deceased, and Walter Smyth esq., and Dame Mary, his wife, formerly wife of the said William Smith, and Humphrey smith, son of the said William and Mary, being an agreement concerning the settlement of the manor of Elford, with lands in Elford, Okeley, Hasloore, Tamworth, co. Staffs, in dispute between the said parties. Creation dates: 8 March 1529/30 Reference: MS 3878/61 Bond from Walter Smyth of Elford co. Staff., esq., and Humphrey Ferrers of Tamworth co. War., es., to Richard Huddleston esq., to secure performance of covenants. Creation dates: 8 March 1529/30 Reference: MS 3878/63 Indenture between Richard Huddlestone esq., Margerie, his wife, and Walter Smyth, esq., and Dame Mary, his wife, being a covenant between the said parties concerning the exchange of the Manors of Elford and Oakley, co. Staff., with the manor of Sybertoft Sibbertoft co. Northampton, and the manor of Quarnden, co. Leic. Creation dates: 27 October 1530 Reference: MS 3878/67 Quitclaim from John Gemme of Whytynton Whittington, co. Staff., yeoman to Richard Huddylston, esq., Lord of Elforde Elford co. Staff. of a river meadow with appurtenances near the River Tame. Reference: MS 3878/69 Testimony of John Deyster of Elforde, Elford co. Staff., husbandman, in a dispute between Richard Huddylston of Elforde, co. Staff., esq., and William Babynton of Tymmore Tamhorn, co. Staff., esq., concerning land in Elford, called Lolyms. Creation dates: 20 January 1538/9 Reference: MS 3878/73 Testimony of Thomas Wode, of Warrforde Warford, co. Cheshire, William Colyn of Fysherwyke Fisherwick, Co. Staff., and Roger Colyn of Drayton Bassett, Co. Staff., yeoman, in a dispute between Richard Huddylston, lord of Elforde, Elford, Co. Staff. and William Babynton of Tymmore, concerning a piece of land in Elford, called a holme. Creation dates: 14 March 1539/40 © 2002 The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Birmingham City Archives Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown. In the Procat Records we learn more: STAC 2/3 PLAINTIFF: William Babyngton DEFENDANT: Richard Huddleston, Henry Smythe, Peter Fulces, and others PLACE OR SUBJECT: Forcible entry, &c. at Tymover (Tymmore)COUNTY: Stafford 22/04/1509-22/04/1547; STAC 4/9/33 PLAINTIFF: Anthony Babyngton DEFENDANT: Richard Huddleston, Thomas Cartwrit, alias Wall, Richard Carter, Peter Fulsere, and others PLACE OR SUBJECT: Assaults and destruction of property at Tymmore and Elford, and vexatious suits COUNTY: Stafford 19/07/1553-17/11/1558; and we find that Dame Mary was Dame Mary Huddleston: PROB 32/32/265 Deceased: Huddleston, Dame Mary, widow, St. Mary le Savoy, Middx. Letters of administration with will annexed. Issued by Court of Archdeacon of Middlesex 1692 July 8 PROB 36/6 Name of deceased: Huddleston, Dame Mary [unstated]Case title and other data: Cox alias Cocks con Staples alias Tufton 1692

Indenture between Richard Huddlestone esq., Margerie, his wife, and Walter Smyth, esq., and Dame Mary, his wife, being a covenant between the said parties concerning the exchange of the Manors of Elford and Oakley, co. Staff., with the manor of Sybertoft Sibbertoft co. Northampton, and the manor of Quarnden, co. Leic. Creation dates: 27 October 1530 Reference: MS 3878/67 Quitclaim from John Gemme of Whytynton Whittington, co. Staff., yeoman to Richard Huddylston, esq., Lord of Elforde Elford co. Staff. of a river meadow with appurtenances near the River Tame. Reference: MS 3878/69 © 2002 The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Birmingham City Archives Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown.

The Ferrers, Ferrars, Smythes recorded in the House of Commons and the Records of the Virginia Company seem to fit together. Edwin Sandys' mention in the Elford records and above records seemed to back this up.

House of Commons Journal Volume 1 10 March 1576 (This would be nine years before Captain John Huddleston was born) Lady Weyneman, &c. Mr. Doctor Barcley and Mr. Powle do bring from the Lords the Bill touching the Confirmation of an Abitrament to be made between Richard Huddlestone Esquire, and Dame Izabell Weyneman his wife, on the One Part; and Francis Weyneman Gentlemen of the other Part; are sent up to the Lords by Mr. Secretary Smythe and others. (Three times before this Lady Weyneman's Bill was read and she shows up the 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 13 of March 1576) A Sir Rich. Weyneman is admitted to the commons one day and sent to the Tower later and so is a Sir Tho. Weyneman sent to the Tower. House of Commons Journal Volume 1 01 May 1621. -To carry him to the Fleete, and whip him.-And hopeth, upon Search of his papers, to find Matters to hang him. PRO Reference Title/Scope and Content Covering Dates E 115/405/5 Wayneman, Wainman, Waynman, Wenman, Weyneman, [Lady Ann]: Oxford.

C 1/274/30 Richard Wenman, of Witney. v. John Toly and Parnell, his wife.: Detention of deeds relating to a messuage and land in the lordship of Coggs near Gylden Mill.: Oxford. C 1/588/37 Richard Wenman of Witney. v. Thomas Bele of Over Guyting.: Lands and rents in Over Guyting alias Temple Guyting.: Gloucester. 1518-1529 C 1/795/36-38 John Fetyplace. v. Thomas Wenman of Caswell [in Witney].: Obtaining from the Earl of Huntingdon a lease of a farm called Lord Hastings's Farm, with land, water, and fishing in Standlake, in prejudice of a lease to plaintiff.: Oxford. 1538-1544 C 1/908/1 Thomas Tailiour and William Paris of Otterton, executors of Alice Wenman. v. Thomas Lane.: Slanderous statement that complainants have forged the said Alice's will, and detention of goods.: Devon. 1538-1544 C 1/1169/36-38 Henry WAYNMAN (Wenman, Weyman), priest, v. Denise SANDES, late the wife of Walter Champion of London, draper.: Salary charged by the said Champion on his lands in Guildford, Godalming, and elsewhere, to find a priest to sing for his soul in the collegiate church of St. C 3/14/38 Bennet v. Wenman: Oxford. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/191/50 Wenman v. Wenman: Oxford. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/195/9 Wayneman (or Wenman) v. Wayneman (or Wenman): Gloucester. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/195/13 Wenman v. Hanford: Buckingham. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/196/23 Wenman v. Wenman: Gloucester. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/197/33 Wenman v. Clarke: Gloucester. A.D. 1558-1579 C 3/220/89 Wenman v. Wenman: Wilts. A.D. 1579-1587 C 3/225/71 Huddilston v. Wenman: Berks. A.D. 1587-1591

In The Ballad of Bosworth Field Bennett, Michael. The Battle of Bosworth. St. Martin's Press, 1985, rev. 1993. This excerpt, pp. 170-175, is reproduced with the kind permission of the author. DATE: Earliest surviving copy mid-17th century, but prose summary of earlier version late 16th century; form and content indicate initial composition within living memory of battle. AUTHOR: Anonymous member of Stanley entourage, probably eye-witness. TEXT : B.L., Additional MS. 27,879, fos. 434-43; Bishop Percy's Folio Manuscript. Ballads and Romances, ed. J.W. Hales and F.J. Furnivall, 3 vols. (London, 1868), III, pp. 233-59; B.L. Harleian MS. 542, f.34 (prose summary). English; spelling modernis ed; readings from prose summary marked #.) John Huddleston ['Hurlstean', 'Adlyngton'#]. Against the armed might of all England two shires alone (Lancaster and Cheshire) stand for Henry Tudor. On Monday Lord Stanley leads the Lancashire men from Lathom to Newcastle. Sir William Stanley with troops from Cheshire and North Wales moves first from Holt to Nantwich, then on Tuesday to Stone, whence he rides across to meet Henry Tudor at Stafford. The narrative leaps several days to describe the triumphal entry of the pretender and the younger Stanley into Lichfield on the Saturday morning, but the latter abruptly leaves in the direction of Tamworth, where it is reported that Lord Stanley is about to be attacked by the king. The Stanleys are in position near a place called 'Hattersey'; Lord Stanley has the vanguard, and Sir William's company comes in as the rearguard. They remain in defensive formation through Sunday, expecting the royal advance, but Henry Tudor arrives first and finally meets Lord Stanley. Early the next morning the battle begins.

There was Sir Iohn Neuill of bloud soe hye, Sir Iohn Hurlstean in rich array, Sir Rodger Herne behind wold not bee, Sir Iames Harrington, sad att assay. -- 83.332 Bosworth Fielde Text from Bishop Percy's Folio Manuscript. Ballads and Romances, ed. J.W. Hales and F.J. Furnivall, 3 vols. (London, 1868), III, pp. 233-59. Reproduced by kind permission of Department of Special Collections, University of Pennsylvania Library. Keyboarding and HTML markup by Judie Gall; proofreading by Laura Blanchard).

Since Captain John Huddleston did not receive his commission to be master of the Bona Noua till 1620; We must question which came to Virginia first-the Bona Noua or Captain John Huddleston? Without question the Bona Noua is mentioned in records more often and first before Captain John Huddleston. Could Captain Weldon been a prior master of the Bona Noua before Captain John Huddleston? You will notice in the passenger list William Weldon is mentioned. Could Captain Weldon been termed 'Captain' in the Militia and Naval term of the word? Case in point is found on page 226 in the margin of the 'Records of the Virginia Company'. LXXXVI Aboard the Bona Nova there were shipped 600 bushells of English meale whereof 36 were sent to Smiths hundred and 20 bushells to Mr Farrars Plantation soe there remayned to the 2 Companys of C. Weldon and Lieve-Whitakers-544 bushel onely witness the Cape Merchant. We do know that from reading the 'Records of the Virginia Company' that the ships in the 1618-1620 era left London on the Thames River and arrived in Virginia in the Isle of Wight at Cowes and that Jamestowne in Virginia had its own separate port. We know that from this same passage that of 100 men aboard the first known trip of the Bona Noua, 50 were Captain Weldon's men and 50 were Lieutenant Jabez Whittaker's men. Was, according to this passage, Lieutenant Jabez Whittaker under Captain Weldon in terms of rank?

Finding Ratcliff, Middlesex, London, England was a difficult research for me but the following paragraph explains this place.

Public Record Office Online Catalogue E 134/22Jas1/East24 Sir Robt. Maunsel, Knt. v. Sir William Clavill, Knt.: Glass works in the Isle of Purbeck (Dorset), and at Ratcliffe (Middlesex). Touching an indenture of covenants made between Phillip Earl of Montgomery, Sir Thos. Howard, Knt., Sir Edwd. Zouche, Knt., Sir Thos. 22 Jas 1 1623-24 E 178/4180 MIDDLESEX: East Smithfield Inquisition as to houses built on encroached land between Lewen's Wharf and Ratcliff. 9 James I. E 178/4197 MIDDLESEX: Ratcliff Certificate of the sale of a forfeited ship called `the Hopewell.' 10 James I. LR 14/989 GRANTOR: William Stubbes of Ratcliff, co. Middlesex, gentleman. GRANTEE: Thomas Cleyton, mercer. PLACE OR SUBJECT: Assignment, indented, of his interest in the lease of the house and site of the Dominion Friars in Newcastle-under-Lyme. COUNTY: Staff. 24 Eliz. MR 1/248 Middlesex (now in London Borough of Tower Hamlets). Four plans of named areas 'with their several housings and wharfes', and showing names of proprietors. (1) Limehouse, from the north part of the street down to the River Thames, with houses and wharves on the south side. 1635 The County of Middlesex Trust: Middlesex-HISTORICAL FACTS About the time of Captain John Huddleston's birth the Public Online Catalogue gives a Huddleston case in Middlesex: C 3/226/35 Huddleston v. Dorchester: Middlesex. A.D. 1587-1591

Crofts Castle
The area around Croft Castle has been occupied for over two thousand years-there was an iron-age hill fort on the ridge to the north of the existing building- and the Croft family have lived here since before the Norman invasion. It is thought that the Norman family de Croft came over during the time of Edward the Confessor, and by the time of Domesday, a Bernard de Croft held the land. The de Crofts have a distinguished history; in 1103, Bernard de Croft endowed the Cluniac monastery at Thetford in Norfolk, and became a monk there and in 1100 Jasper de Croft fought in the Crusades and was knighted. In the thirteenth century, the Lord of Croft helped the captured Prince of Wales, later Edward I, to escape to Croft. John de Croft married a daughter of Owen Glendower and the battle of Mortimer's Cross in 1461 was fought on Croft land. When Henry Tudor came to the English throne, men from Wales and the Border Marches found favour at court and Sir Richard Croft became Treasurer of King Henry VII's household and later steward to his first son, Prince Arthur. During the Civil War, the Crofts fought for the King, and Croft Castle is known to have been dismantled by the Royalists to prevent its use by the Parliamentarians. The property and estate eventually left Croft hands in 1746, sold to Richard Knight of Downton to repay debts. It returned to the Crofts in 1923 when it was bought back by the Trustees of Sir James Croft. He was killed in action with the Commandos in 1941. Although now run by the National Trust, members of the Croft family still live in the castle and on the estate, thus continuing the ancient family association. Jonathan & Clare of West Yorkshire & Cheshire Copyright 1998-2003

Middlesex was first recorded in a Saxon Charter of 704 A.D. as "Provincia middleseaxon" (Province of the Middle Saxons) making it the third oldest recorded county name after Kent and Essex. Originally it was part of the Kingdom of Essex until the Danes overran Essex and captured London in the mid ninth century. In 886 A.D. Alfred the Great re-took London and established the boundary between the Saxons and Danelaw along the river Lea. Middlesex (including modern Hertfordshire) remained part of the Kingdom of Wessex until the Norman Conquest in 1066 A.D. In the late ninth century the shires as we know them today were created. They were parts of kingdoms or provinces which were shorn off to create smaller units, thus Hertfordshire was detached from the Middlesex Province. N.B. Middlesex was never a shire. The Normans used the existing Saxon Divisions of the Country calling them Counties (units of account for the Domesday Survey in 1086 and being under the control of a compte or count) The County Town is the place from which the county is administered. From at least 1549 (earliest records) until the creation of county councils in 1889, Middlesex was administered by 'magistrates' from Clerkenwell. The Middlesex County Council which sat at the Middlesex (.Guildhall in Westminster, only existed for 76 years (1889-1965) and only represented 3/4 of the County. The only claim for Brentford being the County town is the fact that the County elections were held there during the 18th and 19th centuries. The 'magistrates' sat at Clerkenwell for at least 440 years and represented the whole county, giving Clerkenwell the only legitimate claim to be the County Town of Middlesex. The River Thames was the key to the history of Middlesex. From about 8000 BC traders and settlers used the Thames as their waterway. During the Iron Age (c. 500 BC) settlements existed at Brentford and Heathrow. In the Ist century BC Belgic tribes had established themselves in southeastern England, and Middlesex formed part of the Catuvellauni territory. The Romans set up outposts at what became Staines and Brentford. In the early 5th century AD the Saxons began to colonize the area. Positioned as it was between the East and West Saxons, the region soon obtained its modern name (meaning "middle Saxons"); the earliest written record of it is in the form Middelseaxan, in a charter of 704. Encyclopaedia Britannica: Middlesex

After the attempted invasion of Britain by the Spanish Armada in 1588, when the loyal Londoners raised a large band of men to help defeat the invaders, England became more politically stable. There was a marked increase in prosperity and the population of London grew accordingly. The core of the city was built around the lands seized from the church and we begin to see the richer citizens moving out to country estates to the west of the city along the Thames where many of the old bishops' palaces were rebuilt for use by the nobility. Tudor London By David Nash Ford The accession of King James VI of Scotland to the English throne, as James I in 1603, led to a major influx of Scots into London, which was to continue in succeeding centuries. In James' time and later in that of Charles I, Inigo Jones introduced town planning to the capital. He built the Queen's House at Greenwich Palace and the Banqeting House at Whitehall. However, the experimental developments at Covent Garden and Lincoln's Inn Fields were still in their infancy when Civil War broke out. Perhaps the most significant civic achievement of James I's reign was the provision of a clean water supply for the capital under the New River Scheme, overseen originally by the City Corporation and later by Hugh Myddelton with help from the King. James was not always a popular monarch however and his harsh anti-catholic laws led to an attempt to assassinate him at the opening of Parliament at the Royal Palace of Westminster in 1605. Fortunately, this 'Gunpowder Plot' was uncovered and the perpetrators rounded up. Stuart London By Margaret Johnson (Both articles taken from a history of London).

November 18, 1618 is a date to remember. Sir Thomas Smith is connected with the Elford Huddlestons and Millom Huddlestons since the Elford Huddlestons come from the Millom Huddlestons. SIR Thomas Smith, Knt. was treasurer and Governor of the Company during the first twelve year which ended the 18th of November, 1618. This coincides with the article that Edwin Sandys first boat to send is the Bona Noua. George Yeardley's instructions concerning the survey reports is November 18, 1618. The Bona Noua first landed in Pasbehay, Virginia on November 18, 1618. This information is derived from the Virginia Surveys which is found in the 'Records of the Virginia Company' and from Library OF Congress The Records of The Virginia Company of London The Court Book, From The Manuscript In The Library Of Congress Edited With An Introduction And Bibliography, By Susan Myra Kingsbury, A. M., Ph. D. Instructor In History And Ergonomics Simmons College Preface by Herbert Levi Osgood, A. M., Ph. D. Professor Of American History In Columbia University Carola Woerishoffer Professor Of Social Economy Bryn Mawr College Copyright Washington Government Printing Office 1906 & 1933 Volume I 1607-1622 & Volume II 1622-1624 Volume I page 94 March 1619 (saue onely 100 men sent in the Bona Noua Volume I page 185 After May 9, 1623 9 The late Ires: And the lists compared Wth the Booke of the Massac: The Farrars Aduenters in the Bona Noua, the Hopewell, the Furtherance, and the Abigaile &c some of these Shipps haue gone twice or thrice Wthin theise 4 yeares. The accent is on the word 'sent' meaning after the fact.

Argall's Gift lay about a mile north of Jamestown. See p. 275, note 1. First Hand Accounts of Virginia, 1575-1705 Sir George Yeardley , who had been a soldier in the Low Country wars, sailed for Virginia as captain of Sir Thomas Gates 's company in 1609. He was wrecked with Gates on the Bermuda Islands and reaching Virginia was deputy-governor from the departure of Dale in April, 1616, to the arrival of Argall in May, 1617. After Lord Delaware 's death he was appointed to succeed him as governor and captain-general. He convened the first legislative assembly in America. He served till November 18, 1621. In March, 1626, he was reappointed governor, and continued in that office till his death in November, 1627. Then came there in a complaint against Captain Martin , that having sent his Shallop to trade for corn into the bay , under the command of one Ensign Harrison , the said Ensign should affirm to one Thomas Davis , of Paspaheighe, Gent. (as the said Thomas Davis deposed upon oath ,) that they had made a hard voyage , had they not met with a Canoe coming out of a creek where their shallop could not go . For the Indians refusing to sell their Corn , those of the shallop entered the Canoe with their arms and took it by force, measuring out the corn with a basket they had into the Shallop and (as the said Ensign Harrison said ) giving them satisfaction in copper beads and other trucking stuff . (An order of the General Assembly touching a clause in Captain Martin's Patent at James City , July 30, 1619) Aug. 4th, 1619. This day also did the Inhabitants of Paspaheigh, alias Argall 's town , (Argall's Town or Gift was situated on the north side of the river a mile from Jamestown in the old fields, where once stood the chief village of the Paspaheghs, but from which they had removed to Sandy Point not long before the coming of the white men. Argall's Town was established by Argall in 1617.) present a petition to the general assembly to give them an absolute discharge from certain bonds wherein they stand bound to Captain Samuell Argall for the payment of 600lb and to Captain William Powell , at Captain Argall 's appointment, for the payment of 50lb more. To Captain Argall for 15 score acres of woody ground, called by the name of Argal 's town or Paspaheigh; to Captain Powell in respect of his pains in clearing the ground and building the houses for which Captain Argal ought to have given him satisfaction. Now , the general assembly being doubtful whether they have any power and authority to discharge the said bonds , do by these presents (at the Instance of the said Inhabitants of Paspaheigh, alias Martin 's hundred people) become most humble suitors to the Treasurer, Council and Company in England that they will be pleased to get the said bonds for 600lb to be cancelled; for as much as in their great commission they have expressly and by name appointed that place of Paspaheigh for part of the Governor 's land . And wheras Captain William Powell is paid his 50 which Captain Argall enjoin d the said Inhabitants to present him with, as part of the bargain , the general assembly, at their entreaty , do become suitors on their behalf , that Captain Argall , by the Council and Company of England, may be compelled either to restore the said 50lb from thence, or else that restitution thereof be made here out of the goods of the said Captain Argall . Narratives of Early Virginia, 1606-1925 Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL.D. Charles Scribner's Sons New York 1907

It is interesting to note that Captain William Powell had acquired the goods of Captain John Huddleston. 21 July 1626-King Privy Council Action: An order was directed to the Governor of Virginia to assess the value of the Estate of Captain Nathaniel Powell, decd., and to send value of it in tobacco to England, a petition having been made by Thomas Powell, brother and admistrator of said Powell, decd, stating that in consideration of the poverty of said Powell's brothers and sisters, that proceeds of the said Captain's Estate should be paid unto them. The Virginia Company had certified that one William Powell, no way kin to the decedent, had taken out Letters Of Administration of the said Captain's Estate and had seized the goods of Captain John Huddleston in Virginia. The said William Powell then died, and Nathaniel Powell's Estate came into the hands of Mr. [Edward] Blaney who married William Powell's widow. Thomas Powell, eldest brother of the said Nathaniel Powell, dced had taken out Letters Of Administration for the decedent in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. Acts of the Privy Council of England (1613-1631), as cited by Coldham, 1:72. Also, in 1626 the mention of James Slights house mentioned in the court document. A COURT at James Citty the 19th. of February 1626, being sent Mr. Doctor Pott. Capt. Smyth. Capt. Matthews. Mr. Secretary. Mr. ffarrar. It is ordered that there shall be a warrant sent up unto Sherley Hundred in ye Maine, that John Ewins & Jane Hill should be sent downe to James-Citty, & there to be examined concerning such leud behavior as hath bin betweene them. Patrick Kennady marriner sworne & examined sayth that as concerning those words which Mrs. Allice Boyse taxeth Capt. Hudleston to have accused her with at Capt. Martins plantation, viz that he say Capt. Hudleston should there say that Capt. Epes had the use of her body that night that he lay in James Slights house, or else said he never had the use of his owne wife, more then Capt. Epes had of her yt night; this deponeth sayth he did not heare Capt. Hudleston speake the same words, but that Capt. Hudleston sayd there was very unfitting behavior between them.

XLVII. Virginia Company. Instructions To George Yeardley November 18, 1618 (1) Miscellaneous Records, 1606-1692 pp. 72-83 (2) Randolph MSS., III, pp. 46-150 Document in (1) Library of Congress, (2) Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. List of Records No. 87. On page 109 Each Survey to be set down distinctly in writing and returned to us under your hands and seals In Witness whereof we have hereunto set our Company Seal Given in a great and general Court of the Council and Company of Adventurers of Virginia held the Eighteenth Day of November 1618 And in the years of the Reign of Our Soverain Lord James by the grace of God King of England Scotland France and Ireland Defender of the Faith &c Vizt of England France and Ireland the Sixteenthe and of Scotland the two and fiftieth. Novr 18. 1618. [In the early seventeenth century, the land along the north shore of the James River from Jamestown Island to the mouth of the Chickahominy River was known as Pasbehay or Pasbehay Country. In 1618, the Virginia Company of London ordered that 3000 acres were to be set aside and planted for the benefit of the Company. In 1619, Sir George Yeardley arrived at Jamestown with tenants to settle on both the Governor's Land and the Company Land. In late 1619, Lieutenant Jabez Whittaker and perhaps as many as fifty men were sent by the Virginia Company to the Company's tract. According to Whittaker, he and his men built a 40' by 20' "guesthouse" to season new immigrants. They also erected other dwellings, and fenced in their acreage and livestock. The tenants who worked on the Company Land agreed to serve for seven years in return for 50% of the profits of their labor. Additionally, the Virginia Company provided the tenants with a year's supply of food and cattle along with clothes, weapons, tools, and other equipment. Over a 15 year period, disease, famine, Indian attacks, and other obstacles took a heavy toll. Of 14,000 settlers who arrived at the colony between 1607 and 1622, 13,000 died. The survivors increased trade with England to include timber, furs, tobacco, and other goods, and by 1614 the first sustaining shipment of trade goods was exported. Within 15 years, two other historically significant events occurred: In 1619, the colonists formed the first New World representative ruling assembly; and the first black slaves arrived. This year also marked the first westward movement of English settlers, as the community of Pasbehay was founded near the confluence of the James and Chickahominy Rivers. Source: THE SERENDIPITOUS HISTORY OF DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT SURROUNDING THE "HOSPITAL POINT" AREA AND ITS NAVAL HOSPITAL IN PORTSMOUTH.

'Records of the Virginia Company' CXVI. John Pory. A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys June 12, 1620 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene Colledge, Cambridge. Letter Signed List of Records No. 180 Page 305 Nowe as concerninge ye buylding of guest-houses, this tyme of ye year is most vnfittinge, in respect of ye tymbr to be felled, wch would nowe be full of sap in respect of ye heate, and lastly in respect of ye peoples attendinge their corn, where on depende ye lives of vs all. In winter some good wilbe done in that kinde. To drawe ye old planters also to assist in ye Iron workes wilbe harsh and difficult, And I doe verily knowe, and without flattery may [1b] confidently affirme, that ye governor yf he wer able would defray all these publique affaires out of his owne purse, and would not put ye people to so much as an howes worke. He hath allready by ye George and ye Bona Nova (ye wch I was much against) proffered his salary towards ye buyldinge of a forte at Poynt Comforte. If ye Company please they may apply that to ye buylding of guest-houses, and other publique vses, and to keepe ye old planters from losse and murmuringe.

On 15 December 1710, Spotswood wrote the Council of Trade:"I gave your Lordships an account in my last of a project intended to be laid before the next Assembly [House of Burgesses plus the Council] for carrying on an Iron Work, but that design did not meet with the countenance which was expected from the House of Burgesses, it being the temper of the People here never to favour any Undertaking unless they can see a particular advantage arising to themselves, and these Iron mines, lying only at the Falls of James River [saying in effect that no other deposits were known], the rest of the Country did not apprehend any benefitt they should reap thereby. Since therefore the Country hath so little inclination to make use of the advantages which nature has put into their hands, I humbly propose to Your Lordships' consideration whether it might not turn to good account if her Majesty would be pleased to take that work into her own hands, sending over workmen and materials for carrying it on, and imploying therein the Revenue of Quitt-Rents which should be a sufficient fund to bring it to perfection. I have been assured that the Oar has been tryed and found extraordinary Rich, and I have discoursed the Owners of the Land [the William Byrd family], and find them very willing to yield up their Right into her Majesty's hands without expecting any other consideration than such an Office in the management of the work as they shall be found capable of. The Iron might even be sent home as Ballast to Ships without any other charge than of Sloops or Lighters to put it on board, and by this means her Majesty may prevent its being manufactured in this Country, which is the only ill consequence that might have been feared if this work had been undertaken by the Inhabitants . . .[a new subject starts without a formal end to the previous thoughts]." [Commentary: This letter makes it clear that the iron ore mentioned in the previous letter to the Commissioners was not on the Rappahannock or Rapidan Rivers but on the James River. Being at the Falls [i.e., near present day Richmond], it is the location where a smelting furnace had been built in the 1620s and destroyed in the general Indian uprising of 1622. This is also the iron ore sent to England in the 1580s for testing. It was found to be very good ore. Therefore, it was not newly discovered iron nor had it been found by Spotswood. (John Blankenbaker from Note 1957) GERMANNA_COLONIES-L@rootsweb.com

William Weldon, a passenger on the Bona Nova was a Captain and wrote about his trip on the Bona Nova to Sir Edwin Sandys. Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts. 1606-1737 Page 262-page 265. CII. William Weldon. A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys March 6, 1619/20 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge. Autographed Letter; Signed, with Seal List of Records No. 166 Harrowhattocke the 6th of March 1619. Honorable Sr May it please you to vnderstand that vpon the 10th of August wee set sayle from Deale & havinge a faire & prosperous winde held our Course toward the Caribo Islands & vpon the 27th of Septemb: fell wth Metallina & the 3th of Octob: anchored at Mem's from whence wee depted the 11th of Octob: & after some stormy & tempestuous wether ariued at Pointe Comfort vpon the 29th of Octob: the 4th of Nouemb: followinge anchored before James Citty where we landed all our people in as good or better health than they were when they came abord a wonderfull & miraculous passage the like wherof hath not bene knowne since the first plantation of this Country wherein the lord plainly sheweth that he loueth the gates of Sion more then all the dwellings of Jacob

Page 263 March 6 1619/20 (The letter continues.) blessed be his glorious maiesty for this & all other his mercies & may his loue euer continue to this his poore vine that the roote of it may fill the land & the hills may be couered wth the shadow of it. And truly the experience of his former mercies (in preseruinge vs in that extreame hot climate in a ship so excedingly pestered assureth me that he will doe this & much more for vs if or sins hinder him not. But honorable Sr the great defects of the provisions promised in England hath very much griiued me & almost dishartened my whole Company for whereas the tennants were promised 3 suits of apell for euery mann full armes & a competent provision of houshold stuffe I finde here but 2 suites of apell for a mann. (& one of them soe meane & vnseruiceable that it will not defend them from the iniury of the wether wth hath bene extreame Cold euer since our Cominge hether) but 30 muskets 5 iron pots & 1 small kettle for 50 menn. To omit the promises of kine & other thinges (wth I hope wilbe pformed) our maine provision of victualls is so short that the Gouernor & cape9chant seeing my Inuoice protested I had not a competent proportion for 50 menn for aboue 4 monthes havinge only 32 1/2 hhds of meale or any other English victualls. In regard whereof the Gouenor & Counsell thought it fitt to put out the one halfe of my Company for their victualls this yere & a proportion of Corne & Tobacco to victuall & apell them the next yere wth I was Constrained to doe to my owne great greife & the no small discontent of my whole company. All wch inconueniencies I pswaded them to beare wth no patience indure to heare of it bitterly Complayninge that they haue noe othermeanes to furnish themselues wth aparell for the insuinge yere but are likely as they say (and for ought I cann see) to be starued if they be debarred of it. In regard of wch necessity & to make them beare their present wants wth more alacrity & for that I am pswaded it is a thinge pleasinge to god that menn imploied in so a noble a busines should haue any Christian incoragement I am bold to intreat inlargement of my authority in that pointe & haue wth the allowance & good likinge of the Gouenor giuen them leave to plant some this yere but will restraine them to so small a quantity as possibly I cann by inioyninge them to so much corne as they shalbe able to attend.

Page 264 the land apointed for the Colledge is from Henrico to the falls of wch I may say wth Dauid her lot is fallen to her in a faire ground she hath a goodly heritage beinge as pleasant & frutfull a soyle as any this land yeeldeth. But one of the best seats is already planted by Captain Mathews for the vse of Sr Thomas Midleton & Alderman Johnson & another Chalenged by Thomas Dows by a graunt from Captain Argoll one of them beinge now ready for the plough & the other most conuenient for pasture both of them nere the place of my plantation & most fittinge for presnt vse. The Gouernor whom I haue found a noble fouorer & futherer of this busines hath giuen them both warninge to depte & take ground elswhere wch they haue hether to forborne to doe trustinge that the company will Confirme Captain Argoll his graunt wch I hope you will forbeare to doe in regard these 2 seats are the most conuenient & likely to proue the most benificiall for the present vse of the Colledge. There is small likelyhod of any proffit from my people this yere in regard the nombe of them is but small & some of them continually imployed in fetchinge vp our provisions & the rest of them I haue implyed in buildinge conuenient howsinge for themselues & the vse of supplies wch I expect wch I found great want & they shall receiue no small comfort ffor my owne pte I will doe my vttermost indeuour to make their labors profitable howsoeuer I haue hetherto receiued but small incouragement yet seeinge by former experience that god hath bene good to Iraell & beinge vndoubtedly pswaded that he will still continue to bee soe I haue comforted my selfe & am bold to incourage you to send such as haue bene grought vp to labor & those betwene 20 & 30 yeres of age for old menn either liue not or doe little seruice in this Country & aboue all let me intreat you to send them well prouided both of victualls & aparell for I cannot be suplyed here (vpon any termes) of such necessaries as my Company extreamly wanteth although I haue both spoken & sent & written to the Capemarchaunt In regard whereof I haue dealt wth the bearer here of Thomas Smith (beinge one of the 2 menn wch I brought ouer for my owne vse) who intendeth to bringe a ship & menn & necessaries as I shall want of my Company humbly intreatinge that he may haue a Comission to that purpose.

Page 265 April 5, 10, 1620 wh I hope you will not deny vnles some other order be taken to furnish the Company wth things necessary And thus not hauinge further to inlarge humbly Committinge yor worp & all yor indevors to god's mercifull protection & direction I rest Yors in all humility to Comand Willm Weldon [Indorsed by Sir Edwin Sandys:] Mr William Weldon 6 Martii 1619 from Virginia Voiage from 10 August to 29 October

Captain John Huddleston lived in the city of Poquoson (found in the book Cavaliers and Pioneers 1623-1666 abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent on page 44). Then, the county was known as Charles River County but later changed to York County, which was one of the first original shires(Places in Virginia History change names a lot). This Captain John Huddleston is the start of Series "B" of the "Huddleston Family Tables". Compiled by George Huddleston Birmingham, Alabama 1933 Scanned by Dick Huddleston 2002. Alan Huddleston has these Tables on his website: http://www.geocities.com/huddlestonfamilyhistory/id3.html ).

First Hand Accounts of Virginia, 1575-1705 By his Majesties Counseil for Virginia. 22. Junij. 1620. London Printed by T.S. 1620. A NOTE OF THE Shipping, Men, and Provisions sent to VIRGINIA, by the Treasurer and Company in the yeere, 1619. Part 2.1 The Bona Nova of 200. Tun sent in August 1619. with } 120 persons. The Duty, of 70 Tunne, sent in January 1619. with } 51. persons. The Jonathan, of 350. Tun, sent in February, 1619. with } 200. persons. The Triall, of 200. Tun, sent in February, 1619. with } 40. persons & 60. Kine. The Faulcon, of 150. Tun, sent in February, 1619. with } 36. persons, and 52. Kine, and 4. Mares. The London Merchant, of 300 Tun, sent in March 1619. with } 200. persons. The Swan of Barnstable, of 100. Tun, in March 1619. with } 71. persons. The Bonaventure, of 240. Tun, sent in Aprill, 1620. with } 153. persons. Besides these, set out by the Treasurer and Company, there have been set out by particular adventurers for private Plantations. The Garland, of 25. Tunne, sent in June, 1619, for Mr. John Ferrars Plantation, with } 45. persons. Who are yet detained in the Summer Islands. A Ship of Bristoll, of 80. Tunne, sent in Septemb. 1619. for Mr. Barkleys Plantation, with } 45. persons. There are also two Ships in providing to be shortly gone, for about 300 persons more, to be sent by private Adventurers to Virginia. } 300. persons. © Copyright 2000 by Crandall Shifflett. All rights reserved. A part of Virtual Jamestown XML searching and web delivery provided by the University of Virginia Library's Electronic Text Center

Captain John Huddleston helped the Pilgrims in 1622, See Bradford's Of Plymouth Colony, page 150 and Young's Chronicles, page 293. For Captain John Huddleston to be a witness in regards to the Captain Wye and the 'Garland' he would either had to be aboard the Garland or in his ship, the Bona Noua. This information is from the Library of Virginia (typing verbatum) ff.38vo-4040ro. 11 May 1620. Evidence given by William Wye of Limehouse, sailor, aged 25, son William plaintiff. Statement similiar to others. ff.67vo-70ro. 17 June 1620. Similiar evidence given by John Johnson of Limehouse, Nauta. ff.67vo-70ro. 18 June 1620. Evidence of John Cuff, London Merchant, aged 40. ff.71vo-72ro. 18 June 1620. Evidence of Richard Wiseman, London Merchant, aged 31. ff.72ro-73vo. No date. Further examination of Thomas Hopkins ff.73vo-75ro. 22 June 1620. Similiar evidence of William Bens of Somers Island, aged 35. f.75ro. 22 June 1620. Similiar statement from William Ewens of Limehouse, Nauta, aged 40. ff.75ro-75ro. 22 June 1620. Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor, aged 33.

Procat Records concerning Wye: C 146/487 Grant by John Tommys and Thomas Strech, of Teukysbury, to Giles Wye, John Bette, Francis Bette, William Larans, William Stone, John Swayn, Thomas Frampton, Robert Wyzt and John Merten, of lands, &c., in Tewkesbury and Sowthewyk (which the grantors had by the grant of Alexander Beynham,knight, and others named) for the life of Anne Monyngton, late the wife of William Wye, with remainder to Richard Wye, and Eleanor his wife, and the heirs of their bodies. Tewkesbury, 4 April, 24 Henry VII. C 146/979 Grant by Alexander Beynham, knight, William Grevell, sergeant-at-law, William Tracy, Robert Wye and Richard Wye, to Nicholas Dobyns, of all their lands and tenements in the town of Tewkesbury which they formerly held with William Wye, the elder, and William Wye, the younger, deceased, &c. 2 April, 24 Henry VII C 146/1150 Attornment of Nicholas Dobyns, of Tuewksbury, to John Thomys and Thomas Streche, purchasers of lands &c., in Tewkesbury and Southwyck, which the said Nicholas held for his life by the grant of Alexander Beynam, William Grevell, William Tracy, Robert Wye and Richard Wye, who had sold the reversion to the said John Thomys and Thomas Streche: [Glouc. 3 April, 24 Henry VI C 146/3239 Release by John Brigges, son and heir of Thomas Brigges, late serjeant-at-law, to Robert Poyntz, knight, John Norewoode, esquire, William Wye, William Carsy and John Grenehill, of all his right in the manor of Wike and the advowson of the church, or free chapel, there, and in all lands &c. 19th January, 8 Henry VII

It may be argued that the commission may have came after the fact of the ships' departure. The Bona Noua made atleast four trips back and forth from England to Virginia. It stands to reason that Captain John Huddleston born by the docks of Ratcliff learned sailoring talents at the docks and probably sailed on ships in the river Thames before he ever was master of the Bona Noua. Since the Garland was sent in June 1619 and the Bona Noua sent in August 1619 and John Huddleston, sailor was a witness in the report of the Garland; it makes sense the two ships met in Bermuda or close by and Captain John Huddleston was already a master of the Bona Noua. The term sailor itself refers to a deckhand and certainly one would want a Captain of a ship to have been a sailor before becoming a Captain of a ship. But let us consider two different documents.
Colonial Records Project Survey Report No. 3996 ff.75ro-75vo. 22 June 1620. Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor aged 33. Survey Report No. GL.5 References Crick and Alman Guide, pp.64-65. Vol.V No.65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621.
Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1666 Abstracted and Indexed by Nell Marion Nugent Copyright, 1963 by Genealogical Publishing Company originally published Richmond, 1934 page 44 Capt. Christopher Calthropp, 100 acs., being a second devdt., according to a graunt signed by Sir Georg Yeardly to John Hudleston, Marriner, 26 Apr. 16, 1621 & assigned by Richard Cox, Atty. to sd. Hudleston, to sd. Calthropp. 5 July 1636, p. 368. Adj. to the first devdt., whose bounds were, viz: W. upon Waters his Cr. E. upon land of Robert Hutchins, S. the river & N. into the woods. Same. 100 acrs. Chas. Riv. Co., same date & page. Within the new Poquoson at the head of Powells Cr., Nly. upon sd. Cr., Ely. to land formeley graunted to him. Trans. of 2 pers: Christopher Watts, Senr., Christopher Watts, Junr.

We find Robert Hutchins listed above in John Hudleston's graunt also in this updated list showing John Hurleston below Blunt Point which is actually John Hudleston or in other words Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova.
ROY, Your HUDDLESTON land of 1621-1636 is reported by Nugent to be in CHARLES RIVER COUNTY, the name of which was changed to YORK COUNTY in March 1642/3. My reference to this is from Nugent I, which points to Henings Statutes I:240, from my notes, but possibly the page ref is garbled. Sorry. But for sure, your land was in what became YORK COUNTY, west of Chesapeake Bay, and not on the EASTERN SHORE. Also wondering if RICHARD COX may be the RICHARD COCKE who was in nearby HENRICO COUNTY about 1630s, and involved in many legal and social matters, a man of some influence. You can read about RICHARD COCKE in GENEALOGIES OF VIRGINIA FAMILIES From The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography (Baltimore : Genealogical Publishing Co, 1981), Volume II "Claiborne - Fitzhugh", pages 104-165, etc. Best to you in your efforts.Rulon N. Smithson
The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660 Entries November 21, 1621 Commissions granted to: Daniel Gat(e)s to be master of the Darling and to fish on the coast of Virginia; John Huddleston to make a voyage to Virginia; and to have free fishing on the American coast; Captain Thomas Jones, master of the Discovery, to fish on the American coast and to trade furs in Virginia.
The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1776 Undated 1607 Updated 1626. List of first settlers at Jamestown Island, Virginia, in 1607 as noted by Captain John Smith: Territory of Tappahanna. John Dodds [150]. John Burrows [150]. Richard Pace [200]. Francis Chapman [100]. Thomas Gates [100]. Mr. John Rolfe [400]. Captain William Powell [200]. Captain Samuell Mathews' divided planted. Captain John Hurleston's [Huddleston's] dividend planted. John Bainham [200]. Mr. George Sandys [300]. Edward Grindon [150]. William Ewens [1000]. Captain William Powell [550]. Ensign John Utie [100]. Robert Euers [100]. Below Blunt Point. Captain John Hurlestone[Huddleston] [100]. Robert Hutchins [100]. John Southerne [40]. Sir Francis Wyatt [500]. Morris Thomson [150]. John Salford [100]. Pharaoh Flinton [150]. Lieutenant Giles Arlington [100]. William Bentley [50]. Thomas Godby [100]. (PRO:CO1/4/pp.24-27).

On page 555 and 557 of 'Records of the Virginia Company' we see Captain John Hudleston listed as Captain John Hurleston with the same information as noted in the preceding paragraph with date May 1625 and additional information on Captain Samuel Mathewes that he was court ordered to plant his divident Page 557 in May 1625 at Blunt Point. An interesting note can noticed since Denbigh is listed below Blunt Point in Chronological History of Warwick County Virginia 1629 Denbigh, best known of the Warwick Plantations was so named and was the seat of Capt. Mathews, who in 1626 is recorded as having taken up land in the Blunt Point area, calling his plantation "Mathew's Manor". So in other words he moved south a year later. In 1626, Samuel Mathews, of Denbigh, and William Claiborne, of Kecoughtan, offered to build the palisades, and construct houses, at short intervals, between Martin's Hundred and Chiskiack. James City County, VA Williamsburg, The Old Colonial Capital; Wm. & Mary Qrtly; Vol. 16, No.1 Transcribed by Kathy Merrill for the USGenWeb Archives Special Collections Project Williamsburg The Old Colonial Capital William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 16, No. 1. (Jul., 1907), pp. 1-65. Page 2. And from the 1626 court document in James Citty concerning Captain John Huddleston and Allice Boyse; We know he was in James Citty, Virginia. A COURT at James Citty the 19th. of February 1626, being sent Mr. Doctor Pott. Capt. Smyth. Capt. Matthews. Mr. Secretary. Mr. ffarrar. On page 558 we find that Lieutenant John Cheeseman planted 200 acres on ye southernly side of Maine River against Elizabeth City. We can see from page 567 that Captain Samuel Mathewes was at James Citty June 15, 1625 from his name put in by a scribe on a document. Page 587 starts the index and the end of the book.

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part 1, Page 4 MAURICE TOMPSON, 150 Acres, 4 March 1622, Page 20. Gent., a new planter, who first having trans. himself out of England has remained now 4 years in this country. Bet Newport News & Blunt Point. 100 acs. for trans. of: Georg Tompson & John Bembridge, out of England & 50 acs. for his own per. adv.

TEMPERANCE FLOWERDEW in Virginia, 1608; m. 1618, Sir George YEARDLEY; after his death, 1627; she m. Francis WEST, son of Lord DE LA WARR, who succeeded her husband as Governor of Virginia, 1627; she m. Francis WEST, 1628, d. 1629. "Virginia Magazine," Vol. 25, No. 2, April, 1917.) Sir Henry was the son of Sir William who m. Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Philip CALTHORPE and Anne, dau. of Sir William BOLYNE. Sir Thomas BOLYNE, his son, was the father of Queen Ann BOLYNE and Mary who m. William CARY, their dau. Katherine CARY, m. Sir Francis KNOLLYS. She was first cousin to Queen Elizabeth; dau. Anne m. Thomas WEST, second Lord DE LA WARR; their son Francis WEST m. Lady Temperance YEARDLEY, 1628, in Virginia. COL. EDMUND SCARBOROUGH, d. 1671; Burgess for Northampton County, Virginia, 1642-1645, 1652-1655, 1660 and for Accomac, 1666; Speaker of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1645; High Sheriff of Accomac County, Virginia, 1660-1661; in command of the expedition against the Assateague Indians, 1659; Surveyor General of Virginia, 1655-1671; m. Mary CHARLETON, dau. of Stephen and Elizabeth HARLETON. Col. Stephen CHARLETON commanded in Indian Massacre, 1644; Vestryman, 1635, Accomake; Burgess Northampton County, 1644-1645, 1652; d. 1653; he m. November 1653, Ann WEST, widow of Anthony WEST, Gentleman, of the family of Thomas WEST, Lords DE LA WARR, as shown by Arms on tomb of Maj. Charles WEST, his gr. gd. son, at Onancock, Northampton County, Virginia. Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 6

In FamilySearch we find a John HUDDLESTON (AFN:11DD-XC3) Born: Abt 1580 Of, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, England Married: 8 Jul 1618 to Grace Mrs WHITMORE (AFN:11DD-XD9) Born: Abt 1580 Of, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, England and they have a daughter Grace HUDDLESTON (AFN:11DD-XFH) Christened: 25 Feb 1618/1619. I only mention this because of this John Huddleston's closeness to London, England and because the Bona Noua was sent from London, England to Virginia.

GOV. WEST AND COUNCIL TO SIR ROBT. HEATH James City, Feby. 27, 1627/8. Governor Francis West and the Council of Virginia to Sir Robert Heath, the King's attorney General. On receipt of his Majs letter and other instructions from himself (see Novr., 1627), They immediately caused divers ships to be stayed that were ready to depart, and altho' they could not, the tobacco being already put aboard, try the goodness of the same, or contract for it on his Majs behalf, they had delivered to them invoices of the several quantities laden aboard & they have taken security for landing the same at the port of London. Have given orders, in obedience to the King's commands, that the Burgesses should shortly be assembled at James City, that by the general and unanimous voice of the whole Colony his Majesty may receive a full answer to the several points concerning their tobacco, and as they will be more willing that his Maj. reap the benefit of their labours than any other, so they hope his Maj. will commiserate their poor estate and admit their just requests in those particulars, without which it is evident to them they cannot subsist and do otherwise fear the immediate decay and misery of the whole Colony. The goodness of their tobacco shall far exceed that formerly gone from hence. Implore his Maj: to admit of such a quantity, whereby they may be able to sustain themselves, the excessive rates of commodities here being considered and that the Colony hath lately received an increase of one thousand persons and the abundance of wares this year imported hath so deeply indebted the planters to the merchants. The King's letters received but five days since, and Mr. Capps being absent after the arrival of the ships fourteen days, on what pretence they know not, they could not by any other means come to any particular information concerning the other matters, but they conceive the price, his Maj. will be free of customs & all charges, freight excepted. Will advertise him by Capt. Preen of the rest of those things of which they can now say nothing. Desire his favour. They want the means and not the wills to raise those staple commodities proper for this Plantation, the charges of which should rather be supported by a royal hand sustaining us than by the weak and poor estates of the planters. Signed by Francis West, John Pott, Roger Smyth, Win. Claybourne, Win. Tucker, & Sam. Mathews. Certified copy by Robert Barrington, cler. (Colonial Papers, Vol. 4, No. 40.)

GOVERNOR WEST AND COUNCIL TO THE PRIVY COUNCIL James City, March 4, 1628 Have received their Lordship' letters concerning George Sandys petition against themselves in reference to certain tenants and goods belonging to the late company since November, 1623, but which Sandys enjoyed during his stay in the colony, tho' his three years commission (which he refused to show), expired in Oct., 1624. Explain the grounds of their order about same. Sandys two years absence from the colony and his not purposing to return, and he himself at his going away refusing to execute his office of Treasurer, saying he had nothing to do with it. He might have had remedy if he would from Capt. Whitaker, who presently departed the country unquestioned to the great damage of those to whom the moity belonged, signed by Francis West, John Pott, Roger Smyth, Sam. Mathews, Win. Claybourne, & Win. Tucker. (Colonial Papers, Vol. 4, No. 41.)

COMMISSION TO GOVERNOR HARVEY AND THE COUNCIL OF VIRGINIA. March 22, 1627/8. Commission reciting a previous commission of 26 Aug., 22. Jac. I. (which see) to Sir George Yeardley and appointing John Harvey, Esq., Governor of Virginia, to execute the same as fully as any Governor resident there within the space of three years last past, and Francis West, George Sandys, John Pott, Roger Smyth, Ralph Hamor, Samuel Mathews, Abraham Piersey, Will. Claybourne, Will. Tucker, Jabes Whitaker, Edward Blany and Will. Ferrar, the Council-and William Claybourne, the secretary of State in the colony, with this mem: "This is only the renewing of a former commission to sir George Yeardley, deceased, and others, with this alteration, that the said John Harvey is herein nominated to be Governor in the room of Sir George Yeardley. (Sign Manual Charles I, Vol. 6, No. 66.)

PETITION OF GOVERNOR, COUNCIL AND BURGESSES TO THE KING March 26, 1628 Petition of the Governor and Council together with the Burgesses assembled in Virginia to the King. They have according to his maj. command assembled themselves and returned answer that they shall he willing to accept for their tobacco delivered in the colony three shillings and six pence per pound, and in England four shillings, one half to be paid at ten days, the other half at three months, desiring his maj. to take in certainty 500,000 wt. yearly and if they make more, that they may export it in to other parts, the custom being paid. Implore the King to commiserate their poor estate, having continually for six years groaned under the oppression of unconscionable and cruel merchants by the excessive rates of their commodities, caused for the most part by unreasonable and unjust contracts, made wholly without their consents to the unspeakable prejudice of this colony; that they want the means and not the wills to raise those staple commodities proper for this plantation, which now they hope by the beams of his maj. favour reflected upon them will recover a new life and receive perfection by his Royal hand. Certified copy by Robert Barrington, cler. (Colonial Papers, Vol. 4, No. 44.) PUBLIC RECORDS OFFICE COLONIAL SERIES Edited by Wm N. Sainsbury

19. Chancery Proceedings. Series I. Charles I Public Record Office 1628-1629 CLASS C2 Charles 1 H42/64 John Hart c. John Delbridge did in May May 1622 agree to set forth several ships for a fishing voyage to New England. They approached Hart to organize the voyages and to keep the accounts. Afterwards Mr. John Ferrar became partner with Delbridge and Barbour, each having a one-third share. It was agreed that Hart should be paid L40 for his services. Ferrar and Barbour have each paid him L15 but he has not received the L10 from Delbridge. In November 1633 he was again employed in settling out the "Bona Nova" for fishing in New England. From this information we know the "Bona Nova" was still seaworthy even as late as 1633. I can find no earlier evidence of the 'Thomas and John' before 1627 but the 'Thomas and John' certainly finds itself back in a shipyard in England in 1633 being equipped and with a Captain Richard Lambard in 1635 leaving for Virginia with a James Powell and a Thomas Sherly as passengers.

This gets us to the marriage of John Hudleston and Barbara Poulter Microfilm 0375028 24 SEP 1616 Saint Gregory By Saint Paul, London, London, England. Their son is shown by two records John Hudleston Christening: 18 FEB 1619 Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England Age at Christening: 1 Death: 12 MAY 1628 and JOHN HUDDLESTONE Christening: 06 JUN 1625 Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England Death: 12 MAY 1628. The death dates match up. With this information we can conclude that he was born 18 FEB 1619 and was christened 06 JUN 1619. 6902926 is the Film number given for both records but 1568-1620 is given for the first record and 1621-1641 is given for the second record. The day and month match up but there is 6 years between 1619 and 1625. Name Church of England. Parish Church of Stepney (Middlesex) Titles The marriage registers of St. Dunstan's Stepney, in the county of Middlesex Memorials of Stepney parish : that is to say the vestry minutes from 1579 to 1662 ... Miscellaneous records from Christ Church, Spitalfields, Stepney in the county of London ... The parish registers of Stepney, Middlesex Parish registers of the Stepney parish church,1568-1929 © 2002 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. The IGI doesn't say where the child died. Gloucestershire Record Office: Muniments of the Rogers, Coxwell, Beale and Browne Families The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Gloucestershire Record Office. Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2004. Cockbury farm, Bishop's Cleeve: This property, which formerly belonged to the Huddleston family, was acquired by William Rogers in 1660. The title deeds begin in 1548 (D627/1-5). There is a fairly complete set of leases, 1680-1802 (D269/T228, D627/6-7). Interesting details of stock, crops and implements are contained in a survey of 1640 and in inventories and bills of sale, 1724-53 (D627/8-11). Reference: D269/A/T47 Creation dates: 1591-1679 Extent and Form: 8 Scope and Content Messuages including Ball Heyes with 1½ yardlands in Dowdeswell and Pegglesworth; Poulter's Meese with 1 yardland in Dowdeswell and land (5 a., field names) in Charlton Kings; Pillmore's House and land (70 a.) in Dowdeswell; 6 messuages and 13½ yardlands in Brockhampton and Sevenhampton, land (360 a.) in Sevenhampton, common of pasture for 30 beasts and 300 sheep in Puckham Wood, Brockhampton; messuage called Cockbury or Huddlestone's Cockbury and land (40 a., field names) in Bishops Cleeve.

The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia: Ship and Passenger Information: Boyse, Allice~See name in Virginia Muster, January 24, 1624/5 (Her husband. Luke, arrived on the Edwin in May, 1619). We can now know the wife Allice Boyse was referring to in her statement(1626 court case) and that she knew Barbara Poulter before she made the trip on the Bona Nova. This atleast covers Captain John Huddleston's birth in Ratcliff which is of Stepney and his marriage to Barbara Poulter which is of Stepney. The birth of their child John shows Stepney. From the marriage record of 1616 we can surmise he stayed in Ratcliff, Stepney from 1587 to 1616. This would mean he was 29 years old when he was married. We can see they had a child, John who died in 1628 with age at death 12. From the Bona Nova trip passages we can deduce that two years after that marriage he left England to Virginia. Also, we can speculate that on each trip back to London he remet Barbara Poulter. From her later marriage to William Herrick in 1641 and Captain John Huddleston having lands in Nevis Island in 1642 along with Allice Boyse's court information of him having a wife in 1626 and the possible birth of William Huddleston, servant unto Mr. Canhow in 1628; We must wonder if Captain John Huddleston didn't have a different wife in 1626 or atleast didn't have children by a different woman. Bruce, Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century. Ch. X Author: Bruce, Philip A. Title: Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century: An Inquiry into the Material Condition of the People, Based on Original and Contemporaneous Records. Citation: New York: MacMillan and Co., 1896 Subdivision: Chapter X Page 9

Could Captain John Huddleston have had relations with an Indian woman? He certainly was around a lot of Indians in the 1622 massacre. We just don't know because We haven't found any records of Captain John Huddleston and Barbara Poulter's divorce but he was noted as being dead in 1624/1625 and that is the last record of the Bona Noua making trips between London and Virginia. The Letters of Administration taken by William Powell to acquire the goods of Captain John Huddleston further admit this possibility. Maybe Barbara Poulter heard the same thing and she thought he was dead, too. She didn't do this lightly because she didn't get remarried to William Herrick to 1641.

The Bona Nova Voyages~1618 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Ship and Passenger Information: Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia. Paraphrasing Allice Boyse's statement "or else said he never had the use of his owne wife" shows a past tense and the possibility of a snide remark. We don't know if Barbara Poulter made the trip with Captain John Huddleston but with the death of child in Death: 12 MAY 1628 suggests the mother may have stayed in England. 1628 is also the year Valentine Huddleston was born. 08 JUL 1641 Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England It looks like the same Barbara Poulter gets remarried to a WILLIAM HERRICK according to the IGI. Film Number 184179. The son, John Huddleston who died at age 12 death place is the same as the mother's, Barbara Poulter new marriage place to William Herrick. Interesting enough the last entry we have of the Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua in Nevis Island is 1642 and Barbara Poulter new marriage date is 1641. We wonder if she got a divorce? Could she be the mother of Valentine Huddleston? According to the IGI 1642 is also significant to Katherine Chatham, the wife of Valentine Huddleston and the IGI gives London, England as her birthplace. In an ancestral file associated with John Chamberlain, Catherine Chatham she is shown born about 1630.

In considering John Huddleston, the son of Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua and William Huddleston, servant of Jamestowne (later to be known as James Citty) to be brothers; We find that William Huddleston born before 1640 and John Huddleston born 1635 were probably born in New Poquoson, Virginia. This is based on Captain John Huddleston's deed from Yeardley. We can surmise that Captain John Huddleston left Poquoson City, Virginia and went to Nevis Island where he had property there in 1642. Captain John Huddleston was 48 in 1635 and in 1635 we know the 'Thomas & John' was in England with a new master.

In the book, "Grandfather's Chair" by Nathaniel Hawthorne, VII. The Quakers And The Indians page 1; "WHEN his little audience next assembled round the chair, Grandfather gave them a doleful history of the Quaker persecution, which began in 1656, and raged for about three years in Massachusetts. He told them how, in the first place, twelve of the converts of George Fox, the first Quaker in the world, had come over from England. They seemed to be impelled by an earnest love for the souls of men, and a pure desire to make known what they considered a revelation from Heaven. But the rulers looked upon them as plotting the downfall of all government and religion. They were banished from the colony. In a little while, however, not only the first twelve had returned, but a multitude of other Quakers had come to rebuke the rulers and to preach against the priests and steeple-houses. Grandfather described the hatred and scorn with which these enthusiasts were received. They were thrown into dungeons; they were beaten with many stripes, women as well as men; they were driven forth into the wilderness, and left to the tender mercies of tender mercies of wild beasts and Indians. The children were amazed hear that the more the Quakers were scourged, and imprisoned, and banished, the more did the sect increase, both by the influx of strangers and by converts from among the Puritans, But Grandfather told them that God had put something into the soul of man, which always turned the cruelties of the persecutor to naught. He went on to relate that, in 1659, two Quakers, named William Robinson and Marmaduke Stephen-son, were hanged at Boston. A woman had been sentenced to die with them, but was reprieved on condition of her leaving the colony. Her name was Mary Dyer. In the year 1660 she returned to Boston, although she knew death awaited her there; and, if Grandfather had been correctly informed, an incident had then taken place which connects her with our story. This Mary Dyer had entered the mint-master's dwelling, clothed in sackcloth and ashes, and seated herself in our great chair with a sort of dignity and state. Then she proceeded to deliver what she called a message from Heaven, but in the midst of it they dragged her to prison."

This site and all of its contents are © 2002-2003 by LoveToKnow, Inc. Quakers: Persecution in colonial Massachusetts Hubert H. Bancroft book published 1900 excerpt; "In 1651 a party of Anabaptists reached Massachusetts. The doctrines they advocated raised a storm of opposition in the colony; they were arrested, tried, fined, and one of them severely flogged, and a law was passed banishing from the colony any one who should oppose the dogma of infant baptism. THE treatment which the Quakers experienced in Massachusetts was much more severe [than that of the Anabaptists], but certainly much more justly provoked. It is difficult for us in the calm and rational deportment of the Quakers of the present age to recognize the successors of those wild enthusiasts who first appeared in the north of England about the year 1644 and received from the derision of the world the title which they afterwards adopted as their sectarian denomination.... When the doctrines of Quakerism were first promulgated, the effects which they produced on many of their votaries far exceeded the influence to which modern history restricts them, or which the experience of a rational and calculating age finds it easy to conceive." "On their first appearance in Massachusetts (July, 1656), where two male and six female Quakers arrived from Rhode Island and Barbadoes, they found that the reproach entailed on their sect by the insane extravagance of some of its members in England had preceded their arrival, and that they were regarded with the utmost terror and dislike by the great bulk of the people. They were instantly arrested by the magistrates, and diligently examined for what were considered bodily marks of witchcraft. No such indications having been found, they were sent back to the places whence they came, by the same vessels that had brought them, and prohibited with threats of severe punishment from ever again returning to the colony. A law was passed at the same time, subjecting every shipmaster importing Quakers or Quaker writings to a heavy fine; adjudging all Quakers who should intrude into the colony to stripes and labor in the house of correction, and all defenders of their tenets to fine, imprisonment, or exile.. The penal enactments resorted to by the other settlements [than Rhode Island] served only to inflame the impatience of the Quaker zealots to carry their ministry into places that seemed to them to stand so greatly in need of it; and the persons who had been disappointed in their first attempt returned almost immediately to Massachusetts, and, dispersing themselves through the colony, began to proclaim their mystical notions, and succeeded in communicating them to some of the inhabitants of Salem. They were soon joined by Mary Clarke, the wife of a tailor in London, who announced that she had forsaken her husband and six children in order to convey a message from heaven, which she was commissioned to deliver to New England. Instead of joining with the provincial missionaries in attempts to reclaim the neighboring savages from their barbarous superstition and profligate immoralities, or themselves prosecuting separate missions with a like intent, the apostles of Quakerism raised their voices in vilification of everything that was most highly approved and revered in the doctrine and practice of the provincial churches. Seized, imprisoned, and flogged, they were again dismissed with severer threats from the colony, and again they returned by the first vessels they could procure. The government and a great majority of the colonists were incensed at their stubborn pertinacity, and shocked at the impression which they had already produced on some minds, and which threatened to corrupt and subvert a system of piety whose establishment, fruition, and perpetuation supplied their fondest recollections, their noblest enjoyment, and most energetic desire. New punishments were introduced into the legislative enactments against the intrusion of Quakers and the profession of Quakerism (1657) and in particular the abscission of an ear was added to the former ineffectual severities. Three male Quaker preachers endured the rigor of this cruel law.

In July, 1656, the ship Swallow anchored in Boston harbor with two Quaker women from Barbados on board. The two women, Mary Fisher and Ann Austin, had come to Boston to share their Quaker faith. When they landed, however, they were kept on board the ship while their belongings were searched and over 100 books were confiscated. They were then hurried off to jail where they were stripped of their clothing and inspected for signs of witchcraft. Five weeks later, the captain of the Swallow was placed under £100 bond to take the women back to Barbados. But two days later, another ship with eight more Quakers came to dock! These Quakers were imprisoned for eleven weeks before they were shipped back to England. They were able to convert one man to their Quaker faith, Nicholas Upsall, but he fled to Rhode Island to avoid punishment. Because of the influx of Quakers, on this day October 14, 1656, Massachusetts enacted a law against the "cursed sect of heretics lately risen up in the world, which are commonly called Quakers..." It declared that any shipmaster bringing a Quaker into the colony would be fined £100. Any colonist possessing a Quaker book would be fined £5. Any Quaker coming within the jurisdiction of the colony would be arrested, whipped, and transported out of the colony without conversing with anyone. Yet, some Quakers felt they simply had to share their beliefs in Massachusetts. Robert Fowler built a small craft, the Woodhouse, and loaded it with Quakers bound for New England. They landed in Rhode Island, and some entered Massachusetts to spread their views. Quaker Mary Clark went to Boston to test the law, and she soon had twenty stripes of a 3-corded whip "laid on with fury" and then spent twelve weeks in prison. Even so, the Quakers continued to arrive. So, in October, 1658, stronger laws were passed. Between 1659 and 1661, four Quakers were sent to the gallows. When King Charles II heard of that, he said all Quakers were to be sent to England for trial. There were no more Quaker hangings in Massachusetts, and no Quakers were sent to England for trial; but punishments and deportations from the colony continued. Source: Adapted from an earlier Christian History Institute story by Diana Severance, Ph.D. Additional sources: Jones, Louis Thomas. "The Quakers of Iowa." Iowa History Project. (http://iagenweb.org/history/qoi/QOIPt1Chp2.htm). [footnotes quote sections of the Massachusetts law.]

Timeline of Plymouth Colony 1620-1692 March 5, 1638/9 First mention of the men of Barnstable in the Court records. 1656 Members of the Religious Society of Friends, commonly referred to as Quakers, arrive in Boston from England. While springing from the same religious turmoil that gave rise to the Separatist movement, the Quakers lack respect for hierarchy and believe in man’s ability to achieve his own salvation. Tenets so contrary to orthodox Puritanism quickly turn most New Englanders against them. 1657 The small number of Quakers in Plymouth Colony congregate primarily in Sandwich on Cape Cod and in Scituate. Laws are passed forbidding any to transport Quakers into the colony, give them “entertainment” (housing) or to attend a Quaker meeting. Punishments include fines, whipping, imprisonment or banishment. A number of people are brought before the courts on these charges. 1658 More laws are enacted preventing Quakers or their sympathizers from becoming freemen or exercising voting privileges. December 3, 1658 The Plymouth Court attempts to prevent Quakers from coming to Sandwich by sea by seizing any boats carrying them. 1659-1661 Laws tighten further against Quakers and sympathizers. June 8, 1661 Laws against Quakers are repealed. From Plymouth Plantation.

Hi "Roy I was reviewing genforum recently and realized we haven't been in contact for a long time. As with many of us you changed your email address. So here is the report I was trying to send to you, for future reference on the Valentine Huddleston lines. As you will see I've given this a lot of thought over the years, and compiled a lot of the collateral lines, that are so intermarried for about 4 generations before these families left MA. So review and comment if you wish. I'm so involved now in politics that I don't do a lot of genealogy, but about 4 months ago, a new member entered our little library, explaining that her family were from OHIO. So I said were they in Champaign Co, YES, were they in Christiansburg, YES, were they Huddleston's? YES The expression on her face was fantastic as she is descended from Miers Huddleston. So we've had some great revelations, as she explained she'd like to have bought Denzil Mauldins books but they are too expensive, then I pulled the Huddleston Family Tables off the shelf right behind me, and handed that to her. total shock as you can imagine. I've done this number of times as people joining my club say they have Mendenhall's or Hussey, or Cox or other Quaker lines of ancestry and find I have their line in my file already. So review the following and glad to make reconnection, I keep leading Huddlestons to the data on line now, and they can't believe all that is happening. Thanks for all the early lineage work you have done. Now realize I still think Henry of Bucks Co, is a nephew of Valentine. Don Cordell

Just Googling and looking at links on Valentine, and reviewing your statement about Katherine Chatham etc. Especially about the Chamberlin's. Over the years I first found a claim that Hannah Chamberlin, dau. of John and Mary (Brown) married James Case. NO PROOF. But then I analyze various marriages in these various families and came to the conclusion, Hannah Chamberlin was the wife of James Case, now review here we have the step daughter of Katherine (Chatham) Chamberlin/Huddleston who had various children such as Sarah who married Katherine's son Henry Huddleston, and Mercy that married George Huddleston. On the face of it, you'd think maybe. But now consider that James and Hannah also had a daughter Susanna who married John Lake. Also a daughter Penelope who married John Lake's brother Joseph Lake. Joseph and Penelope had a son Thomas Lake, who married Lydia Huddleston dau of George and Mercy Case. There are a number of similar marriages between these families, cousins marrying cousins. As I put these generations together by further research it became more and more clear to me that here we have this close family relationship between the Chamberlin's, Katherine, and it makes sense that her step daughters daughters are linked closely to be the spouses of Katherine's Huddleston children. I can send you printouts to show more of this if you are interested, as I see it. The Fish, Cornell, Gifford, Tripp, Brayton, Sherman, Fisher, and others of these families are so intermarried it's so convincing about who James Case married and who the Case daughters were. Thought maybe you'd find this interesting. Thomas Lake's first wife was his first cousin on his fathers side, Mary Lake, the daughter of Thomas Lake and Lydia Fisher NOTE the Fisher name. Henry Huddleston's son Seth Huddleston had a daughter Penelope who married James Fisher, son of John Fisher and Joanna Fish, sister of Seth's wife Elizabeth Fish. Joanna and Elizabeth Fish had a sister Mehitable who married William Cornell, their son Daniel married Mary Huddleston daughter of Peleg and Mary (Quithill) Huddleston Peleg the son of Sarah Case. See what I mean? There are more, over and over, the whole bunch of Quakers so close, and for about 4 generations until they left Mass. The Cornell's are married in to the Wings, who are married in to the Giffords, and Seth Jr married who? Lydia Gifford, daughter of Benjamin Gifford son of Jeremiah Gifford son of Sarah Wing. Just thought I'd fill you in on these links, and how interesting it gets when you look at all the families involved, there is even more on all of these families when you look at all the Quaker lines. Don Cordell

In Series 'A' later descendants of Huddleston are spelled as Huttleston. History of Bristol County Massachusetts with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men Compiled under the supervision of D. Hamilton Hurd Illustrated Philadelphia J.W.Lewis & Co. 1883 CHAPTER XV. DARTMOUTH.1 Early Settlers.-The following is a list of early settlers and proprietors: Valentine Huttlestone. Acushnet, Bristol Co., MA, Cemetery Memorial Record of The Dead of Families of the Early Settlers Interred In The Old Colonial Burying Ground Established In The Reign of Queen Anne In The Old Township of Dartmouth Now Acushnet, Massachusetts New York, 1881 HUTTLESTONE, Peleg Age 60 Died May 22, 1801 HUTTLESTONE, Tabitha, wife of Peleg Age 47 Died Aug 24, 1790 HUTTLESTONE, John T., son of Thomas & Phebe Age 4-5 Died Apr 19, 1827 HUTTLESTONE, Phebe, wife of Thomas Age 45 Died Nov 27, 1827 HUTTLESTONE, Thomas, Jr., died at sea Age 29 Died Nov 8, 1828. When you look at Series A pertaining to Valentine Huddleston and Series X pertaining to Thomas Huddleston similiarities might be noted. When you read the last part of Series A, this information from the cemetary seems to be an exact match. Could Series X be a continuation of Series A? There seems to be an very old Peleg in the first part of Series A and and newer Peleg listed at the end of Series A (chronologically speaking). Could the change in the spelling of Huddleston to Huttleston be the reason it wasn't added to the Series (comparitively speaking, i.e., Huddlestone, Huddleston, Huddleson to Huttlestone, Huttleston, Huddleson). Are there two Thomas Huddlestons listed in Series X married to two different ladies or one Thomas Huddleston married to Anna Moses and one Thomas Huddleston married to Francis King? Capt. W. Nye's Company, Lieut. Col. B. Lincoln's Regiment. From June 17 to June 29, 1814. Raised at New Bedford. Service at New Bedford Privates. Huttlestone, Thomas Lieut. Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Regiment MA Militia, War of 1812 Created November 10, 2001 Copyright 2001 Web design and graphics by Kathy Leigh http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ma/state/military/militia/lincoln.html The Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary Edited by Edward W. James Copyrighted by Edward W. James 1895 Vol. 1, 2, 3 page 71 A List of Persons Joined together in Holy Matrimony By the Rev Joshua Lawrence (Baptist Minister, Princess Anne County) Page 71 1786 Sep Thomas Huddlestone and Anna Moses Page 19 A List of Marriages Solemnized by the Rev Anthony Walke Princess Anne County Lynhaven Parish Nov 12 1789 Thomas Huddlestone and Frances King Vol. 5 Page 5 Land and Slave Owners, Princess Anne Co., 1775 For the Middle Precinct of the Eastern Shore Thomas Huddleston 75 acres, father of Annanias Vol. 5 1820 James Huddlestone, Page 58 James Huttlestone, Page 11 2 slaves Property Owners, Princess Anne County, 1811 Thomas Huttleston dced 100 acres L.T. $64 Tax $64 Princess Anne County Loose Papers 1700-1789 Edited by John Harvie Creecy Copyright, 1954 by John Harvie Creecy Page 40 7 June 1766. Sarah A. HUTTLESTONE Parents: James HUTTLESTONE and Mary "UNKNOWN". She was married to William MCCLANAN on 22 Feb 1855 in Virginia Beach, Princess Anne Co, Virginia. Clerk of Court Office Virginia Beach, Princess Anne Co, VA Marriage Register 1853-1938, Cert # 9, Page 2 by William Strawhand Groom's Vitals: age 20 / s / B: Princess Anne Co, VA / Occ: Farmer Bride's Vitals: age 17 / s / B: Princess Anne Co, VA http://digginforkin.tripod.com/SHRds/d140.html#P3608 In checking in with a Gary Huttleston, who is researching the Huttleston surname, his records tell him that in one case the Huddleston surname was changed to Huttleston in about 1786.

The Colonial History of Maryland The country near the head of Chesapeake Bay was first explored by Captain John Smith. It afterwards formed part of the grant that was made by Charles I. to Sir George Calvert, by title Lord Baltimore, a Roman Catholic nobleman. Inspired by the same feeling that had moved the Puritans, he sought to establish a refuge in America for men of his religious faith, who were persecuted in England. With this purpose he planted, in 1621, a Catholic colony in Newfoundland. But the unfavorable soil and climate, and annoyances from the hostile French, soon ended his hopes in that quarter. He next visited Virginia, but found there a religious intolerance hostile to his purposes. The territory finally granted him extended from the upper Chesapeake to the fortieth degree, the latitude of Philadelphia. The charter given to Lord Baltimore, unlike any previously granted, secured to the emigrants equality in religious rights and civil freedom, and an independent share in the legislation of the province. The colony was formed in 1634 by two hundred emigrants, mostly Roman Catholics, who entered the Potomac and purchased of the Indians a village on the St. Mary's River, about ten miles from its junction with the Potomac. The policy of paying the Indians for their land, and their subsequent equitable treatment, inaugurated peaceful relations, though these did not remain long undisturbed. The treaty of Calvert with the Indians, though less dramatic, resembled in principle the celebrated one made many years afterwards by William Penn

From Linda Jenstrom's work on Valentine and the Huddleston Family Tables in Series "A" we get this information on Katherine Chatham. Valentine immigrated to Maryland about 1663. He had numerous transactions in land on Patuxent River, in Calvert County, between that date and 1671. He immigrated to Rhode Island where he and Catherine Chatham got married. (Catherine's last child by John Chamberlain was Jane born in 1667 and Catherine's first child by Valentine was Henry born 1673, so it is reasonable they were married in 1672. But if so where does this Thomas Huddleston fit in? Could he been a brother of Valentine?

Talbot Co., MD Deeds Vol 1 At Court 15 Sept. 1668. 27 March 1668 Geratt Vanswareing of St. Maries Co. appoints Peter Debarale his Attorney to give Robert Macklin possession of my plantation in Chester River with as many cattle and hogs and as much corne as he leaves me on his plantation in St. Mary's Co. Wit: John Brickes, Thos. Hurdleston.

John Chamberlain is shown to have been born in 1626 in England, to have married Catherine in Massachusetts. By the birth of their firstborn, Susannah Chamberlain in 1664; it is reasonable to conclude that they were married in 1663.) Katherine was a Quakeress, who had been cruelly persecuted in Boston, see New England Judged, Bishop, p. 420. "Yet a word or two of Katherine Chatham of whom I have made mention in the margin of what hath been said before. She came from London through many trials and hard travel to Boston and appeared clothed with sackcloth as a sign of the indignation of the Lord coming upon you in the weight and sense of which she came there and appeared for which instead of coming to a sense of your condition and what was coming upon you in the burden of which she came so far and through such hardship. You laid hand upon her and put her in prison out of which you would give no deliverance until with the seven and twenty aforesaid you drove her out with a sword and club into the wilderness and that was the reward you gave her for her love in coming so amongst you. And such was your rage and cruelty to her that at Dudham she was not only whipped but the man that was with her and traveled together though you had little to say to him. After this she coming to Boston again you imprisoned her for a long season there to pay a fine you laid upon her thinking to be rid of her that way in a cold winter and sad extremities and sickness near to death but the Lord otherwise provided for her and disappointed you for she was took to wife by John Chamberlain and so became an inhabitant of Boston." (1660)

Annual Assembly On 10 March 1628 the first Virginia General Assembly authorized by the king convened in Jamestown. Though a legislative body had met in Virginia in 1619, the session of 1628 was the first to be called for by the crown following the collapse of the Virginia Company in 1624. Initially, governmental affairs in the Virginia colony were largely controlled by the organizers of the Virginia Company in London. Early settlers were afforded all the rights and privileges of free Englishmen. Unfortunately, the Virginia colony failed to develop as both the Virginia Company and the crown had hoped. In 1618, as part of a general reform, the governing body of the Virginia Company authorized the creation of a representative assembly in Virginia in hopes that such an effort would foster goodwill between the company and settlers and make the colony more viable. This first legislature in 1619 dealt with a number of issues of great importance to the colony, including taxes, protection from the Indians, and the planting of crops.

By 1624, it was quite evident that the Virginia Company was unable to make Virginia a productive and populous colony. After the dissolution of the company by King James I, responsibility for governing Virginia was largely transferred to the crown-appointed governor and his council. However, in March of 1628, the crown requested Governor Francis West to call for an assembly to discuss the tobacco contract, whereby tobacco produced in the colony was sold exclusively to England. Though this assembly may not be considered a legislative body in the traditional sense, it is significant as it marked the beginning of annual meetings of the assembly in the royal colony of Virginia. (Virginia Historical Society) Tobacco production surged from 200,000 pounds in 1624 to 3,000,000 in 1638, and the Chesapeake outstripped the West Indies to become the leading supplier of tobacco to Europe. This stimulated the population growth of emigrants from England to Virginia, from 350 colonists in 1616 to 13,000 by 1650. (Interactive History 1628 Accross the Continent)

All it gives on Valentine is that he was born 1628 somewhere in England. His birthdate is 1628 and he gets married to Katherine Chatham in Newport, Rhode Island. Captain John Huddleston, master of the Bona Noua becomes master of the Thomas and John by 1627 through 1628 with records in Virginia departing for England. From page 8 of "The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography" LVX No. 4 (Oct. 1957) we find that in May 13 1628 that John Huddleston is noted as being the master of the Thomas and John. (His son John Huddleston died in Stepney, England on March 12, 1628. Edward Morgan & Company imported 2400 pounds. This means the tobacco was coming into England. The tobacco was grown in Virginia and had made it to England. The Thomas & John was in Virginia waters in 1627. Richard Cocke was a prominent man in Henrico County. He was involved in the maritime trade and may have been the purser of the ship Thomas and John, which was in Virginia waters in 1627. He got patents for considerable land, including the estates of “Bremo” and “Malvern Hill” and was the ancestor of all Cocke relations. Copyright © 2001-2002, John W. Pritchett. All rights reserved. Richard Cocke imported 500 pounds of tobacco on May 15, 1628 and on that same day Patricke Kenneday imported 600 pounds-shows in court records with John Huddleston in 1626. The first import of tobacco on May 15, 1628 was of John Cheeseman for 600 pounds, then later that day, Richard Cocke for 600 pounds, then Richard Hooke for 1400 pounds, William Hind for 150 pounds, Patricke Kenneday for 600 pounds, Thomas Piddocke for 400 pounds, John Davy for 100 pounds, John Hurleston, Mr for 400 pounds, and Joe Barrett for 1800 pounds.

May 16, 1628 John West imports 1000 pounds of tobacco. This is our first tangeable link to John West who I believe is the strongest link to Captain John Huddleston and William Huddleston, servant of Jamestown.) Twelfth child of Sir Thomas West, Second Lord De La Warr, and his wife Lady Anne Knollys. Born between 5 & 6 in the afternoon. Godfathers: Sir John Norreys, Mr. John Foskin; Godmothers: Mrs. Sccudamore, Mrs. Ratcliffe. B.A. Matriculated at Magdalen College 17 Feb 1603/9 and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts the 1st of Dec 1613. (2 Aug. 1585-1 Feb. 1586/7 Cruickshank, C.G.. ELIZABETH'S ARMY. Oxford University Press, 1966 (2nd ed.). pp. 290-303 No. I o. 1586. ED. CROMWELL. SP 46/34/fo 277 Henry, lord Norreys to Myldmay: Place conveyed his interest in Buck prebend to Richard Huddleston, whose estate Norreys has, but Place keeps the house. Will put in his bill if lord Henry Seymour will answer him; 29 Nov. 1587.) Emigrated on the Bonny Bess in 1618 with his brother Lord De La Warr, and resided at "West Point", Virginia. He was made a member of the Colonial Council, where he served 1630-1659. When decision was reached, 1630, to plant a settlement on the York River, Colonel John West was among the first to patent lands there and by 1632 was established on his plantation, which, sold to Edward Digges, 1650, was then known as the "A.D. Plantation" and later as "Bellefield". From York, John West removed to his plantation at the fork of the York River on the site of the present town of West Point originally called Delaware. This tract of 3000 acres may be identified in a patent issued to him 6 Mar 1653, which included 850 acres granted to him, 3 Jul 1652. In addition, he was granted 1550 acres, 6 May 1651, about 6 miles up York River up the fort (fork) on the south of the River." which he subsequently sold to Major William Lewis, who included the land in his patent for 2600 acres issued, 20 Jan 1656. On 27 May 1654 West patented 1000 acres in Gloucester County, on the "N.E. side of the Mattapony river". (This I believe is our first link from William Huddleston, servant of Jamestown to Robert Huddleston born 1694 of Spottsylvania Territory because of the Lewis surname. I believe Elizabeth Lewis married Constable Robert Huddleston who was born about 1720 at Saint George's Parish, Spottsylvania. Elizabeth shows up in records about 1724 at the Parish.)

But there was a Major William Lewis, who had a real connection with the Lewises of Warner Hall. He was probably the William Lewes, aged twenty-five, that in 1635 entered himself for Virginia in the Globe of London. He obtained numerous patents of land - 50 acres in York county, southwest side of the freshes of York River, October 14, 1653; 1,200 acres in Gloucester county, north side of Mattaponi River, May 25, 1654; 640 acres in Gloucester county, north side of Mattaponi, May 25, 1654, 2,000 acres in New Kent, north-east side of same river, bounded with Mamasheement on the northwest side of Mattaponi River, on Arsantan's Creek, adjoining 640 acres of said Lewis, in New Kent county, June 8, 1655; 2,600 acres on the southwest side of the freshes of York River, including half the divident commonly called Port Holy alias Chimahocans, purchased by said Major Lewis of Col. John West, January 20, 1656; 2,000 acres in Westmorelant county, June 28, 1658 (patented with Robert Hubbard). There are probably other grants of land to him. Gloucester county was formed from York in 1651, and New Kent from York and Gloucester soon after.

Now it appears that "Chemokins alias Port Holy, lying in the parish of St. Peters in New Kent county, containing 1,300 acres more or less, and being part of a patent granted to Major William Lewis", was in the possession and seizin of Major John Lewis of Warner Hall in 1717, who deeded it to his son Charles. (Hening's Statutes, VII., p. 377). Major William Lewis had the title of Major as early as 1653. Lewis of Warner Hall; Wm. and Mary Qrtly., Vol. 9, No. 3 Page 192

On May 17, 1635 the Colonial Council prevailed upon him to accept the office of Governor, when Governor Sir John Harvey was expelled. He was the third West brother to be a Governor of Virginia. In 1637 West was commissioned Muster Master General of the colony by King Charles in his own hand. He sold his Bellfield estate in 1650 moved to his West Point estate of over 6000 acres. Most of his acres were granted to him for bringing many new settlers to Virginia in his ships. It was customary at the time for 50 acres to be given for each person brought in, family, relatives, and servants included. Port Richmond West Plantation was settled by Col. John West about 1655. This was in William County, Virginia, not far from Elsing Green. Colonel John West died at his West Point plantation, 1659, and March 1660 the House of Burgesses passed a resolution of good will in recognition of "the many important favors and services rendered to the country of Virginia by the noble family of West, predecessors of Mr. John West, their now only survivor ..... It is ordered that the levies of the said Master West and his family be remitted, and that he be exempt from payment thereof during life".

The source says this same man of Survey 3 is also found on Survey 4 and 5. On Survey 4 he is listed as John Hurleston with date of May 15, 1628. On Survey 5 he is listed as John Hurlston with date of May 17, 1628. Public Record Office Class E. 190/32/8 Port Book. Divers Ports. Collector of the import and increase of subsidy upon tobacco. Michaelmas 1627-Michaelmas 1628. List of Exchequer, Queen's Remembrancer, Ports Books. Part II, 1565 to 1700, f 562. shows the "Thomas & John" of London being in Virginia and being loaded from 13 May 1628 to 11 Aug 1628 and that Captain John Huddleston was its master from Virginia. We know it was the same John Hudleston, marriner being on the graunt from George Yeardley by John Hudleston's neighbor Maurice Thompson & company who imports 6787 pounds of tobacco on May 30, 1628 on the 'James' who shows up on page 9 Public Record Office Class E. 190/32/8.

1635/6 February 12th Court [Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume III, York County, 1633-1646, [by Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, (The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3 Volume) I Genealogical Publishing Co., In. Baltimore 1988), Volume III, York County, No. 1 page 21] A Court at Utimaria 12 Feb. 1735/6. Present Capt John West Esq'r Governour etc., Capt John UTIE, Mr John Chew, Capt Nicholas Martian, Mr. Richard Townsend, Lef't John Cheeseman. (Larkin Chew shows up in the Spotsylvania Deeds books)

Continuing with the tobacco imported for the Thomas and John, May 16, 1628: Henry Fisher 2400 pounds and William Bonham 100 pounds. May 17, 1628 William Hind 180 pounds, Francis Peckett 3200 pounds, Bartholomew Hoskins 2300 pounds, Thomas Piddocke 260 pounds, Robert Thacker 500 pounds, John Hurlston, Mr 56 pounds, John Cheeseman 52 pounds and Christopher Downeman 400 pounds. No tobacco was imported May 18, 1628 (This could of been a Sunday.) May 19, 1628 John Sharples 7500 pounds, William Adams 58 pounds and William Shepton 350 pounds. ( The 'James' and the 'Thomas & John' were importing tobacco on the same days.) The importers for the Thomas and John for May 20, 1628 were Richard Wake, Francis Peckett, John Hardcastle, Edward Morgan, Richard Cocke, Robert Thacker, Patrick Kenneday and Joan Champman. May 21, 1628 importers of tobacco were Robert Shepton, Reynold Parker, Richard Cocke, Henry Fisher, William Bonham and Bartholomew Fleet. No tobacco imported for May 22, 1628. The James imported May 23, 1628 but the Thomas and John did not. May 24, 1628 Richard Wake only importer. No imports for May 25, 1628. May 26, 1628 Helen Brandon and Antony Wall. May 27, 1628 John Cheeseman and Bartholomew Hoskins. May 28, 1628 Daniel Hosking, Richard Wake and Christopher Downeman. No imports for May 29, 1628. May 30, 1628 John Sharples.

Temperance Flowerdew, arrived with 400 ill-fated settlers in the fall of 1609. The following winter, dubbed the "Starving Time," saw over 80 percent of Jamestown succumb to sickness, disease and starvation. Temperance survived this season of hardship but soon returned to England. By 1619, Temperance returned to Jamestown with her new husband, Governor George Yeardley. After his death in 1627, she married Governor Francis West and remained in Virginia until her death in 1628. Her many years in Virginia as a wife and mother helped fill the gap in Jamestown's early family life. (Role of Women at Jamestown-National Park Service).

Since George Yeardley graunted 100 acres to John Hudleston, marriner in 1621 we must ask the question, 'Was Captain John Huddleston's 100 acres part of Flowerdew Hundred?' Prince George County History
Prince George County was established in 1702 and was named in honor of Prince George of Denmark, Husband of England's reigning monarch, Queen Anne. It was formed from Charles City County, one of the original eight shires, and its boundaries stretched from south of the James River down to the North Carolina line. Boundary definition of Prince George County was not completed until 1703. This area was one of the earliest settled regions of Virginia. It was first visited by the English in May of 1607, when Captain Christopher Newport led a crew of twenty-one men in search of the best location for their permanent settlement. As they sailed up the James River to the mouth of the Appomattox River, Newport noted that the area now known as Prince George would be a suitable location for the settlement. When he returned to the anchored fleet, he found that his impatient followers had already unloaded and begun settlement at Jamestown, without waiting for his advice. In 1616, John Martin, one of the men who arrived in 1607, was among the first to receive a permanent land grant in the Prince George area. He was granted Brandon, a vast tract of land along the James River. (From the 1626 court case involving Allice Boyse we know that John Huddleston was at Captain Martin's house. Also, very much later, Elizabeth Morgan marries Constable Robert Huddleston of Spotsylvania County, Virginia in Bristol Parish, Prince George County, Virginia.) Martin's Brandon was later sold to three men, one of whom was Richard Quiney whose son Thomas married Judith Shakespeare, daughter of William Shakespeare. The property later passed to Nathaniel Harrison in 1720. It was at this time that Thomas Jefferson, a good friend of Harrison's son, designed the main part of the house as it stands today. Brandon remained in the Harrison family until 1926 when it passed to Robert Williams Daniel. Brandon's Palladian-style mansion and renowned gardens are home to the Daniel family today, making this state and national landmark which is still an active farming operation the longest continuous agricultural enterprise in the U.S. Another plantation in Prince George which was established by the early settlers is Flowerdew Hundred, a 1,000 acre tract of land acquired around 1619 by Sir George Yeardley. Since King James I had stressed the immediate need for mills and bakehouses in the new land, Yeardley built at Flowerdew the first wind driven grist mill in English N. America. In 1978 a post windmill overlooking the James River at Flowerdew Hundred was built to commemorate the original mill of 1621.

At Martin's Hundred Living: William Harwood; Samwell March; Hugh Hues; John Jackson; Thomas Ward; John Stevans; Humphry Walden; Thomas Doughtie; John Hasley; Samwell Weaver; Widow Jackson; daughter Jackson; Mrs. Taylor; Ann Windor; Elizabeth Bygrave; Mr. Lake; Mr. Burren; John Stone; Samwell Culley; John Helline; Helline's wife; a Frenchman & wife; Thomas Sibery (Book of Emmigrants-concerning who was still living after the Indian attack of 1622) It shows William Jackson dead (William Jackson was the gunner for the Bona Nova.) America's Women: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines by Gail Collins We don't know if Mrs. Forrest and her baby survived the winter, but her former maid, Anne Burras, did. Anne, who was only fourteen when she arrived, soon married a twenty-eight-year-old laborer in Virginia's first wedding ceremony and gave birth to a daughter-- another Virginia--who also lived through the famine. So did Temperance Flowerdew, a young woman who had arrived in Virginia in 1609, after surviving a hurricane at sea. The storm hit a small fleet of boats destined for the colony. One, the Sea Venture, was destroyed, her passengers shipwrecked in an uninhabited part of Bermuda for nearly a year, while the crew turned the wreckage into two smaller boats. The marooned men and women weathered their ordeal on a warm island filled with food, while Temperance and the other émigrés who made it to Virginia were foraging for scraps and cooking rats. But after that unpromising beginning, a number of the women did very well. Temperance was the wife of two of the colony's governors. The first, Captain George Yeardley, was knighted in 1618 and became one of the richest men in Virginia, with several plantations. He named one of them Flowerdew in honor of Lady Yeardley. After his death, Temperance, then about forty-two, married Captain Francis West, one of his successors. The recruiters preferred not to mention certain details. Even after the food shortages ended, the Chesapeake was a death trap. The brackish water, mosquito-laden swamps, and steamy weather killed most people during their first year. Those who survived often suffered from weakness or periodic fits as an aftermath of their exposure to malaria. At least 6,000 people came to Virginia between 1607 and 1624; by 1625, only 1,200 survivors were still there. But the colonies' sponsors were desperate to get females, by hook or by crook--their ventures were in danger of being wrecked on the shoals of dissolute, irresponsible young manhood. In 1619, the Virginia House of Burgesses, petitioning that wives as well as husbands be eligible for grants of free land, argued that in a new plantation, "it is not knowen whether man or woman be the most necessary." London recruiters began searching for marriageable women, offering free passage and trousseaus for girls of good reputation and a sense of adventure. When they married, their new husbands had to reimburse the company with 120 pounds of good leaf tobacco. The first shipment of ninety "tobacco brides" arrived in Jamestown in the spring of 1620. The youngest, Jane Dier, was fifteen or sixteen when she left England. Allice Burges, at twenty-eight, was one of the oldest and said to be skillful in the art of brewing beer- important in a place where the water was generally undrinkable. Cicely Bray was from one of the best families, of a rank that required her to be addressed as "Mistress" rather than the more plebian "goodwife." But all the brides were respectable women, mostly the offspring of middle-class tradesmen who had died, leaving them with no male protectors. All of them provided references, attesting to their honesty, sobriety, and past behavior. Anne Richards was "a woman of an honest [life] and conversation . . . and so is and ever hathe bynne esteemed," wrote one of her parish elders.

We don't know which tobacco brides won the golden ring and became a contented farm wife or a prosperous plantation mistress. Only a few of their disasters made it into history. Some of the women, including Cicely Bray, were killed in an Indian attack in 1622, when 347 settlers lost their lives. Examining the site of that massacre, modern archaeologists were puzzled to discover the skeleton of one woman with an iron band around her head that apparently had protected her from scalping. Women in England, they later deduced, used those bands to fasten a roll of cloth under their hair, to make their hairdo look fuller. Perhaps she was a tobacco bride, still trying to maintain her old standards of fashion. Some British contractors, hired to provide the colonies with wives and female servants, simply went out and grabbed whatever warm bodies they could find, shoved them into a boat and set sail. In October 1618, a warrant was issued in England for one Owen Evans, who was kidnapping young women from their villages and sending them off to be sold in Bermuda and Virginia as indentured servants. "His undue proceedings breed such terror to the poor maidens as 40 of them fled out of one parish into such obscure and remote places as their parents and masters can yet have no news what is become of them," reported a correspondent to King James I. The danger of being dragged off to America against one 's will figured prominently in the popular literature of seventeenth-century England-playwrights found the shanghai artists, or "spirits," a handy deus ex machina for eliminating characters midplot. Parents sometimes pursued the spirits' vessels down the Thames, where they ransomed their kidnapped children before they disappeared forever. The law didn't seem to do much to dissuade the abductions. From America's Women by Gail Collins. Copyright © 2003 by Gail Collins. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher, HarperCollins Publishers. George Yardley, it must be added, was not one of the beneficiaries, having married Temperance Flowerdew on a brief return to England in 1618 with the rank of Governor and Captain General to be knighted by James I. Temperance was the great-niece of Amy Robsart, who was the wife of Elizabeth 1’s favorite, the Earl of Leicester. Many settlers were by now regarded as permanent residents, Sir George and Temperance being among the first. A petition from the Governors of the Virginia Company in England reflects their concern for the future when it asks for an allowance of ‘one share in the Virginia Company to every male child born to any Planter’s wife in the Colony and to all others begotten in Virginia, being our only hope of posterity’. Sir George and his wife lived for the greater part of their lives in the colony and there they died. The most romantic figure, however, was Sir George Yardley, who was born in 1588, the year of the Spanish Armada. He was the eldest of six sons born to Ralph Yardley, a London merchant, and his second wife, Rhoda. By the time he was sixteen George had already fought at Oudewater in the Low Countries, and on his return to England he went back into service with his old commander, Sir Thomas Gates, assisting him to plan an expedition for the relief of the settlers in Virginia and actually sailing in the tiny Sea Adventurer on the 15th May 1609, eleven years before the Pilgrim Fathers set out in the Mayflower. (The Story of Yardley)

Taking account the three months of ocean voyage given by some sources for the London to Virginia trip that would place the Thomas and John back in London by November 1628. Since Katherine Chatham was born in London, the future wife of Valentine Huddleston, we wonder if Valentine might have known her in London. With Captain John Huddleston being the first known Huddleston in America and Valentine Huddleston being the second known Huddleston in America what else are we to think but that they might be related as father and son. After years of research, I just realized Chatham was Catherine Chamberlin's maiden name. From the Chamberlayne family we get this information: John4 Chamberlain (Henry3 Chamberlin, [Unknown]2, Henry1) was born Bef. 15 Nov 1633 in Hingham, Norfolk, England, and died Apr 1666 in Newport, RI. He married (1) Anne Brown 19 May 1653 in Boston, Suffolk, MA, daughter of William Brown. She was born 07 Apr 1633 in England, and died in Prob. Boston, MA. He married (2) Catherine Chatham Abt. 1663. Notes for John Chamberlain: John Chamberlin was a currier, who worked with leather and garments. He was admitted as an inhabitant of Boston, July 28, 1651, and purchased a house from William Courser of Boston on Hanover St. on Oct 14, 1652. He became a Quaker and by September 1661 had been whipped nine times, "three times through three towns." He was present at the execution of Marmaduke Stevenson and William Robinson, and the reprieve of Mary Dyer, on Boston Common, Oct. 27, 1659, and was drawn to visit the Quakers in prison. He became a Quaker, and before Sept. 9, 1661, had been nine times whipped, "three times through three towns." He was imprisoned in Boston where his father and brother Henry petitioned the General court for a remittance of his "sentence of banishment upon Payne of death. "The Deputies ordered him removed to Castle Island, there to provide himself lodging, housinge, vitualls, etc. at his own charge." That petition was dated 7 June 1661. About 1663 he moved to Newport, RI , where he died April 1666.

Notes for Anne Brown: Her father was of Boston, MA. "She was not of the same principle altogether with (her husband)." Deputy Governor Bellingham tried to get her to deny her husband, unsuccessfully. Notes for Catherine Chatham: Catherine married 2nd Valentine Huddleston. "A Quakeress, who came from London to Boston where she "appeared cloathed with sackcloth." She was put in prison, whipped at Dedham, and driven into the wilderness. Imprisoned again, and ordered to pay a fine, "she was taken to wife by John Chamberlaine and so became an inhabitant of Boston."

Savage's Genealogical Dictionary of the First Planters A GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY of THE FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW ENGLAND, SHOWING THREE GENERATIONS OF THOSE WHO CAME BEFORE MAY, 1692, ON THE BASIS OF FARMER'S REGISTER. BY JAMES SAVAGE, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND EDITOR OF WINTHROP'S HISTORY OF NEW ENGLAND. WITH TWO SUPPLEMENTS IN FOUR VOLUMES. [[Corrected electronic version copyright Robert Kraft, July 1994]] Baltimore GENEALOGICAL PUBLISHING CO., INC. Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862 Reprinted with "Genealogical Notes and Errata," excerpted from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXVII, No. 2, April, 1873, pp. 135-139 And A Genealogical Cross Index of the Four Volumes of the Genealogical Dictionary of James Savage, by O. P. Dexter, 1884. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1965,1969,1977,1981,1986, 1990 Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 65-18541 International Standard Book Number: 0-8063-0309-3 Set Number: 0-8063-0795 Volume 1-Volume 2-Volume 3-Volume 4- Vol3, pp 422-423 This 4-volume dictionary lists early settlers and gives biographical data, relevant to genealogists, but also to students of early local history in Massachusetts. In Vol. 2 HUDDLESTONE, VALENTINE, Newport, by w. Catharine had Henry, b. 21 Sept. 1673; and George, 28 Sept. 1677. He rem. to Dartmouth, and d. 8 June 1727, in 99th yr. as is said. [[488]]
Chamberlayne Family
In same volume and right above Valentine Huddleston

CHAMBERLAIN, oft. CHAMBERLIN, ABRAHAM, Newton 1691, was, perhaps, s. of William of Woburn. BENJAMIN, prob. of Roxbury, and s. of Richard, was a soldier at Hadley in 1676. EDMUND, or possib. EDWARD, Woburn, m. 4 Jan. 1647, at Roxbury, Mary Turner, perhaps sis. of John, had Mary, bapt. 16 Apr. 1648 at R.; Sarah, b. 18 Dec. 1649; and ano. d. 11 Mar. 1652; both at w. rem. to Chelmsford 1655, there had Edmund, 20 or 30 May 1656, wh. d. young, as he was in Moseley's comp. for the hard campaign of Dec. 1675; Jacob, 15 Oct. 1658; was [[353]] freem. 1665; and his w. d. 7 Dec. 1669 at the ho. of Samuel Ruggles in Roxbury. He m. next, Hannah Burden, 22 June 1670, at Malden, there had Susanna, June 1671, wh. d. next yr.; Ebenezer, 1672, d. the same yr.; Susanna, again; and Edmund, again, 31 Jan. 1676; rem. to planta. call. New Roxbury, now Woodstock, there d. leav. wid. Hannah. Susanna m. 14 Nov. 1693, John Tuckerman of Boston. EDMUND, Woodstock, s. of the preced. m. 21 Nov. 1699, Elizabeth Bartholomew, prob. d. of William, had Edmund, b. 23 Aug. 1700; Elizabeth 6 Mar. 1702; William, 23 Feb. 1704; John; Peter; Mary; and Hannah, 2 Jan. 1721. EDMUND, Billerica, s. of William, m. 26 Aug. 1691, wid. Mercy Abbot. HENRY, Hingham, shoemaker; came in the Diligent 1638, with w. two ch. and his mo. from Hingham in Co. Norfk. was freem. 13 Mar. 1639, and no more with confid. is kn. of him, not even the date of his d. nor names of his ch. tho. strong presumpt. is that they were Henry and William. HENRY, the freem. of 1645, was, I think, of Hingham, and s. of the preced. but no more is heard of him, exc. that he had s. Nathaniel, and possib. Henry. HENRY, Hull, or Hingham, s. perhaps of the preced. was prob. one of Moseley's comp. in Dec. 1675, by w. Jane had Elizabeth b. 20 Dec. 1683; Henry, 11 Mar. 1686; John, 29 Jan. 1689; Ursula, 11 Jan. 1691; and Joseph, 10 Apr. 1694. JACOB, whose place of resid. in Mass. is uncert. but Jackson, in Hist. of Newton, says, his w. Experience had brot. him five s. and next m. Jonathan Dyke, and he d. 1712, aged 83. JACOB, Roxbury, s. perhaps of the preced. more prob. of either the first Edmund, or sec. William, m. 24 Jan. 1685, Mary Child, d. of the first Benjamin, as I conject. had Jacob, b. 7 Mar. 1686; John, and ano. s. tw. whose name is not seen, 1 Aug. 1687, was adm. freem. 1630, and next yr. liv. at Newton; but d. 7 Nov. 1721, at Brookline. His will, made four days bef. calls him of Boston, yeoman, names s. Jacob, and John, d. Mary, w. of Samuel Davis, and Elizabeth w. of Joseph Weld. JOB, Boston, by w. Joanna had Job, b. 19 May 1685, William, 16 Jan. 1687; Elizabeth 11 Jan. 1689; all bapt. 23 Feb. 1630; Susanna, bapt. 26 Nov. 1693; Mary, 8 Dec. 1695; and prob. Jane, 31 Mar. 1706, at Mather's ch. as I think. JOHN, Charlestown, d. at Woburn, 3 Mar. 1652. JOHN, Boston 1651, a currier; m. 19 May 1653, Ann, d. of William Brown, had Ann, b. 6 Feb. 1634; Elizabeth 25 Oct. 1656; and Henry, 3 Feb. 1659; was imprison. as Quaker 1659; may have rem. to Newport, where was a John, wh. by w. Catharine had Susanna, b. Aug. 1664; Peleg, Aug. 1666; and Jane, Dec. 1667; and d. of smallpox, 26 Apr. 1668. JOHN, Charlestown, a soldier at Hadley 1676, by w. Deborah Templar had John, bapt. 14 May 1682 wh. d. 24 July 1684, aged 5; ano. ch. whose name is not found, bapt. at the same time; Mary, 14 Oct. 1683; Deborah, 3 July 1687; and Sarah, 19 Jan. 1690; and he d. 22 Dec. foll. aged 36. Mr. Wyman ascert. him to be s. of William of Hull, and that his wid. m. a Miller. JOHN, Malden, freem. 1690, by w. Hannah had [[354]] perhaps Hannah, b. at Charlestown, 15 Aug. 1681; Mary, b. 5 Dec. 1685; Sarah, 25 Nov. 1688, and Sarah, again, 14 Mar. 1706. JOSEPH, Hadley, soldier there on serv. 1676, perhaps from the E. m. 8 June 1688, Mercy, d. of John Dickinson, first of the same, had Sarah, b. 2 or 9 Nov. 1690, d. soon; Sarah, again, 10 Mar. 1693; and John, 4 Mar. 1700; rem. to Colchester; where his w. d. 30 June 1735, and he d. 7 Aug. 1752, aged 87. NATHANIEL, Hull. s. perhaps of Henry the sec. by w. Abigail had Elizabeth b. 8 June 1682; Nathaniel, 23 Aug. 1683; John, 26 Dec. 1684; Mary, 5 Feb. 1686; Joanna, 8 Jan. 1688, and five or six more ds. and last, Thomas, 21 May 1695. But perhaps he rem. to Scituate, and there, Deane thinks, he had more.

William Chamberlin witnessed Henry Chamberlin's deed to Valentine Huddlestone of Newport, March 20, 1680, where he had moved with his family in 1663. He removed to Shrewsbury, NJ, before 1687. He was a "cooper" and deeded his right in one-half of a patent of 100 acres to Edward Woolley of Shrewsbury, Nov. 19, 1687. He died before July 8, 1717, when John Chamberlin was appointed guardian of his son Henry, at which time he was "deceased." Notes for Peleg Chamberlain: He is probably the Peleg Chamberlin who was a designated heir of Valentine Huddleston of Dartmouth, Bristol Co. and the Province of Massachusetts Bay, yoeman "who for love, good will and affection gave his son-in-law, Peleg Chamberlain of New Port, in the colony of Rhode Island.... Newport and Providence Plantations, cordwainer, 17 Sept. 1722 , two tracts of land in West Jersey (New Jersey), lying East South East from New Burlington about twelve miles from Delaware River.... purchased from the Indians by Daniel Lewis and others about the year 1695, the two tracts together containing about 566 acres." Valentine Huddleston was the 2nd husband of Catherine (Chatham) Chamberlin, the 2nd wife of Peleg's father John Chamberlin. This would explain the use of the term 'son-in-law' in the deed of Valentine Huddleston, meaning the son of his wife Catherine (Chatham) Chamberlin. Notes for Henry Chamberlain: Henry Chamberlin removed with his parents to Newport, RI, about 1663, as the result of his father's support of the Quakers cause. "Henry Chamberlin, eldest son of John Chamberlin, deceased, of Rhode Island," deeded Valentine Huddlestone of Newport, all interest in his father's estate in Rhode Island, March 20, 1680. He removed to Shrewsbury, NJ, before March 25, 1687. He died at Manesquam, or Manasquan (perhaps Ssquankum), Monmouth Co., NJ, before Feb. 14, 1688-89, upon which date his widow, Anne Chamberlin, returned the inventory of his estate, and Feb. 15, 1688-89, she was appointed administratrix of the estate of Henry Chamberlin of "Shrosberry." He m. Anne, whose surname was Laffetra or West, daughter, or step-daughter of Edmond and Frances Laffetra. She made her will Jan. 15, 1691-92, and it was proved Jan. 25, 1691-92. She mentioned her brothers Robert and Joseph West, her son John Chamberlin then under age, and her mother and sisters, whose names were not given. Joseph West was commissioned executor , Dec. 29, 1692. On March 20, 1679/80, he sold to his step-father, Valentine Huddleston, all rights of his father's estate in Rhode Island. He and brother William removed to the Quaker Colony at Shrewsbury, NJ about 1682-4. His wife Anne was named in the will of her step-father Edmund Lafetra of Shrewsbury, NJ (dated 4 Sep 1687) as daughter Anne Chamberlin. Their residence was referred to as "Squankum" or "Manasquan."

Knowing John Brook was the wife of Lucy Hudleston gives us a connection to the Poulter family: West Kent Quarter Sessions Records Indictments FILE-File of indictments, etc. for gaol delivery sessions 7 Jan. 1596/7.-ref. QM/SI/1597/1 [n.d.] item: Henry Poulter of Otford, Peter Daniell of Sevenoaks, John Brooke of Chipstead in Chevening and James Formerl of Chevening, all labourers, for burgling the house of John Saker at Tonbridge and taking 36 lbs. butter worth 2s. 6d., a pair of shoes worth 6d. and yarn worth 2s. [All found guilty of felony but not of burglary]-ref. QM/SI/1597/1/7-date: 20 Dec. 1596 FILE-File for Michaelmas Sessions 1610-ref. QM/SI/1610/21-date: Sept. 1610 item: Stephen Baker, "rippier", Thomas Baker, ripper, Michael Thomas, yeoman, Thomas Poulter, labourer, all of Goudhurst, at Goudhurst, from 1 Aug. 1610 to the day of the taking of the indictment without licence, have kept "Comon tipling howses" and sold "Ale and beare"-ref. QM/SI/1610/21/3-date: 1 Aug. to end Sept. 1610 FILE-Gaol Delivery Roll-ref. Q/SRg-date: 1596-1605 item: 7th January, 1596/7 at Maidstone-ref. Q/SRg/m. 1d-date: 1596/7 \_ [from Scope and Content] 1. Henry Poulter of Otford, labourer Family Wills, Settlements and Personal Papers FOXE/CORBETT/HERBERT SETTLEMENT DEEDS AND PAPERS FILE [no title]-ref. 20/14/33-34 -date: 17 Oct 18 Chas I (1642) \_ [from Scope and Content] Now at the special request of Margt. Herbert and Fras. Herbert, to 2. all the lordships of Great and Little Sutton and all messuages, cottages, mills, lands, grounds, tenements etc. belonging in occs. of Richd. Cludd, Thos. Jordan, Thos. Lewis, Thos. Sheppard, Mary Jorden, widow, Chas. Wleelings, Joan Brooke, widow, Richd. Brooke, Thos Crowther, Edwd. Adams, Wm. Poulter, Richd. Haynes and Thos. Jorden, Also all cottages, messuages, farms, etc. in Clee St. Margaret and Cold Weston now in occs. Richd. Morgan, Wm. Coulton, Widow Gravenor and Adam Wadley. Title Deeds: Out-County Essex Mountnessing FILE [no title]-ref. D1057/A/2/28/1-8 -date: 1567-1662 \_ [from Scope and Content] Eliz. Mawbroke widow of Jn. Mawbroke/Hy Pechy/Thos. Pechie and Wm. Pechie/Wm. Lincollne/Richd. Poulter/Thos. Sharpe/Edmund Peart Miscellaneous Deeds WARWICKSHIRE Stoneleigh Fletchampstead FILE-Stoneleigh, Fletchampstead.-ref. DR 18/1/985 -date: 1603 \_ [from Scope and Content] Lease by Sir Thomas Leigh of Stoneley, kt, to Thomas Higginson of Barkeswell, tanner, citing a lease made by the same, as Thomas Leigh esquier to the said Thomas, of a meadow in Fletchampstead confirming the lands named in the above lease (except Poulter's Meadowe,) 20 March 32nd Elizabeth, (1589-90) viz Northe and Roughe Waste, Walgrave's and Kingswood, late William Wright. FILE-Indenture- ref. Wellington/A 294/13 -date: 1574 \_ [from Scope and Content] Involving James Poulter, yeoman, of Milford (Hampshire) and Thomas Nash of Rotherwick (Hampshire)

In researching Henry Poulter we are once again drawned back to the 'Records of the Virginia Company' because of his wife Francis Throckmorton. A Sir William Throckmorton, John Smythe of Nibley, Richard Berkeley and George Thorpe are very much involved with Sir George Yardley, the Virginia governor because through a collected pool of money of theirs in association with our Thomas Smythe, treasurer. This can be found on page 130 pertaining to the indenture, page 136 pertaining to the patent, and many other pages.

This also lets us understand the significanse of our Captain John Huddleston learning of the death of William Tracy because page 266 'Records of the Virginia Company' CIV. William Tracy. A Letter To John Smyth April 15, 1620 Smyth of Nibley Papers, Smyth, 16 Document in New York Public Library. Autographed Letter, Signed List of Records No. 16 Sr I was glad of yor letter & ye good nues of virginia, but sori ye ship is not retorned god send her a hapi Coming & all ouer bisnes hapili to go on to gods gods glori & ouer good there is a gust Caues ye I canot met at gloster, as yo loue me Condem me not so do I inret my cousin barli what so ever yo to agre on I will Consent vnto be Caues I am assured yo will do nothing vnfitting yo selves Yf I may know her to met my cousin barkli ye first nite I will not fayle & it may be goe a long wth him to london Yf not wth yo Yf not wth yo yf go from ouer parts. but at london ther shall we haue tim suffisient to determen all I am binding my men I haue at lest 20 promised me ye most part I am suer of. there is no dout of more then wee men at this to Cari. ti all of yousefull trads so ye we may leaue those ye ar of lest imployment tel ye nest going do as ye plese wth Sr William Throkmortun I will do nothing but as yo aduise me Yf I proue not ferm & faythful let me not be held orthi ye name of a Cristian this hoping this may geve yo satisfactione I rest Yors in all asurance 15 Aprill 1620 [Addressed: ] To my worthi frind Mr. John Smith this nibli [Indorsed: ] Mr Tr[acys let]ter 1620 http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=mtj8&fileName=mtj8pagevc03.db&recNum=293.gif On page 271 Sir William Throckmorton indentures his part of Berkeley Plantation to William Tracy and on page 289 we find the ship William Tracy was referring to was the 'Garland' because as we know William Wye was the Captain of the 'Garland'. On page 291 Sir William Throckmorton and William Tracy are concerned about a silkworm business. The real surprise is finding mention of a Sir John Brook who could of been the wife of Lucy Huddleston mentioned in 'Records of the Virginia Company' right above a letter about William Tracy on page 367 indorsed by Mr. Russell July 5, 1620 Agree wth some litle varyacon wth Mr Russell: the Acumist & chimist Sr John Brooke. 2. April 1621. told mee, that of his c[orrec]t knoledg, this wine was made of sassaphras, & licoras boyled in water: he had of ye drynk. [Indorsed:] Mr Russells project touchinge artificiall wyne in Virginia. July. 1620 On page 368 we find William Tracy gets his commission as Captain of the 'Supply' so you finding about William Tracy's death Captain John Huddleston was acknowledging the death of a fellow Captain in the Virginia Company. But page 379 is geneaologically significant because we find that Captain William Tracy becomes governor of Virginia through a commission and is allowed to build a town called Berkeley. On page 396 we learn of his death and of his wife Mary Tracy and how their son Thomas Tracy goes back to England but daughter Joyce Tracy died in England and her husband Captain Nathaniel Powell was slained.

The Bona Nova, itself could of been the property of the Virginia Company and we learn particularly the resposibility fell on Sir Edwin Sandys: LXXX. Sir Edwin Sandys. A Letter to John Ferrar. September 20, 1619. Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge University. Autograph Letter, signed List of Records. 131
Sr I send yu here enough to read; & therfore my owne writing may be short to yu at full of all busines, & the next moneth be wth yu, to assist in effecting them. Meane while I shalbe glad to heare from yu of the nues stirring in those parts: especially of the certainty of Bohemia: & what else yu please. I pray yu doo not sarue from my former order of paiments: vis First all for the Bona Nova. Secondly Fraight & wages for the Diana: coming by Mr Webs note to 170 in all. then not anie more till or meeting, for a reason yu then shall knowe. And I pray yu get yor warrents to me for all from the Committies: & to beare date a little before the monie was paid: hereof be carefull: But for the old debt for the Diana it must be from he Auditors. So wth most hartie commendacions, I rest yors assured, Northborn .20. Septemb: 1619 Edwin Sandys

Considering John Juddlesee and his relationship to Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua
LXXXVI. Council in Virginia. " The Putting Out Of The Tenants That Came Ouer In The Bona Noua Wth Other Orders Of The Councell" November 11, 1619 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge University List of Records No. 138 James Citty Novembr 11th 1619: By the gouernor & Counsell:
As Concerninge the Company of a hundred new men sent hither in the Bona Noua to become Tennants vpon the Companies land and the Colledge land fifty vnder the Comand of Captain weldinge and thother fifty to be Comanded by Lieutenant whiteaker because ther provision of victualles of to pounds of meale a day to a man would not last them above 5 monthes and 14 dayes, and for as much as wee find by experience, that were abundance of new men are planted in one body they doe overthrowe themselues either by contagion of sicknes or by the mother and cause thereof, ill example of Idlenes, more ouer because diuers of those new men Cominge heither in tyme of winter might miscarry by lyinge in the woods before such time as conveneite howses could be erected for the harouringe of them all, and lastly seeinge that most of these new men beinge put forth into the seruice of old planters, might not onely be prsently howsed and prouided of necessaries but be well seasoned for the pubiqve against another yeare. It was thought expedient by the gouenor and Counsell to aduise the said to gentlemen to rent out the greatest part of ther people to some honest and sufficient men of the Colonie tell Cristmas come twelue month for iij barrells of Indian Corne and 55 waight of tobacco a man wch might abundantlie serve them victualls and apparell for the yeare next ensuinge the expiracion of ther time when they should returne to the publique busines and be able to instructe other new commers as they had bine instructed: You shall at all times accordinge to your taste and accordinge to your Judgement and Conscience make report of the true value and price of tobacco whether at three shillings or eyghten pence or vnder, soe helpe you God &c: This day the Gouerner and Counsell found out a convenient seat for Lieftennante Whiteaker vpon the Companyes lands: [Endorsed by Nicholas Ferrar:]

The above records are also found in the Records of the Virginia Company where we also find the Bona Noua was 200 tuns with 120 passengers and the Mayflower was 140 tuns and 100 passengers but they were both sent out from London in August 1620 with the Elizabeth. We then get two letters from John Pory to Sir Edwin Sandys that are in the Records of the Virginia Company. In Records No. 156 dated January 13 1619/1620 XCVI Most worthy Knight, After my sicknesses and miseries past, the Bona Nova hath brought me in particularly one singular and cordial comfort namely the newes of your being elected Treasurer: for nowe I am confident, that what (The rest of the letter is not shown) But the next day he writes another letter XCVII No. 157 Honble Knight, Untill the last moment of sending away, I had forgotten to write you a list of their names both Colony men & other passengers that came in the Bona Nova, whereby it appeareth, there went Colony men of the Number of an hundred, Nor doth it appear whether the passages of the rest that in the same not go vnder the name of passengers by payd for, or freely given by the Company. Captain Welden saith, the Company save him passage for twoe, Thomas Smythe and Edward Kerby gentlemen, wch the Gouernr will not accept of a warrant sufficient to saue him harmless, wthout certificat from the Company. Wch two, together wth Adames that goes vnder the name of Mr Whitakers man, the Gouernr will not lett passe for England; nor yet Mr Hansbies man in pledge of George Eden that by your order is to go for Smythes hundred, till such time as he receive other order from the Company, or vntill there come three others in their roome. (John Pory then writes about silkworms) but the date is Jan 14 1619 and he writes from James City

We are learning about the many trips of the Bona Nova and how messages between England and Virginia are sent by it. CXXV. Virginia Council. Extract From a Letter August, 1620 Manchester Papers, No. 272 Document in Public Record Office. London List of Records No. 193
But for the matter therein conteyned about the Chekohomini e ill not pemptorilye it to be executed (so long time being passed) but leaue it to yor iudgemt vpon mature deliveracon th the hole body of Councell so to pceed therein as that iustice being satisfied for that barbarous crueltye may be otherwise left to the disturbance of the peace of the Colonye But touching the matters of Capt. Argall we alter nothing from our first resolucons neither haue had cause his proceedings here giueing vs noe satisfaccon But some alteracon seemeth to haue been wrought in yor who promising to dispatch all that business, at the returne of the Bona Noua haue no so much as sent them one line or word concerning him. wee affect herein nothing but truth trall of truth, and that he may be cleared by his owne innocencye and not by vnderhand dealing whereof ee haue had cause to be more then suspicious but from yor wee haue expected alayes reall pceedings according to yor first comissions & or later direccons in wch expectacons for that wch remaneth wee still continue August 1620 Ed: Sheffeild Lion: Cranfeild Ed: Sandis Jno Dauies Xro: Brook Tho: Gibbs Jno Farrar, Deputy Ro: Smith Tho: Shepheard [Indorsed:] Clause of ye Councells ler concerning Cap. Argall.

Page 406 CXLIII. Sir Edwin Sandys. A Letter To John Ferrar September 18, 1620 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College. Autographed Letter, Signed, With Seal List Of Records No. 211
Good Mr Ferrar: I knowe ye will partake wth me deeply in my sorroe, not for the losse, (I most humbly thank God,) the Bona Nova wth hir Pinnace set saile from the Downs, wth a prosperous wynd: & was met that evening beyond the Nesse. That day we spent here amongest or friends in great ioy.
Until the advent of the sloop, pinnaces were the primary small craft of the Caribbean. Like a sloop, a pinnace is very fast, very maneuverable, and with a draft that permits sailing in shoal waters. Sailing upwind (close-hauled) it is even faster than a sloop, and much faster when rowing into the wind. However, a pinnace is also much smaller than a sloop, with minuscule capacity for cargo and guns. A boat for communication between ship and shore.

1587 is an important date in Virginia. July 22, 1587: Raleigh's 3rd expedition to Virginia, consisting of three ships carrying about 115 settlers, lands on Roanoke Island. John White, the artist, is governor. After a few months, 1/3 of the settlers are dead from famine and disease. August 18, 1587: Virginia Dare, John White's grandchild, is born in Roanoke--the first English child to be born in America. John White is sent off to England in the sole remaining ship for help. He leaves behind his daughter and her new-born child, Virginia Dare--the first English child to be born in the Americas. But back home, Spain is assembling an Armada to crush England, and no ship may be spared for the return voyage. ©1998 Gene Borio, Tobacco BBS (212-982-4645). WebPage: http://www.tobacco.org). Original Tobacco BBS material may be reprinted in any non-commercial venue if accompanied by this credit. From a survey report we find Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua to be born in 1587 and from a deposition we get that he was from Ratcliffe, Middlesex; which is of London, England. Virginia Colonial Records Project Survey Report No. 3996 ff.75ro-75vo. 22 June 1620. Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor aged 33. Survey Report No. GL.5 References Crick and Alman Guide, pp.64-65. Vol.V No.65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621. the depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliff, Middlesex, master of the Bona Nova; William Jackson of Ratcliffe, gunner of the Bona Nova; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe; mariner. The depositions state the deponents were in Virginia during the period January-June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.

London Metropolitan Archives Quarter Sessions of the Peace for the City and Liberty of Westminster, 1618-1844 SESSIONS ROLLS Rolls transferred from Westminster Abbey ROLL (NEW SERIES) NO.1; JAN.17 JAMES I FILE-Recognizance:; John Wright of St. Margaret, Westminster, yeoman (£20), John Glover of same, yeoman (£20), for their own appearance at the next general sessions for misdemeanours towards William Jackson; Taken before: Ralph Dobinson; Annotated: [agreed] - ref. WJ/SR(NS)1/085-date: 17 James I [1619] 28 Oct FILE-Recognizance:; William Jackson of St. Martin in the Fields (£20), for his own appearance at the next general sessions to present against John Wright and John Glover; Taken before: Ralph Dobinson; Annotated: [discharged]-ref. WJ/SR(NS)1/095-date: 17 James I [1619] 28 Oct The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of London Metropolitan Archives. Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2003. Public Record Office Online Catalogue Series details for STAC 5 Court of Star Chamber: Proceedings, Elizabeth I c1558-c1603 STAC 5/R2/18 Revett v Huddleston, Daubney, Bennet, Jackson. 17 Eliz STAC 5/L27/39 Leyce, and others v Huddleston & Jackson 37 Eliz.

STEPNEY Description and History from 1868 Gazetteer
STEPNEY, a parish and populous district of the metropolis, in the Tower division of Ossulstone hundred, and borough of the Tower Hamlets, county Middlesex, 25 miles E. of St. Paul's Cathedral. It is a junction station on the North London, the Blackwall, and Great Eastern railways; it lies chiefly between the Commercial-road and the Great Eastern railway, and includes the populous districts of Mile-End, New and Old Town, and part of Ratcliffe. The population of the parish in 1861 was 98,836, and of the ecclesiastical districts of the Holy Trinity and St. Philip respectively 10,478 and 14,805. Previously to 1669 it was much more extensive than at present, comprising, in addition to its present parochial limits, the hamlets Of Stratford-le-Bow, Limehouse, Shadwell, St. George's-in-the-East, Spitalfields, Bethnal Green, Wapping, Whitechapel, Poplar, and Blackwall, which from their increased importance have been successively separated from it, and formed into distinct parishes. In Domesday Book it is written Stebenhede, and in later documents Stebenhythe and Stebonheath. In 1299 it was the seat of a parliament summoned by Edward I. to meet at the mansion house of Henry Walleis, then lord mayor of London. In the 14th century the manor was held by the bishops of London, who had a palace called Bishop's Hall at Bethnal-Green, then a rural district, as described by Sir Thomas More in a letter to Dean Colet. It was subsequently alienated by Bishop Ridley to the crown, and given by Edward VI. to the Wentworths, from whom it came to the Manners and Colebrooke families. In the first year of Charles I.'s reign it was ravaged by the plague, which carried off 2,978 persons; and at the commencement of the parliamentary war was strongly fortified for the defence of the city. At this period the parish was a wide flat extending to Blackwall, as seen in the print of Hogarth's "Idle Apprentice."

The parish church, dedicated to St. Dunstan, was built in the 14th century. It has a low broad tower, strengthened with buttresses and surmounted by a turret and dome. In the porch is a Stone from "Carthage wall," and in the interior are many ancient monuments and tombs of eminent men, with several epitaphs, noticed in No. 518 of the Spectator. In addition to the parish church are the follow district churches, viz: Holy Trinity, St. Thomas, St. Philip, All Saints', St. Peter's, and St. Paul's, Bow Common, the livings of which are all perpetual curacies, varying in value from £350 to £250. The Stepney Poor-law Union comprises the parishes of Limehouse, Ratcliffe, Shadwell, and Wapping, Mile-End Old Town having its own establishment. All children born at sea are supposed to belong to Stepney, according to the old rhyme "He who sails on the wide sea, Is a parishioner of Stepney." In consequence pauper's born at sea have been sent here from all parts of the country, but the recent decisions of the superior courts refuse to establish this traditional law. See also articles London, and the parishes enumerated above as once included in Stepney. [Description(s) from "The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland" (1868) Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

Stepney in Other Days
From "The Copartnership Herald", Vol. II, no. 19 (September 1932) It is not easy to imagine either the appearance of the riverside or the rural condition of the mother parish of Stepney four hundred years ago, when it was possible to view afar over field, meadow and marsh the little ships of sail passing up and down the silver reaches of the Thames, with the green hills of Kent and Surrey beyond. To-day most of that which is seen in the streets of East London has been developed since the making of the great docks early in the nineteenth century and the building of wharves and warehouses. The beginning of the change that altered the character of the whole district occurred, however, in the second half of the sixteenth century, in the days of Queen Elizabeth, when England, awakened by the spirit of adventure, took to the sea, and laid the foundations of its maritime power, the Indian Empire, and the oversea Dominions. In this great enterprise Stepney played no mean part. In the words of honest John Strype: "It is further to be remarked that the Parish of Stepney, on the Southern Parts of it especially, that it is one of the greatest Nurseries of Navigation and Breeders of Seamen in England, the most serviceable Men in the Nation; without which England could not be England for they are its Strength and Wealth." Previous to this era there was, between the Precinct of St. Katherine's by the Tower and Blackwall (just under six and a half miles) nothing but marshland, having a sparse population, except at Ratcliff, where from time immemorial people had gathered and carried on waterside occupations. It occupied a favourable position, having a low cliff with a foreshore lying in the curve of the river where the straight run of tides without eddies caused no silting up of mud and gave a depth of water suitable for its use as a quay. At the western end of this convenient stretch of foreshore, the extent of which corresponds with the present Broad Street, stood a slight eminence sometime named Cock Hill, while at the other was Ratcliff Cross, with its stairs and hardway giving access to the water at all states of the tide. Nearby there was a small inlet now filled in, which in later years was known as Ratcliff Dock. The natural advantages of the situation were recognised in the Roman times when a causeway was made across the marshes from Tower Hill along the line which centuries afterwards was to become the notorious Ratcliff Highway.

[JOHN HUDDLESTONE Christening: 10 DEC 1592 Saint Katherine By The Tower, London, London, England Father: MATHEWE HUDDLESTONE P001441 1584-1695 0845261, 0845262 Film 6903590 Film IGI Individual Record

In the beginning of the sixteenth century, in the time of Henry VIII, "the town" of Ratcliff had become of considerable importance, and had numerous inhabitants who were engaged in the trades and occupations peculiar to riverside life. Evidence in support of the place being populous is the choice of it by Nicholas Gibson, citizen and grocer, for founding, in 1538, a free school for sixty boys and almshouses for fourteen aged poor persons. His widow married Sir Anthony Knyvett, and on his decease, for the continuance of the Charity, provided for it being vested in the Company of Coopers. Lady Avice Knyvett and her two husbands are buried in Stepney Church, and the site of the school is pre served in the name of the still existent Schoolhouse Lane. The importance of Ratcliff is stressed in parochial affairs by the fact, which is not widely known, that the parish church of St. Dunstan and its large churchyard stands wholly within it. Near the church was the large house, The Great Place as it was called, where Sir Henry Colet lived. His son John Colet, Dean of St. Paul's, and founder of St. Paul's School, while he was Vicar of Stepney, was visited on more than one occasion by the great and learned Dutch scholar Erasmus, whose impressions of Stepney as a place of residence at that time are happily preserved in a letter to his friend: "I come to drink your fresh air, my Colet, to drink deeper of your rural peace. Wherever you look, the earth yieldeth you a pleasant prospect, the temperature of the air fresheth you, and the very bounds of heaven do delight you. Here you find nothing but bounteous gifts of Nature and saint-like tokens of innocency." These remarks might be taken as savouring of polite exaggeration, but there is confirmation of their literal worth to be found in a letter of Sir Thomas More, who alludes to the delights afforded by "the country about your parish of Stepney." From a panoramic map of London and its suburbs made in 1543 a section has been reproduced (left) to assist our readers in obtaining some idea of the aspect of the southern part of the old parish of Stepney abutting on the river. Considered as an actual representation, the picture may seem to be slightly out of perspective, but it should be borne in mind that in its compilation the mental impressions of the various places shown were relied upon from the imaginary position above the monastery of Bermondsey, part of which is seen in the foreground.

Across the river there is unmistakably the Tower of London, behind which, within the city wall, is Tower Hill with the place of execution; and continuing along the wall there is Aldgate surmounted with three heads of criminals stuck on poles, and to the right is the former church of St. Botolph. The road into Essex is indicated passing through Whitechapel to Mile End, and thence to the left of Stepney Church. The gateway in the city wall, the one nearest the Tower, is the Postern Gate, from whence began the highway across East Smithfield to Ratcliff. East of the Tower is the Church and Hospital of St. Katherine, with houses clustered on three sides. On the further, the East side, marshland extends to Cock Hill. Beyond Ratcliff in the next curve of the river is the low-lying Isle of Dogs, opposite which is seen a small part of the old Palace of Greenwich. St. Katherine's by the Tower owes its name to the Hospital founded about 1148 by Queen Matilda, wife of Stephen, who created and endowed it in the time of her grief over the loss of her two children who died and were buried in the Church of Holy Trinity, Aldgate. At this time, it may be remarked, there was a vineyard in the vicinity. Under the shadows of the Hospital there grew up a populous neighbourhood, which, when the map was made, was largely composed of foreigners, mostly Flemish and Dutch, or persons of foreign extraction. They carried on their trades near, yet outside, the city from which they were excluded as aliens. Here on the quayside the little ships from Holland landed their goods and took on board cargoes for their homeward voyage. Beer was one of the commodities thus shipped. Much of it was brewed in the locality, and the water of the Thames long enjoyed a high reputation for its value. Stow remarks that "the brewers remain to the friendly water of the Thames." In the narrow circuitous Nightingale Lane leading from East Smithfield to the banks of the river stood one of these breweries. "This part of the public sustenance," it is recorded, "was subject to regulation as early as Henry VII who, in 1499, licenced John Merchant, a Fleming, to export 50 tuns of Ale called Berre, and in the same reign one Geoffrey Gate, probably a King's officer spoiled [took possession of] the brew-houses at St. Katherine's twice, either for sending too much abroad or brewing it too weak for home consumption." There was a steady demand for this article from foreign parts, and even when there was a scarcity of corn (which, it may be noted in passing, was grown at this time in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel) its exportation was permitted by Royal Licence. The King's brewhouse on the east of St. Katherine's stood at a place which bore the name of the Hermitage, where a small chapel sometime stood for prayer for the preservation of the embank ment or river wall. The whole inhabited area of St. Katherine's was a network of tangled lanes with wooden-built habitations. The Precinct, which was originally deemed to belong to the Portsoken Ward of the City, became within the jurisdiction of the Tower, and as one of the Liberties was included in the Tower Hamlets. In this way it became part of the Borough of Stepney. Just over a hundred years ago the Hospital was pulled down, together with some 1,250 houses of the poorest and meanest description, and 11,800 inhabitants displaced, to make St. Katherine's Docks, which now occupy twenty-four acres of the site. by Sydney Maddocks

ECHOES OF MANX HISTORY IN SOMERSET RECORDS.
Joan Stapleton, one of the descendants of Sir Miles, brother of Sir Brian Stapleton, married Sir John Huddleston, sheriff of Cumberland, in 1451. Her direct descendants married and inter-married with Flemings, Senhouses and the Christians of Ewanrigg and of Milntown in Man. There was a Thomas Huddleston in Man in 1587. A William Huddleston of Ballahott was father of Captain Thomas Huddleston, Water Bailiff in 1700. And, curiously, this property of Ballahott was occupied by a William Fyne in 1760. There was another link between the Stapletons and Man, which, however, runs in later than this. Joan Stapleton, wife of Sir John Huddleston, is said to have been widow of Christopher Harcourt, son of her stepfather. One of his Harcourt ancestors had married a daughter of Sir John Bek of Eresby, brother of Bishop Anthony Bek, who once bore rule in Man.

FILE-Title deeds of Huddleston Farm and 140a. land in Steyning, acquired in 1614/5 by Richard Bridger from Sir Thomas Shirley, and sold in 1763 by John Bridger, sen. esq. and s. Sir John Bridger to Richard Trevor, Bishop of Durham. Abstract of title reciting deeds, 1602-1617.-ref. GLY/2404-2431-date: 1593-1763 SP 77/112 Miscellaneous supplementary papers, including letters from W Trumball, J Dickinson, Richard Weston, Spanish letters concerning Captain Huddleston, an account of the taking of the ship Unity of Deal by Ostenders 1607-1751 Virginia Colonial Records Project.(Lancashire Record Office: Lancashire County Quarter Sessions [QSB/1/201 QSB/1/250] FILE-Recognizance Roll: Lancaster, Epiphany, 1638/9 ref. QSB/1/208 date: 1638/9 item: DALTON-in-FURNESS Agnes Sanderson likewise ref. QSB/1/208/9 date: 1638/9)who were married in Dalton In Furness, Lancashire, England in 7 Oct 1582.

From Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaelogical Society New series Vol.XXIV (1926) "Cooke's Visitation of Lincolnshire 1562-4 Eight generations: no dates given Sequence is : Sir John Huddleston knt. succeeded by son Sir John Huddleston knt. by son William knt by son Robert(Born ??1468) (marr. dau of John Savill) " "? named Emmot as mentioned on a now missing monument in Rowston church "Savyle & Agneis uxoris" Translated as Savill and Agnes his wife. Also "Orate pro bono statu Robti & Emmotae consortis suae" Translated as "pray for the souls of Robert and Emmot his wife"" AMTH son Godfrey (Born 1490) (marr. Isabel Beach)son Robert (Born c.1516/8 ) marr. Alice Winter son Richard (Born 1546) marr. Rachel Fitzwilliam dau. Jane who marr.-Gannock of Boston

HUDDLESTON’S OF ROWSTON
This interesting piece written by the Rev Lewty, Vicar (1862) of St Clement’s Church Rowston reveals that Godfrey Huddleston was the first Huddleston to be seized of the Manor of Rowston and also how the Manor was lost by Richard Huddleston. Beginning with an inscription found in the South East Window in this Church by Holles-“Orati pro bono Robti Hodleston & Emmotae consorti suae” and following up the name in the register of this Parish, the family of the Huddleston’s appear to have lived in Rowston for some 128 years from 1528 to 1656. In many instances such ancient families become extinct but here we have one which up to the present time of writing still remains in many places in different parts of the world and although they no longer live in the village one Colonel George Huddleston of Kewferry Middlesex still shows a great interest in the village and some of his ancestors, not only from a genealogical point of view but also a religious one.
In 1928 he wrote the writer of these lines saying he was visiting Lincoln on some inquiry as to some of his family who lived at Lincoln in early times, also at Branston where it is believed the Rowston members went when they left here (Rowston). He was desirous he said of worshipping at the Church of his ancestors at Rowston. In 2 volumes records the dates and doings of the Huddleston’s from early times to the present day and from the sale of this work has generously given proceeds to the funds of the Church work in this Parish.

PEDIGREE In the Lincolnshire branch of this family we begin with Robert ( b1425) of Lincoln. He was Sheriff in 1474-Mayor 1480 and he died in 1487 and was buried in the Alto Choco of St Peter at Arches, leaving a son Robert born circa 1468. He was the first known Huddleston to settle in Rowston and died 1528. He is mentioned in his father’s will as ‘Robert Huddleston of Ritson’. There was a window in this Church inscribed “Orati pro bono Robti Hodleston & Emmotae consorti suae” and it is believed that this window was a memorial to this Robert and his wife. He had two sons John and Godfrey. John born 1480 and died 1530. In his will dated 19th September 1530 he left £10 to the poor people, 6 shillings (s) and 8 pence (d) to the Lady Chapel at Rowston, 3s-4d to the High Alter of the Church, ‘a strike of malt’ (Whiskey) to every poor person of Rowston. He also left money for a priest to sing for his soul and that of his father and mother. Godfrey second son of Robert (d 1528) was born about 1490 at Rowston. It would appear that the Manor of Rowston at this time was in the tenure Michael Beach under the Commandery of Temple Bruer and St. Johns’ of Jerusalem. (It would appear that the Manor of Rowston was alienated to Godfrey Huddleston as a result of his marriage to Elizabeth the daughter of Michael Beach. However it appears that Godfrey had another wife Margaret who is mentioned in his will!).

In 1544 a licence was granted to Robert Taverner to alienate the Manor of Rowston to Godfrey Huddleston. In 1554 Godfrey Huddleston presented the living of Rowston with his son Robert in 1557. Godfrey died in 1558 making several bequests in his will to Rowston Church and the poor and was succeeded by his own son Robert. Robert was born circa 1518 and in his will describes himself as “Roberte Huddlestonne of Pinchbeck in the countie of Lincoln Gent.”. His wife Alice nee Winter, his two sons Richard and John and his daughters Elizabeth, Beatrice, Emma, Jane and Millicent were all beneficiaries. His will was dated 23rd November 1564 and he died in 1564. Richard his eldest son was born in 1546. Here we come to a disappointment in the Huddleston branch of Rowston.
Col George Huddleston in his most valuable history of the family gives the following story:-“Richard was a man of doubtful strength of character while still a lad of 18 in 1564 he had succeeded his father Robert and had come in possession of all his houses land and properties at Pinchbeck, Digby, Rowston and elsewhere in the vicinity. During the next 21 years he had lost much of what he had inherited. It is probable that no Huddleston ever became so quickly and completely impoverished as he. The more we try to probe the reason the more difficult it is to discover it. One however stands out Richard was constantly going to Law. In the early part of Elizabeth I Reign numerous suits in Chancery against relations and others about minor properties. Richard lost one part of his inheritance after another and finally alienated the Manor of Rowston to an outsider.” Richard’s will was dated 24th August 1585. He bequeathed his freehold lands to Rachael his wife for life and after her death to his daughter Jane and her Heirs and for want of such heirs to his brother John for ever. Similarly he left his copyhold lands in Pinchbeck with similar conditions following.
Col Huddleston makes the following remarks: “Strange that Richard made such stipulations when dying seeing that he himself had alienated the Manor of Pinchbeck to William Ryvett of London in 1569". Richard’s brother John born 1561 went to Cambridge where he became a great scholar taking his BD in 1597 he was ordained at Lincoln in 1589. In 1591 Vicar of Sleaford, Vicar of Falmersham Bedfordshire in 1597-8. Hitchin in 1603-20 where he died in 1621. Some of the family continued to hold land at Rowston until 1678 when John the eldest son of a widow moved to Branston, But the last entry in the registers of this Parish was the burial of Jane Huddleston February 1752.

Roy, I have a number of entries from the parish register and the Bishop's transcripts of Rowston which I have not been able to confidently enter into the database. Most of them are deaths, where there is usually just the name, or, if it is of a child, the name also of the father. There are no ages, so it is usually impossible to identify which William or John etc it is. The rest are baptisms and marriages. DEATHS William 10/16/1589 Widow H 12/13?/1569 William 10/17/1590 William 1590 Francis son of James 8/9/1594 Edward 1590 Widow H 10/1/1604 James 4/23/1608 William 10/8/1604 Rafe/Rose 1/14/1627 Elizabeth 12/21/1626 William 1627 Thomas 2/9/1627 Jane 7/18/1702 BAPTISMS William son of Thomas 6/3/1634 Thomas son of Thomas 2/9/1636 Jane d of Thomas 2/25/1636 Alice 1/30/1566 William son of Christopher 2/9/1604 MARRIAGES Thomas and Ann Groom 4/23/1607 Mallorston? and Olivia H 9/29/1618 Francis and Mary Stanley 4/23/1636 John Parker and Jane H 2/10/1562 Dollingbridge and Alice H 6/?/1562 Robert and Emily H 2/8?/1573 I am not sure that this list is complete, and there are probably Digby and Pinchbeck ones as well. I looked at the records for Dorrington, as this was part of Robert of Pinbeck's holdings, but there were no Huddlestons in either the parish register or the Bishop's transcripts. The writing in these documents is sometimes terrible, and the ink faded, so sometimes it is simply impossible to read what is there. Alwynne Mackie
The six generations counted from 1562 would just carry back to the two Sir Johns, the 5th.(Sir John Huddleston, Knight, 1330-1398 married Katherine Tempest, daughter of Sir Richard Tempest of Bowling)[FamilySearch has this listed as John Huddleston(AFN:17NN-9t2) and shows Bracewell, Yorkshire, England and spouse listed as Catherine Tempest(AFN:17NN-9V8) with marriage as 1381 of Bracewell. Catherine Tempest's birth is listed as 1360 of Bracewell and father of her is shown to be Richard Tempest with wife Maria Talbot] and 4th. Lords(Sir John Huddleston, Knight, 1306-1367 married Maud de Pennington, daughter of Sir William de Pennington)[ of Millom" ***Genealogist iv.181

[The above mentioned Sir William Huddleston, Knight who married Elizabeth Hartepoole and later Mary Bridges is brother to Richard Huddleston who married Rachel Fitzwilliam](Robert Huddleston (1425-1487) of Lincoln, Robert Huddleston(1468-1528) of Rowston, Godfrey Huddleston(1490-1558) of Rowston, Godfrey Huddleston(1490-1594), William Huddleston (Born in St Martins, Camden Town)

[In the late 13th century Geoffrey Alselin’s lands here had passed into the hands of the de Calz family, when they consisted of half a knight’s fee and an eighth part of another. These were held by the Templars through the gift of Matilda de Calz; then let by them to Philip de Rowston and Richard West by knight’s service. Five oxgangs here were then held by the Chapter of Lincoln to whom they had been given by Matilda de calz, and 2 oxgangs were held by the Prior of Catley, through the gift of Geoffrey de Calz. ‘Testa de Nevill.’ In 1275 the Prior of Haverholme held 5 oxgangs of land in this village,4 of which he let to Robert de la Grene for 20 shillings per annum and the other to Robert Clerk at a rent of 3 shillings per annum. The first lot had been given to the Prior by philip son of William de Scaupewyke, who had received it of Matilda de Calz, and she of the King ;and the last was the gift of Matilda herself some 60 years previously. In 1287 died Robert de Everingham, lord paramount of part of this village.’ Inquisition Post Mortem 15. E. I’ In 1291 died William Fitzpiers seized of lands here.’ Inquisition Post Mortem 20. E. L’. In 1321 Hugo de Tighler or Tigheler of Lincoln, paid the King a fine of 5 Marks for having acquired the manor of Rowston for life. ‘Ab. Rot. Orig. 15. E.2'. But this act led to litigation between him and Sir Adam de Everingham, of Laxton, and others; and although he recovered possession of the manor in 1327 by recognizance, was disseized of it the following year by judgement of the King’s court at Lincoln. ‘Ab.Rot. Orig. 1&2 E. 3.’ In 1550 Richard Huddleston was holding the Manor of Rowston. Nine years later Robert, son of Geoffrey Huddleston seized of the manor, leaving a son Robert, who lived at Pinchbeck and died 1564. ‘Harl. MS.6829'. He was succeeded by his son Richard who alienated the manor to William Ryvitt, citizen and mercer of London, by licence from the crown in 1569, except for a small portion in the hands of Geoffrey Huddleston, consisting of a messuage, a cottage close containing 7 acres, called Crathe Close, another called Lages or Sand Close and 16 acres of moor and marsh held by the King in chief by the service of an eleventh part of a knight’s fee. ‘Pip. Rot. 16.J.1.’ his son John Huddleston, succeeded to these in 1618.

In the North wall of this chapel is an acutely pointed recess. This appears to have been a single sedile in the 13th century, but now constitutes a cupboard. The silver flagon and paten of this church were presented to it by Anne Lady Hodgson, in 1761. She was the daughter of Anthony Thorold, eldest son of Sir William Thorold, Bart., of Cranwell and left lands for several charitable purposes, the benefit of which is still experienced by this and other parishes. When Holles visited this church the following armorial bearings remained in the windows, all of which have since disappeared, viz: in a South window of the chancel, on a cross sable 3 bulls heads couped arg. Sa, on a chevronarg3 mullets pierced gu between 3 pheons arg, a chief gu charged with cross arg; and in the aisle windows, Arg on a bend sa 3 owls of the first for Savile, with the fragment of a legend:- “Savyle and Agnetis uxoris”. “Orate pro bono statu Robti Hodleston & Emmotae consortis suae” (Robert of Rowston) Extracted from “The History of the Wapentakes of Flaxwell and Aswardluurn” (1872)By Trollpe.

Film Number 2078053 E 134/36&37Eliz/Mich20 Miles Sill, Geoffrey Sturdie. v. Ewen Dimsdale: Right and title to a tenement in Gaile, in the manor of Middleham (Durham). Customs of manor. [The possessions of James Dimsdale, Thos. Dimsdale, of Gaile, in Wensidale, Geoffrey Dimsdale, Thos. Metcalf, Sir Christopher Metcalf, Richard Wynn, Henry Sill, and Giles Huddlestons, are mentioned. 36 & 37 Eliz E 134/41Eliz/East13 John Pickworth, John Seymor, Richard Methringham, and others. v. John Isack, Richd. Atkinson, Edwd. Dysney, Wm. Huddleston, senior, William, junior, Edward Burbotte, and others.: Towns and fields of Cathorp and Fulbeck (Lincoln), and the wastes and commons belonging. 41 Eliz

The Church of Millom, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is situate in this township, close to the Castle. It is a venerable edifice, consisting of a nave and chancel, a south aisle, and a modern porch, with a bell turret carrying two bells. The circular-headed north door has been walled up, and most of the old windows have given place to modem unecclesiastical substitutes. Near the east window is a piscina, and at the west end is an octagonal stone font, ornamented with quartre-foils, and a shield charged with the arms of Huddleston and a label. In the church is an ancient mural tablet, recording the names of several of the Huddleston family, and near to it is an altar tomb, ornamented with Gothic tracery, &c., on which recline the effigies of a knight and his lady, in alabaster, much mutilated; and also the remains of a wooden effigy of a knight "apparently of the 14th century," supposed to have been once clad in armour. In the church yard are the remains of a cross, the shaft of which bears four shields. It is grievous to see the neglected state of this ancient fabric, both internally and externally; its call for restoration seems alike unheeded by the earl of Lonsdale and the inhabitants, whose duty it is to keep it in repair. The benefice is now a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the duchy of Lancaster, but was rectorial till 1228, when it was given to Furness Abbey; one moiety of the revenue being appropriated by Walter de Grey, archbishop of York, in 1230, for the maintenance of three chaplains in his cathedral. It is valued in the king's books at £8 5s. 8d., but was certified to the governors of queen Anne's bounty at the annual value of £26 1s. 8d., and in 1835 at £189 a year. It was augmented about the year 1721, with £256 left by the Rev. John Postlethwaite, master of St. Paul's school, London, a native of this parish, and £200 obtained about the same time from queen Anne's bounty, both of which sums were expended in the purchase of an estate, called Fawcett bank, near Sedbergh, in Yorkshire, which is now let for only 40 guineas, though it once let for £70 per annum. The Rev. Henry Pickthall, B.A., is the present vicar, having been inducted in 1836. The impropriated tithes, which belonged to the earl of Lonsdale, have nearly all been redeemed by the different landowners. The vicar has the patronage of the ancient chapel of Ulpha, but Thwaites chapel is presented to by several landed proprietors. The tithes of Chapel Sucken township were commuted in 1847, for a yearly rent charge of £128. The present vicarage house, and the glebe attached to it, were bought in 1781 for £240, of which £200 was obtained from queen Anne's bounty, and the remainder raised by subscription. It is situate in the township of Millom Above, distant about 1¼ mile from the church; the old vicarage house, which stood near to the church, having been pulled down during Cromwell's rebellion, "lest the rebels should take refuge therein." The school at Millom Below was endowed with £100 by Joseph Huddleston, Esq., who died in 1700, but that endowment was lost many years ago; it now enjoys, in common with the two schools at Millom Above and Thwaites, a share of a bequest of £800, bequeathed in 1811 by Sir. Wm. Atkinson, of Bog-house, who ordered it to be invested in Government Stock, and the interest (except £2 12s.) to be applied half-yearly for the education of poor boys and girls in these three townships, at the discretion of the trustees, provided "that not more than 4s. be given for teaching any poor scholar for a quarter, nor even that if the scholars can be well and diligently taught for less." Fifty shillings of the interest is to be given annually to the customers at Upper Beck stones-mill; no family to have more than three shillings, nor less than one. In 1722, it was certified that there was a poor-stock of £30 2s. belonging to this parish, "given by several persons not known." The particulars of Buckman Brow school are given under the account of Thwaites chapelry.

Millom Castle, of which there are considerable remains, was for many centuries the seat of the Lords of the seigniority of Millom, and though its venerable ruins have been neglected, they still point out its former strength and grandeur. It was fortified and embattled in 1335, by Sir John Huddleston, in pursuance of the king's license, and was anciently surrounded by a park well stocked with deer, and adorned with noble oaks, which it is said were cut down in 1690, by Ferdinand Huddleston, for the purpose of building a ship, and supplying fuel for his iron smelting furnace. When Nicholson and Burn wrote in 1774. the park was "well stored with deer." The late earl of Lonsdale disparked it about 1802, when 207 deer were killed, and the venison was sold at from 2d. to 4d. per lb. The principal part of the castle now remaining is a large square tower, formerly embattled. The moat is visible on the south and west sides; the principal entrance seems to have been at the west front, by a lofty flight of steps. In the wall of an out house, are the arms of Huddleston, painted in proper colours, with the motto-Soli Deo honor et gloria. A small part of the castle is now occupied as a farm house. The seigniory of Millom is the most extensive lordship within the great barony of Egremont; it contains the parishes of Millom, Bootle, Corney, Waberthwaite, Whicham, and Whitbeck, extending about eighteen miles in length, and about eight miles in breadth, but is divided into several manors, which are holden immediately of Millom, as Millom is of Egremont, with some difference of service. This seigniority anciently possessed great privileges, its lords had the power of life or death, and enjoyed jura regalia in the six parishes forming their seigniority, and it was a special jurisdiction into which the sheriff of the county could not enter. To commemorate the power of its lords, a stone has been recently erected with the following inscription:- "Here the Lords of Millom exercised Jura Regalia." It was given in the reign of Henry I by William Meschines, to the father of Godard de Bovil, (alias Godardus Dapifer) who gave to Furness Abbey a carucate of land with the appurtenances, called Monk Force.

The Boyvills, or Boisvilles, afterwards took the surname of de Millom, and held this lordship in their male issue, from the reign of Henry I till the reign of Henry III, a space of 100 years, when their name and family ended in a daughter, Joan, who brought their inheritance in marriage to Sir John Huddleston, Knight, who was then lord of Anneys, near Millom, and could trace his ancestors for several generations before the Conquest. His descendants possessed Millom for above 500 years; seven of the family were knighted for their valour, and one of them (Sir William) raised a regiment of foot at his own expense, for the service of King Charles I. William Huddleston, the twenty-first of his family who held Millom, left two daughters, Elizabeth and Isabella, the former of whom was married to Sir Hedworth Williamson, Bart., who in 1774 sold the estate for little more than £20,000 to Sir James Lowther, Bart., whose descendant, the present earl of Lonsdale, is now lord of the manor and owner of a great part of the soil. The lordship of Millom still retains its own coroner, and that office is now held by Christopher Hobson, Esq., of Cross House, Bootle. Mannix & Whellan, History, Gazetteer and Directory of Cumberland, 1847 [The copyhold manor of Thwaite, which is united with Hunderthwaite, anciently belonged to the Fitz Alans, lords of Bedale.

Matilda, daughter and co-heir of Brian Fitz Alan, married Sir Gilbert de Stapleton. After four descents, it was conveyed, by the marriage of an heiress to Sir John Huddleston, and it remained in the possession of this family 400 years. In 1741 it was purchased by G. Bowes, Esq., of Streatlam Castle, from whom it has descended to the Earl of Strathmore. On this estate, in 1784, a leaden jar containing a large quantity of old English pennies was found by some workmen who were engaged in turning up the sward of an ancient pasture. Many of the coins were cut into halves and quarters, which were legal tenders before the issue of halfpence and farthings. Singularly enough, a dim tradition of some hidden treasure had induced several persons to dig about the place previously. Thwaite Hall was one of the seats of the Huddlestons, whose principal residence was Millom Castle. Sir William Huddleston was a zealous and devoted royalist during the Cromwellian wars; he raised a regiment of horse for the service of his sovereign, as also a regiment of foot; and the latter he maintained at his own expense. At the battle of Edgehill, he retook the royal standard from the enemy, and for this act of personal valour, he was made a knight banneret by the king on the field.]

From Huddleston Family Tables The surname Huddleston was originally spelled de Hodelston, The spelling Huddleston is now generally used, however numerous varations are found, such as Huttleston, Huddlestun, Heddleston, Huddelson and others, most of which are recent and yet persist. On account of the variations, no attempt is made, either in the tables or the appendix, at accuracy in reproducing the spelling of any particular period, or as used by any group. Hereditary surnames, which were unknown in England prior to the Conquest (1066), were introduced by the Normans, and were gradually adopted by the landed gentry during the two succeeding centuries. They were not used by the commonality until later, and many of the laboring class assumed such names as late as the Sixteenth Century. The Normans took their surnames from their manors, the prefix de (of) being used, and this custom was generally followed by the English. Practically all of the old English surnames came from estates, and the prefix de, was usual during the first three hundred years, after which it was generally dropped. de Hodelston, except for the prefix, is a combination of Anglo-Saxon words. Hod was Hodr, the blind son of Odin of Teutonic mythology, and was common given name in Saxon times, upon it numerous surnames are based; el is a diminutive; ton is from the Saxon tun, meaning originally an enclosure and later an estate or manor.

MYTHAEUM: AN ARCHETYPAL ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF MYTH GERMANIC PEOPLES Hodr = Hoder = Höd (m.) Hodr steals the sword of Mimir from the cave and kills Balder. Hoder was a blind god renowned for his tremendous strength, a youthful hero. On Hoder it is told: While a stripling, he excelled in strength of body all his foster-brethren and compeers (Saxo Grammaticus, Danish History, I). Höd is one of the gods. He is blind. He is immensely strong too, but the gods would rather there were no need to mention his name, since his handiwork will long be remembered amongst gods and men (Late Edda). Hoder assaulted the gods, on one occasion putting them to flight (Saxo Grammaticus, Danish History, I). Now Höd was standing on the outer edge of the circle of men because he was blind. Loki asked him: ‘Why aren’t you throwing darts at Baldr?’ He replied: ‘Because I can’t see where Baldr is, and, another thing, I have no weapon.’ Then Loki said: ‘You go and do as the others are doing and show Baldr honour like the other men. I will show you where he is standing: throw this twig at him.’ Höd took the mistletoe and aimed at Baldr as directed by Loki. The dart went straight through him and he fell dead to the ground. This was the greatest misfortune ever to befall gods and men (Late Edda). Hoder’s name is related to words for ‘war’. Hoder was a great judge (Saxo Grammaticus), performing the duties of an arbiter by the side of Balder. The literal meaning of the name was, therefore, of the manor of Hod. The name de Hodelston originated in Yorkshire. Some ten miles East of Leeds is yet to be found the ancient village of Huddleston. Nearby is the old manor house Huddleston Hall, now a farm house. In the neighborhood is the celebrated quarry which contributed stone for York Cathedral, also Huddleston Old Wood, formerly an extensive park. All formed in the old days Huddleston Manor, a part of the Barony of Sherburn, which under the feudal system was attached to the See of York.1 In 1109 Nigel, then the Provost of the Archbishop of York, donated two and one half carucates of land (Hillam), with part of his tithe in Hodelston, to the Convent of Selby. In 1165 Gilbert, son of Nigel, donated to the Archbishop of York, "his Lord," land in Clemen thorpe. Speaking of these charters, Farrar (1 Early Yorkshire Charters, 53) says: "The fact that Nigel gave a part of his tithe in Huddleston, combined with evidence in later times of the tenure by the Huddleston family of a knight's fee in Huddleston, Wetwang and other places, prove that Nigel was ancestor of that family." Also, p. 52: "Nigel, the Provost, was undoubtedly the ancestor of the family of Huddleston." The name de Hodelston was assumed by Nigel or by his son Gilbert, it is not clear which, and thenceforth it was the family surname. It seems certain that there are several American families of Huddlestons descended from different immigrants.

History of Parliament Trust Publication, A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds: Volume 6, Author, H. C. Maxwell Lyte (editor), Year published 1915 Pages 470-48 'Deeds: C.7401 - C.7500', A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds: Volume 6 (1915), pp. 470-483. [York, W.R.] C. 7454. Quitclaim by William de Skargyle to Sir Henry de Lasci, earl of Lincoln, of his right in a wood in Stapeltone, adjoining a wood of the earl, called 'Rughstorth,' and in 20a. land in Stapelton. Witnesses:—Sir Miles de Stapelton, Sir William de Stopham, Sir Adam de Hodlestone, and Sir John de Nevile, knights, Thomas de Fishbourn, Robert de Heppehale, and Adam de Neirforde. Seal of arms in white wax, damaged. Oxford. C. 7457. Grant by John de Bolmere to Henry de Lascy, earl of Lincoln, of his mill of Middelingtone. Witnesses:—Sir Roger de Trompington, Sir William le Vavasur, Sir John de Hodleston, Sir William de Stopham, Sir Thomas de Breute, Sir Roger del Hulle, and Sir Henry de Boelys, knights, John de Cotesford, and Richard de Kaune. 26 November, 14 Edward I. French. Endorsed.—Midlington in comitatu Oxon'.

The earliest Virginian was Captain John of "James Citie" (1622), but of his descendants no record has been produced.1 Records of what appear to be separate families in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina at the time of the Revolution are to be found.2 Tracing American genealogy is difficult indeed. The early Colonists were chiefly of humble station, and their departure from the old world and arrival in the new were not events of great moment. The century following the settlement of Jamestown (1607) was a time of rebellion and disorder in England. The defeated Royalists were despoiled by the Parliamentarians. The partisans of the latter were persecuted upon the Restoration. Under each regime many took secret flight to the new world, and there is record neither of their departure nor of their arrival. Such ship lists and immigrant records as are available are fragmentary and show only a fraction of those who came. The Colonists came to a wide, new country, where the struggle for existence was so keen that there was little time for anything else. The settlements were more or less transient, and 1 Hotten's List 270, 273; Bradford's Hist. of Plymouth, 150; Young's Chronicles, 293; Tyler's Quarterly (1920) 218. 2 U. S. Census 1790. 1 The Coat of Arms, of the Yorkshire family was Gules a fret argent. This is identical with that of the Milliom group and of the Newcastle family. St.George Vis. 1615; 2 Nicholson's Westmoreland & Cumberland 13; 9 The Genealogist N. S. 17. The arms of Ralph of Lincolinshire, as it appears in St. Mary's in Wickford, is Gules a fret six piece argent. 1 Lincoln Record Soc. 55. The arms of the Rowston and Pinchbeck families is Gules a fretty argent. Madison's Lincolnshire Pedigrees 519 (Harleian MSS. 1550) HUDDLESTON FAMILY TABLES COMPLIED BY GEORGE HUDDLESTON (b182) BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 1933 Printed In The United States Of America At The Rumford Press, Concord, N. H. Permission granted by George Huddleston's daughter Mrs. Nancy Huddleston Packer COPYRIGHTED FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY

(Touring Elmet) Nigel de Huddleston is the first recorded member of the family to have the Huddleston surname which was recorded when he became a monk at the nearby Selby Abbey in 1110 AD, and his son Gilbert, continued to use it. The northern family that took this name “de Huddleston” appear to have had close connections with the Norman barons and Bishops of Bayeux, probably indicating that they were themselves coming from the same region of Normandy. The names “Nigel” and “Gilbert” are of Norman origin. Yet the Saxon family already mentioned seem to have become tenants of deLaci (deLacy) and so it could be that they adopted Norman names in order to fit in with their new lords. Both Gilbert, and a Richard, now also named ‘de Huddleston‘, owned property at Clementhorpe (outside York) in 1175. They also had other local lands in Hillam , in Wetwang and in Poppleton . Another Richard de Huddleston who lived from around 1198 to 1250 is said to have married Alicia, the daughter of one William, son of Henry, of Garthorpe. The Huddlestons are certainly listed as having had lands in Garthorpe in or around 1223 and in 1296 one Richard de Huddleston, by license from Dean Sewal de Bovill, had leave to attach a chapel to his manor house. "To hear divine service, this year in my chapel, kept in my court of Hodelston, yet so that on chief feast days I am to repair to the mother church of Sherburn." Richard was the last of the male line and his successor was John de Meaux or Melsa, who had married Beatrix the daughter of Richard, did homage to the Archbishop of York around 1298, for lands in Huddleston, Go Thorpe (or) Garthorpe and Youlthorpe, (the latter place being to the East of York) which presumably came with the marriage of Richard and Alicia and which John de Meaux had inherited with Beatrix. This Sir Richard, oh yes, he had a knighthood, was the father of Richard , Beatrix (de Meaux) who died around 1287, and a son John, who lived from 1222 to 1252 (only thirty years), who married Joan de Boyville, of Millom in Cumberland., and probably had the other son Robert too. The younger Sir Richard died childless in around 1285, when the estates went to Beatrix and her husband. John de Hudleston the second of Millom (note the single ‘d’) tried to claim Huddleston in 1287 from John de Melsa or de Meaux (after the death of Beatrix) but he was unsuccessful, and by 1304 the estates had passed on to the Grenefields and to other families.

One of these local families that was directly connected with Huddleston Hall were the Hungates. It is one of this clan who is credited with digging up the scattered bones of the Towton Battlefield dead and reburying them in great pits within Saxton village church a generation or so after the battle. Another, as mentioned at the beginning of this article, was directly responsible for the school in Sherburn-in-Elmet. Confused about this small house‘s historical connections? Good, so am I! But this is the complicated way in which many houses and families lived and endured their way through the mediaeval period. While Huddleston passed from the ownership of the Huddleston family the said family did not die out. Many miles to the north west, in Cumbria, is the coastal town of Millom, ( note John de Hudleston mentioned above ).

There was once an imposing castle in the town and in the 19th century the records tell us, “This castle was built by Godard de Boyvill who first possessed the manor of Millom. His posterity Arthur, surnamed de Millom, Henry, William and Adam his brother, successively enjoyed it after him. But the last, leaving only one daughter, Joan, who was in the reign of Henry III married to John Huddleston, it was then transferred to that family, in which it has remained till the present time.” All contents © copyright John Davey 2002. All rights reserved. ]

Film number 449742 Page Number 80 Reference 13732(Title Computer printout of Dalton in Furness, Lancashire, England Stmnt.Resp. extracted for the controlled extraction program and published by the Genealogical Dept. of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Notes Batch nos. 00516-1, 2, 3. Extracted from microfilm copies of parish registers and parish register transcripts on fil nos. 0093719 it. 1, 0844820 it. 3-4 or book no. 942.72 K29pr v. 100, 104. Subjects England, Lancashire, Dalton-in-Furness-Church records-Indexes Format Books/Monographs (On Film) Language English Publication Salt Lake City : Genealogical Society of Utah, 1993-1994 Physical 2 microfiches. Film Notes Note-Location [Film] Births and christenings, A thru Z 1565-1691-FHL BRITISH Fiche [ 6909425 ] Marriages, A thru Z, 1565-1691-FHL BRITISH Fiche [6909426] Another filming, 1966-1973. on 3 microfilm reels ; 16 mm. Christenings 1565-1620-FHL BRITISH Film [455592 Item 5] Christenings 1621-1657-FHL BRITISH Film [ 820765 Item 2 ] Christenings 1658-1691-FHL BRITISH Film [541788 Item 15 ] © 2000 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.)(Title Computer printout of Dalton in Furness, Lancashire, England Stmnt.Resp. extracted for the controlled extraction program and published by the Genealogical Dept. of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Notes Batch nos. 00516-1, 2, 3. Extracted from microfilm copies of parish registers and parish register transcripts on fil nos. 0093719 it. 1, 0844820 it. 3-4 or book no. 942.72 K29pr v. 100, 104. Subjects England, Lancashire, Dalton-in-Furness-Church records-Indexes Format Books/Monographs (On Film) Language English Publication Salt Lake City : Genealogical Society of Utah, 1993-1994 Physical 2 microfiches. Film Notes Note-Location [Film] Births and christenings, A thru Z 1565-1691-FHL BRITISH Fiche [ 6909425 ] Marriages, A thru Z, 1565-1691-FHL BRITISH Fiche [ 6909426 ] Another filming, 1966-1973. on 3 microfilm reels ; 16 mm. Christenings 1565-1620-FHL BRITISH Film [ 455592 Item 5 ] Christenings 1621-1657-FHL BRITISH Film [ 820765 Item 2 ] Christenings 1658-1691-FHL BRITISH Film [ 541788 Item 15 ] © 2000 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Corporation Of London FILE-Indenture between Richard Huddleston, esq., Margery his wife, daughter of William Smyth knt., deceased, and Walter Smyth esq., and Dame Mary, his wife, formerly wife of the said William Smith, and Humphrey Smith, son of the said William and Mary, being an agreement concerning the settlement of the manor of Elford, with lands in Elford, Okeley, Hasloore, Tamworth, co. Staffs, in dispute between the said parties.- ref. MS 3878/60-date: 8 March 1529/30 FILE-Bond from Walter Smyth of Elford co. Staff., esq., and Humphrey Ferrers of Tamworth co. War., es., to Richard Huddleston esq., to secure performance of covenants.-ref. MS 3878/61-date: 8 March 1529/30 FILE-Grant by Richd. Poley, Esq. of Boxted, son & heir of late Jn. Poley, Esq. of Wormingford, Essex, to his son Richd. Poley, junr., Jn. Cotton, Jn. Huddleston, Edwd. Gryffyn, Francis Clopton, sent., Robt. Rokewood, Nich. Rokewood, Wm. Clopton of Liston, Ed. Felton, Richd. Morgan, Esqs., Richd. Turke, citizen & fishmonger of London, Jn. Warley, citizen & mercer of London, Giles Fyrmyn, Jn. Goldyng, senr., clothier, of Glemsford, & Thos. Payn, yeomen of Boxted.-ref. HA 519/78/15-date: 10 June 1542 FILE-Conveyance by Jn. Cotton, Jn. Huddleston, Edwd. Gryffyn, Francis Clopton, senr., Robt. Rokewood, Nich. Rokewood, Wm. Clopton, of Liston, Ed. Felton, Richd. Morgan, Esqs., Richd. Turke, citizen & fishmonger of London, Jn. Warlye, citizen & mercer of London, Richd. Poley, junr., Giles Fyrmyn, Jn. Golding, senr. of Glemsford, clothier, & Thos. Payn, yeoman, of Boxted, to Richd. Poley, sen., of Boxted & wife Anne.-ref. HA 519/74/16-date: 12 June 1542 FILE-Accounts of Richard Huddleston, 'gentleman' of the horse, for years ending 24 March 1685/6, 17 Feb 1686/7, 2 March 1688/9, 25 March 1690 and period ending 31 Dec 1690-ref. PHA/176-180-date: 1686-1690 FILE-Disbursements made by Richard Huddleston.-ref. PHA/227, 228-date: 1686, 1687/8 FILE-Private Act, 18 Elizabeth I, c. 13-ref. HL/PO/PB/1/1575/18Eliz1n30-date: 1575 |_[from Scope and Content] An Act for the Confirmation of an Arbitrament to be made by certain Persons, touching a Controversy between Richard Huddleston, Esquire, and Dame Isabell Weyman his Wife on the one Part, and Francis Weyman, Gentleman, on the other Part. FILE-BARGAIN AND SALE WITH FEOFFMENT-ref. 731/2/1881-date: 25 Mar 1679 |_ [from Scope and Content] Richard Bostock and Mary his wife, Nathaniel Bostocky and Elizabeth his wife, James and Anthony Bostock, Henry Huddleston and Mary his wife, John Fitz Herbert, and Andrew Crosse, to George Chambre. FILE-BUNDLE 1-ref. QSJ/8/1-date: 1673 item: Sacrament Certificates-ref. QSJ/8/1/201-date: 20 Jul 1673 |_ [from Scope and Content] Ulverston. George Inman, Vicar of Urswicke "and chiefe Scole Master of the Free Scole of Litle Urswicke." Minister. John Ambrose, B.D., Churchwarden Issac Huddleston. Witnesses Henry Nicholson of Coulton, clerk, and Hugh Dobson, parish clerk of Ulverston. FILE-Bargain and sale-ref. HA 507/2/88-date: 20 Aug 1553 |_ [from Scope and Content] Manor of South Rauceby and land in North Rauceby Sir John Huddleston of Sawston (Cambridgeshire)-Robert Jay of Welling FILE [no title]-ref. IOR/F/4/1425 [n.d.] FILE-Feoffment.-ref. 148/2/902-date: 1591 |_ [from Scope and Content] Consideration: 2. fitted out 1. & paid his debt to William Hylyard of City of York, Esq. (£170) & John Watson of York £400) + £300 to William & Robert Hunigate of Huddleston, York. FILE [no title]-ref. ZMI/B2/IV/3-date: 1654 March 19 |_ [from Scope and Content] (1) William Middleton of Trewick, Northumberland, esq. (2) Robert Middleton of Belsay, Northumberland, esq. (3) John Brownell of the City of London, gent. Articles of agreement concerning Trewick and Whalton with a schedule of money due to various creditors of (1). Signed, John Brownell. Seal in red wax, on a tag Endorsed: witnessed, William Huddleston, Tho. Stotesberdy, Tho. Readhead. FILE [no title]-ref. 157 DD/P/21/20-date: 19 Jan, 1669/70 |_ [from Scope and Content] Lease: for 21 years: at £20 annual rent for 20 years, and a peppercorn rent for the 21st year: James Cardrow (as DD/P/21/19) to Thomas Harrison and John Pattinson, both of Newark, gents:--the Thorough Toll alias the Day Toll or Passage Toll; with toll of carts and carriages bringing iron ware to merchandise in Newark --: Witn. Mathew Jenison, Jo. Clarke, William Wright, Richard Huddleston, Robert Buckinham, George Hawson, John Bellamee (servant of George Carleton scrivener). © 2002 Public Record Office

Veleville's participation in the jousts celebrating Henry VIII's coronation on 24 June 1509 might suggest that his life at Court was to continue unaffected by the young king's accession (43), but about this time developments occurred which marked a fundamental change in his career. The earliest evidence for this is provided by royal letters patent dated 3 July 1509 and issued by the chancery of the principality of north Wales at Caernarfon. Taking account of the time required to send a royal warrant authorising their issue from the Court to Caernarfon (44), it seems probable that the decision to grant the letters patent was taken about the middle of June 1509, less than two months after Henry VIII's accession. The letters patent recorded the grant to Veleville, during pleasure, of the offices of constable of Beaumaris castle and captain of Beaumaris castle and town, with all fees, rewards and profits as amply as Sir William Stanley, Sir Robert Chamberlain or any other had received them (45). Full payment of all sums due under this grant was ensured by a warrant issued at Greenwich on 29 October 1509 instructing the chamberlain of north Wales to pay Veleville the first half- yearly instalment due at Michaelmas 1509 of his annual fee of £40 as constable, his wages of 8d. a day as captain, and the wages of twenty-four soldiers at 4d. a day, these being the rates allowed to Stanley as shown in the chamberlain's account for 4 Henry VII (1488).
On 6 December 1509, a further warrant was issued at Greenwich ordering the chamberlain to pay Velville wages for himself and his soldiers at the rate allowed to Sir William Hastings or Sir Richard Huddlestone (46), and Veleville consequently received a half-year's instalment of the wages of a further twenty-four soldiers at 4d. a day and of a priest at £3 1s. 8d., as allowed to William Hastings, the lord chamberlain, in 5 Edward IV (1465). Veleville's total emoluments by virtue of these grants amounted to £350 5s. 0d. a year, comprising £40 for his fee as constable, £12 3s. 4d. for his wages as captain, and £298 1s. 8d. for the wages of his forty-eight soldiers and priest. Besides these grants relating to his offices in Beaumaris, royal letters patent under the great seal were issued on 1 August 1509 making Veleville a fresh grant, during pleasure, of the annuity of £20 first granted in 1493 (47), while the life annuity of forty marks (£26 13s. 4d.) granted in 1496 continued to be paid (48). The significance of these grants will be discussed after Veleville's later career has been outlined. 46. William Hastings (executed 1483), created Lord Hastings in 1461, was appointed constable of Beaumaris castle on 4 March 146l and to the same office for life on l2 August 1469 (Breese, op. cit., p. l22; Cal. Patent Rolls, 1467-1477, p. l65). Sir Richard Huddlestone (d. c. 1485) was appointed constable of Beaumaris castle, for life, on 28 November 1483 (Breese, op. cit., p. 122; Cal. Patent Rolls, 1476-1485, p. 369).

Survey Report No. 3996 f.218. 5 October 1621 10. In the Bona Nova from Virginia, John Hudleston being its Master, Hue Hopkins imported 20 lbs of pudding tobacco valued at L(pounds), the duty in each case being 10s. ff.75ro-75vo. 22 June 1620. In June 1619 Mesers John Farrer and Thomas Sheppard loaded on board the "Garland";, then lying at anchor in the Thames, "divers goods, merchandise, victualls provision, and passengers";, to be carried to the Somers Islands and James Town, Virginia. The ship, of which William Wye was Master, arrived off Garners Head in the Somers Island on 30 October, but, as a result of considerable damage caused through a heavy storm, the "Garland"; was forced to stay at the Islands in order for repairs to be made. One condition stipulated by the Governor of the Islands-Captain Butler-before he would allow repair work to begin, was that Wye should return immediately afterwards to England, carrying in his ship the tobacco output of these Islands: this Wye agreed to, as being the only possible way of refitting the "Garland".

ff.26ro-28ro. 25 April 1620. Evidence of Thomas Hopkins of Farrer and Sheppard loaded the "Garland"; prior to its sailing to the Somers Islands and James Town. On its arrival at the Somers Islands, the crew of the "Garland" of which William Wye was Master were unable to unload their cargo and passengers for lack of sufficient boats. Whilst at anchor there (this delay had resulted in an unnecessary stay of 20 days), the "Garland" was crippled by a great storm. Wye, in an effort to save ship and men, threw the main mast overboard. With his ship completely unable to continue refitting her: this was only obtained on promise that Wye would not pursue his journey to Virginia but would first return to England with the tobacco produce of those Islands. Provisions and fittings were then found, some being transferred from the magazine ship "Warwick" which had also foundered in the storm. ff34ro-36ro 10 May 1620. Alexander Farr of St Olaves in the parish of Southwark, aged about 24, was ship's carpenter on the "Garland". He was on board when the storm actually broke. A carpenter, cooper, and three other members of the crew perished, and many others were sick. Wye, according to him, bartered, and sold a number of stockings whilst at Somers Islands, although how many, and at what price, he did not know. The remainder of his statement is no different from those of other witnesses.(Somers Island is now Bermuda Island) Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor aged 33. Survey Report No. GL.5 References Crick and Alman Guide, pp.64-65. Vol.V No.65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621. The depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, master of the Bona Nova; William Jackson of Ratcliffe, gunner of the Bona Nova; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe; mariner. The depositions state the deponents were in Virginia during the period January-June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.

CCLXIX. Henry Marten. Decree in Case of the Virginia Company Against Wye, Absolving Wye December 9, 1622 Admiralty Court, Instance and Prize, Libels 81, no. 216. Document in Public Records Office, London. List of Records, No. 379

William Ewens. Covenant with the Company for Virginia. July 1621. To all to whome these presents shall come greetinge Knowe yee that I Wm Ewens Mr of the good Ship the George of 150 tun burden nowe resident in the Riuer of Thames for and in consideracon of the Sume of 480li of good and lawfull money of England to mee in hand paide and deliuered by the Treasurer and Companie of Aduenturors and Planters of the Cittie of London for the first Colonie in Virginia before the insealinge and deliuery hereof and for and in consideracon of certaine couenants between them and mee agreed I the said Wm Ewens do promise and couenant in manner and forme followinge Imprimis that the good Shipp the George before her departuer out of River of Thames shalbe stronge and staunch and in all things well fitted and prouided aswell with furniture belonging to a Shippe as also Marriners and Sea men fitt and sufficient for the safe and good pformance of the voyage now intended and couenanted Item I doe couenant and promise with the first opportunity of wynde and weather to sett sayle wth the first Shippe for the Porte of the Cowes neare the Ile of Wight and there to receaue and take into the said Shippe such Passengrs and goods as the said Treasuror and Company shall direct and appointe and no other and I do further couenante and promise after the Passengers and goods shalbe receaued into the said Shippe to departe from thence the directest course for the Porte of James Citty in James Riuer in the Kingdome of Virginia and during the time of the said voyage to giue and make such allowance of victuall to the Passengers as by the Shedull herevnto affixed is specified. And I doe promise and couenant to deliuer the said Passengers and goods (mortallity and dangers of the Seas onely excepted) safe and well condiconed at James Cittie in Virginia accordinge as the said Treasuror and |Company shall direct and appointe. And I do further promise and couenant to take and receaue into the said Shippe the George such Tobacco as the Governor and officers residinge in Virginia shall lade aboord here duringe the time that the said Shippe shall abide in Virginia for the Account of the said Treasuror and Company here in England & the said Tobacco and their goods to deliuer and consigne safe and well condiconed (the danger of the Seas excepted) to such ffactors in England or Holland or Ireland and at such Ports as the said Treasuror and Companie shall appointe and ordaine. And to the pformance of all and singular the Couenants aboue recited to be well and truly holden kept and pformed in all things by mee I the said Wm Ewens binde my self my executors and Administrators and goods and namely the Shippe aforesaid wth the fraight tackle boale and apparell of the same vnto the saide Treasuror and Companie and their Successors in the Sume or penaltie of 1000li of lawfull money of England well and truly to be paide by these presents : In Wittnesse whereof I haue herevnto sett my hand and Seale this [blank] day of July 1621 And in the yeares of the raigne of or soueraigne Lord James by the grace of God King of England Scotland ffrance and Ireland Defendor of the faith that is to say of England ffrance and Ireland the 19th and of Scotland the fower and fiftith. Source: Additional Manuscripts, 14285, ff.78a-79a. British Museum.

21 July 1626-King Privy Council Action: An order was directed to the Governor of Virginia to assess the value of the Estate of Captain Nathaniel Powell, decd., and to send value of it in tobacco to England, a petition having been made by Thomas Powell, brother and admistrator of said Powell, decd, stating that in consideration of the poverty of said Powell's brothers and sisters, that proceeds of the said Captain's Estate should be paid unto them. The Virginia Company had certified that one William Powell, no way kin to the decedent, had taken out Letters Of Administration of the said Captain's Estate and had seized the goods of Captain John Huddleston in Virginia. The said William Powell then died, and Nathaniel Powell's Estate came into the hands of Mr. [Edward] Blaney who married William Powell's widow. Thomas Powell, eldest brother of the said Nathaniel Powell, dced had taken out Letters Of Administration for the decedent in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. [(Acts of the Privy Council of England (1613-1631), as cited by Coldham, 1:72

Captain John Huddleston had his goods seized July 21 1626 but is still alive. We learn later that Captain William Powell and Captain John Huddleston were close neighbors and even traded land acreage. Captain Matthewes and Captain Ewens were also Captain John Huddleston's neighbors. One can also notice in Virginia that a lot of Captains get into politics. It is amazing how many of them made Governors. Captain John Huddleston seems more involved with fishing and warning people about Indian massacres. Richard Cocke was a prominent man in Henrico County. He was involved in the maritime trade and may have been the purser of the ship Thomas and John, which was in Virginia waters in 1627. He got patents for considerable land, including the estates of “Bremo” and “Malvern Hill” and was the ancestor of all Cocke relations. Copyright © 2001-2002, John W. Pritchett. All rights reserved. GOV. WEST AND COUNCIL TO SIR ROBT. HEATH James City, Feby. 27, 1627/8. Governor Francis West and the Council of Virginia to Sir Robert Heath, the King's attorney General. On receipt of his Majs letter and other instructions from himself (see Novr., 1627), They immediately caused divers ships to be stayed that were ready to depart, and altho' they could not, the tobacco being already put aboard, try the goodness of the same, or contract for it on his Majs behalf, they had delivered to them invoices of the several quantities laden aboard & they have taken security for landing the same at the port of London. We later learn Captain John Huddleston was the master of the Thomas and John from May 13 1628 to August 11 1628. We later learn to of William Huddleston, servant to Mr. Canhow in Jamestown.

From William Weldon's letter to Sir Edwin Sandys concerning his passage from London, England we learn that the Bona Noua had finally docked in James Citty after its long trip. In the book, Cavaliers and Pioneers 1623-1666 abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent, Captain John Huddleston and William Huddleston both show up in the same book. James City County took its name from James City, the original name of Jamestown. Both were named in honor of James I of England (1566-1625), "who never said a foolish thing and never did a wise one." He defended himself on the ground that his words were his own, but his actions were his ministers'.

It seems both the father, Captain John Huddleston and son William Huddleston were connected to the West family. Two months before William Huddleston was in court there was a Richard West in court, too. 13th of Oct., 1640. The Court hath ordered that Wm Wootton and John Bradye as principall actors and contrivers in a most dangerous conspiracy by attempting to run out of the country and Inticing divers others to be actors in the said conspiracy to be whipt from the gallows to the Court door and that the said Bradye shall be Branded with an Iron in the shoulder, and Wotton in the forehead each of them to serve the Colony seven years, the service due from the [13] said Wotton to the said Mr Sanderson being first performed, each of them to work in Irons during the time of the said censure for the rest of these that are freemen (viz) John Tomkinson and Ricr West for consenting and concealing the said plott that they shall be whipt and serve the colony two years and those that are servants (viz) John Winchester, Wm Drummer Robt Rouse and Robt Mosely to be whipt only as also Margarett Beard, and that the masters of the said servants shall pay the fees due from the servants to the sheriffs and the servants shall make good the same, at the Expiration of their time by a years service apiece to their said masters and that none of them shall be released from their Irons without order from this Board. H[enry] R[ead] McIlwaine (1864-1934), ed, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, 1622-1632, 1670-1676, with Notes and Excerpts from Original Council and General Court Records, into 1683, Now Lost (Richmond : The Colonial Press, Everett Waddy Co., 1924). Page [*194]

To understand this West family connection is to partial trace the West family. 1596 Lord Delaware West married Cecelia SHIRLEY in England (daughter of Sir Thomas Shirley the elder). He became the first colonial Governor of Virginia. 1613 Shirley Plantation granted to Lord Delaware West 1618 Lord Delaware West died on the return voyage to England on the ship "Neptune" (from New England History and Genealogy. Reg. Vol. XXX page___. 1655 Shirley Plantation passed to the Hill family (Remember a Thomas Shirley is passenger aboard the Bona Noua and the 1626 court mentioning Allice Boyse, another passenger on the Bona Noua, at the Shirley Plantation.) brother, Francis West 1586 emigrated to Virginia in 1608, elected to the Council 1609 and was appointed Governor of Virginia in 1627. Married 1st Margaret___, 2nd Temperance (Flowerdew) Yeardley, 3rd Jane Davye. No known descendants JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA - The Town Site and Its Story by Charles E. Hatch, Jr. It was obvious to everyone that there were too many men for all to remain at Jamestown. John Martin was sent to attempt a settlement at Nansemond, on the south side of the James below Jamestown, while Capt. Francis West, brother of Lord Delaware, was sent to settle at the falls of the James. Returning to Jamestown after an inspection tour at the falls, Captain Smith was injured by burning gunpowder and incapacitated. The implication in the documents of the period is that Ratcliffe, Archer, and Martin used this opportunity to depose him and to compel him to return to England to face their charges against him. These three men, failing to agree on a replacement from their own number, persuaded George Percy to accept the position of president. Percy was in command during the terrible winter that followed. Another brother of Lord Delaware West and brother to Francis West-John West 1590, B.A. Magdalen College, Oxford, emigrated to Virginia in the Bonny Bess in 1618. Patented land on York River on the site of the present town of West Point. He was member of the Council, and House of Burgesses, justice of York Co. and Governor of VA 1635-37. His son, Col. John West, born about 1632, served as a Captain, Major and Lieutenant Colonel of the Militia, 1652-73, loyal to Governor Berkeley during Bacon's Rebellion, member House of Burgesses. etc. Lt. Col. Nathaniel West 1592, emigrated to VA probably 1618. Died 1623/4. Married 1st Frances Greville, (she m. 2nd Abraham Peirsey, 3rd Capt Samuel Mathews). Son: Nathaniel West 1622, died 1670/1, buried Warton, Lancaster Co. VA. He married Elizabeth (Preston) Sagar. No descendants.

Captain Samuel Matthews and Captain John Huddleston were neighbors and Captain Samuel Matthews was at the 1626 court with Captain John Huddleston in regards to Allice Boyse. Capt George Yardley, son of Ralph Yardley, merchant tailor of London and Governor of Virginia in 1619, was a soldier in the Low Countries (Holland). He went to Virginia with Gates in 1609. Capt George Yardley was married to Temperance WEST. (from Ken Scislaw). Captain George Yeardley is mentioned in Captain John Huddleston's commission of the Bona Noua which makes him master of it and Captain George Yeardley graunted Captain John Huddleston his land in Poquoson also called New Poquoson which showed Captain John Huddleston was still alive in 1635 in Virginia. Needless to say, had some powerful friends in the West family that went way back to London. Without being in politics in any known way, Captain John Huddleston had many friends. (Remember Captain John Huddleston's letter-"To my friends".) Sir Thomas West was the first Lord Governor and Captain General of Virginia 1610. He proceeded that year with one hundred and fifty skilled workers and craftsman and saved the colony from abandonment by the disheartened settlers. He returned to England in 1611 and died in Nova Scotia June 17, 1618 on a return voyage to America. Delaware Bay and the State of Delaware named after him. He married Cecily Sherley, daughter of Sir Thomas Sherley the elder of Wiston, Sussex Co. England. They had 6 children. His daughter Penelope West m. Herbert Pelham, Esq. (the younger) of Hastings, Sussex Co. England. Some of the children were: (1). Herbert, who married Jemima Waldegrave. of Essex Co. England. One of their children is recorded in St. Margaret's Parish in Westminister in 1629. As early as 1629, Herbert Pelham agreed to invest in the Winthrop project of colonization with his father-in-law, and invested some $3,000 pounds in the venture. The two families embarked from Gravesend in 1639/40. His wife died during the crossing. He remarried, became Treasurer of Harvard College in 1643, Commissioner of the United Colonies in 1645, and was active with the Society for Promoting the Gospel in New England. He returned to England and died in 1674. He is buried at Bures, Essex Co. (2). William Pelham sailed with the Winthrop Fleet in 1630, resided Sudbury Massachusetts until 1647, died in England 1667. (3). John Pelham, emigrated to New England 1635. (4). Penelope Pelham migrated in 1635 age 16 years and died 1702. Married Richard Bellingham, Gent., Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony.

John4 Chamberlain (Henry3 Chamberlin, [Unknown]2, Henry1) was born Bef. 15 Nov 1633 in Hingham, Norfolk, England, and died Apr 1666 in Newport, RI. He married (1) Anne Brown 19 May 1653 in Boston, Suffolk, MA, daughter of William Brown. She was born 07 Apr 1633 in England, and died in Prob. Boston, MA. He married (2) Catherine Chatham Abt. 1663. Notes for John Chamberlain: John Chamberlin was a currier, who worked with leather and garments. He was admitted as an inhabitant of Boston, July 28, 1651, and purchased a house from William Courser of Boston on Hanover St. on Oct . 14, 1652. He became a Quaker and by September 1661 had been whipped nine times, "three times through three towns." He was present at the execution of Marmaduke Stevenson and William Robinson, and the reprieve of Mary Dyer, on Boston Common, Oct. 27, 1659, and was drawn to visit the Quakers in prison. He became a Quaker, and before Sept. 9, 1661, had been nine times whipped, "three times through three towns." He was imprisoned in Boston where his father and brother Henry petitioned the General court for a remittance of his "sentence of banishment upon Payne of death. "The Deputies ordered him removed to Castle Island, there to provide himself lodging, housinge, vitualls, etc. at his own charge." That petition was dated 7 June 1661. About 1663 he moved to Newport, RI , where he died April 1666. Notes for Anne Brown: Her father was of Boston, MA. "She was not of the same principle altogether with (her husband)." Deputy Governor Bellingham tried to get her to deny her husband, unsuccessfully. Notes for Catherine Chatham: Catherine married 2nd Valentine Huddleston. "A Quakeress, who came from London to Boston where she "appeared cloathed with sackcloth." She was put in prison, whipped at Dedham, and driven into the wilderness. Imprisoned again, and ordered to pay a fine, "she was taken to wife by John Chamberlaine and so became an inhabitant of Boston." John Savage's book and information from the Chamberlain family.

For a nonrelated person to get the goods even though a will is not present would mean that all adults related are dead. Letters of Administration After the death of a person, their will and an inventory of their possessions had to be proved by the Governor and Assistants at the next Court after their death, provided it was not in the same month that they died. Letters of administration would then be granted to the executor so that the estate could settled. If someone did not make a will, they died intestate, and after an inventory of their possessions had been taken, the Court gave legal authority to someone, usually the wife, husband or close relative, through letters of administration, to settle the estate (PCR 11: 195).

From page 8 of "The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography" LVX No. 4 (Oct. 1957) we find that in May 13 1628 that John Huddleston is noted as being the master of the Thomas and John. The source says this same man of Survey 3 is also found on Survey 4 and 5. On Survey 4 he is listed as John Hurleston with date of May 15 1628. On Survey 5 he is listed as John Hurlston with date of May 17 1628. Public Record Office Class E. 190/32/8 shows the "Thomas & John" being in Virginia and being loaded from 13 May 1628 to 11 Aug 1628 and that Captain John Huddleston was its master.
Volume III Cavaliers & Pioneers Page 290 Robert Hughes, 400 acs. (N.L.) Henrico Co., on S. side of James River; crossing Muddy Creek; near Huddlecey's fence; 17 Aug 1725, p. 285. 40 shill
And we know he was married: Volume II Cavaliers & Pioneers Page 116 Robert Parker, 150 acs., in Rappahannock; bet. Mill Cr. & the River; adj John Smith; Nicholas Cattlett; Henry Munkester or Tho. Munday, & c; 14 Oct. 1672, page 424. Trans. of 3 pers; Roger Smith; James Jones, Widdoe Huderson.
1607-1628 Timeline 1607, April Captain Edward Maria Wingfield, President of the Council. 1607, Sept. 10. Captain John Ratcliffe, President of the Council. 1608, Sept. 7. Captain John Smith, President of the Council. (1609, May 23. Thomas West, Lord de la War, or Delaware, appointed "Governor and Captain General;" but did not reach Virginia until June 10, 1610.) Born in England, 1577; died at sea June 7, 1618 1609 Captain George Percy, President of the Council. Born in England, September 4, 1586; died in England, March, 1632. 1610, June 10. Thomas West, Lord Delaware, Governor. 1611, Mar. 28. Captain George Percy, Deputy Governor. 1611 (, May 19. Sir Thomas Dale, "High Marshall," and Deputy Governor. 1611, Aug. Sir Thomas Gates, Acting Governor. 1612, Mar. Sir Thomas Dale, Acting Governor. 1616, April Captain George Yeardley, Lieutenant or Deputy Governor. Born in England; died in Virginia, November, 1627. 1617, April 9. Captain Samuel Argall, Lieutenant or Deputy Governor. Born in England, 1572; died in England, 1639. 1619, April 9. (Captain Argall and Sarah (MICHAEL) YEARDLEY, g. dau. of Colonel Argall YEARDLEY, and gr. g. dau. of Sir George and Lady Temperance (WEST) YEARDLEY; m. (secondly) Josepha Maria GODWIN. Colonial families of the United States of America: Volume 1) Captain Nathaniel Powell (On page 75 of Volume III of 'Records of the Virginia Company' on October 20, 1617 Captain Argall appoints William Powell as Captain of his guards in Jamestown, Virginia), Senior Councillor, Acting Governor. Born in England; killed by the Indians, March 22, 1622. 1619, April 19. Sir George Yeardley, who had been knighted and appointed Governor and Captain General, November 18, 1618, arrived in the Colony. 1621, Nov. 18. Sir Francis Wyatt, Governor. Born in England, 1588; died in England August, 1644. 1626 Sir George Yeardley, Lieutenant Governor. 1626, April 19. Sir George Yeardley, Governor (Commission dated April 19) 1627, Nov. 14. Captain Francis West elected Governor by the Council. 1628 (TEMPERANCE FLOWERDEW in Virginia, 1608; m. 1618, Sir George YEARDLEY; after his death, 1627; she m. Francis WEST, son of Lord DE LA WARR, who succeeded her husband as Governor of Virginia, 1627; she m. Francis WEST, 1628, d. 1629. "Virginia Magazine," Vol. 25, No. 2, April, 1917. Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 6), Mar. 5. Dr. John Pott elected Governor by the Council. Born in England; probably died in Virginia.

Women were needed in the colony to make it more stable. Many men were coming to Virginia and making a fortune and then going back to England. If they had wives and children in the colony they would be less likely to leave. The first women did not come to Virginia until 1610. They were Mistress Forrest and her servant Anne Burras. After that the majority of women who came to the colony were single and married the settlers. In 1619, the first bride ships came to Virginia. The future husbands had to pay for the brides' passage in tobacco. Other women came to Virginia as indentured servants. An indentured servant worked for a number of years [in Virginia it was 7] to pay for their passage. When their time was up they were freed and given a piece of land and other things to get started in the colony. Life in the colony was still hard. In England possible indentured servants heard of the difficult life in the colony. The number of indentured servants coming to Virginia went down. The colonists began buying African slaves to work in the fields. The first Africans arrived in Virginia in 1619 on a Dutch trading ship. The traders sold the slaves for food and supplies. In 1619, representatives from each plantation, hundred, or town met at the Jamestown Church for the first Legislative Assembly. The citizens were able to pass laws based on their needs within the colony. This was the first assembly of its kind in Virginia. It became the model for the later assemblies in other colonies. [Bride Ships: Ships carrying unmarried women to become brides for the colonists. The colonists paid for their voyage in tobacco. Indentured Servants: A person who sold himself/herself to work in a specific amount of time before being freed. Hundred: A piece of land owned by one person who brings people to work on it.] Copyright ©1996, 1997 by The Mariners' Museum

GENEALOGIES OF VIRGINIA FAMILIES Vol IV N-T William & Mary Quarterly p. 215-6 The Muster of Inhabitants shows on 24 Jan 1624 at Necke of Land, Charles City: Luke Boyse aged 44 in the Edwine May 1619; Alice his wife in the Bona Nova April 1622; Their Servants; Robert Hallom aged 23 in the Bonaventure August 1620; JOSEPH ROYALL aged 22 in the Charitie July 1622 (Hotten, p. 202). On 11 Nov. 1635 there was granted to Hannah Boyse daughter and heir of Luke Boyse, late of Henrico, 300 a. in that county, adjoining the lands of her mother, Alice Edloe, due in right of her father for transporting persons, including Robert Hallom and JOSEPH ROYALL. There was a regrant 13 July 1637 (Nugent, pp. 40, 59; V Va Mag. 97, 212; XXIV W & M (1) 128).

A COURT at James Citty the 19th. of February 1626, being sent Mr. Doctor Pott. Capt. Smyth. Capt. Matthews. Mr. Secretary. Mr. ffarrar. It is ordered that there shall be a warrant sent up unto Sherley Hundred in ye Maine, that John Ewins & Jane Hill should be sent downe to James-Citty, & there to be examined concerning such leud behavior as hath bin betweene them. Patrick Kennady marriner sworne & examined sayth that as concerning those words which Mrs. Allice Boyse taxeth Capt. Hudleston to have accused her with at Capt. Martins plantation, viz that he say Capt. Hudleston should there say that Capt. Epes had the use of her body that night that he lay in James Slights house, or else said he never had the use of his owne wife, more then Capt. Epes had of her yt night; this deponeth sayth he did not heare Capt. Hudleston speake the same words, but that Capt. Hudleston sayd there was very unfitting behavior between them. Philemon Powell sworne & examined sayth that he hath not receiued (according to his Invoice) from aboard the Marmaduke two runletts, viz, the one being eight gallons of Aquavitae & ye other 21 gallons of Canary wine. It is ordered that Patricke Kennady Purser of the Marmaduke doe satify Philemon Powell Marchant for one runlett of eight gallons of aquauitae, & for another runlett of 20 gallons of Canary wine. And further for that it appeareth plainly that the said Philemon Powell hath receiued much wrong & damage in many of his runletts of wine & liquor, fome being wanted and one being deliuered ashore emptry with a peg in it, & one of ye sailors seene drinking at another, it is there-upon ordered that said Philemon Powell be satisfyed by ye said Patricke Kennady for fifteen gallons of wine in recompense of the said wronge & damage.

Booth, Richard - patent 23 Apr 1681 - 465 Ac. To all & whomsoever etc. Now know ye that I ? ? ? Henry chickeley Knt. dep.ty Govr. etc. Give & grant unto Rich. Booth of ye Isle of Wight County fouer hundred Sixty five acres of Land situate on ye west? side of a swamp known by ye name of Wm. Lawrence's Bever dam being a branch of ye main Black water in ye County aforesd. bounded the?, beginning at a red oak by ye aforesd. swamp side ??? ye line of Robt. Lawrence Ge?n? thence north fifty two degrees west three hundred twenty pole to a red oak thence south twenty degrees westerly two hundred fifty five pole to a stooping pine then south fifty two degrees Easterly two hundred seventy two pole to a pine ???? ?? swamp aforsd. & then by ye run of ye ?? Swamp to ye first station The ?? land being due to ye said Booth by & for ye transportation of ??? psons ?? Johane & to ???? ???? ????? ???? & paying ?? provided etc. dated ye three & twentieth of April One thousand six hundred & eighty one ??? ?? Carter, Mary ?y?ond, Jno West, peter> wright, Tho:Jackson } 10 Jno Was? Tho whip Wm Long Sam Poynter, Jan? Humphry } Misc. Land Patents - Isle of Wight Co. VA. I had thought this was Martin's Plantation but have just learned that this location was actually Brandon Martin which according to Isle of Wight history was a private plantation. This was Captain John Martin's place before he had to give it up. In the Isle of Wight history Captain John Martin lived to 1627. Isle of Wight Historical Review ™. ©2001 Brandon Parish is one of the oldest in Virginia with its history dating back to 1613, when Brandon Plantation was patented by Captain John Martin, an Englishman who came to Virginia with Captain John Smith in 1607. The present building is the fourth to be used by the parish. The first two were wooden structures located on Brandon Plantation itself. The third building, which was the last in the line of Colonial vintage, was erected on the site of the present Burrowsville Public School around 1723. Martin's Brandon Episcopal Church Copies of church records are on file at the Library of Virginia. (History of Martin's Brandon Episcopal Church) First Hand Accounts of Virginia, 1575-1705 Proceedings of the Virginia Assembly, 1619 For Martin Brandon-Capt. John Martin's Plantation Mr. Thomas Davis, Mr. Robert Stacy. Brandon, on the south side of James River. This was one of the private plantations, resembling manors © Copyright 2000 by Crandall Shifflett. All rights reserved.
Thomas West, third Baron De La Warr (1577-1618)was granted 8,000 acres in 1613. That acreage was called “West and Sherley Hundred” after himself and his wife, Lady Cessalye Sherley. When, Lord De La Warr died, in 1618, much of the grant was transferred to others.
Captain Martin is Captain John Martin which is in the Thomas Jefferson Papers and also the Records of the Virginia Company [When you study the records of Thomas Jefferson for this time era, you find they are the same records Series 8: Virginia Records, 1606-1737 Records of the Virginia Company Table of Contents for Volume III]: April, 1622 Captain John Martin, the only member of the colony's first council still in Virginia, agrees to give up his original patent for land, "Martin's Hundred," for a new one. His original patent gave him independence from both the Company and the General Assembly, including some of its laws. The Company seeks to bring all private plantations or hundreds into the government's jurisdiction.

21 July 1626-King Privy Council Action: An order was directed to the Governor of Virginia to assess the value of the Estate of Captain Nathaniel Powell, decd., and to send value of it in tobacco to England, a petition having been made by Thomas Powell, brother and admistrator of said Powell, decd, stating that in consideration of the poverty of said Powell's brothers and sisters, that proceeds of the said Captain's Estate should be paid unto them. The Virginia Company had certified that one William Powell, no way kin to the decedent, had taken out Letters Of Administration of the said Captain's Estate and had seized the goods of Captain John Huddleston in Virginia. We can safely say that whatever happened to Captain John Huddleston happened between 19 February 1626 and 21 July 1626 [From the court document of Captain John Huddleston being alive in 19 February 1626 and the Letters of Administration in 21 July 1626] POWELBROOKE was the land of Capt Nathaniel POWELL, who was killed (along with his wife Joyce, daughter of William TRACY) in the 1622 Indian massacre. When William BARKER and his associates acquired the property, they changed the name to Merchants Hope for Barker's ship. Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1666 Abstracted and Indexed by Nell Marion Nugent Copyright, 1963 by Genealogical Publishing Company originally published Richmond, 1934 page 44 Capt. Christopher Calthropp, 100 acs., being a second devdt., according to a graunt signed by Sir Georg Yeardly to John Hudleston, Marriner, 26 Apr. 16, 1621 & assigned by Richard Cox, Atty. to sd. Hudleston, to sd. Calthropp. 5 July 1636, p. 368. Adj. to the first devdt., whose bounds were, viz: W. upon Waters his Cr. E. upon land of Robert Hutchins, S. the river & N. into the woods. Same. 100 acrs. Chas. Riv. Co., same date & page. Within the new Poquoson at the head of Powells Cr., Nly. upon sd. Cr., Ely. to land formeley graunted to him. Trans. of 2 pers: Christopher Watts, Senr., Christopher Watts, Junr. We know Captain John Huddleston was still in Virginia and alive 5 July 1636 because of the assign by Richard Cox who was Captain John Hudleston's attorney and who with him and Captain Christopher Calthropp. It does not show deceased in the transaction. The Indians had the land, then Sir Georg Yeardly got it, then Captain John Hudleston got it and finally the transaction shows Captain Christopher Calthropp getting the 100 acres. We know from this next transaction that Captain John Huddleston had moved to Nevis Island and was still alive in 1642. The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660 Entries November 21, 1621 Commissions granted to: Daniel Gat(e)s to be master of the Darling and to fish on the coast of Virginia; John Huddleston to make a voyage to Virginia; and to have free fishing on the American coast; Captain Thomas Jones, master of the Discovery, to fish on the American coast and to trade furs in Virginia. (BL:Add Mss 14285)July 1, 1652 Petition of Captain William Digby. He was a planter in St. Christopher's 24 years ago but was soon after taken prisoner by the Spaniards to Cadiz where he remained for 6 years. Ten years ago Sir Thomas Warner, the governor of St. Christopher's, assigned him a plantation in Nevis, Captain Luke Stokes, has taken 280 acres of the plantation for John Jennings. He prays for its restitution. Encloses note of grant made by James, Earl of Carlisle, to William Digby of land in Nevis between the lands of Captain John Huddleston and Thomas Merriton. (cspl)

Page 25, Page 72 and Page 260 all refer to the same Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua according to The Complete Book of Emigrants by Peter Coldham. And that shows up on Page 536 of the same book.

July 1
60. Petition of Capt. Wil. Digby to the Council of State. Was a planter in St. Christopher's about 24 years since, but was soon after taken by the Spaniards prisoner to Cadiz, where he remained six years. About 10 years since, Sir Thos. Warner, then Governor of St. Christopher's, assigned to him a plantation in Nevis formerly confirmed to Warner by Capt. John Kettleby, then Governor of Nevis. Notwithstanding which grant, and his peaceable enjoyment of the plantation for more than eight years, the present Governor of Nevis, Capt. Luke Stokes, has taken away about 280 acres of land for the use of John Jennings, who denies that he has any propriety therein. Prays that he may be re-established in the said land, and enjoy it according to his patent. Underwritten is a note referring this petition to the Committee for Plantations for their report; 1652, July 14. Annexed,
60. I.Order of the Council of State. Referring the above petition to the Committee for Plantations for their report. 1652, July 10, [mistake for 14th.]
60. II.Grant of Jas. Earl of Carlisle to Capt. Wil. Digby of240 geometrical paces of land in Nevis, beyond the fig tree plantations, betwixt the land of Capt. John Hudleston to the north-west, and that of Thos. Merriton to the south, in consideration of a sum of money paid to the Earl. [Copy.] 1648, Dec. 11.
60.III.Affidavit of Godfrey Havercamp, of Teddington, co. Middlesex, that he spake with Capt. John Jennings at the Royal Exchange and showed him a survey of Capt. Digby's lands in Nevis, and that Jennings utterly disclaimed any interest therein. 1652, Aug. 13.
0. IV.Affidavit of Maurice Gardiner to the same effect as the preceding. 1652, Aug 3. Underwritten is an acknowledgment by Jennings of the truth of the above. 1652, Nov. 3.
60. V."Notes concerning Digby's case." Ed. Mullerd certifies that the copy of the grant is true. Digby in possession six years before the date thereof, and until last April twelvemonth. Minutes of a conversation with the Governor. 1652, Sept. 13.
0. VI.Order of the Committee for Foreign Affairs. For Jennings to give in a written answer to Digby's petition on Wednesday the 15th Sept. 1652, Sept. 13.br>60. VII.Answer of John Jennings to Digby's petition. Has a plantation in Nevis, entrusted to Capt. Luke Stokes, Governor, the propriety of which he owns and will defend. Knows nothing touching the allegation in the petition.
July 1. 61. Copy of the above petition. Sponsor Institute of Historical Research Publication Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1: 1574-1660 Author W. Noel Sainsbury (editor) Year published 1860 Pages 384-387 'America and West Indies: July 1652', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1: 1574-1660 (1860), pp. 384-387.

The island of Liamuiga, or «fertile land» in the language of the Carib Indians who originally lived there, was renamed St Christopher by Columbus on his second voyage to America, in 1493. It was not colonized by Europeans until 1623, when adventurer Thomas Walker established the first English settlement in the Caribbean. The neighboring island of Nevis was colonized five years later. After the rapid extermination of the Caribs, the English started to grow plantation crops, especially sugar cane, for which they used slaves from Africa. NOTE: The country profiles are drawn from the World Guide 2001/2002, New Internationalist Publications Ltd St. Christopher (hereafter, St. Kitts) and Nevis share a long history of British colonization. St. Kitts has been referred to as the "mother colony of the West Indies," a reflection of its status as the first English colony in the Caribbean. Although discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493, St. Kitts was not settled by Europeans until 1623, when a small group of Britons established themselves at Sandy Bay. As elsewhere in the Caribbean, the French were not far behind; they established settlements the following year. Nevis was colonized in 1628 by an English party dispatched from St. Kitts. Library of Congress Publications

CHAPTER TWO Copyright 1998 by Prentice-Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. The English in the Caribbean Section Contents Sugar and Slaves A Biracial Society The Spanish claimed all Caribbean islands by right of Columbus's discovery, but during the early seventeenth century, French, Dutch, and English adventurers boldly defied them. By the 1640s, the English occupied Antigua, Barbados, Montserrat, Nevis, and St. Christopher; in 1655, they conquered the Spanish -held island of Jamaica (see Map 2-3). Although a few English efforts, including an attempt to found a Puritan colony on Providence Island off Nicaragua's coast, failed, the West Indies soon became the jewel of England's empire, producing vast wealth from the cultivation of sugar. Caribbean planters created a society totally unlike any of the mainland colonies--not least of all because their prosperity depended on the exploitation of African slaves. Sugar and Slaves Like the early Virginians, the first English colonists who came to the West Indies in the 1630s raised tobacco and imported indentured servants to work their fields. By that time, however, tobacco fetched low prices. Moreover, the disease environment of the West Indies proved even harsher than that of the Chesapeake, and settlers died in great numbers. That thousands came anyway during the 1620s and 1630s testified more to their hopes for prosperity than their actual chances of success.

PAGE 51 BEGINS
But by the 1640s, a Barbados planter boasted of "a great change on this island of late from the worse to the better, praised be God." That change was a shift from tobacco to sugar cane. How the English learned to grow sugar is unclear. Perhaps it was from English visitors to Portuguese sugar plantations in Brazil or from Dutch traders. However they learned, many sugar planters grew astonishingly wealthy. In 1646, a 500-acre plantation on Barbados sold for 16,000 pounds--more than the whole island had been worth just a few years before. On average, the estate of a Caribbean sugar planter was worth four times as much as a prosperous Chesapeake plantation.

I think that Captain John Huddleston went to Nevis Island because of the money. According to the chronology of Saint Kitts in 1666; 1628-1666 St. Kitts divided into separate English the center) and French (both ends) zones and 1666 - 1671 French occupy entire island. This might explain why William Huddleston is shown transported to Accromack County, Virginia in 1666.

Sugar rapidly transformed the West Indies. Planters deforested whole islands to raise sugar cane. They stopped planting food crops and raising livestock- -thereby creating a demand for lumber and provisions that boosted New England's economy. In 1647, John Winthrop noted that Barbadians "had rather buy food at very dear rates than produce it by labor, so infinite is the profit of sugar works."

Caribbeana IV continued Abstracts of Nevis Wills in PCC Probate 5.9.1637 Roger Glover of London, Merchant, will dated 14.11.1636. Mentions William Hawkins of London, Bro Richard Glover, sisters, Eliz and Sarah, niece Eliz Glover, born Jess Glover, Wm Rowe, Eliz Pommerton, JOhn Worcester, friend Capt Thomas Sparrowe, Goverenor of Island of Nevis, George Upcote, Nicolas Godsalve. "If I recover all debts due to me from THOMAS LITTLETON, late Governor of said Island, I give to JAMES LITTLETON, son of said THOMAS LITTLETON, £100. Will of James Hewett of Nevis, planter dated 9.8.1649 mentions, Wm Charley, Capt Digbie, Margaret Merriton, also half of another parcel (of land) containing 4000 plants of ground, purchased of ROBERT LITTLETON, lying at Gingerland at said .... ENGLISH BACKGROUND STUDIES Helms Family Research

Governors of Nevis Governors 1628 - 1629 Anthony Hilton (1st time) 1629 - 1630 George Hay 1630 - 1631 Anthony Hilton (2nd time) 1631 - 1634 Thomas Littleton 1634 - 1635 Luke Stokes (1st time) 1635 - 1637 Thomas Spurrow 1637 - 1638 Henry Huncks 1639 James Jennings 1640 Jenkin Lloyd 1640 - 1641 John Meakem 1641 John Kettleby 1641 - 1651 Jacob Lake 1651 - 1657 Luke Stokes (2nd time) 1657 - 1671 James Russell http://www.worldstatesmen.org/Saint_Kitts_and_Nevis.html

House of Lords: Journal Office: Main Papers 1509-1700 FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/42 - date: 14 Apr 1640 - 25 Sep 1640 [from Scope and Content] 1 May 1640 -- Petition of Sir Peter Vanlore, Knight and Baronet, to the House of Commons, for consideration of his case against Doctor Littleton, concerning the vicarage of Tylehurst [Tilehurst]. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/44 - date: 1 Dec 1640 - 18 Dec 1640 [from Scope and Content] 1 Copy of order of the Privy Council in the case made upon report of the Solicitor-General Littleton and His Majesty's advocate, Dr Rives. FILE - Main Papers: Includes undated items for 1640 - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/45 - date: 19 Dec 1640 - 31 Dec 1640 [from Scope and Content] [1640] -- Petition of George Griffith, merchant. In 1628 Thomas Littleton being arrested at the suit of Peter Marsh, Roger Glover, and Francis Soare became bail for him, but Marsh not being content petitioner became further bail: hereupon Littleton and Glover went beyond the seas, and Soare being unduly released by Sir Henry Marten, judge of the Admiralty Court, upon pretended privilege of being servant extraordinary to His Majesty, petitioner was taken in execution by Jeremy Drury, the pretended administrator of Peter Marsh. Prays for redress from their Lordships as the case is remediless by any ordinary course of justice. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/49 - date: 23 Jan 1641 - 30 Jan 1641 [from Scope and Content] 30 January 1641 -- Draft order of the House of Commons, respecting Sir Thomas Littleton's petitions, etc. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/50 - date: 1 Feb 1641 - 8 Feb 1641 [from Scope and Content] 8 February 1641 -- Petition of George Griffith and Henry Gardiner; about the year 1628 petitioners became adventurers with Thomas Littleton, since deceased, for the planting and peopling of Nevis, one of the Caribbee Islands in the West Indies, and spent large sums thereon, which Littleton was to have repaid them out of the profits thence derived, but he died, leaving them entirely unsatisfied; pray for a lease of the island without payment of rent, the more so as the Earl of Carlisle and the rest of the feoffees have never raised any money from Nevis, and the Earl promised Littleton a lease at the first planting of the island. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/51 - date: 9 Feb 1641 - 17 Feb 1641 [from Scope and Content] 2 Francis Littleton to Lord Morley. Has heard of a plot against his life and honour, the prosecutor of which is Mrs Clarke; will meet his Lordship, if he please, this afternoon in Gray's Inn Walks, to acquaint him therewith. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/58 - date: 25 May 1641 - 31 May 1641 [from Scope and Content] 25 May 1641 -- Petition of Godfrey Havercamp, John Mold, gentleman, executor of George Mold, and George Griffith, administrator of Thos Littleton, all creditors of James, late Earl of Carlisle; Havercamp and Mold fitted out a ship for the Earl in 1628 for a voyage to St Christophers and the Carribbee Islands, for which a large sum is due, and £1,000 to Littleton; [from Scope and Content] 1 Certificate of Littleton appointed by the Earl to audit the expenditure of Havercamp and Mold. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/69 - date: 5 Aug 1641 - 13 Aug 1641 [from Scope and Content] 12 August 1641 -- Petition of Godfrey Havercampe, and others, creditors of the Right Hon. James, late Earl of Carlisle. Godfrey Havercampe and George Mold expended £5,041 11s. 9d. in setting forth for the late Earl a ship called the "Carlisle" to St. Christopher's and the Carribbee Islands, which expenditure was allowed by the Earl's auditor, Thos Littleton; of this sum more than £1,000 remains unpaid. The Earl was further indebted £100 to Thos. Littleton, which also remains unpaid. [from Scope and Content] 1 Copy of Thos. Littleton's allowance mentioned in preceding. FILE - Main Papers: Protestation Returns Middlesex - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/99 - date: 1642 [from Scope and Content] Littleton. FILE -Main Papers-ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/114 - date: 3 Jan 1642 - 31 Jan 1642 [from Scope and Content] 28 January 1642 -- Letter from the King to the Lord Keeper Littleton, touching the 3rd Article of the Scotch Commissioners. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/115 - date: 1 Feb 1642 - 18 Feb 1642 [from Scope and Content] 6 February 1642 -- Letter from the King to the Lord Keeper Littleton. FILE - Main Papers - ref. HL/PO/JO/10/1/117 - date: 28 Feb 1642 - 19 Mar 1642 [from Scope and Content] 4 March 1642 -- Letter from the King to Lord Keeper Littleton concerning the Attorney General. The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of House of Lords Record Office. Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2004.

Although many people have never heard of the 36-square-mile island, Nevis is an eastern Caribbean paradise, with dense greenery, a lavish botanical garden and no traffic lights whatsoever. After several centuries under Spanish domain, the British colonized it in the early 17th century. Welcome to The History of Nevis page By the time Christopher Columbus first visited Nevis in 1493 it was already occupied by the Caribs who bare the reputation of having been cannibalistic and warlike. Jump 134 years to 1628 and enter the English who settled on the island. Initially the island was cleared for tobacco plantations, but it was soon realised that Nevis was no match for Virginia, so the island quickly gravitated to sugar production. Further Reading: Swords, Ships & Sugar: History of Nevis to 1900 (1993) by Vincent K. Hubbard By 1642, the island was known to produce the finest sugar in the Caribbean, and its population, at 10,000, exceeded that of Virginia’s by several thousand. Caribbean Dream Exotic, Upscale Nevis Rolls out Welcome Mat for Tourists by Larry Luxner The Washington Diplomat. The cultivation of sugar cane and the ability to crystallize it (a secret brought by Dutch traders and Jewish emigrants from Brazil) changed the island completely. By 1642, Nevis was acknowledged to produce the finest sugar in the Caribb and its population was estimated to be 10,000, when Virginia had a population of only 8,000. A HISTORY OF NEVIS By Vincent K. Hubbard, Author of, "Swords, Ships and Sugar: a History of Nevis to 1900".

Since Captain John Huddleston was at Virginia in 1628 aboard the 'Thomas and John' with tobacco being loaded on that ship and by studying the history of Nevis showing tobacco was its first crop by the English; We can conclude that the Captain had to change from the tobacco to sugar production. In other words it seems reasonable that he had a sugar plantation in Nevis in 1642.

Earls of Carlisle, Second Creation (1622) James Hay, 1st Earl of Carlisle (1580-1636) James Hay, 2nd Earl of Carlisle (1612-1660) James Hay, 1st Earl of Carlisle (d. March, 1636), was the son of Sir James Hay of Kingask (a member of a younger branch of the Erroll family), and of Margaret Murray, cousin of George Hay, afterwards 1st earl of Kinnoull. He was knighted and taken into favor by James VI of Scotland, brought into England in 1603, treated as a "prime favourite" and made a gentleman of the bedchamber. In 1604 he was sent on a mission to France and pleaded for the Huguenots, which annoyed Henry IV. and caused a substantial reduction of the present made to the English envoy. On June 21, 1606 he was created by patent a baron for life, with precedence next to the barons, but without a place or voice in parliament, no doubt to render his advancement less unpalatable to the English lords. The king bestowed on him numerous grants, paid his debts, and secured for him a rich bride in the person of Honora, only daughter and heir of Edward, Lord Denny, afterwards earl of Norwich. In 1610 he was made a knight of the Bath, and in 1613 master of the wardrobe, while in 1615 he was created Lord Hay of Sawley, and took his seat in the House of Lords. He was sent to France next year to negotiate the marriage of Princess Christina with Prince Charles, and on his return, being now a widower, married in 1617 Lady Lucy Percy (1599-1660), daughter of the 9th earl of Northumberland, and was made a privy councillor.
In 1618 he resigned the mastership of the wardrobe for a large sum in compensation. He was created Viscount Doncaster, and in February 1619 was despatched on a mission to Germany, where he identified himself with the cause of the elector palatine and urged James to make war in his support. In 1621 and 1622 he was sent to France to obtain peace for the Huguenots from Louis XIII, in which he was unsuccessful, and in September 1622 was created earl of Carlisle. Next year he went to Paris on the occasion of Prince Charles's journey to Madrid, and again in 1624 to join Henry Rich, afterwards Lord Holland, in negotiating the prince's marriage with Henrietta Maria, when he advised James without success to resist Richelieu's demands on the subject of religious toleration. On July 2 1627 Lord Carlisle obtained from the king a grant of all the Caribbean Islands, including Barbados, this being a confirmation of a former concession given by James I. He was also a patentee and councillor of the plantation of New England, and showed great zeal and interest in the colonies.

He became gentleman of the bedchamber to King Charles I after his accession. In 1628, after the failure of the expedition to Rhe, he was sent to make a diversion against Richelieu in Lorraine and Piedmont; he counselled peace with Spain and the vigorous prosecution of the war with France, but on his return home found his advice neglected. He took no further part in public life, and died in March 1636.

Carlisle was a man of good sense and of accommodating temper, with some diplomatic ability. His extravagance and lavish expenditure, his double suppers and costly entertainments, were the theme of satirists and wonder of society, and his debts were said at his death to amount to more than 80,000. He left behind him, says Clarendon, a reputation of a very fine gentleman and a most accomplished courtier, and after having spent, in a very jovial life, above 400,000, which upon a strict computation he received from the crown, he left not a house or acre of land to be remembered by. His second wife, Lucy, was involved in many conspiracies, or allegations thereof, during the English Civil Wars. The first earl was succeeded by James, his only surviving son by his first wife, at whose death in 1660 without issue, the peerage became extinct in the Hay family. Encyclopedia

Amelia Huddleston Barr in her book "All the Days Of My Life" mentions Valentine Huddleston as being the clearest line which is easiest to research. I found the christening of one Valentine Huddleston, 29 February 1586 (in the old calendar), son of Godfrey, in the parish of Digby, Lincs. Digby is only 1.2 miles from Rowston, and like Rowston, had lots of Huddlestons. They were almost certainly the same family. I found the entry in the Bishop's Transcripts, but for some reason this entry was missed when being transcribed to the IGI. I don't know if this Valentine is connected to the Valentine (b. 1628) who went to America, but I'm posting this info just in case anyone is interested. Alwynne Huddleston Mackie
It may have nothing to do with Valentine Huddleston of 1628 but it has to do with a Valentine Huddleston born 29 February 1586 (in the old calendar), son of Godfrey, in the parish of Digby, Lincs. Digby is only 1.2 miles from Rowston, and like Rowston, had lots of Huddlestons.
A California editor told me three years ago that there were Huddlestons among the rich miners of that state; and there is a notable branch from Valentine Huddleston who came to the Plymouth colony in A. D. 1622. This gentleman is among the list of the proprietors of Dartmouth. He had two sons the eldest family name of Henry. Nothing can be more clear and straight than the pedigree of this branch; and its direct descendant at the present day one of New York's most esteemed and influential citizens. From All The Days Of My Life by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr. My question is how did he come from Plymouth in 1622 if he wasn't born till 1628 unless it was referring to the earlier Valentine? Could the Valentine Huddleston of 1586 be the Valentine Huddleston Amelia was referring to in her book? I only question the birthdate because it seems from Amelia's mention that a Valentine Huddleston was born earlier than 1628. I am not saying that Valentine Huddleston was the son of Captain John Huddleston but from Amelia's book a Valentine Huddleston was from in the Plymouth Colony in 1622 and so was Captain John Huddleston in the Plymouth Colony III-Building of the Fort, June 1622-March 1623 The deaths osence of Barnaby Brien, Christopher Sherland, Richard Lane, Edward Bruett, Owen Geltham, Wil. Rushton, Christopher Crouch, Humfrie Parkes, Edward Loggas* And whereas since the date of my will I have by one other deed given to my Lord North and others, diverse parcels of silver plate and other things in trust for my daughter Sanchar I do hereby likewise ratify and confirm the said gift Mary Farmor Probate granted 10th April 1627 *This name appears to be Boggas or Loggas

Local History Research Group Thame, Oxfordshire, England Information@ThameHistory.net Isobel Williams, daughter of Sir John Williams, married Sir Richard Wenman, a wealthy wool merchant from Witney. The name Wenman is said to derive from the family's early associations with wool wagons, or wains. The family was among many sixteenth century yeoman traders who rose to great wealth and power through the wool trade. Sir Richard and Isobel Wenman moved into Thame Park. Thame Park House consisted at this time of the Abbot's lodging and the somewhat delapidated ancient Abbey. Parts of the east wing of the house, adjoining the Abbot's lodging, date from the sixteenth century. Sir Richard's grandson, also called Richard Wenman, saw military service on behalf of Queen Elizabeth, and for this he too was knighted, at Cadiz in 1596. In the wake of the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 both Sir Richard Wenman and his wife Agnes were questioned on their part in the conspiracy. No action was taken, as it appears that Agnes Wenman may have had several innocent dealings with Roman Catholics involved on the margins of the plot to assassinate the King and Parliament. In fact, under Charles I in 1628 Sir Richard was created the first Viscount Wenman. Thame Park, south east of Thame, has a long and remarkable history. It is reputed to contain some of the oldest enclosed parkland in England. Thame Park was home for four hundred years to a Cistercian Abbey, and a community of monks, founded at the time when the famous order of white monks was enjoying great wealth and power. It bebstracted from the book "Newport News Virginia, 1607-1960" by Annie Lash Jester published 1961 1624 August 14- Edward Waters patented land on Waters Creek, now Lake Maury in the grounds of the Mariners Museum.
First Hand Accounts of Virginia, 1575-1705 Narratives of Early Virginia, 1606-1625 Edited by Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL.D President of the College of William and Mary Chrles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1907 THE VIRGINIA PLANTERS' ANSWER TO CAPTAIN BUTLER, 1623 The Answers of divers Planters that have long lived in Virginia, as alsoe of sundry Marriners and other persons that have bene often at Virginia unto a paper intituled: The Unmasked face of our Colony in Virginia, as it was in the Winter of the yeare 1622. 1. I FOUNDE the Plantacions generally seated uppon meere Salt marishes full of infectious Boggs and muddy Creekes and Lakes, and therby subjected to all those inconveniences and diseases which are soe commonly found in the moste Unsounde and most Unhealthy parts of England wherof everie Country and Clymate hath some. 1. I FOUNDE the Plantacions generally seated uppon meere Salt marishes full of infectious Boggs and muddy Creekes and Lakes, and therby subjected to all those inconveniences and diseases which are soe commonly found in the moste Unsounde and most Unhealthy parts of England wherof everie Country and Clymate hath some. Page 413 1623] THE ANSWER TO CAPTAIN BUTLER they are verie fruitfull and pleasant Seates, free from Salt Marishes being all on the fresh River, and they are all verie healthfull and high land except James Citty wch is yett as high as Debtforde or Radclyffe.3 © Copyright 2000 by Crandall Shifflett. All rights reserved.

Confirmation from the Museum Dear Mr. Huddleston, Thank you for your recent inquiry. While our collection does not specialize in early Virginia history, we do have some sources that helped out while searching for your ancestor John Huddleston. In Nell Marion Nugent's Cavaliers and Pioneers, it is indicated that one "John Hudleston, Marriner" owned a plot of land adjacent to Waters Creek. Waters Creek (whch no longer exists; it was dammed up in the 1930s to create a lake on our property), which ran out into the James River was named for English adventurer Edward Waters. This would possibly explain why Huddleston's farm was known as "Water's Edge." Unfortunately, there was no record of the name "Water's Edge" in our sources, and no description of Huddleston's lands other than the brief mention by Nugent. You may want to contact the Virginia Historical Society (www.vahistorical.org) or the Library of Virginia (www.lva.lib.va.us) to see if their records can shed more light on Huddleston's land holdings. As an aside, John Huddleston seems to make one last appearance within our collection. In volume 27 of the Virginia Historical Magazine from 1919, there is a reprint of some court cases that came up in Jamestown on February 19th, 1626. Huddleston is mentioned as a defendant in a case that sounds a tad on the sordid side. If you would like me to send some details on that case, I can. I just did not want to include anything too unpleasant without your okay. Our material on early Virginia did include some bits and pieces on the vessel Bona Nova. She was apparently an important vessel to the first settlers, bringing much needed supplies and reinforcements from England. She is listed as 200 tons (a sizable ship in those days, but a very cramped way to sail the ocean by modern standards) and carried on at least one occasion 120 passengers. I hope this information will be helpful. Regards, Josh Graml Reference Mariners' Museum Research Library and Archives

Josh Graml's reply: Josh Graml wrote: Dear Mr. Huddleston, Below is the excerpt from the 1919 "Virginia Historical Magazine" which gives a few sparse details on the Jamestown court case between one Alice Boyse and John Huddleston: "A COURT at James Citty the 19th. of February 1626, being sent: Mr. Doctor Pott. Capt. Smyth. Capt. Matthews. Mr. Secretary. Mr. ffarrar. Patrick Kennady marriner sworne & examined sayth that as concerning those words which Mrs. Allice Boyse taxeth Capt. Hudleston to have accused her with at Capt. Martins plantation, viz that he the say Capt. Hudleston should there say that Capt. Epes had the use of her body that night that he lay in James Slights house, or else said he never had the use of his owne wife, more then Capt. Epes had of her yt night; this deponeth sayth he did not heare Capt. Hudleston speake the same words, but that Capt. Hudleston sayd there was very unfitting behavior between them." I hope it is of interest. Sincerely, Josh Graml Mariners' Museum Research Library and Archives

New information on the land that was Captain John Huddleston's farm: Sir George Yeardley, Governor of Virginia, was given a tract of land by the king of the Weyanoke Indians in 1617. Their chief town was at the head of the creek later known as Powell's Creek. In 1618 Yeardley patented 1000 acres on the west side of a creek, which he named Flowerdieu, which was his wife's maiden name. By 1619, the Virginia Company of London had granted Sir George Yeardley a 1,000 acre tract 25 miles upriver from Jamestown. At that point of land, previously cleared by American Indians, Yeardley established a plantation and named it Flowerdew Hundred in honor of his wife's family. The settlement at Flowerdew Hundred was organized for the production and exportation of tobacco. LaVere Peters Genealogy and History of Flowerdew Hundred. Also from History of Flowerdew Hundred we get to learn the name of Sir George Yeardly's wife's name: Flowerdew Hundred, variously referred to as Flourdieu Hundred or Peirsey's Hundred, is probably named after Temperance FLOWERDIEU wife of Sir George YEARDLEY, VA's first Governor, who came to Virginia in January 1619 on the same ship with John and Sarah WOODSON. This about the time of the first legislative assembly in Jamestown-July 30, 1619-August 4, 1619. Flowerdieu was represented in the assembly, the first House of Burgesses, by Ensigne Roffingham and Mr. Jefferson.

How big was Captain John Huddleston's farm? Title: Colonial Families of the Southern States of America, Author: Stella Pickett Hardy Publication I have been trying to prove Stella's work and have a book where I believe where she got part of her early work on Captain John Hudleston of the Bona Noua. He is known by this name and his boat was knowned by this name in England. However, the Records of the Virginia Company which shows his name and boat by this name also his name as Huddleston and Huddlestone. Also, in American versions of the boat's name it is showned as Bona Nova. (To paraphrase Shakespeare: 'A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.') In the book 'The First Seventeen Years-Virginia, 1607-1624' By Charles E. Hatch, Jr. Published and Copyrighted in 1957 The Virginia 350th Anniversary Celebration Corporation, Williamsburg, Virginia on page 79 we find how she must of discovered Captain John Hurleston and Captain John Hudleston were one in the same. Captain William Powell traded acres here with Captain John Hurleston as early as 1620. A court case in 1625 establishes that Captain Powell and others " did cleere a piece of grounde" here in April, 1622 which later fell to Captain Samuel Matthews. Page 80 In May, 1625, it is of record that in excess of 3,700 acres had been taken up in "The territory of Tappahanna over against James Citie" by sixteen persons. Eleven of the grants were noted as "planted." The largest single grant was to William Ewens for 1,000 acres. It should be noted, perhaps, that no acreage figure was shown for the "Divident" of Captain John Hurleston.
Page 81
Hugh Crowder's Plantation: In 1625 Crowder was living on land here that earlier had been claimed by Captain John Hurleston who exchanged it about Christmas time in 1620 with Captain William Powell.
Page 101
Blunt Point: the extent of settlement in this area on the north side of James above Newport News in 1625 is difficult to determine. One for 100 acres, on August 14, 1624, was to Edward Waters at "Blunt Point" and several others were issued four months later in the area between the point and Newport News. Some were to old residents of Newport News and Keoughtan and several were issued to new arrivals. One grant for 150 acres to Maurice Thompson had been made as early as March 4, 1621. Patented acreage at "Blunt Pointe" and "below Blunt Point" in 1625 embraced some 2,200 acres and 1,390 acres respectively. the massacre of 1622 forced the withdrawal of any who may have been located in the area at that date. Included in the list of those killed at the time was Edward Walters, his wife, child, maid and boy all at "Master Edward Walters his house" which may have been in the Blunt Point vicinity.
If this were really Edward Waters who received the patent at Blunt Point in 1624, it would mean that he had already established himself here. Such is conconceivable since, at the time of the massacre, he and his wife were made prisoners by the Nansemond Indians and possibly could have escaped and took refuge at Elizabeth City [Kecoughtan].
Waters was an ancient planter who had come to Virginia with Gates, reaching the Colony in 1610. He was one of a party who had returned to bermuda for hogs for Virginia. Circumstances intervened and he remained there about seven years. It was not until about 1617 that he returned to Virginia where he was married and settled down. In 1625 he was listed as living at Elizabeth city with his wife, son and daughter, "borne in Virginia." His muster then included six servants and five others.

Court Record, 1625. A land dispute is brought before the Court. Justices were Sr. Fra' Wyatt, Sr. George Samell Mathews, Mr. Abraham Persie, and Mr. Wm. Cleybourne. It is stated that the piece of ground belonging to Capt. Powell, Richard Pace, Wm Pery, Thomas Gages, Richard Richards, and Hugh Crowthers had been cleared for the use of all concerned. The stir arose when Capt. Powell exchanged "that ground where Mr. Crowthers lives with Capt. Hurlstone". Hugh Crowthers declared that the land was not cleared for Capt. Powell or anyone else in particular and that furthermore six of his family (brothers? children? relatives?) who did help to clear the ground had noe share (or could this be the men working for him?). Hugh Crowthers here further declared that Capt. Mathews had worked as hard as anyone to bring this land to perfection. There is more to the record. Ref.: Virginia Magazine of History.

Depository: Principal Probate Registry / Class: Will-Register Books, 132 Pembroke. SR Number: SR 04098 Reel Number: Not filmed Title: Will of William Ewens References: Matthews Abstracts 1630-1654, Vol. 51. Will of William Ewens of Greenwich Co., Kent, mariner. To Mary his wife §100 a year for life from his lands in England, with noted exceptions. His other lands to his daughter Mary, as well as the annunity of §100 after his wife's death. His wife may inherit his daughter's legacy, but if neither inherits, half the rents of his land goes to Thomas Ewens the elder for life, and then to his sons William and Thomas, or failing them to his kinsmen Ewen Johnson, Margaret Johnson, Ewen Peters, Mary Noble, and her daughter in equal shares. (Provision is made for contingent inheritance).

Sir William Berkeley's ideal society, however, needed not only a ruling class, but also a people to be ruled. Most of Virginia's white immigrants were either indentured servants or convicts. In 1618 Virginia had adopted the headright system that gave fifty acres of land to anyone who would bring settlers to Virginia. England's unskilled and unemployed laborers could not pay a ship's passage to the New World. It was paid for them in exchange for their signing an indenture or contract to become a servant for 4-7 years. The fifty acres, however, went to the man who paid their passage, not to the immigrants themselves. They came with few possessions, were examined like livestock, and worked under grueling conditions. Besides those who became servants voluntarily, convicts, prostitutes, and prisoners of war were forcibly "transported" from England to Virginia in large numbers. It seems today that no one claims descent from them. Credits The Story of Virginia was curated by James C. Kelly, Assistant Director for Museums. Text for the online exhibition was written by James C. Kelly. Additional text by John d'Entremont, Keith Egloff, David Hackett Fischer, and Sara Bearss. Additional input came from Robert Gross, Suzanne Lebsock, and Robert Pratt.
From the Yancey family site: The voyage to America was by no means easy and the actual trip across the ocean was probably the worst of it. The journey across the great Atlantic took an average of two to three months-a dreadfully long journey for the adventurous immigrants in view of the poor conditions. The ships were generally crowded and cleanliness, hygiene, and decent and sufficient living quarters, it would seem, were luxuries not afforded many of the voyagers bound for America. Hunger, thirst, boredom, depression, anxiety, fear, sickness and, all too commonly, death were a number of the many unpleasant experiences witnessed by these early America-bound immigrants. The gross uncleanliness and generally unwholesome conditions aboard the crowded vessels resulted in the outbreak of epidemic diseases. The great epidemics of measles, small pox and other contagious diseases, which at times spread throughout the colonies taking many victims, were often the result of the disease being originated on these contaminated and unwholesome vessels. During the early 17th century England was plagued with weak and unfavorable economic conditions. Wages were low, unemployment high, and commodities scarce. The laws of primogeniture, markedly influencing life in England, provided that the eldest child in a family was to receive, under normal circumstances, the entire estate of his father, the majority of his parents possessions, and often exclusively inherit the social rank of his father. Many a younger son, finding himself with little material property and upon viewing the desperate economic situation of the country, looked anxiously for a means to better his economic and social position. Upon hearing the often exaggerated stories of a new unsettled land "of milk and honey", where land was up for the taking and a fortune could be made, and upon discovering that the law allotted to every settler fifty acres of land for each member of his family he brought to the new land, many a man of humble means sacrificed all he had for a chance to seek his fortune and begin a new life in America. The main concentrations of early settlers of Colonial Virginia were to be found along the great rivers of Eastern Virginia. Along the Eastern Coast of Virginia four great rivers empty into the Atlantic-from South to North: The James, the York, the Rappahannock and the Potomac. Between these rivers are three stretches of land. This area from the eastern shores, west to what was called the "fall line" (which bordered the fertile inner plateau known as the Piedmont) was known as the "Tidewater". Thus the terms "Tidewater Virginia" and "Tidewater Aristocracy". The constant washing of the soil from the fertile Piedmont region down to the Tidewater area made it a very productive farm area. It was in this area that our first ancestors came. No one seems to know exactly where the first Yancey brothers settled when they arrived in America, but by the early 18th century the two main concentrations of Yanceys seem to have been in Hanover County, North of the James River and in that area, along the Rappahannock, that in 1748 became Culpeper County. (http://americanhistory.about.com/library/prm/blmartinshundred.htm

Martin's Hundred Indian warriors killed hundreds of Virginia colonists during the Powhatan Uprising of 1622. Also among the victims were 20 women whose stories will never be fully told. By J. Frederick Fausz for American History Magazine Fortunately for the residents of the main settlement of Jamestown, an Indian informant had alerted them to the upcoming attack, and they were on guard, but Wolstenholme Towne was “ruinated and spoyled” by the Indian assault and suffered the highest death toll of any settlement during the uprising. Although the official number of Virginia colonists killed was recorded at 347, some settlements, such as Bermuda Hundred, did not send in a report, so the number of dead was probably higher. The Indian raids suddenly and shockingly transformed Virginia into a “labyrinth of melancholy,” a severely wounded colony struggling to survive. The loss was so great that Martin’s Hundred and many other settlements were temporarily abandoned, although England continued to “set forth a verie chargeable supply of people” to Virginia.

In 1624 Captain John Smith published his Generall Historie of Virginia and provided even more detailed information. He reported that an English expedition along the Potomac River had received a message in late June or early July 1622 from Mistress Boyse, “a prisoner with nineteene more” of the Powhatans. Mistress Boyse, who pleaded for the governor to try to secure the captives’ release, was the wife of either John Boyse, who had represented Martin’s Hundred in the first Virginia legislature of 1619, or his kinsman, Thomas Boyse of the same plantation, who was listed among those killed in the March 1622 attack. With her at the Indian stronghold near present-day West Point, Virginia, were Mistress Jeffries, wife of Nathaniel Jeffries who survived the uprising, and Jane Dickenson, wife of Ralph Dickenson, an indentured servant slain in the assault. It soon became clear that the fate of the missing women depended not upon official concern or humanitarian instincts but upon the principle that everything and everybody had a price. Near the end of 1623, more than a year and a half after the uprising, the prosperous Dr. Pott ransomed Jane Dickenson and other women from the Indians for a few pounds of trade beads.

By 1624, no more than seven of the fifteen to twenty hostages had arrived in Jamestown. The majority of them returned with Jane Dickenson. Those who did not come back were presumed killed during the 1622 attack, although one captive, Anne Jackson, was not returned until 1630. Mistress Boyse, the first of the missing women to rejoin the colony, was not mentioned in official records following her return. Another of the captives, Mistress Jeffries, died within a few months of her release. Anne Jackson probably returned to the colony badly broken from the consequences of her captivity, for in 1630 the council ordered that she "bee sent for England with the first opportunity," with the stipulation that her brother take care of her until she was on board a ship. Nothing more was heard of Jane Dickenson after she petitioned the council in March 1624 for release from her "slavery" with Dr. Pott.

The missing women of Martin’s Hundred were uprooted by their enemies, manipulated by their countrymen, and mistreated in both societies. No brave frontiersmen stalked their captors, and no romantic legends arose to memorialize them. There were no heroics involved in their return; in the harsh, unforgiving world of Virginia in the early seventeenth century, it was a dispassionate business transaction that brought about their release. This article was written by J. Frederick Fausz and originally published in American History Magazine in March 1998. ©2002, PRIMEDIA History Group, a division of PRIMEDIA Special Interest Publications. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of PRIMEDIA is prohibited.

ALMANACK; PLACES; HISTORIC BUILDINGS In the 17th century, the sprawling farm was named Martin's Hundred, and it was among the subsidiary "particular plantations" of the joint-stock Virginia Company of London. The Society of Martin's Hundred, named for Richard Martin, recorder of the City of London, was its owner. Sir John Wolstenholme was among its investors. William Harwood was the farm's commander. Martin's Hundred (hundred defined a subdivision of an English county) fronted on 10 miles of the north shore of a bend in the James River, about 9 miles below Jamestown. The administrative center was Wolstenholme Towne, a fortified settlement of about 40 souls sheltering in rough cabins of wattle and daub woven on wooden posts thrust into the clay subsoil. Still, fresh settlers came, and on March 22, 1622, the Powhatans rose to kill as many English as they could surprise in their homes and fields. From near modern Richmond to Newport News, the Powhatans burned and looted dwellings and desecrated corpses. Death counts vary, but about 400 English died. Martin's Hundred, the plantation hardest hit, lost more than 50, perhaps as many as 70. Wolstenholme Towne's death toll was not separated in the death rolls. Wolstenholme Towne was resettled a year or more later but abandoned sometime after 1645. It may be that no trace of the town was apparent by the time planter Robert "King" Carter bought the land about 1709. What remained of Wolstenholme Towne and its dead lay forgotten beneath the plantation's fields and woodlands until 1976. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation © 2002.

On January 22, 1626, a trial was hold in Jamestown, Virginia, that produced one of the queerest judgements ever rendered in this or any other country. JOSEPH ROYALL was a ship's master in England and worked for a man by the name of Boise. In June, 1625, Boise outfitted a ship for transporting people to the colonies. The ship left England on July 1, 1625, with Mrs. Boise and 4 daughters as passengers for the trip over. On the trip, Capt. ROYALL, "thru neglecte" caused sea water to ruin the clothing of the passengers. At the trial, the court decreed that Captain ROYALL should provide Mrs. Boise and her four daughters with all of the dresses, clothing and accessories that they might want FOR THE REST OF THEIR NATURAL LIVES. [Alice Boyse was aboard the Bona Noua.] Matthew Edlow (Edlowe, Edloe) was member House of Burgesses for College Plantation 1618. His widow Alice (who married secondly Luke Boyse)had patent Nov. 1636 for land between Harrow Attacks and the falls for her personal adventure and transportation of 14 persons. Matthews Edlowe, Junior (son of Matthew) settled in James City Co. and has numerous descendants (William and Mary XV, p. 282, and Virginia Magazine, V., p. 96). Patricke Kennady loads tobacco on the Thomas & John in May 15, 1628.
Richard Cocke was a prominent man in Henrico County. He was involved in the maritime trade and may have been the purser of the ship Thomas and John, which was in Virginia waters in 1627. He got patents for considerable land, including the estates of “Bremo” and “Malvern Hill” and was the ancestor of all Cocke relations. Copyright © 2001-2002, John W. Pritchett. All rights reserved.

Following up the "Thomas" and John" ship: It was the usual custom at this period for a vessel, on her completion, to be furnished with as many pieces of ordnance as her owner deemed necessary for her defence, and for this purpose, warrants, known as Trinity House Certificates, were issued. They are known to have been granted in respect of the following ships, built by Tranekmore at Shoreham. Five of them were of 300 tons-a fair size for those days-four of 200, and one each of 180, 150, and 140 tons. The dates given are those of the certificates. 27th September, 1625, the "Thomas Bonaventure" ; 4th January, 1626, the "Garland," of London ; 28th October, 1627, a ship on the stocks unfinished; 15th July, 1629, the "Mary and John," of London; 14th October, 1629, a ship unnamed; 25th November, 1629, the "Content," of London; 5th June, 1630, the "Charles," of London ; 27th July, 1631, the "Joan Bonaventure" ; 5th May, 1632, the "Confident" ; 6th July, 1633, the "Joseph," of London ; 28th September, 1633, the "Thomas and John," of London, which vessel was "furnished with 18 pieces of cast-iron ordnance, from the usual market in Smithfield " ; 7th May, 1636, the "Blessing," of Dover ; 25th June, 1636, the "Ann and Sarah." Pages 148 and 149 of the "The Story of Shoreham" by Henry Cheal Hon. Curator and Librarian to the Sussex Archaeological Society Illustrated by Arthur B. Packham Hove Combridges 1921 Copyright © Martin Snow 2002 All rights reserved Revised 27 February 2002

Since all information concerning a Captain John Huddleston of the 'Bona Noua' ends in August 21 1626 (at the latest and July 21 1626 referring to the letters of administration which was 2 days after the James City Court incident with Alice Boyse and a Captain John Huddleston of the 'Thomas and John' doesn't start till May 13 1627 combined with the 'Thomas and John' being in England in September 28 1633; it makes one wonder if his commission was just done and he simply went back home to England to be with his family. One might even think he died between July 19 1626 and July 21 1626. One Huddleston researcher claims the two John Huddlestons might be entirely two different people referring the captain of the 'Bona Noua' and the 'Thomas and John'. Simply put, Captain John Huddleston left Virginia before May 13 1627 because it says from Virginia and was back in Virginia May 15, 1628 because Patrick Kennady as loading the ship in Virginia at that time. We know that Patrick Kennady is listed in the Allice Boyse document and that court proceedings was Elizabeth City, Virginia. Also, Doctor Pott, the physician, listed in the Elizabeth City court document and Page 485 of the 'Records of the Virginia Company' in July 25, 1621 ... We haue likewise sent youe to sufficient preachers: Mr Haut Wyatt, who is to be Preacher to the Governors tennts: and Mr Bolton, whom wee haue consigned to Elizabeth Citty, to inhabitt with Capt Tho: Nuce to hom we recomende him, vnderstandinge that Mr Stockton is otherise seated. And for supply of Phisitions place we haue sent youe Doctor Pott,...
From IGI records we learn John Hurleston of Picton, Chesire, England married in 1609 and was buried in 3 Nov 1669 in Plemendstall, Chesire, England married Anne Wilbraham of Woodhey and Tilston, Chesire, England. There son John Hurleston was christen 5 Nov 1618 in Chesire and married Mary Leigh 11 May 1657. John and Mary's marriage is registered on microfilm number 6906734 of filche: 2. John Hurleston and Anne Wilbraham had 12 children in total.

MINUTES OF THE COUNCIL AND GENERAL COURT OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA 1622-1632, 1670-1676, p. 132 the 11th of January 1626 At this Court there was a petition preferred by Mrs. Alice Boise widow agt JOSEPH ROYALL servant unto her late husband Luke Boise & shewed a covenant bearing date the 25th day Febr: 1625, wherein ye said JOSEPH ROYALL was bound unto ye said Luke Boise to performe certaine conditions therin mentioned, whereuppon it is ordered according to the said Covenants that ye said JOSEPH ROYALL shall make or cause to be made gratis for ye said Alice Boise her child & such servants as were then of his family all such apparell as they shall weare or use til such day & time as he shall depart this land, so longe as those of ye family shall either serve her or ye child.

ADVENTURERS OF PURSE AND PERSON 1607-1625 p.283-6 JOSEPH ROYALL, aged 20 years, came to Virginia in the "Charitie", July 1622 and the following year in the census was listed at Neck of Land in Charles City. As shown in the muster he was one of two young men serving Luke Boyse. After her husband's death Mrs. Boyse petitioned the Court regarding an agreement entered into between her husband and young ROYALL: At this Court (11 January 1626) there was a petition preferred by Mrs. Alice Boise widow, against JOSEPH ROYALL servant to her late husband Luke Boise and showed a covenant bearing date 25 February 1625, wherein the said JOSEPH ROYALL was bound unto the said Luke Boise to perform certain conditions therein mentioned; whereupon, it is ordered, according to the said covenant that the said JOSEPH ROYALL shall make or cause to be made gratis for the said Alice Boise, her child and such servants as were then of this family all such apparel as they shall wear or use till such day and time as he shall depart this land, so long as those of the family shall either serve her or the child. A decree of this sort would be difficult to enforce and it is reasonable to conclude that circumstances freed young ROYAL from the permanent obligation under which Mrs. Boyse sought to place him. By 15 August 1637 he was a land owner in his own right, having patented a portion of a tract later included in the Isham-Royall plantation known as "Doghams". The land lay on the north side of the James River above "Shirley" and remained in the Royall family for more than 200 years.

1679 Tythables For Henrico County Att a Court holden att Varina for the County of Henrico the second day of June Anno Dom 1679... An account of ye several fortye Tythables ordered by this Wor'll Court to fitt out men and horse armes &c. according to act, vis: In Bermuda Hundred: Jos Royall 3 At Mr Hatcher's Sen 5 Jno Huddlesee 2. Huddlesee, John, 24W(1) 133, 208.

DEED OF ABRAHAM CHILDERS SON OF ABRAH CHILDERS 1681 Know all men by these presents that I ABRAHAM CHILDERS (sonne & heir of ABRAH CHILDERS decd) for and in consideration of a tract of land of JNO. PLEASANTS being five hundred and forty eight acres, lying and being in the Forke of foure mike Creeke (part) as a patent will more fully appears, remit release & forever quitt claimed any ringt title or interest of this within mentioned land which was by my father purchased of WM. HARRIS & given me by his last will and testament as the said will may appeare. And doe by these presents for me my heirs of adms. forever assigne all rights title & interest of the said land within expressed unto the said JNO. PLEASANTS his heirs and assigns forever to have and to hold the said piece or parcell of land in as full & ample manner to all intents & purposes, as I myselfe my heirs might or could doe or hereafter may doe by virtue of this bill of sale & my fathers will or by any other way or meanes whatsoever I have hereunto sett my hand & seale this tenth day of February 1680/81. Testes signed JOHN HUDDLESEE ABRAHAM CHILDERS his BART B. Mark Test: H. DAVIS dep clerI ANNE wife of said ABRAH doe hereby acknowledge to relinquish my right of dower to ye said land in this conveyance mentioned witness my hand this 1st December 1681. ANNE CHILDERS

Henrico co, VA, Deeds 1677-1805 by Benjamin Weisinger p 109, 10 Nov, 1679 John Huddlesee, 40 (age given at deposition) Ibid p 135, 2 August, 1680 John Huddlesee for 400 lbs tobacco to John Pleasants, my part of land taken up by said Pleasants and myuself, 274 acres, part of 578 acres patented 1 Oct, 1679, on North side of James River. Wit: John Stewart, Tho (+) Huddlesee Signed: John Huddlesee (John Stewart is the husband of Michelle Ballew) Ibid p 150, 10 Feb, 1680 Henry Chichleley, Knt, Dep. Gov., grants to John Pleasants and John Huddlesee, 548 acres on north side of James River on main branch of Four mile Creek to Captain Matthews. Signed: Hen Chicheley, 20 Sep, 1680. We make over our part in above land to Abraham Childres. Ibid p 199, 1 Dec, 1681 I Abraham Childres son of Abrah Childres, dec'd, for one tract of land had of John Pleasants, sell him the plantation I live on John Pleasants land is 548 acres on four Mile Creek. I quit claim to the land purchased by my father of William Harris, and left to me in his will dated 10 Feb, 1680. Wit: John Huddlesee, Barth Roberts Signed; Abraham Childres Anne, wife of Childress relinquished her dower right. Ibid p 201, 1 Oct, 1679 Grant from Gov Chicheley to John Pleasants and John Huddlesee for 548 acres on north side of James River on main branch of Four Mile Creek, for transporting 11 persons. We assign all interest in above patent to Abraham Childres. Wit: R Sharpe, Ro Evans Signed; Jno Pleasants, John Huddlesee Ibid p 204, 20 Feb, 1681 Bond of Abraham Childres, son and heir of Abraham Childres, dec'd, of Henrico co, to John Pleasants, 10000 lbs tobacco, in deed of land from Childres to Pleasatns, being land on North side of James River at lower end of Curles, 90 acres, purchased of Maj William Harris. Wit: John Huddlesee, Tho (+) Huddlesey Signed: Abraham Childers Ibid p 220, 12 Nov, 1687 Thomas Cocke sr, of County & Parish of Henrico, Gent, to John Huddlesey of same, planter, throught humble request and manifold importunity of Huddlesey, then imprisoned and under execution served on his body by Mr John Brodnax for a debt 2634 lbs tobacco, redeemed and released him from prison and has since hindered and stayed a second execution by Michael Gartwright, by satisfying sum of 1012 lbs tobacco. For all ths Huddlesey agrees to serve Cocke in such employment as Cocke directs, 1 year for every 4005 lbs tobacco. Wit: Joshua Wynne, Stephen Cocke. Signed; John Huddlesee Recorded 1 August, 1691

In FamilySearch he is also listed as John Huddlesy (AFN:197X-44Q) Born 1639 died about Jun 1694 in Henrico, Virginia and he was married to a Susan last name unknown (AFN:197X-45X) who was born before 1660. John Huddleston born 1639 and Susan had three children: Susan Huddlesy(Huddleston) (AFN:197X-48K) who we find later marries a Frances Chalmley in Henrico, Virginia at St. James Church; Charles Huddlesy (Huddleston) (AFN:197X-46S) born before 1694 and a Thomas Huddlesy (Huddleston) (AFN:197X-47C) born before 1694.

A single instance may be mentioned. An inventory of the personal estate of Mr. John Cumber of Henrico was presented in court in 1679.1 It reveals the fact that his tools were at the time of his death lying at four different places in the county. It will be interesting to enumerate them. At Mr. Cox’s, there were one jack-plane, one smoothing plane, and four small plough planes, two files, two bramble bits, one keyhole saw, a quarter-inch and a one and a half inch gouge, a half-inch and a quarter-inch short auger, a one-half inch and one-quarter inch heading chisel, two mortising chisels, one gimlet, one pair of compasses, one pair of piercers, two hand-irons for a turning lathe, a chalk line, two wooden gauges one-half foot square, and one tool chest. At Mr. Radford’s, there were one hand-saw, a pocket-roll, a jack and line, one two-inch and one half-inch auger, two smoothing and eight small narrow planes, one hold-fast, one hammer, a bench hook, four small pincer bits, a file for a hand-saw, one inch and one half-inch heading chisel, a broad turning chisel, one paring and one half-inch ordinary chisel, two gimlets, a quarter-inch gouge, and a small pincer bit, two small squares, one gauge, one bow-saw, and one pair of compasses. At Falling Creek Mill, there were two broad axes, three adzes, four augers, three chisels, one whip and three hand-saws, one foreplane, two hammers, one pair of compasses, one chalk line, and two files. At Mr. John Hudlesy’s, there were two chisels and one small jack-plane. 1 Records of York County, vol. 1657-1662, p. 193, Va. State Library.

In the Name of God Amen. I John CUMBER, make this my last Will and Testament, being sick in body, but in sound and perfect memeory, thanks be to God. Item: First I bequeath my soul into the hands of his maker hoping that bby the merrit of Jesus Christ my Savior, I shall have parden for all my sins, and by his mercy and for his sake be received into his Heavenly Kingdom, there to live forever and ever and enjoy that heavenly happiness, provided for those whom he hath redeemed by his most precious blood Item: Next I bequeath my body to the Earth from whence it came to be buried decently and according to the discretion of my executor. Item: After my debts satisfied, my will is and I do give unto John RADFORD my small gun. Item? I make Mr. Thomas COCKE my whole and sole executor desiring him to except of the trouble and to take all my estate into his hands of what natural or orginal source and-------------------as my estate will go to satisfy all my just debts that that shall appear to be justly due by law. The the testfication of this to do my last will and testament , there hereunto sett my hand and seal this 30th of March 1679. John Cumber Witnessed in the Presence of Francis Radford Samuel F. Moody Charles White Henrico County, Virginia - Wills & Probates Wills Film #31769 On File with Family History Library 85 East Temple Street Salt Lake City, Utah 84501

In 1695, Robert Sharpe contracted to pay John Hudlesy, both being citizens of Henrico, twenty-two hundred pounds of tobacco in consideration that Hudlesy would build for him a framed house, thirty feet long and twenty feet wide, having a chimney at each end. Sharpe was to furnish the boards and shingles, and Hudlesy the nails and timbers, the latter during the performance of the agreement being required to supply his own food. 2 Ibid., vol. 1677-1699, orders Oct. 1, 1695, Va. State Library.

Falling Creek Ironworks Archeological Site *** (added 1995 - Site - #95000242) Also known as 44CF7 Address Restricted, Richmond Historic Significance: Information Potential Area of Significance: Engineering, Historic - Non-Aboriginal, Exploration/Settlement, Industry Cultural Affiliation: Euro-American-English Period of Significance: 1600-1649 During the years 1619 to 1622, the Virginia Company attempted to establish an ironworking facility on Falling Creek, in Chesterfield County, Virginia, now on the outskirts of the city of Richmond. The Falling Creek Ironworks were the first iron production facility in North America. The ironworks were to produce iron from local ore deposits. According to Virginia Company records, the ironworks was able to produce some quantity of iron, although it is not clear whether it had begun full production. In 1622, war with the Powhatan Confederacy of tribes put the operation of the Falling Creek Ironworks to an abrupt end. An attack by Native American forces left the all but two colonists at the Ironworks dead, and the facilities destroyed. Previous archaeological investigations had identified a terrace located at the foot of the lower falls of Falling Creek as the site of the 1619-1622 ironworks, but Limited testing during the course of these investigations found no conclusive evidence of structures or domestic areas. The geophysical investigation was performed by Archaeo-Physics LLC. Archaeological investigations at the Falling Creek Ironworks are under the direction of Lyle E. Browning, Browning and Associates, Ltd working through the Chesterfield County Department of Parks & Recreation. The project was sponsored by the Falling Creek Development Committee, Chesterfield County, Virginia reference: Jones, Geoffrey. 2001. A Geophysical Investigation at the Falling Creek Ironworks, an Early Industrial Site in Virginia. Archaeological Prospection, 8, 247-256 Shallow Subsurface Geophysical Survey ©2004 Archaeo-Physics LLC - Materials from this website may be reproduced for educational purposes; please cite or link to source page. Chesterfield has historically been a leader in industry. Falling Creek was the birth place of two great American industries, iron and coal. The first iron furnace in the United States was built in Chesterfield. Opechancanough's Indians put an end to the Falling Creek iron works in the Great Massacre of 1622 in which iron workers and their families were killed and the iron furnace was destroyed. copyright © 2001 Chesterfield County, Virginia

Smyth of Nibley Papers Public Libraries, 1619, 1621 Page 1 of 1 Survey Report No. GL.5 Title Smyth of Nibley papers Vol.V No. 65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas,17 November 1621. The depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, master of the "Bona Nova"; William Jackson of Ratcliffe' gunner of the "Bona Nova"; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe, mariner. The depositions state that the deponents were in Virginia during the period January - June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter. John Ward, an ancient planter who was thus in Virginia by 1616. Jamestown City, VA Census - 1624 THE CENSUS OF VIRGINIA IN 1624 John Ward free man age 24 Location E. C. Across Hampton Riv Ship of Entry Bona Nova Date of Arrival 1619 Census Date 1624-02-07 A census taken March-May 1619 enumerated twenty-six men and no women or children on “Captayne Wardes Plantation.” Records show he arrived in Virginia on the Sampson on 22 April 1619 and left the next month to fish as far north as Maine. 1622 Thomas Sheffield obtained a patent for 150 acres some 3 miles from Falling Creeke & 2 miles above henrico Island that became "Sheffield" plantation. Fact 1632 Living in Virginia. 11 FEB 1631/32 Earliest record of Seth Ward; Varina; planter; three score acres of land in upper parts of Henrico adjoining Dan'l Sherley (Passenger on the Bona Nova), Powhatan's Three, Three mile swamp, dated 30 May 1634. 11 FEB 1631/32 Land order for Seth Ward, 3 mile swamp, Henrico Co., VA Fact 30 MAY 1634 Seath Ward of Varina, lease 60 acres in Henrico, abutting land of Daniel Sherley toward Powhetans's Tree, 21 year lease Patent book 1, page 405. Like Seth, John too received a 21-year lease in Varina near the land of Thomas Packer or Parker on 20 March 1633/4 — only two months before Seth. Patent 1, page 146. John Ward’s wife, Grace —, also an immigrant, died and John married Elizabeth (—) Boates, the widow of George Boates. When William Hatcher secured a patent for land in Henrico County on 1 June 1636 they described the property as “neare land of Elizabeth Ward, Widdowe.” Patent book 1, page 353. Elizabeth remained a widow only briefly because when James Place patented land the same day she was Mrs. James Place. Patent book 1, page 353. Seth Ward’s patent of 1643 included 50 acres purchased from John Baker and a Richard Ward patent of 1637 adjoined John Baker. 17 NOV 1643 Gov. Berkeley renewed patent to Seth Ward with addition of 50 acres purchased of John Barbar (John Barbar was on Captain John Huddleston's commission and later had the Bona Nova in Canada per earlier entry as late as 1633, 1 May 1636 & 150 acres more. Patent 1, page 440.

mar·i·ner [ mérrənər ] (plural mar·i·ners) noun sailor or navigator: somebody who sails or navigates vessels at sea [13th century. Via Anglo-Norman or French marinier from Latin marinarius , from marinus , from mare “sea.”]

WILL OF SETH WARDE: Wills Recorded in The Prerogative Court of Canterbury; Lewyn 51
"In the name of God Amen. The fouertenth daie of ffebruarie in the yeare of our Lord god One Thousand five hundred ninetie eighte. I SETHE WARD of Abbington in the countie of Cambridge yeoman being ____in bodie but in perfect remembrance thamks be given to Almighty God doe orgaine and make this my last will and Testament in manner and forme followinge. First I bequeath my soule to Alimighie God my maker surelie believinge that by the death and passion of m Jesus Christe my redeemer to have forginess of all my synnes and my bodie I will to be buried in the churchyarde of my parrishe church of Abbington aforesaide.
Item: I give unto ANNIS MY WIFE five pounds three shillings and eigth pence yearlie during her naturall life to be paide quarterlie unto her out of my farms in Abbington where I now dwell (that is to saie) fouer nobles everie quarter. Ref I give unto my siade wife two beats in my yarde one browne cowe with high hornes and one blacke pyed cow and three sheep with the pasturing and getting of them in the commons or fields of Abbington as my sonne John goes\eth. Ref. I give unto her my saide wife one ioynes bedd and a trundle bedd standing in the filer with one feather bed one bolster who pillows one mattrisse two blankets and one coverlipp and a quilte with the ____ to the same belongine. Furthermore my will is that my saide wife should have her meate and drinke and abinginge with MY SONNE JOHN during her life yf she does like of it provided ____ and yf she doe not like ofit her borde with him my siade sonne JOHN his heirs or assinges that then my will is that she shall have her dwelling in one SETH WARDE laboere now dwelleth in Abbington payinge noe rent for the same during her life. Ref I will hat my saide sonne JOHN his heirs ______ or assignes shall yearlie every year of his own beste and ____ __ __ of meade in the yard of the saide tenement to the use of my wife and one ____ of my best wheats and one ___ of my best Barley that she my saide wifhem fe or her assigns shall out fof my saide farm in Abbington twentie years during her life to be chosen at or before the feast of Saint Toman Duppolis and the same to be ruff[?] downe and ___ ___ where my saide wife shall ___ within the saide farme of Abbingyon as she ___ and charges of my saide sonne JOHN his heirs,___ or assignes and if my saide wife shall happen to departe from my saide sonne JOHN that then mysiade wife shallhavbe the growing of fine barley in the Commons and the proffit of it to her use.
Item: I give unto MY DAUGHTER MARIE threescore and five pounds thirteen shillings and fouer pence of good and lawfull Monie of England to be paide unto her at the day of her marriage or within one quarer of a year after my decease, which of them shall first happen to come provided that if my saide daughter shall happen to depart this world before either of the saide tymes then I will that her saide protion shall be equallie devided amonst my othe children that then shall be living. Ref. I give unto my saide daughter MARIE two beasts ths is to saie the one a blacke cowe that ____first to years and the other a redd heifer gravid with calf. Ref. I give toher one I syned bedsted, a cupboard and isyned table and a formed new featherbed and a bolster two futuan pillows a mattress five blankets and one new bed coverlet and five pairs of flaxen sheets and eigth pairs of ? sheets three pairs of flazen pillow___s one flaxen tablecloth two sowen tablecloths and a flexen _____ ____ and fifteen towels one dozen of napkinds Five pewter platters six pewter dishes five _____ five pewter salts two white ______ and a cotton _______ a cotton ____ a brass pott a great brass panne one copper and a ____ a chamber pott and little isyned stooles a a chaire to be given to her at the day of her marriage of within one quarter of a year after my decease.
Item: I give unto MY SON ENOSHE all my freehold landa and commons with ______ ___ whihc I have lying and ____ in Littlington and Steeplewarden forest to have and to hold to him and to his heirs and assigns for ever. Ref I give and bequeath unto my said sonne ENOCH all my dessmaine_____ lands and ____ the of Lymltinsorstet lying in LIttling ton and Steeplewarden afreosiade to him and his heirs and assingas according to the outcome of the _____. Ref I give unto him foruer horses to take his share out of the north ____ __ started and ploughgears to furnishe the said four horses and one longe carte with the wheels ___ to take his share after my soone John hath first chosen and one _____ and a oaur if sbells the ___ bus one and one ____ ___ __. Moreover I give unto my saide sone ENOCH halfe my dropp which I have for my part of EDWARD HINTON his choice for the year after my decease and I give him two beasta an a yearling calfe that is to saie and white _____ cowe and the other a white __ a red pyed yearling calfe. Ref I give unto him an isyned bedstedd in the litlle chamber by the dore a mattress an teather bedd and a holster five piloows that is a fustian pillow and a fife? Pillow two blankets a new coverlet being greene and yellow three pairs of flaxen sheets three pairs of ___ sheets three flaxen pillow_____s and one of hempe four a bande? Towels halfe a dozen of table napkins and longe flaxen tablecloth two ___ tablecloths a drinking flagon clothe and _______ one great ____ a new posnet? Three great pewter platters three pewter dishes three ____ one white _____ one cotton ______ a pewter salt a ____ pewter dishe one highe charie two isyned stooles the one of the bigge ____ and the other ogf the copper ___ the middle _____ and the caste drippings panne of yron a pair of yron ____ and a great barrel and two vareels of the copper sorte out of the best ___ for ______ _____.. _____ the best frying pans Item, I give unto MY SONNE THOMAS ten pounds of lawful Englishe monie to be paid him withi a halfe year after my decease and other five remindaer of life lawfull English monie to be piade unto him that tyme __ months afer. Ref I give him, two beasts that is to saie the one a blacke and the other a browne cowe.
Item I give unto MY DAUGHTER ANNE JACOB five pounds to be paide unto her within one year after my decease. Ref I give ELIZABETH JACOB MY SAIDE DAUGHTER ANNE'S CHILDE the summe of five pounds lawful Englishe monie to paide unto her at such tyme as she shall accomplishe the age of fifteen years and if it happens that the saide ELIZABETH to die before she doth accomplish the saide age of fifteen years, then my will is that yf saide daughter ANNE have anie more children it shall remaine unto the next childe of my saide daughter and if she have noe more children that it shall remand unto JOHN WARDE the sonne of my sonne JOHN WARDE and if he happen to die then to remind utno SETH WARD his brother. Item I give unto ROBERT WARDE MY BROTHERE twentie shilling of lawfull Englishe Monie to be paide unto him within a quarter of a year after my decease/ Ter I give unto my sister Wilson Tenne shillings to be paide within one quarter of a year after my decease. I give unto the reparament of my tithe church of Abbington aforesaide___ shillings of lawful English Monie. Ref. I give unto the poore people of the ____ of Abbington tenne shillings to be piade to them at the date of my burial. I Ref I give unto JOHN WARDE SONNE OF SAID SONNE JOHN WARDE fouer pounds of Lafull Englishe money to be paid unto him at the age of one and twentie years. Ref I give to SETH WARD his brother the summe of five pounds Lawful Englishe Monie to be paid unto him at the age of one and twentie years of life. Ref I give to ANNE WARD DAUGHTER OF MY SAID SONNE JOHN and unto MARTHA WARD, ELLIN WARDE, MARIE WARDE, to___of them the summe of five pounds to be paid unto either of them at such time as they shall accomplishe the age of fifteen years provided afterwards that if anie of these my sonne John his children shall happen to die before they shall accomplishe the siade age of fiftine years that then their portion shall be equallie divied among the othe children that shall be living. Item I give ynto everie one of my servants three shillings and four pence to be paide unto either of them within one quarter of a year after my descese. Ref My will is that ANNIS MY WIFE and MY SONNE JOHN shall equallie ___ amd doveode all the brass pewter and lynnon between them which is not bequeathed . The ___ opf my goodes and chattels unbequeatehed my debts paide and my legacies fulfilled. I give unto JOHN WARDE MY SONNE whom I make my sole executor of this my last will and testament. Ref I do ordaine ______ STEWARD and JOHN JACOB to be my supervisors of this my will and testament and I give to each of them for their ____ five shillings . Witness this my last will and testament ____ _____ and ROBERT WARDE with _____. Signum SETHE WARDE ____ BENNETT, ROBERT WARDE."

Capt. Seth Ward I, in his own words If he could speak to us today, Capt. Seth Ward I might describe his life as follows. I testified at a deposition in August 1691 that I was 30, so I was born about 1661. Henrico County Deeds & Wills 1688-1697, page 223. Being a county clerk was the road to wealth. I had to pay 200 pounds of tobacco in October 1681 to record my marriage license. Henrico County Deeds & Wills 1688-1697, page 185. Since he lost the record, I suppose the county owes me a refund. Anyway, the woman I married was likely Ann Hatcher whose grandfather Henry Lound left one shilling to his granddaughter, Ann Ward. Seth Ward II was the eldest son of Capt. Seth Ward and Ann Hatcher. His father died young and in 1713 his younger brother Joseph Ward chose Seth to be his guardian. Henrico County Court Order Book 1710-1714, page 251. Copyright © 2001-2004, John W. Pritchett. All rights reserved. The proximity of John and Seth Ward in Varina within two months suggests they could be brothers. Indeed a will in Abbington, Cambridgeshire, made by one Seth Ward in 1598 gives “unto John Ward the sonne of my saide sonne John Ward tenn poundes of lawfull English monie to be paid unto him at the age of one and twentie yeares; Also I give unto Seth Ward, his brother, the somme of tenn pounds of like lawfull English monie to be paide unto him at the age of one and twentie years.” Virginia Will Records (GPC, 1982), page 485-487. On 14 July 1637 Richard Ward was granted 100 acres in Varina Parish, Henrico County, including 50 acres “for his own personale adventure” — a benefit typically available only for immigrants. Patent book 1, page 440. Perhaps he is the father of Richard Ward. Edward Ward, the son of Richard Ward, was born about 1665. Henrico County Deeds & Wills 1688-97, page 375. Henrico County Deeds & Wills 1688, page 626 He married the daughter of Gilbert Elam I, who named son-in-law Edward in his will 1694-will. Henrico County Deeds & Wills, page 653. Gilbert Elam II was married to Mary Hatcher. Ward and the two Gilbert Elams secured a patent for 2,015 acres Patent book 8, page 147 of land on Falling Creek, Varina Parish, Henrico County in April 1691.

From a brief history of Henrico & Henricus Step into history, enjoy nature's tranquility 1611 Citie of Henricus-Henricus Historical Park The 1611 Citie of Henricus, from which Chesterfield evolved, is located on a bluff overlooking one of the most scenic areas of the James River. Here, Sir Thomas Dale, following instructions from the London Company to find a more suitable location for a colony than the Jamestown site, led 350 settlers in the building of Virginia’s second permanent English settlement in the New World. The location was described as "convenient, strong, healthie and a sweete seate to plant a new Towne in." The 1611 Citie of Henricus flourished. From it arose many new beginnings. What transpired had an unprecedented impact on the growth and destiny of America. It was here that Pocahontas resided at Rock Hall, the home of the Rev. Alexander Whitaker, converted to Christianity and was courted by John Rolfe. The Citie’s history also boasts the first private ownership of land and the development of the American system of free enterprise. It was at Henricus that tobacco crops were first grown and cultivated for sale in Europe and where the large self-sustaining plantations, for which Virginia is famous, found their beginnings. In addition, the first university was chartered; the first hospital, Mt. Malady, was built and operated; and the industries of ironworks and brick making were first successfully practiced in the New World.
A REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT
In 1619, the Virginia Company instituted reforms in the colony that led to the establishment of a representative form of government. The colony was divided into settlements or "plantations," one being the City of Henrico. Each plantation sent representatives to Jamestown to the General Assembly of 1619, the first representative legislature in a British colony. Henrico's settlement included a parcel of 10,000 acres for what was intended to become the University of Henricus, the first English university in America. One of the schools within the university was to be for the Indians.
BRIEF HISTORY OF "THE COLLEDGE"
The reference to "The Colledge" refers to the land in Henrico County (now in Chesterfield County) which was set aside by the London Company for the building of "a colledge to educate Indians," which plan included enough land for farming that the college could be self-sufficient. This land was at or near the town of Henrico, sometimes called "Henricopolis" which was begun by Sir Thomas Dale around September, 1611. Sir George Yeardley arrived in the colony in April 1619, bringing instructions to form a government with a representative assembly. The colony was divided into "four cities or boroughs namely the chief city called James Town, Charles City, Henrico, and the Borough of Kiccotan." Land was set aside in each city or borough for company tenants and for support of the settlement. Provisions were also made to provide land to adventurers and to those who paid passage for colonists under the headright system. Three thousand acres in Henrico were designated as company lands to be occupied by the company's tenants for half profits. Ten thousand acres granted for the support of "a university and College" at Henrico were situated on the north side of the river from Henrico to the falls. Another one thousand acres were set aside for the college for the conversion of infidels." (Robert Hunt Land, "Henrico and Its College" William and Mary Quarterly, 2nd ser., Vol. 18: 467-487)

Gov. Yeardley called for elections in each of the eleven settlements. Two delegates were to be elected from each settlement to form a house of Burgesses. On July 30, 1619, the first representative assembly met in the church at Jamestown. The two representatives from Henrico were Thomas Dowse and John Polentine. One law passed called for each settlement to take in and prepare Indian children "so to be fitted for the Colledge intended for them." They petitioned the company "that towards the erecting of the University and Colledge they will sende, when they shall thinke most convenient, workmen of all sorte fit for that purpose." 50 tenants, sent by the Virginia Company under Capt. William Weldon arrived November 1619. George Thorpe was selected on April 3, 1621 to take charge of managing the college land and tenants. Between 1619 and 1621 ships had brought 3,570 men and women, 347 colonists, including Thorpe, were killed in the Indian massacre of 1622. The college, ironworks and settlements north and south of the James River above its junction with the Appomattox were evacuated.
By the end of the summer of 1622, the "replanting" of Henrico and "the Colledg lands" was considered a necessity, and the governing council asked the London Company to send additional tenants to be settled on the company's land and that orchards and gardens be planted on the college land. Resettlement was not successful, the king brought suit against the London Company. On May 24, 1624, the suit was settled, the Company dissolved, and Virginia became a royal colony. In May, 1625, only 22 inhabitants were reported residing in the corporation of Henrico. A total of 23 patents had been issued for land south of the James, but the inhabitants were reported as being on the college lands. In May, 1625, the land on the north side of the James was reported as follows: 3,000 acres company land; 1500 acres common land; 10,000 acres university land & 1,000 acres college land. The town of Henrico was abandoned and 15 years after the massacre of 1622, the site was included in a 2,000 acres tract patented by Willian Farrar, and the area became known as Farrar's Island. By February 1625 there were 1,209 whites and 23 blacks reported in Virginia.
The first Thanksgiving in America was December 4, 1619 at Berkeley Plantation on the James River. [Ghotes of Virginia-Tidbits about the Eastern Shore.][Good News From Virginia. The Rev. Alexander Whitaker. 1613. Whitaker was the Anglican minister of Henrico parish. He sent this long sermon on the text, "Cast thy bread upon the waters: for after many daies thou shalt finde it again" (Ecc. 11:1) to the Council of the Virginia Company in England. In the introduction Whitaker interprets the text to command the readers to charity and liberality.]

Dear Mr. Huddleston. I found your entries on the hfhc web site, which I monitor because I am descended from one James Huddleston of Mifflin Co., PA (who removed to KY in 1796, thence to IN and points west.) I noticed your interest in Jn. Huddleston of the Bona Nova, whom I had found several places in the Virginia State Library. I thought you might be interested in some of the things I found about him. "John Huddleston, Mariner" was deeded 100 acres of land on 26 April 1621 by a grant signed by Sir George Yeardly. The land was described as sold on 5 July 1636 to a Capt. Christopher Calthropp, adjacent to the 100 acres of a Richard Cox, Atty, and "west upon waters." Since George Yeardley was overseer of Accomack County, it appears this land was on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, facing the Chesapeake Bay shore. See "Book of Cavaliers and Pioneers Land Patents and Grants,: Vol I (1632 - 66), VA State Library and Archives, Richmond, 1992, Page 44 " At James City Court comprising Dr. Pott, Capts Smythe and Mathews, "Mr. Secretary" and "Mr. Ffarrar," an Alice Boyse, widow of Luke Boyse, sued Capt. John Huddleston for slandering her by alleging illicit relations with a Capt Epes. See VMHB (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography), Vol XXCII, Page 265 Capt. John Huddlestone ((note spelling variation)) swore at James City Court on 14 Jan 1627 that he transported from London to Virginia five men on the account of one Mr. Sharples. This was a fraud case. See VMHB XVII, Page 325. Capt John Huddleston in May 1622 was master of the Virginia Company's ship Bona Nova on a fishing voyage off Main. He sent a boat to Plymouth Colony warning the Pilgrims of the 1622 Jamestown Massacre. John Winslow of Plymouth was sent to the fleet to beg for provisions ((Plymouth Colony was near to starvation that year)), and wrote that Huddleston "not only spared what he could, but writ to others to do the like." VMHB 62 (1954), page 159, citing the book, "Of Plymouth Plantation," by William Bradford, Pages 110-111. Also, an address on 19 Jan 1966 to the VA Historical Society by Thomas Adams, President of the Mass. Historical Society, "Bad News from Virginia," printed in VMHB 74 (1966), Page 138. John Huddleston was master of the ship, "Thomas and John" which on 13 May 1628 delivered 2400 pounds of VA tobacco to London (page 428). At Page 430, a John Hurlston was reported as master of that ship on 17 May 1628, and to have sold 56 pounds of VA tobacco. Clearly, that was the same man and the same voyage. See "England's Tobacco Trade in the Reign of Charles I," VMHB 65 (1957), pages 428 and 430. At Court at James City on 13 November 1626, a Hugh Crowder, Planter" was granted permission to move from the barren land owned by "Capt. John Huddleston to land at Chapooks Creek owned by Capt Ffrancis Cook. The court comprised "Sir George Yeardley, Knt, Governor &c, Dr. Potts, Capt Smith, Capt Mathews & Mr. Claybourne," VMHB for 1918, VOL XXVI, Page 142, per ibid VOL XXVII, Page 142. (NOTE: Chapooks Creek flows from the south into the James River, and divides present Prince George and Surrey County. This is a few miles west of Jamestown, VA.) John Huddleston of the Bona Nova was a very interesting character, I think. David M. Hudelson Horse Shoe, NC.
Colonial Surry by John Bennett Boddie Page 80
At court 13 Nov. 1626, "Upon request of Mr. Hugh Crowder, planter, that by reason of the barreness of the ground whereon, he now liveth belonging to Captain John Hudleston, he desireth to remove and plant upon the ground of Captain Francis West at Chippokes Creek" which the Court gave him leave, "for him and his company living with him so to do."

A TOWN UNDER ATTACK
An Indian uprising on March 22, 1622, abruptly halted plans to develop Henrico and its university. The Indians regarded the colony's rapid development as a threat. On Good Friday morning, Indians attacked settlements throughout the colony. Houses were burned. Men, women, and children were murdered. Henricus was almost completely demolished. Most survivors retreated to Jamestown or other nearby settlements. The city called Henrico was abandoned. The site of Henrico's first settlement was part of a large land grant made to William Farrar, Sr., and came to be known as Farrar's Island. In the years following the Indian uprising of 1622, the colonists engaged in regular attacks against the Indians, pushing them farther and farther westward.
HENRICO BECOMES A SHIRE
As the Indians became less of a threat to the colonists, more settlers came to Virginia. In 1624, England assumed control of the colonies. In 1634, Virginia was divided into eight shires, or counties, one being Henrico. By 1640, the Henrico court was held at Varina. By 1752, the courthouse was moved to Richmond.

MARRIAGES-St. John’s Church, Henrico Co.,Virginia 1698: Joseph ROYALL to Elizabeth KENNON, Dec. 1691: Francis CHALMEBY with Sarah HUDDELEY. In Patty B. White's Individual Record Entry in the LDS, Francis Chalmeby is given with birth as 1666 in Henrico, Virginia and Sarah Huddleley's birth is given as 1671 in Henrico, Virginia. According to her their marriage was 1691 in St. John's Church, Henrico, Virginia. John Huddleston married Peggie Pleasants? in 1734 at Henrico County film number (1760811) This is the same John Huddleston born 1693 film number (1761138). I am still searching for more information about her. Peggy is a nickname for Margaret Pleasants and she does show up as the daughter of John Pleasants who was list in the 1679 tax tables and John Huddleston and Joseph Royal listed above. I believe John Huddleston born 1693 is listed below by Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 page 174 Sept. 6, 1746. William Williams of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co. and Elizabeth, his wife, to John Williams of same Par. and County. L35 curr. 100 a. in St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., part of a tract taken up by Nicholas Lankford, and by him sold to John Coller sold to Robert Stubblefield and Ralph Williams, by Deeds, in Spts. Co. Court, and afterwards acknowledged to Wm. Williams, etc. Witnesses, Robt. Huddleston, Danl. x Pruit, John Huddleston. Nov 4, 1746.(Film Number 1760811 FamilySearch)(Thank you, Royal family, so much)

John Huddleston the third had a son(film number 1761138 in FamilySearch, Thomas (Huddlesey) Huddleston born about 1649 in Henrico County, Virginia. Virginia Wills and Administrations, 1632-1800 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. copyright Baltimore 1977 Originally Published The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America Richmond, 1930 Compiled by Clayton Torrence page 219 Huddlesey Henrico Thos. 1726-son; Thomas Huddleston born about 1649 Henrico County, Virginia death 1726. This Thomas Huddleston born about 1649[Names of Officers and Soldiers engaged in the American Expedition, who during the Years 1656, 1657 and 1658 applied for Arrears of Pay, or on whose account such applications were made by their Widows or Representatives. Many of the persons alluded to in the applications of Widows or Representatives are stated to have lost their Lives in the Expedition to America or in Jamaica. Lieut. Thos. Huddleston 12 Feb 1657 Sainsbury, W. Noel, ed., Calender of State Papers, Colonial Series (Volume 1), America and West Indies, 1574-1660, Preserved in the State Paper Department of Her Majesty's Public Record Office (Vaduz: Kraus Reprint Ltd., 1964) First Published London: HMSO, 1860. pp. 436, 446, 448, 452, 454-455, 458, 462, 464, 472, 476. ] had a son named Thomas Huddleston who would be Thomas Huddleston, Jr. This Thomas Huddleston, Jr. (FamilySearch Film Number 1761138)This same Thomas Huddleston has a son named John Huddleston who is born in Henrico County, Virginia with the same film number (1761138) in about 1709.
Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants-Abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent Volume 2: 1666-1695 Published and copyright by Virginia State Library Henry Bishop, 2300 acs. Accromack Co., 9 Nov. 1666, p. 32. On the N. side of Bockatenock Cr. & bay, E. on the deviding line Cr. & partly by the entrance into Selbye's bay & c. Trans of 46 per: Samll. Evins, Jno. Colan, Tho. Pierce, Joseph Sawle (or Sawte), Richard Hawke, Hump. Arscott (or Hescott), Jno. Thomas, Tho. Hickes, Bath. White, Bernard Kendall, David Moyle, Francis Hearle, Nath. Lugger, Rich. Ersly, Edward Hearle, Jno. Cerly, Rich. Carter, George Fletcher, Wm. Dalston, Wm. Hudleston, Jane Wilford, Gilber Thacker, Henry Wilmot, Godfrey Clarke, Symon Degg., Wm. Wolley, Jno. Wright, Francis Barker, Jane Bamfield(or Barnfield), Jno. Roll, Peter Ball, Jno. Skelton, Wm. Jennings, Charles Grills, Will Webber, Jno. Edwards, Stephen Wheeler, Peter Jenkens, Charles Bacawen.

Title of Westover Lyon G. Tyler William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 4, No. 3. (Jan., 1896), Page 152. In 1631-'32 Capt. Pawlett was appointed one of the commissioners or justices for the upper precincts of Charles City and Henrico, and in 1641, a member of the Virginia Council. He died in 1644, without issue. The grant made to him January 15, 1637, was for "2000 acres in Charles City County bouding to the river south, northwest to the Maine, Eastward to the land of Capt. Perry, west upon Berkeley Hundred Land extending by the River side from Herring Creek to a gut of land dividing hte said land from the land of Berkeley Hundred", "being due unto him, the said Capt. Thomas Pawlett, for the personal adventure of his brother Chideck, and for transportation of 38 persons into the Colony". Under the will of Capt. Pawlett, dated January 12, 1643-'44, this land went to his brother Sir John, Lord Pawlett. An abstract of this will(1) is as follows: To my god-children Wm Harris, John Woodson, Tho. Aston, Thomas Fludd, Henry Richley, John Bishop, Tho. Woodward, Tho. Boyse, Tho. Poythers, and William Bayle, one silver spoon and one sow shote apiece, for eant of shotes the value to be paid out of the estate; to god-children Fra: Epps & Wm ferrar a silver spoon & my silver bowl and wine cup, to be divided between them; to Lieut. Bishop, Sergeant Williams, and Ensign Page, 20 shillings; to the Church of Westover, 10 acres, to lye forty pole square, now leased to Richard Hamlet, which ten acres are to be laid out for the best conveniency of the church; to my loving friends Mr George Menefie and mr Walter Aston, 20s apiece as poor token of my remembrance; to Mr George Menefie my sword and to Mr Walter Aston my gun; to Capt Fra. Eppes my drum, and to Mr Richard Jones minister my cow called Cherry; to Sir John Pawlett my everloving brother the residue of my estate after satisfaction of legacies and debts; sir John, sole ex'or, Capt. Francis Epps and Mr Walter Aston overseers of his will who are to bury him according to their own discretion; bequeathes to them 5L apiece sterl., but "withall desiring them that this and all other Legacies mentioned in this will may not be paid in money, but in some commodity naturally produced in this country that they may be no greter prejudice to the estate than the value of each legacy." In case of his brother's death before his enjoyment of this estte, "then my overseers to surrender it to Sir Wm Berklay, my much honoured kinsman, who is then to be ex'or"; to Mrs. Epps 20s. for a ring and my Bible; to Mrs. Menefie and Mrs. Aston 40s apiece; to Mrs. Reynolds Evans one cow; to Sam Salmon, 20s; "My two servants, John Claptona nd John Bennett, if they shall do faithful service to within one years space of the end of their indentures, to have them delivered up, othewise to be disposed of by the overseers of county court; my ex'ors to pay William Mundy 30s due form my Brol Chideck Pawlett; gives 40 shillings to John South". Dated 12 January, 1643. Witnesses John South, John Flud, Reynold Evans. Proved by the oath of Reynolds Evans before me: Fra: Epps. (1) This will, together with many other wills and deeds, is given in Byrd's Book of Title Deeds", MS. in the Virginia Historical Society.

Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly, April 1684-June 1692 134 Assembly Proceedings, October 26, 1686. Lib. W. H. Mattawomen or St Thomas Creeke in Baltemore County at Towne port or place in Sposuty Creek on the land formerly p. 282 Mr John Colletts now in possession of John Mould and the Land adjacant and one other in Gunpowder Riuer vpon the point comonly called Westburies Point. In Tabott County a port Towne or place at or neer the Cort House vpon the land of James downes & the land adjacent to be called Yorke. In the County of Somersett a Towne or port att Snow hill on the land formerly belonging to Henry Bishop and last to Ann Bishop his Widdow and one other in Arnold Erzyes land & the land adjacent att Oyster Neck att the mouth of Monokin, and tht all persons that haue already built vpon the said land called Snow Hill shall Enjoy their lotts as fully firmely & effectually as any other builders vpon Lotts in any other Townes paying for the same as others doe. In dorchester County one in little Choptanck Riuer att Nicholas Maryes poynt, to be called Islington and one other in Hunger Riuer on the East side of the said Riuer on Andrew Fusleyes Neck to be called Bristoll and in the County of Caecill one Towne port or place in Elk Riuer att a place called Caecill Towne at the mouth of Bohe- mia River and that the Comissionrs in the said Act for Advancemt of Trade Nominated or any fiue of them shall & are hereby impowered to haue As full & ample Authority not onely as to the purchaseing & surveying laying & stakeing out Lotts but as to the doeing & performeing of all and euery other thing & things whatsoeuer relateing to the new Townes herein menconed as they had haue or were intended to haue had by the aforesaid two seuerall Acts or either of them in relacon To those Townes in the said former Acts menconed. To all Intents & purposes whatsoever and tht the sd Comissionrs in the said Act for Advancemt of trade for each respectiue County nominated or any fiue of them are hereby Impowred & Enjoyned some time before the twenty fifth day of March now next Ensueing to meete togeather Vpon the respectiue lands & places before in this Act before menconed to be new added Townes or at some other place neere the same & to lay out 100 A: of land in the severall places respectively for Townes in this prsent menconed Act & to cause the same to be laid out into lotts in such manner & forme as by the said first recited Act is directed persueing & following in all points p. 283 and Circumstances the rules & orders in the said two recited Acts praescribed (vnless otherwise provided agt in this prsent Act. And be it further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid that the takeing vp of the severall Lotts in each respectiue Towne in this prsent act menconed complying with the genrall rules prscribed in the aforesaid Acts & building vpon such

Jamestown was the site of the first permanent English settlement in America (1607), the point at which the first representative legislative assembly convened (1619} to set a pattern for self-government in the New World, the locale of stirring events in Bacon's Rebellion (1676-77), and the capital of the Colony of Virginia for 92 years (1607-99}. Bacon was brought before the Governor, paroled, and restored to the Council. Berkeley knew that his opponent had the upper hand and that the House of Burgesses, then in session, was against him. Bacon seemingly could have remained in the capital and personally directed a full program of economic and political reform. This evidently was not his aim. He demanded a commission to go against the Indians, and, when Berkeley delayed, he disappeared from Jamestown, later saying that his person was in danger, although this appears unlikely. Bacon now entered a course from which he could not turn back. With a sizable group of supporters, on June 23, he returned again to Jamestown. He crossed the isthmus ". . . there leveing a p'ty to secure ye passage, then marched into Towne, . . . [sent] p'tyes to the ferry, River & fort, & ... [drew] his forces ag't the state house." In the face of this show of force, the Governor gave him a commission, and the Burgesses passed measures designed to correct many old abuses. Among the new laws was one establishing the bounds of Jamestown to include the entire Island and giving the residents within these bounds the right, for the first time, to make their own local ordinances. JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA - The Town Site and Its Story by Charles E. Hatch, Jr. Source: National Park Service Historical Handbook Series Number Two Washington, D.C., 1952

From James Citty to Jamestown THE TOWN ACT OF 1662
WITH the ascension of Charles II to the throne as King of England, and with the resumption of royal authority in Virginia, renewed efforts were made to maintain James City as the principal town of the colony. Legislative enactments in 1662 were framed with this in mind. Instructions were outlined to guide new and compulsory development in the town. WHEREAS his sacred majestie by his instructions hath enjoyned us to build a towne, to which though our own conveniencies of profit and securitie might urge us, yett encouraged by his majesties royall commands, to which in dutie wee are all bound to yeild a most readie obedience, this grand assembly takeing into their serious consideration the best meanes of effecting it have in reference thereto enacted. First. That a towne be built at James Citty as being the most convenient place in James River, and alreadie best fitted for the entertainment of workemen that must be employed in the work. That the towne to be built shall consist of thirty two houses, each house to be built with brick, forty foot long, twenty foot wide, within the walls, to be eighteen foote high above the ground, the walls to be two brick thick to the water table, and a brick and a halfe thick above the water table to the roofe, the roofe to be fifteen foote pitch and to be covered with slate or tile. 2dly. (b) That the houses shall be all regularly placed one by another in a square or such other forme as the honorable Sir William Berkeley shall appoint most convenient . . . every one building a brick house as aforesaid shall have ground assigned him to build a store on, and shall have the proprietie of the said store and house to him and his heires for ever; and because stores which are built att little cost are likely to produce the greatest benefitt, it is further enacted that noe person or persons but such as build houses as aforesaid shall have the priviledges to build stores [storehouses]. . . .And though in the infancy of this designe it might seem hard to demolish any wooden houses already built in the towne, yett it is hereby provided and enacted that noe wooden houses shall hereafter be built within the limitts of the towne, nor those now standing be hereafter repaired, but brick ones to be erected in theire steads. An Act of the Virginia Assembly. December 1662.

In trying to learn more about Henry Bishop I found this information: William Anderson 03/26/1676 450 acres Accomack County between lands of Occohonock and Matchepungo, bounded by Dorothy Jordan, Arthur Upshore, John Savage, John Sturges, Edward Smith and Henry Bishop. granted 1664 Cornelius Watkinson, escheated, granted Amb. White 1672, escheated granted Anderson for import of 9 persons. The Richardson homepage helps to explain Selby's Bay and that Henry Bishop was a lieutenant as well as possible information on Valentine Huddleston who shows up in Series 'A' in Maryland in 1673. Maryland's portion of the Eastern Shore did not get cut out of Virginia until 1662. Richardson and others were already well established in the Sinepuxent Bay area before it was Maryland. Once this took place, Richardson and a local delegation decided to travel to St Mary City to negotiate with Calvert so that they could keep their properties. On May 6, 1671, Richardson and several others met with Calvert in St Marys City and their land grants were continued, most likely in a pledge for political support and some discussion on the tax rates for the land. Most likely this was not a head between the knees discussion as Calvert needed support as the Virginian leaders kept trying to get all or portions of the Eastern Shore of Maryland returned to Virginia. The size of Richardson's land holdings would have indicated that he was an important political asset for Calvert to watch the Virginians. Richardson's major landholding neighbors at that time were John Parremore (1,500 acres), Thomas Selby (1,250 acres), Edward Smith (700 acres), Alexander Williams (600 acres), Stephen Barnes (600 acres), and Henry Bishop (300 acres). Edward Smith had been an earlier neighbor in Virginia and thought to be a Richard Smythe relative. John Parremore was a major landowner on the Eastern Shore, had come in 1622, and married the daughter of Northampton's Sir Robert Drake, believed to be a great soldier in the low countries and nephew of Sir Francis Drake. Lt. Henry Bishop had been in Accomack in 1661 and a neighbor to Richardson, Edward Smith, etc. Note that quite a few of these families had first been neighbors in Virginia.

Henry Bishop was a large land owner and he shows up in the Ghotes Page in A1 on their map. The map shows Henry Bishop's land to be in Lower Accomack County, Virginia. Selby's Bay turns out to be Sinepuxent Bay. In researching this area we find that before the 1800's ferries were use to get around and that later the railroad came in. The transport of people in mention with William Huddleston of 1666 seems to be a transport of William Huddleston of Jamestown in 1640 to this same William Huddleston to Accomack County in 1666. Right above Accomack County, Virginia is the state of Maryland.

We don't know if William Huddleston, servant, had any land. We know John Hudleston of Poquoson was Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua. We know John Hudleston of Poquoson and William Huddleston are both found in the Cavaliers books by Nugent. William Huddleston was in Accromac ten years before Bacon's Rebellion. That would of been long enough to have taken a side in the rebellion. Both William Berkeley and Nathaniel Bacon seemed to be on the side of the servants.

BACON'S REBELLION Long-standing tensions between small freeholders and the elite of the Virginia colony burst suddenly into the open in 1676. The elite had previously remained united to maintain its hold on the best lands of the colony and other privileges. That changed, however, in April. Free men who lived along the James River had become convinced that Governor William Berkeley's plans to protect them from Indian assaults were inadequate and decided to mount their own campaign, which Nathaniel Bacon, a wealthy planter, agreed to lead. Bacon and his men made few distinctions among Indian tribes, killing friends and foes alike. Governor Berkeley invited Bacon to come to Jamestown, but Bacon's demand for a commission convinced the governor that Bacon posed a greater threat to the colony than the Indians. The men under Bacon's command were former indentured servants who had received land grants after completing their indentures. Virginia's elite had long feared that the grievances of free men, servants, and slaves would boil over into open rebellion. Berkeley therefore charged Bacon and his men with treason. When Bacon arrived in Jamestown with five hundred men on June 6, he was arrested. Then, having reestablished his authority, the governor pardoned Bacon. But Bacon was not appeased. He and several of his men confronted the governor and demanded a commission and authorization to recruit an army. Berkeley agreed and fled to the Eastern Shore. Bacon spent three months raising volunteers and plundering the estates of Berkeley loyalists.

Ironically, Berkeley made fears of a class revolt a self-fulfilling prophecy. He promised freedom to servants who joined his ranks in an unsuccessful attempt to raise troops to return to Jamestown. Bacon made the same offer to the servants and slaves of Berkeley's supporters. After degenerating into random plundering, Bacon's Rebellion ended with his death on October 26, probably of dysentery. When British ships arrived with men to restore order, all Bacon's men, except eighty slaves and twenty servants, surrendered. The Reader's Companion to American History Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All Rights Reserved.

The records of Henrico County contain sundry charges of depredations committed by Bacon's soldiers, showing that the people's cause was strong in that section. Major John Lewis, of Middlesex, laid claim of damages at the hands of "one Matt Bentley," with "forty or fifty men-of- arms," in the ''time of the late rebellion." Major Lewis's inventory of his losses includes "400 meals" (which he declares were eaten at his house by Bacon's men during their two days encampment on his plantation), the killing of some of his stock, and carrying off of meal "for the whole rebel army," at Major Pate's house. The Story of Bacon's Rebellion by Mary Newton Standard Published by The Neale Publishing Company, 1907 E-version, ©, Jeffrey C. Weaver, 2000

In the Rigney Homepage about Thomas Hanford and him being the first Martyr of Virginia in Bacon's Rebellion; We find out about an Ann Huddleston in York County, Virginia-During these nine years we catch an occasional glimpse of him in the courts. A deposition, in June, 1668, declares that passing by his cow pen he tauntingly bid "Ann Huddelstone's Dame" to go and rob the onion patch again. "Can you prove your words?" she indignantly said. "Yes," was the reply. He was sued for defamation of character. After the same manner, he accused Dr. William Townsend of purloining from Squire Digges's old field a foal which he himself had branded for Digges. In another suit he won 200 pounds of tobacco from Abraham Ray for damages done his (Hansford's) horse. And Thomas Reade, his servant, who ran away, was required by the court to make equivalent service for the cost and trouble of his capture. Thomas Hansford First Native Martyr to American Liberty a paper read before the Virginia Historical Society Tuesday, December 22, 1891 By Mrs. Annie Tucker Tyler Williamsburg Virginia. Thomas Hansford, first native martyr to American liberty (1892) Author: Tyler, Annie [B] Tucker. [from old catalog] Subject: Hansford, Thomas, d. 1677. [from old catalog] Publisher: Richmond Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT Language: English Call number: 5861099 Digitizing sponsor: Sloan Foundation Book contributor: The Library of Congress Collection: americana Page 197

It seems that William Huddleston married his wife before June, 1668 but we don't know if they married in Accomack County or York County, Virginia. Evidence of William shows in 1666 in Accomack and evidence of Ann York in 1668. The evidence of "Dame" in conjunction with Ann shows their lot must of gotten better. In the proceeding passages of Bacon's Rebellion we must wonder if William Huddleston was involved. Did he remain a servant after 21 years of age? Could "Dame" be referring to their daughter?

"The Kingdom of Accomack."
Colonel Hansford, after his arrest, was carried to Accomac and hanged as a rebel and traitor. It is known that Sir William Berkeley, during the short period of the Rebellion, was twice driven from Jamestown, then the seat of government in the Colony, and forced to take shelter among his friends in Accomac, which he considered the last refuge of the loyal cause in Virginia. All the historians of Virginia agree in stating that Sir William Berkeley on arriving in Accomac, found all the people disaffected towards him except a few fellows of the baser sort, 'longshoremen and adventurers, whom a desire for plunder drew to follow the fortunes of the impetuous old governor; and even Mr. George Bancroft, evidently following our Virginia authorities, informs us in his monumental work that "Sir William Berkeley collected in Accomac a crowd of base and cowardly followers, allured by the passion for plundering, promising freedom to the servants and slaves of the insurgents if they would rally to his banner" (Vide Bancroft's Hist., Vol. I, p.465). An examination of the records of Accomac county court, covering the periods of Bacon's Rebellion, and the subsequent year will controvert the foregoing view and convince any unbiased mind that the people of Accomac received the Royal Governor with open arms, and hazarded their lives and fortunes for the success of his cause.
Another entry in these old records, about the same time, reveals the fact that during the latter part of the year 1676 a hospital was established at the house of Henry Reade in the lower part of Accomac, where the sick and wounded from Berkeley's forces were received and carefully treated. Certificates were granted by the county court to prove the services rendered by Accomac soldiers in defence of Berkeley's cause under such distinguished leaders as Captain William Whittington, Captain Daniel Jenifer, Major John West, Major Edmund Bowman, Colonel Southey Littleton and Colonel Edmund Scarburgh, all of whom were leading men in Accomac and some of them among the most prominent men in the Colony. "At a court held for Accomac county July, 1677, it is ordered upon the peticon of John Sturges that a certificate be awarded him to the next assembly for forty-six pounds of Butter and forty-two pounds of Cheese, which was delivered for the countries service against the late Rebells, as appears by the attestation of Majr Jno West." "Whereas Majr Edmund Bowman hath made it appeare to the court by ye attestation of Major Jno. West that he had killed and founde salt and caske for thirteen hundred and twelve pounds of Beefe. It is, therefore, ordered that this be a certificate thereof to the next assembly." It is ordered upon the peticon of Majr Jno. West for the sume of twelve thousand two hundred and fifty pounds of tobo. and cask, for the public service against the late rebells, and he having made oath to the same in open court, certificate thereof is accordingly granted him to the next assembly." (We later learn that a Katherine Stratton marries Thomas Huddleston.) "Whereas, Mr. John Stratton hath made it appeare to this court by the oathe of Capn. Nath: Walker that hee the sd Walker did command a shallop belonging to the sd Stratton by the honorbie gover", order in his majesties service against the late rebells; which shallop was cast away in a storm in Warricks creek bay: It is, therefore, ordered that this be a certificate thereof to the next assembly." "These may certify that I, the subscriber, whom [sic] are impowered by the right honbie Sir William Berkeley Govr, and Capn. general of Virginia to procure and impresse such provisions as shall be needful for his present service." "These may certify that I have killed from Morris Dennis one Barren cow for which I give this certificate." "JOHN STRATTON, Commissary." At a court held and continued for Accomack county, September 14, 1677, upon the peticon of Majr Jne West in behalfe of himself and forty-four men, more which were thirty-ffour daies under the command of the Governr Sir Wm. Berkeley in his Majties service to James Citty, and having made oath to the same in open court certificate thereof is accordingly granted to ye next Assembly." In 1663, shortly after the Eastern Shore had been divided into the two counties of Accomac and Northampton, Colonel Scarburgh by order of Sir William Berkeley and the House of Burgesser, made an expedition against the recalcitrant and rebellious Ouakers in the northern part of Accomac. His report of his proceedintss on that occassion is to be found in the oldest record book of Accomac county court, and is justly regarded as one of the most interesting and remarkable documents of our early Colonial history. He appears to have impressed his strong personality on his generation more than any other man of his day. In every part of the Eastern Shore traditions of his remarkable performances survive among Virginia, and from him have descended some of the most eminent men of the State. Onancock Academy, Virginia. FRANK P. BRENT

A William Huddleston shows up in New York 5 September 1702 Address of some Inhabitants of New York to Governor Lord Cornbury against Mr. Attwood and Mr. Weaver. William Huddlestone Headlam, Cecil, ed., Calender of State Papers, Colonial Series (Volume 20), America and West Indies, Jan.-Dec. 1, 1702, Preserved in the Public Record Office (Vaduz: Kraus Reprint Ltd., 1964) First Published London: HMSO, 1912. pp. 755-756. In 1702 the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York made an address welcoming Governor Lord Cornbury. Trinity Church, New York Rector, Church Wardens and Vestry. William Huddlestone Headlam, Cecil, ed., Calender of State Papers, Colonial Series (Volume 20), America and West Indies, Jan.-Dec. 1, 1702, Preserved in the Public Record Office (Vaduz: Kraus Reprint Ltd., 1964) First Published London: HMSO, 1912. pp. 615-624. Bogart: A Life in Hollywood By JEFFREY MEYERS Humphrey attended the private De Lancey School, on the upper West Side, from the 1st through 4th grades. In September 1909 he entered the elite and socially impeccable Trinity School. It was founded in 1709 by William Huddleston, a lawyer and schoolmaster, who deplored the "want of a publick school in the city of New York where ... poor children ... might be taught gratis" and wished to educate the poor in the new English colony in order to combat the "abundance of irreligion." History of Trinity Trinity School founded as charity school by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. William Huddleston is the first headmaster. Classes are held in the steeple of Trinity Church at the head of Wall Street. Fewer than fourty boys and girls are registered. Long Island Wills and Death Notes, 1708-1728 ANDREW CANNON. In the name of God, Amen, the 12 day of March, 1710. I, Andrew Cannon, of Richmond County, being sick and weak, but praised be God of perfect remembrance. I leave to my eldest son, Abraham Cannon, one cow, in full of his pretence as heir at law. I leave to my son Andrew all that my Plantation on Staten Island at a place called the Long Neck adjoining to Phillip Chashee, with all the improvements. When he is of age the Plantation is to be appraised, and he shall pay to his sister Anna one-third of its value. If he die under age then the Plantation is to go to my four children, Abraham, John, Catalina and the heirs of my daughter Hester, and they are to pay to my daughter Anna one-third. All the rest of my estate I leave to my wife Anna, the better to enable her to pay my debts and for her comfortable living, and I make her executor. Witnesses, Augustus Grassett, Elias Neau, William Huddleston. "The above is in the handwriting of Andrew Cannon." Proved, March 27, 1711.
ARCHIVES@trinitywallstreet.org William Huddlestone was the first schoolmaster of the Trinity Church Charity School from 1709 to 1723. He was also one of the first vestrymen and the first clerk of Trinity Parish. His son Thomas Huddleston succeeded him as schoolmaster from 1724-1731.

Back to Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua
The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660 Entries November 21, 1621 Commissions granted to: Daniel Gat(e)s to be master of the Darling and to fish on the coast of Virginia; John Huddleston to make a voyage to Virginia; and to have free fishing on the American coast; Captain Thomas Jones, master of the Discovery, to fish on the American coast and to trade furs in Virginia. (BL:Add Mss 14285)July 1, 1652 Petition of Captain William Digby. He was a planter in St. Christopher's 24 years ago but was soon after taken prisoner by the Spaniards to Cadiz where he remained for 6 years. Ten years ago Sir Thomas Warner, the governor of St. Christopher's, assigned him a plantation in Nevis, Captain Luke Stokes, has taken 280 acres of the plantation for John Jennings. He prays for its restitution. Encloses note of grant made by James, Earl of Carlisle, to William Digby of land in Nevis between the lands of Captain John Huddleston and Thomas Merriton. (cspl) Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua becomes a key issue in descendancy of line because of his son carrying the same name. Also from the Plymoth Colony site we learn that the then governor of Virginia that signed his "graunt" , paid 50 dollars per head, in 1627 to ship captains who brought passengers to the colony. When studying the Nevis site I found a lot of ships had wrecked and many deep sea divers make a living searching through the sunken wrecks.
We know that his goods were taken away from him by Captain Powell. We know that a Captain Huddleston is cited as taking the ship "Unity of Deal". We really don't know what happened to his ship Bona Noua but that the goods were taken. We know that a Captain John Huddleston had lands in Nevis Island in 1642. We have to take in consideration that the passage mentioning Captain John Huddleston Lands of the 1652 date also says ten years ago when mentioning him. Subtracting his birthdate of 1587 from 1642 now puts his age at 55. We know the Spanish letters mentioned about the Unity of Deal being taken by Captain Huddleston with no definate date and the Spanish taking over of Nevis in 1629 and a Captain John Huddleston being aboard the Thomas and John in 1627 through 1628 and the Thomas and John returning to England in 1635. We know that by Captain John Huddleston's testimony about the Garland that he knew something about Bermuda and was there. To have been a captain John Huddleston had to know something about the Islands. I know that there were Huddleston wills in Nevis in the 1700's through research of Nevis Island. Could Captain John Huddleston have taken the ship Unity of Deal because the Bona Noua had problems? Could the text supplied above have been referring to him and he came from Nevis Island to the Carolanas? Was the Blunt Point and Tappahannah Territory considered "hundreds" like the Shirley Hundred? Did they have representatives like the other hundreds? Did Captain John Huddleston have William Huddleston in the care of Mr. Canhow by 1640 and then take him to Nevis Island with him by 1624?

St Thomas Parish Library. It is not certain how St Thomas got its name. It was densely populated by the Tainos/Arawaks when Columbus first came to the island. The Spaniards established cattle ranches at Morant Bay and Yallahs. When the English captured Jamaica residents from other British colonies were invited to settle here. Only the people of Nevis accepted the invitation. The Governor of Nevis, his wife, children and about 1,600 colonists settled at Morant Bay. In a short time two-thirds of them died of fevers including Governor Stokes and his wife. Their children, however, survived and became quite wealthy. They built two imposing houses, Stokes Hall and Stokesfield. The ruins of both remain. © 1998 William G. Innanen A Condensed History of Montserrat 1624:

Thomas Warner settled on St. Christopher (now St. Kitts) which became the first permanent colony in the West Indies. Just after he started his settlement with less than two dozen men, some French adventurers arrived. Warner knew that with as few men as he had, the Carib Amerindians and the Spanish were going to be a serious problem. So he struck a deal with the French. They would share the colony, with the French establishing colonies on the two ends of the island with the English in the middle. 1625: Warner and his syndicate get their royal patent directly from King Charles the First which granted permission to settle St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat and Barbados. 1629-1632: Warner renewed his syndicate's patent, this time through the Earl of Carlisle, who had been appointed by the King to be the Lord Proprietor of the English Caribbees. This time the patent granted Thomas the right to colonize most of the Lesser Antilles. By this time, Warner's St. Kitts colony had a population of about 3,000. Many of these were Irish indentured servants, hoping to settle themselves when their indenture was over. But then, as now, the Protestant English and Scotts couldn't get along with the Catholic Irish. Moreover, Governor for Life Warner feared that in wartime the Irish might side with the Catholic French colonies on the ends of the island. He decided to ship at least some of them to the islands of Montserrat and Antigua to form daughter colonies. These Irish malcontents were described as "rogues, vagrants and sturdy beggars." Warner's four islands, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat and Antigua became known as the Leeward Islands of the Caribbees. "Montserrat West Indies, a chronological history," by Marion M. Wheeler. Published by the Montserrat National Trust, 1988." Montserrat, History of a Caribbean Colony," by Howard A. Fergus, 1994, MacMillan Press Ltd., ISBN 0-333-61217-5)

[The Records of The Virginia Company of London Susan Myra Kinsbury, ed., The Records of The Virginia Company of London (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1906-35), 1:241-47. [*241] XCIV. John Rolfe. A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys January 1619/20 Ferrar Papers. Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge. Autograph Letter, Signed, with Seals List of Records No. 154 Vpon the 4. of November the Bona Noua arriued at James Cyty. All the passengers came lusty and in good health. They came by the west Indyes, wch passage at that season doth much refreshe the people.] [Captain John Huddleston made the same stop over Captain John Smith had to make in Nevis Island in the Mayflower and on John Smith's trip some people stayed on the Island and this is recorded in Nevis Island records]

A notable early visitor to Nevis was Captain John Smith in 1607. He and his men stopped off in Nevis for five days on their way to founding the Virginia colony, in what was to become the United States. Smith mentions that his men encountered a Indian hunting party, but that both sides ran from each other without incident. So much for international diplomacy. Smith also mentions a hot spring, probably Bath Spring, that had remarkable curative powers for gunpowder burns and skin rashes. Nevis was officially settled by the British in 1628. This however, didn't last long as the Spanish invaded and took over in 1629. The tiny settlement was ransacked and the settlers left for safer havens. Many of the settlers at that time were indentured Irish servants, who disliked the English (yes, even then) and joined the Spanish. The Irish then moved on for good, many to Montserrat, another beautiful Caribbean island. This tug-of-war over Nevis went on between the British, Dutch, French, and Spanish governments for the next two-hundred years.[From a brief history of Nevis].

Library OF Congress The Records of The Virginia Company of London The Court Book, From The Manuscript In The Library Of Congress Edited With An Introduction And Bibliography, By Susan Myra Kingsbury, A. M., Ph. D. Instructor In History And Ergonomics Simmons College Preface by Herbert Levi Osgood, A. M., Ph. D. Professor Of American History In Columbia University Carola Woerishoffer Professor Of Social Economy Bryn Mawr College Copyright Washington Government Printing Office 1906 & 1933 Volume I 1607-1622 & Volume II 1622-1624 Volume I page 94 March 1619 (saue onely 100 men sent in the Bona Noua Volume I page 185 After May 9, 1623 9 The late Ires: And the lists compared Wth the Booke of the Massac: The Farrars Aduenters in the Bona Noua, the Hopewell, the Furtherance, and the Abigaile &c some of these Shipps haue gone twice or thrice Wthin theise 4 yeares[In the early seventeenth century, the land along the north shore of the James River from Jamestown Island to the mouth of the Chickahominy River was known as Pasbehay or Pasbehay Country. In 1618, the Virginia Company of London ordered that 3000 acres were to be set aside and planted for the benefit of the Company. In 1619, Sir George Yeardley arrived at Jamestown with tenants to settle on both the Governor's Land and the Company Land. In late 1619, Lieutenant Jabez Whittaker and perhaps as many as fifty men were sent by the Virginia Company to the Company's tract. According to Whittaker, he and his men built a 40' by 20' "guesthouse" to season new immigrants. They also erected other dwellings, and fenced in their acreage and livestock. The tenants who worked on the Company Land agreed to serve for seven years in return for 50% of the profits of their labor. Additionally, the Virginia Company provided the tenants with a year's supply of food and cattle along with clothes, weapons, tools, and other equipment. PASBEHAY 44JC298 Presenter: Nick Luccketti ] {I interject here with the mention of 'Booke of the Massac' because this may be referring to Book of Massachusetts. As you may have guessed Valentine Huddleston would be who I might be referring to since Amelia Barr's reference of Valentine Huddleston coming from Plymouth, Massasachussetts or his possible father's line. I have tried to find this 'Booke of the Massac' with no luck so far.} In FamilySearch I have found mention of a Volentyn Huddleston of Skellingthorpe born 1602 which might correlate with Valentine Huddleston of 1628 since the file shows reference (Valentine Huddleston born 1628) with an unknown father born 1602.)}

Volume I page 370
Hee haveinge receaved notice of the good carriage of some psonns in Virginia was specially to recomend vnto them one mr Whittakers Leivetennat of the Companies men who had given a good Accompt of the trust reposed in him likewise mr Huddlestone mr of the Bona Noua who discharged himselfe well of all that was reposed to his trust and returneth much comended from the Gouernor and Counsell, as one of the sufficientest Mrs that ever came thither.

Volume II page 375 CXXIX. Sir Edwin Sandys. A Letter To John Ferrar August 25, 1620 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge. Autograph Letter, signed List of Records No. 197
Sr Yesterday Mr Huddleston came to salute me: And this day he sent for Captain Nuce & his wife to the Ship: who hath spent Wth me here welnigh a sennight; & I have dismissed him I hope well informed & satisfyed. Page 376 (continuing) Some wants Mr Huddleston was in: Wch are here supplyed. Thus for Virginia all I trust stands well. ffor I have written of all things at large, & satisfyed everie point of Yor carefull letters. But for my owne private, things are not so well as I could wish, ffor my wife hath been in danger: & hir midwife sent for. Yet now she goeth on: Yet will not be able to travail before she be lighted. This will keep me longer from Yu, & sore against my will. But what my mouth cannot performe, my pen shall supplie. I pray ye therefore desire Mr Carter to forbeare the laying in of beer till he heare from me again, unles it be such as ill be good at Alholemtide. The enclosed is from Captain Nuce to Sr J. Davers, to send me down 1000. single Tens & 2000 six penie nailes as he can. So in great hast, Wth hartiest salutations, I rest Yors assured Edwin Sandys

Page 436 CLIX. William Powell.
A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys April 12, 1621 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge. Autograph Letter, Signed List of Records No. 236
Not any waye moved with the power of your place, Right Noble Sr, although I hartelie wish such honnoRS might euer be so worthelie conferd: but as I must confess invited, naye incited by those inward beautyes, pietie, and pitte Wch do so loudlie speak you to the world more then man, did I adventure to present vnto your gentle acceptance the free offering of my willing services: how curteouslye itt pleased you to intertaine them I was certefyed by verball relation from Mr Hudlestone, he farter intimatinge, that if there had not bynn some differences betweene our Gennerall Sr George Yeardley, whome you much respect, and my self, you had vndoubtedlie amplifified your favours in a larger measure: although your least of loue is farr beyond my best of merritt, yett so ambitiouslie covetous am I of your good repute, that I beseech you thinke it not ymptinent, if to remoue such vnpleasinge obstacles I somewhat dilate vpon those occurrences. St Paules affection against Alexaner the Smithe, doth sufficientlie argue the lawlfulnes of a complainte, wherein deliberate discretion inquireth after the matter not the man, for we must not haue the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, who is the god of glorie, with respect of persons, least we comitt sinne, and be convinced of the law as trangressours.

Page 445 May 9, 1621 CLXIV. George Thorpe and John Pory. A Letter To Sir Edwin Sandys May 9, 1621 Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge List of Records No. 241
Honble Sr ffor answere of yor Ire touchinge that lettr of Captain Powell against Sr George Yeardley. yow may be pleased to vnderstand, that before ye receipte of ye same lettr Captain Powell had reconcyled himselfe vnto Sr George in pledge of wch reconciliation they had both receyved ye Sacrament. Sr George was therefore vnwillinge, that ye matter should be any way recyved; but rathr desirous that yt might be forevr buryed Notwthstandinge wee can by no meanes pceive that yf wee should entr into ye examinacon thereof, that Captain Powell can iustify any matrall parte thereof, yet yf yow shalbe pleased to give vs any fathr dyreccons therein, we shall ever be ready to entr into ye partycular examinacon thereof. Concrninge Captaine Maddisons petition yow shall here inclosed receive ye depositions of ye then servants of Captain Maddison and othrs, wch (as wee thinke) ill give yo lardge satisfaccon what no Cause at all Captain Maddison had to complaine. So remayninge ever ready to receive yor fathr comaunde wee rest Yors ever most assured to serve yow Geo: Thorpe J: Pory Secr, James Citty May 9th 1621. [Indorsed by Sir Edwin Sandys:] from Mr Thorpe and Mr Pory Concerning Cap. Powell and Cap. Maddison, 1621 to Sr Edwin Sandys Knight, one of his Matles Counceil for Virginia. At London. [Indorsement of Copy of above by John Pory:] A letter to Sir Edwin Sandys Knight, from Captain George Thorpe & Mr J. Pory concerning Capt. Wm Powell & Captain Isaac Madison, sent home in the Bona noua 8 May 1621

Page 448, 449, 450 and 454 James Cittie this 15th of Maie 1621
The Coop of the bona-noua seems willinge to bringe over for habitation some of his trade I praie you fauoure him in pcuringe him passage they beinge necessarie men.

May 27, 1621 CLXXI. Captain Nuce. A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys Ferrar Papers Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge List of Records No. 249 (Captain Nuce writes this letter to Sir Edwin Sandys that starts on page 455 and discusses the dutchmen of Jamestown. The letter or a collection of letter ends on page 458. We know Captain John Huddleston made a drop of equipment there which will be discussed later. On page 456 of the 'Records of the Virginia Company' ffor myne owne part I will be bold to say that none could ever be more honestly or thriftily issued, yet if many men had not died wee had bene longe since in want, I ymmagine I should haue wronged my self and abused the Company, if I had not said somethinge in lters concerninge Huddlestone, in whom you haue bene deceaued, for he ys a dissemblinge Companion. I haue giuen yow but a touch of his behavyor out of my respect to Mr Deputy: with whom I haue dealt freelie. Though he deserue not the best from me, yet I could eazeley disgest that, had he discharged his dutie otherwise. Thincke not therfore I beseech you that I mallice his person. I haue more to saie then I haue tyme to vtter.

Page 457 Eliza (Elizabeth City) : in Virginia 27 Maii 1621.
Since I cannot write pleasinge thinges, I haue forborne to direct my Ires to Ye Companie, wherein if yow finde I haue erred, I beseech yow to ioyne Wth my L. of SOUTHton in my excuse, whose favoR therin I haue humbly besought.
page 458 (continuing) I haue bene earnestlie entreated by one that otherwise may &doth& commaund me to take my complainte against Huddlestone in my Ires to Ye Councell. I praie Sr, do you therfore take onely a pryvate Notice of his miscarriage. My wife would declared hir owne thankefullnes to my Nobel Ladie in wrytinge. But it is not yet two daies since shee added a iolly boy to the Collonie: and remaines (I thanke God) in good health, considering hir estate, shee, Wth me desires to be rembred to the younge gentlewomen. [Indorsed by Sir Edwin Sandys:] From Capt. Nuice 27 May 1621. to Sr E. Sandys. From Virginia. [Addressed by self:] To the HOble Knight Sr Edwin Sandys these. at Northborne in Kent or elswhere.
Page 485 CLXXXIV. July 25, 1621...we received yor letters by the Bona Noua...
Page 502...or letters and dispatches by the Bona Nova...

Page 516 & 517
CXCVII. Council And Company For Virginia. A Commission Granted To John Huddleston November 21, 1621 Additional Manuscripts, 14285, Folios 75a-76a Document in British Museum, London List of Records No. 277 [75a] A Comission graunted by the Counsell and Company for Virginia to John Huddleston for a Voyadge to Virginia and for a free fishinge on the Coast of America. To all whome these present shall come to be seen or heard the Counsell and Company for Virginia send greetinge whereas the right HONOble Henry Earle of Southhampton Sr Edwin Sandy knight John fferar Thomas Knightley Gabrielle BarboR and John Delbridge haue for the advancement and supporte of the Colonie in Virginia furnished and sett out the good Shippe called Bona Noua of the burden of 190 tun to transporte and carrie ouer into Virginia fortie fiue persons there to plant and inhabite together with sundrie necessarie prouisions aswell for the said Passengers as also for the benifitt and advancement of the Colonie and haue ordained John Huddlestone to be the GouernoR and Captaine ouer the said Shippe and Marriners as also of all the Passengers and Wee therefore do by these present straightly charge and comand the said John Huddleston to take the directest course according to his best skill for Virginia and there to land & deliver [76] all the Passengers and good accordinge as he shalbe here ordered and appointed and after the pformance of the said voyage wee do by these present giue full and [and] authority vnto the said John Hudleston and the rest of the Marriners of the Bova Noua freely to fish in all pt of the Sea cost of Virginia between the degrees of thirty three and forty fiue of Northerly latitude as also ath their pleasure to land on the said Coast and the same to vse aswell for dryinge of their nett dryinge and salting of their fish as also for all necessarie vses for themselues and fishinge duringe the time of that seruice without wronginge or annoying the priuate possesion of any man Straightly charginge and requiringe all Inhabitant or members of the Colonye of Virginia and all other psons tradinge thither or there remayninge to giue noe disturbance or annoyance contrary to the effect of these present to the said John Hudleston or to the ship the Bova Noua or any other vessell boat Agent ffactors Marriners SayloRS or labourers thervnto belong as they will answere the Contrary at their perrill And wee doe further charge the said John Hudleston not to interrupt any Shippinge of the Subject of any his maTE freind or Allies [76] or any other whatsoeuer during his said voyage but if he shalbe chased or encountred by any mann of Warre or other saile whatsoeuer that shall goe about to hinder his proceeding or doe him any violence in such cases accordinge to the power graunted vnto vs his MaTIE wee will and comand him with all his power and vttermost endeauoR to repell resist and defend himselfe and our honors against the vniust force of what Nation souer aswell in his passage outward as homward as in all harboRS Riuers members of the Territories of our Plantacon And this our Comission shalbe his sufficient warrant herein In witnesse of the premisses wee haue herevnto caused the Comon Seale of Or Company to be fixed Giuen in a great and generall Quarter Courte the 21 of Nouemb: and in the yeares of the raigne of Or soveraigne Lourde James by the grace of God Kinge of England Scotland ffrance and Ireland DefendoR of the faith etc that is to say of England ffrance and Ireland the nineteenth and of Scotland the fiue and fifith.
Susan Myra Kinsbury, ed., The Records of The Virginia Company of London (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1906-35), 1:241-47.
[*241] XCIV. John Rolfe. A Letter to Sir Edwin Sandys January 1619/20 Ferrar Papers. Document in Magdalene College, Cambridge. Autograph Letter, Signed, with Seals List of Records No. 154 Honored Sir Studieng with my self what service I might doe you, as a token of my grateful remembrance for your many favors and constant love shewed me, as well in my absence as when I was present with you I could not at this tyme devise a better, then to giue yow notice of some pticulers both of or prsent estate, and what happened since the departure of the Diana. And though I am well assured, yow wilbe satisfied herein more fully by our Governor, yet I desire yor kind acceptance of this my poore indeavor. Presently after the Diana hadd her dispatch Sir George Yeardley (according to a Comyssion directed unto him and to the Councell of State,) caused Burgesses to be chosen in all place who mett at James City, where all matters therein conteyned were debated by severall Comyttees and approved: and lykewise such other lawes enacted, as were held expedient & requisite for the wellfare and peaceable govermt of this Comon-weale. Captaine Martines Burgesses for his Plantacon werre not admytted to this Assembly, the reasons I am assured yow shall receive from or Governor, who sendeth home a report of all those pceeding.
[*242] These principall men being at James Citie, Capten William Epps (who commandeth Smythes Hundred Company) was arraigned (as neere as might be) according to the lawdable Lawes of England, for killing one Captaine Edward Roecroft als Stallenge. He came hether from the North Colony in a shipp of Sr fferdinando Gorges (as he sayd) for some necessaries wch he wanted; and to coast along the shoare to fynd and discover what Harbors and riu9s he could: but through neglect of the Mr of the shipp and others she was forced a ground in a storme neere Newports Newes, and there sprang so greate a leake, that he could not carry her back againe. This myschance happened through vncivill and vnmanly word vrged by Stallenge (there being no prcedent malice) wth wch Captaine Epps being much moved did strike on the heade wth a sword §in the§ skabberd a such an vnfortunate blowe, that wthin 2. daies he died. The Jury (whereof Capt Lawne was foreman a discreete and vnderstanding man) hearing the Evidence, found him guilty of Manslaughter by Chaunce meddley. The Governor fynding him (though young) yet a pper civill gent, and of good hopes, not long after restored him to his Command. Captaine Henry Spelman being accused by Robte Poole (one of the interpretors of the Indian language) of many crimes wch might be priudiciall to the State in generall, and to every mans safety in pticular, receiued Censure at this generall Assembly. But the Governor hoping he might redeeme his fault being §pceeding§ much of Childishe ignorance, pdoned the punishmt [1b] vpon hope of amendmt. In triall whereof he was ymploied as interpretor to Patawamack to trade for Corne. Captaine Ward in his shipp went to Monahigon in the No: Colony in May, and returned the latter end of July, wth fishe wch he caught there. He [He] brought but a smale quantitie, by reason he hadd but little salte. There were some Plymouth shipps where he harbored, who made greate store of fishe, wch is farr larger then New-land-fishe. The George was sent by the Cape Marchant (wth the Governors consent) to New-found-land to trade and buy fishe for the better releif of the Colony and to make triall of that passage. One other reason (as I take it) was, for that the Magazin was well stoored wth good, it was some what doubtfull, wheth9 a shipp would be sent to carry home the cropp so sone as the George might vpon her returne back. She departed hence about the 9th of July, and arriued here againe about the 10: of Septembr. She
[*242] made her passage to Newfound-land in less then 3. weekes, and was at the banck amongst the french fishermen in 14. daies. She came back hether againe in 3. week, wth bare wynd, and brought so much fishe as will make a saving voyadge, wch, besid the greate releif, giveth much content to the wholl Colony. The Sturgeon shipp and the Triall departed hence togeth9 about the fiue of July. Mr Pountys hath taken greate paines in fishing, and toward Michellmas (the weather being somewhat temperate) made some good sturgeon. He hopeth by the spring to be better fitted, wth Cellars and houses, and to do some good therein. The Cattle in the Triall came exceeding well, and gaue the Colony much ioy and greate incouragemt. Both they horses and Mares wilbe very vendible here a long tyme, the Colony increasing wth people as of late. About the latter end of August, a Dutch man of Warr of the burden of a 160 tunes arriued at Point-Comfort, the Comandors name Capt Jope, his Pilott for the West Indies one Mr Marmaduke an Englishman. They mett wth the Trer in the West Indyes, and determyned to hold consort shipp hetherward, but in their passage lost one the other. He brought not any thing but 20. and odd Negroes, wch the Governorr and Cape Marchant bought for victualle (whereof he was in greate need as he prtended) at the best and easyest rate they could. He hadd a lardge and ample Comyssion from his Excellency to range and to take purchase in the West Indyes. Three or 4. daies after the Trer arriued. At his arriuall he sent word prsently to the Gou9nor to know his pleasure, who wrote to him, and did request myself Leiftenante Peace and Mr Ewens to goe downe to him, to desyre [2a] him to come vp to James Cytie. But before we gott downe he hadd sett saile and was gone out of the Bay. The occasion hereof happened by the vnfrendly dealing of the Inhitante of Keqnoughton, for he was in greate want of victualle, wherewth they wold not releive him nor his Company vpon any termes. He reported (whilst he staied at Keqnoughton) thit if wee gott not some Ord’nance planted at Point Comfort, the Colony would be quyte vndone and that ere long: for that vndoubtedly
[*244] the Spanyard would be here the next §spring§ wch he gathered (as was sayd) from some Spanyarde in ye West Indyes. This being spread abroade doth much disharten the people ingenerrall. ffor wee haue no place of strength to retreate vnto, no shipping of c9teynty (wch would be to vs as the wodden walles of England) no sound and experienced souldyers to vndertake, no Engineers and arthmen to erect worke, few Ordenance, not a serviceable carriadge to mound them on; not Amunycon of powlder, shott and leade, to fight and 2. wholl dayes, no not one gunner belonging to the Plantacon, so yer Honors or soveraignes dignity, yor honors or poore reputacons §lives§ and labors thus long spent lieth too open to a suddayne, and to an inevitable hazard, if a forroigne enemy oppose against §vs§. Of this I cannot better doe, to giue yow full satisfaccon, then to referr yow to the iudgemt and opynion of Capt Argall who hath often spoken and herof during his govermt, and knoweth (none better) these defect . About the begynnyng of Septembr J-apazous (the King of Patawamack brother) cames to James Cyty to the Governor. Amongst other frivoulous messag he requested, that 2. shipps might be speedyly to Patawamack where they should trade for greate stoore of corne. Herevpon (according to his desyre) the Governor sent an Englishman wth him by land, and in the begynning of October, Capt Ward shipp and Somer-Iselande frigate departed James Cyty hether-ward. Robte Poole being wholly ymployed by the Governor of message to the greate King, pswaded Sr George, that if he would send Pledge he would, would come to visite him. Or Corne and Tobacco being in greate aboundance in or grounde (for a more plentyfull yeere then this, it hath not pleased God to send vs since the beginning of this Plantacon, yet very contagious for sycknes, whereof many [2b] both old and new men died) the Governor sent two men vnto him, who were returned wth frivoulous aunsweres, sayng he never hadd any intent to come vnto him. The Gou9nor being iealous of them (the rath9 because wee hadd many straggling Plantacons, much weakened by the greate mortality, Poole lykewise proving very dishonest) requested Captaine William Powell and myself (for Opachankano pfesseth much love to me, and giueth much credite to my word ) to goe in a shallopp unto Pomonkey ryver; wch wee did. Going vp that
[*245] ryver wthin 5. myles of his house wee sent Capt Spelman and Tho: Hobson vnto him wth the Governrs message. The shipp and frigate (being not farr out of their way to Patawamack) went in the night about 12. myles into the riu9, and wee hasting vpp wth or shallopp, the messengers were wth Opaihankano, before or asone as any newes came to him eyther of the shipps or or arriuall, wch much daunted them and ptt them in greate feare. Their intertaymt at the first was harshe, (Poole being even turned heathen) but after their message was delyuered, it was kindly taken, they sent away lovingly, and Poole accused and Condemned by them, as an instrumt that sought all the meanes he could to breake or league. They seemed also to be very weary of him. Sh Opachankano much wondered I would not goe to him, but (as I wished the messengers) they said I was syck of an ague, wherewth they was were satisfied. Wee hadd no order to bring Poole away, nor to make any shew of discontent to him, for feare he should pswade them to some myscheif in or corne feilde, hoping to gett him away by fayre meanes. So wee returned in greate love and amyty to the greate content of the Colony, wch before liued in dayly hazard, all messag being vntruly delyu9ed by Poole on both side. The Chikahomynies come not at vs, but wee receyue no domage by them. The Governor hath bounded the lymytt of the 4. Cerporacons the Companies, the Governors, the Vniversity and Glebe lande according to the Comyssion. [3a] All the Ancient Planters being sett free haue chosen place for their dividend according to the Comyssion. Wch giueth all greate content, for now knowing their owne land, they strive and are prpared to build houses §&§ to cleere their ground ready to plant, wch giveth the * * * greate incouragemt, and the greatest hope to make the Colony florrish that ever yet happened to them. Vpon the 4. of November the Bona Noua arriued at James Cyty. All the passengers came lusty and in good health. They came by the west Indyes, wch passage at that season doth much refreshe the people.

German Sawmill Wrights at Jamestown in 1620 by Gary C. Grassl, President The German Heritage Society of Greater Washington, D.C. The records of the Virginia Company of London for June and July 1620 show that four unnamed but "very skillful" sawmill wrights came from "Hambur rough" [Hamburg] to London for service in the Jamestown Colony. "Men skillful for sawmills were procured from Germany and sent to Virginia at the Company's great charge," wrote Alderman Johnson. By 1620, the Colony had advanced beyond Jamestown, leaving small settlements up and down the James River. The Company was anxious to establish sawmills in the Colony so that planks and boards could be cut for building houses and constructing ships. However, Captain Thomas Nuce wrote from Virginia in May 1621 that the Germans were facing great difficulties. Swift streams were required to power the wheels of a sawmill, and the sawmill wrights had difficulty finding any in Tidewater Virginia. The natives, who were poised for a general uprising, still controlled the upstream areas, which made them dangerous for colonists. In addition, the Germans had great difficulty finding people to help them construct the sawmills. They even had difficulty obtaining sustenance. Captain Nuce complained that the Germans couldn't build the sawmills and at the same time "look after their own livelihood." The company bade Governor Sir Francis Wyatt of Virginia "to take care of the Dutch sent to build sawmills, and seat them at the falls [of the James river], that they may bring their timber by the current of the water." The Company told the governor in July 1621, "And here we earnestly commend unto your care the Dutchmen sent for erecting of sawing mills, a work most necessary, since the materials for housing and shipping cannot otherwise without much more trouble, pains and charge be provided." Copyright © 1996-2000 Davitt Publications. All rights reserved.

Captain John Huddleston born 1587 of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, London, England death unknown. Stella Hardy's book listed below figures his death around 1625 see page 44 below and Captain John Huddleston is listed as Master of the Thomas and John in 1628 in the Virginia Colonial. From records of the Bova Nova the Captain left England in 1618: 1618 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Ship and Passenger Information: Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia-Departed in August, 1619, with 120 passengers. Sent by the Virginia Company. (Source: The Voyage ... To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate) November, 1619 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia
Source: "Hotten's Lists"; Burthen: 200 tons (Source: The Voyage...To Verginia 1619 by Ferdinando Yate) Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia-1620 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia-1621 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia. (The Bona Nova departed Virginia May [16], 1621.2) Sources: (1) "Hotten's Lists", Virginia Musters (2) Letter, dated May [16], 1621, from Jabez Whittaker, in Virginia, sent to Sir Edwin Sandys, London, on the departing Bona Nova. (S.M. Kingsbury, "Records of the Virginia Company", 1933, v.III, Page 297)-April, 1622 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia
Passengers from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia-Before 1624/5 The Bona Nova, from London, arrived at Virginia from the Port of London on the Bona Nova to Virginia before February 4, 1624/5, but voyage date not specified.

From Virginia Colonial Records 13 May 1628 Captain John Huddleston master of the Thomas & John, from Virginia Edmond Morgan & Co. imported 2400 pounds (survey report 3973 also imported 15th [The document has been edited and reproduced in full by Neville Williams in "The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography LXV Nc. 4 (Oct. 1957)located in page 5 of the Magazine. Depository Public Record Office Class E. 190/32/8. (Patricke Kennady loaded some tobacco on the boat), 16th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 24th, 26th, 27th, 30th, June 7th(same year-all preceeding dates), July 9th, August 1st, August 11th(other import by various people other than Edmond Morgan & Co. during this time-The Thomas & John made its way back to England Source: "Hotten's Lists", pages 83-85 with a new master in 1635 Richard Lambard, Master Embarked June 6, 1635 The Thomas & John departed London for Virginia. The " Thomas and John," of London, which vessel was " furnished with 18 pieces of cast-iron ordnance, from the usual market in Smithfield " ; 7th May, 1633. The Garland and the Thomas and John together and a Captain John Huddleston knew of both; He knew of the Garland from his deposition and the Thomas and John from him being its Captain.

It reads 1628 13 May In the "Thomas and John" of London, John Huddleston master, from Virginia: Edmond Morgan & Co. inported 2400 lbs, " L 60.

Dennis William Brumm's Genealogy "Captain John West, Governor of Virginia, 1635-37, was the twelfth child of Thomas, eleventh Lord De La Ware and Anne Knollys his wife, daughter of Sir Francis Knollys. (See Chart in Virginia Historical Genealogies 46.) Captain West was born December 14, 1590, died in Virginia 1659. He was a member of the Virginia Company of London, 1609, came to Virginia about 1620, a member of the Governor's Council 1630-1659. In 1635, as senior member of the council, he was prevailed upon to accept the office of Governor Harvey was expelled. On March 6, 1653, as 'Captain John West, Esquire, one of the Council of State' he patented 3000 acres on the northeast side of York River and northwest side of Mattapony. (C. P. 295) This was the famous home called 'West Point' to which he moved. His wife was named Ann; her last name unknown." (Southside VA Families by John Bennett Boddie Vol 1, Genealogical Pub. 1955, pages 398-402. This publication traces the Ancestors of John West - John West - Anne West - Henry Fox II.)"[John] Came to Virginia in 1618. After the massacre of 1622 he associated himself with the military life of the colony."

In a Huddleston forum entrie in 1998 a writer writes about a Huddleston child abandoned in Virginia about 1640 and John Huddleston the third fits that family, since he was born in 1635-In 1640. There was a child Huddleston, who had been left in the care of a resident of Jamestown, the court reported that the boy was not being provided for properly and unless the guardian met the requirements the court would see to it that the boy was taken care of handsomely, and it would cost the guardian dearly.-Copied from a book of Virginia Records. Book in genl court office marked No. 1, 1639 to 1652 p 83 to 148. Id 122, Id 126,7 , Id 343 11th. of Dec., 1640 Whereas William Huddleston servant unto Mr. Canhow [or Cantrow ?] hath complained to the board against his master for want of all manner of apparel, the Court hath herefore ordered that the said Mr. Canhor [or Canyrow ?] shall before Christmas next provide and allow unto the said Huddleston such sufficient apparel of linen and wollen as shall be thought fit by Captain West Esq or otherwise that the said Captain shall have power to dispose of the said servant until the said Canhow [or Cantrow ?] do perform this order.

1 Records of York County, vol. 1694-1697, p. 118, Va. State Library. Among the items in a statement of Edward Moss of York County, showing his expenditures on account of his servant, Richard Stephens, were the following: for a pair of shoe strings, 3 lbs. of tobacco; for a peniston coat, 60 lbs. of tobacco; for a dowlas shirt, 50 lbs. of tobacco. Vol. 16571663, p. 411, Va. State Library. The following from the records of the General Court, Dec. 11, 1640, preserved in a minute in the Robinson Transcripts, p. 8, is also of interest: “Whereas William Huddleston, servant unto Mr. Canhow, hath complained to the board against his master for want of all manner of apparel, the court hath, therefore, ordered that the said Canhow shall before Christmas next provide and allow unto the said Huddleston such sufficient apparel of linen and woollen as shall be thought fit by Captain William West or otherwise that the said Captain West shall have power to dispose of the said servant until the said Canhow do perform this order.”

You might find him in the History of the Wests of Virginia, (Governor's of Virginia.) Also "Early Virginia Families along the James River". There is a William West in the early records of Isle of Wight Co. Virginia also. I have searched the records of Gov. John West who came 1618 to Va. and was Burgess 1629-30 and Justice of Peace of York Co. 1634 but I have not found a Capt. William West. It could be he was a "King's Man" appointed to act as justice for the colonies. I have seen the name also, but at this time, do not have anything that would help you. Lucy Vickers Grisham Lewisville, TX

William West & the Bacon Rebellion Posted by: David Asprey
Calendar of State Papers (Colonial) Vol 10 ƒ132 of March 1677: “Petition of his Majesty’s most loyal and obedient subjects of the Isle of Wight County in Virginia to his Majesty’s Commissioner. In behalf of William West “a rebel absconding”, who took up arms against the Indians by whom his father was barbarously murdered, was taken prisoner, carried aboard a ship, from hence to prison and condemned to death, but has made his escape and, as yet, cannot be heard of. Pray for his life and the restitution of his estate to his wife and children. Signed by about 70 persons, mostly with their mark.” CO 1/39 ƒ85: To the honrll herbert Jeffreys Esqr: Sr Jno Corey Kt and Coll Francis Merrson esqr his most Sacred maistys Commisonr for Virgina The Humble pete of his matis most loyall and obedint subirts of ye County of ye Isle of Waight in Virgina one ye behalf of william weest Most humbly presenteth that by An Actt of Asembly made and confermed in this his most Sacred maties Collony a warr was confermed against ye most Bloody & barbrous Indans who had murdred destroyed and ruined many ifhis most loyall subiects and thought Fit by ye sd actt in every county According to ye number of there tithables to rays men p’poshonall in every county to make upp one thousand soulders with Armes Amuintion and privions Accordingly for ye first two months thay were outt one ye sd warr and two month mour of privions to be provided if ye kernul required it After wch nathanell bacon Junior was confermed by ye said Actt to be Genll of ye force so raised and to appoint all offecers under him by a Commishon granted as he thought Fit: now so it is that noe man ever Immagned or thought but that the warr was woelly intended aganst the Indans, never thinking yt a warr so really Intended Against them would returne and looke bake one our selves to yr taking a way of life and estate and ye utter ruine of mens posteritie and Family as it so manifestly Appeereth and where as Will’ Weest above named was as willwisher to ye destroying of ye sd Indans, whose Father was most barbrously murthred by them: whome to our knowlidge was A loyall Subict to our most dred soveraine Lord the King: who hath proved himself soe to be and all other his mates Subt as ever no herd of by reason that in all the time that he was in Armey nither himselfie or any other woh Accompannied him ever tooke molested trubled or Imprisoned any prson while he was in Army nither in plundring our goods or taking or taking what wee had: yeatt never ye less thoug ye sd Weest after he herd of yr govt actt of indemnity was willing to lay down his armes and submitt himselfe thereto was taken prisonr ferried aboord a ship from thence to prison and by a counsell of warr condemned to dye - After which sentence so pased: to preserve lfe ye sd weest mad an escape and as yeat cannot be heard of: leaving a weakly wooman to his wife and 7 or 8 children all soe small that ye one cannot help the other: all his estat lesed and a gard plased at his house to hir great greef and unspeekable charg.

The prissinor therefore most honrll gentelmen being by your honre tenderly considered yor poor petns mjost humbly begg and besecheth yor honrl: for ye life of ye said Weest and that his estate be Freed leses may be restored the gard discharged wch wille a great help to his poor destressed wife and many small children with Feaver granted yor poor petr as duty bindeth them Shall ever pray for your honr health and happines long to remaine. Tho Gayndy Robin Gladell *John Simond *John Rookty John Richards *Nicholas Hedgebarn Rich Brasenose John Whitley *Mickall fulyham Will Lane Agust manriend *Thomas williamson John hood *John Forrest *Edm Prime philip Thomas Tho honrelle hopkin howell John More Walter morgan Rogger Daves Edmond Windom George webster Ed haild John Williames Willi Askon Walter harris *John Nevill Keney horne John Storenson Ambros hadley Jo Sharpe *John walefeild hodges Cornwell Rich Jeanes *John Bathe *thos Yorke *robart cabidge *Edward Spinkson John Mershall Will Camer *Thomas Davis nick Boone Gilbart Adames James Bryan Will fly *Hercules Calcott John froeset Tho fosythe Rob Barkley *James Cagnall *Robert Morgan *Edward goodson John Lonsil John Afkon *William Bateman Soloned Davis *Tho Joyner Junior Tho Blake Rogger Arsker Will Feller henry maddin Edward davis Owen Griffin Rob Edwards *George Snigers *Roger Jones Rich Jackson *Antho Fulgham Rob meures John fransis *Timothy ….. Rob Sturdy *B…Sheild John myrlo bridyman Joyner John william John Henry Will Cooke An mathews peeter greeves henry dafon Stephen horsfeild *John Marshall mickold osborne *Jn Joiner [many of these names are indistinct; those with an * were signed, the rest with a mark]

Privy Council (Colonial) in London: Dated Whitehall 21 Nov 1677: “Upon reading this day at the Board the humble Petition of Henry West Planter a Native of his Majestys Colony of Virginia (now in England) in behalf of himself and Brother, Setting forth, That his Brother William West having been seduced to accept of a Commission against the Indians under the late Rebell Nathaniel Bacon, and being sent by Colonel Bridger with Promise of free Pardon to lay downe his commission, disband his men, and submit himself to the Governor, He way prevayled upon by the Petitioner so to do, upon the Petitioners Promise to go with him to the Governor, But so soon as they had surrendred themselves to Colonel Bridger, He contrary to his Promise sent them bound to the Governor Sir William Berkeley, who tryed them both by a Councill of Warr, and sentenced to Death the Petitioners Brother, who never acted to the prejudice of any one Person or Estate, and the Petitioner who was alwaies loyall, and against whom nothing could be proved, was after long Imprisonment sentenced to be transported hither, and forced to give Bond to his Majestys use to depart by a day prefixed; which, to indemnify his Security, he did to utter ruine of himself and Wife, and severall small Children . . . And therefore Praying to be discharged of the said Bond, with Liberty to return to Virginia, And that his Majesty of his abundant Goodnes would extend his Pardon to his said Brother, who hath since made his Escape out of Prison, He taking the Oath of Obedience and giving Security for his future good Behaviour. [The petition regarding William West is referred to Lord Culpepper’s decision on his arrival in Virginia: the part regarding the petitioner himself Lord Culpepper is to examine in England and report his opinion thereon to his Majesty in Council.]”

York County was originally named Charles River, and was one of the eight original shires formed in 1634. The present name was given in 1643, probably in honor of James, Duke of York, the second son of Charles I. Its area is 123 square miles, and the county seat is Yorktown. James City County took its name from James City, the original name of Jamestown. Both were named in honor of James I of England (1566-1625), "who never said a foolish thing and never did a wise one." He defended himself on the ground that his words were his own, but his actions were his ministers'. The county grew from the 1607 Jamestown settlement to become one of the "Four Ancient Boroughs," and in 1634, one of the eight original "shires" established by the Virginia General Assembly. New Poquoson, about 1635 - 1692, Charles River, about 1634 - 1642 (name changed to York). I can find no earlier record of this William Huddleston, servant. The following laws would also mean he might of not been abandoned. Author: Abbott, Edith Title: “A Study of the Early History of Child Labor in America.” Citation: American Journal of Sociology 14 (July 1908): 15-37. Page 16 This rigorous insistence on industry was, with the New England colonists, not only a matter of conscience but of necessity. For they had seen “the grime and grisly face of povertie coming upon them,” and Bradford points out with Puritan simplicity that “as necessitie was a stern task-master over them [the Puritans], so they were forced to be such, not only to their servants but in a sorte to their dearest children: the which as it did not a little wound ye tender hearts of many a loving father and mother, so it produced likewise sundrie sad and sorrowful effects. For many of their children . . . . haveing lernde to bear ye yoake in their youth, and willing to bear parte of their parents’ burden, were, oftentimes, so oppressed with their hevie labours that though their minds were free and willing, yet their bodies bowed under ye weight of ye same and became decreped in their early youth.” Bradford’s History, ibid., p. 23. Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Court Records and Province Laws give evidence of the serious attempt made to prevent idleness among children. In 1640, an order of the Great and General Court of Massachusetts required the magistrates of the several towns to see “what couse may be taken for teaching the boys and girles in all towns the spinning of the yarne.” The Town of Boston in 1672 notifies a list of persons to “dispose of their severall children . . . abroad for servants, to serve by Indentures accordinge to their ages and capacities,” and if they neglect this “the selectmen will take their said children from them and place them with such masters as they shall provide accordinge as the law directs.” The children are both girls and boys, for eight years old up. Boston Town Records, p. 67. For example, the Connecticut case of the charges brought against one Phineas Cook for his ill-treatment of “one Robert Cromwell, a poor, helpless, decrepid boy, an apprentice to the said Phineas for a term not yet expired,” New Haven Colonial Records, XI, p. 138 (referred to in Capen, op. cit.). And this law of the Great and General Court of Massachusetts in 1634 tells its own story: “It is ordered that if any boy (that hath bene whipt for running from his maister) be taken in any other plantacon, not having a note from his maister to testifie his business there, it sh(al be) lawfull for the constable of the said plantacon to whip him and send him home.” (Massachusetts Bay Records, I, 115). “Our desire is that we may have them 12 yeares old and upward . . . . They shall be apprentizes; the boyes till they come to 21 years of age; the girles till like age or till they be marryed” (Neill, Extracts from Manuscript Transactions of the Virginia Company of London).

HISTORY of Accomac County
Long before the first white settlers arrived in what is now Virginia, the Native Americans called the Eastern Shore by the name Accawmacke ---meaning the "across the water place". Accawmacke was settled very early by the English. According to history, the natives on the Eastern Shore were friendly and access to the area was easy. The word Chesapeake is the modern English spelling of the native term for "great water". To the early settlers, this "great water" made for easier travel than trying to go into the interior of the New World. So, early settlement was concentrated in the coastal areas.

The original shire of Accomac, created in 1634, covered the entire Eastern Shore. The name of the shire was changed to Northampton in 1642. This name change was part of an effort by the English to eliminate "heathen" names in the New World. So, an English name, Northampton, was chosen. By the year 1663, many, many settlers has chosen the Eastern Shore as their new home. It was decided that the area should be divided into two counties. So, the northern half got back its original name-but spelled Accomac. Accomac County was abolished for a time in 1670. Governor William Berkeley, wanted to arrest Col. Edmund Scarburgh for the murders of some native chiefs. This was one of the incidents that led to Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. Scarburgh claimed to be a Burgess for Accomac, and members of the General Assembly were immune to arrest. So, to circumvent this situation, Governor Berkeley nullified the law that created the county. This eliminated Scarburgh's protection from being arrested. When Scarburgh died in 1671, the General Assembly re-created Accomac County. Accomac County officially became Accomack in 1940, when the General Assembly resolved that the county name would be spelled with the "k". Copyright © 2001, 2002, 2003 by Mark Lewis

From the Ropers in Virginia 1600-1699: February 1642 [1643]. p. 255: To All etc. I Capt. John West Esquire Governor etc. doe with the consent of the Counsell of State accordingly give and graunt unto Henry Williams one hundred and Fiftie Acres of Land Scituate in Co. of Accomack Lying on the old Plantation Creeke North on the Land of Henry Charlton South West on the Fishing Point...Sealed and delivered in the presence of William Roper Recordature v[?] Septemo die September 1644. Could our Anne Boyse have taken John Huddleston born in 1635 into her custody? Or did Captain John Huddleston have his son in Henrico and then retire to Nevis Island with or without his family?
Survey Report No. 4205 Various ships were captured by the Spanish plate fleet, but the 'Mayflower' was separated during a storm and cast away in the Bermudas. Part of her cargo was saved and sent to England in the 'Dorset'. ff.570vo-30 March 1640. John Flowers, Captain of the 'Dorset'.
The first legislative assembly in English North America took place July 30 through August 4, 1619 in the choir of the Jamestown Church. This first House of Burgesses consisted of Company appointed Governor Sir George Yeardley, a six man Company appointed governor's counsil and two representatives from each of the eleven surrounding settlements or plantations. These representatives were chosen by election from among the settlers of each plantation. Members of the council were: Mr. Samuel Macock, Mr. John Pory, Captain Nathaniel Powell, Captain Francis West, Reverend William Wickham, John Pory was designated secretary and speaker; John Twine, clerke of the General assembly; and Thomas Pierse, Sergeant of Arms. Plantations and their representatives were: For James City: Ensign William Spense, Captain William Powell; For Charles City: Samuel Sharpe, Samuel Jordan; For the City of Henricus: Thomas Dowse, John Plentine; For Kiccowtan: Captaine William Tucker, William Capp; For Martin-Brandon, Captain John Martins Plantation: Mr. Thomas Davis, Mr. Robert Stacy; For Smythes Hundred: Captain Thomas Graves, Mr. Walter Shelley; For Martins Hundred (also known as Wolstenholme): Mr. John Boys, John Jackson; For Argals Guifte: Mr. (Thomas) Pawlett, Mr. (Edward) Gourgainy; For Flowerdieu Hundred: Ensign (Edmund) Rossingham, Mr. (John) Jefferson; For Captain Lawnes Plantation: Captain Christophor Lawne, Ensign Washer; For Captain Wardes Plantation: Captain (John) Warde, Lieutenant (John) Gibbes[source] Charles E. Hatch, Jr., America's Oldest Legislative Assembly and its Jamestown Statehouses-Appendix II Proceedings of the Virginia Assembly, 1619, National Park Service Interpretive Series History No. 2, Washington: Revised 1956. 1626 April 25th Deed [Genealogies of Virginia Families, Volume II, Jefferson Family, page 432] In a record of the Virginia General Court for April 25, 1626, mention is made of Capt. John JEFFERSON being then in the West Indies, and permission was granted to Captain John UTIE to occupy and settle his land, on his promise to indemnify Capt. JEFFERSON, if he should ever return. (Va Magazine XXX, p. 49). This John JEFFERSON was the first named John JEFFERSON, a London merchant, that appeared in Virginia cira 1618 in the Bona Nova and represented Flowerdew Hundred in the first General Assembly, which convened at Jamestown July 20, 1619. He remained in the colony abt 3 years, and returned to England, where in June 1622, he testified before the London Company against Capt. John Martin. While in Virginia he was made a lieutenant, and in England in 1623 was appointed by the King on the Commission to make report as to conditions in Virginia. Having resided over three years in Virginia, he was granted by the Company 250 acres at Archer’s Hop for “his personal adventure”. He was also mention as “He interested himself in St. Christopher’s Island, and with Sir Thomas WARNER and Ralph Merrifield, London Merchants, began the colonizing of St. Christopher in 1623. He left England in the Great Hopewell, in October 1623, and came to that Island in March, 1624. Capt. John JEFFERSON was reportedly the son of John JEFFERSON, Pittistrie, Suffolk yeoman, and that about 1656 Capt. Jefferson purchased the manor of Dillingham, Cambridgeshire. His will was dated Sept 4, and proved October, 1660. He had brothers, from one of whom President JEFFERSON may have descended.”Copyright Information and Restrictions: Our Totty Roots Research Reports have been provided for the free use of those engaged in NON-commercial genealogical research by our Totty Roots Research Group. Any and ALL commercial use is strictly prohibited. These documents may be included in your own genealogy, however ALL these documents are copyrighted (to or by the authors to whom they are credited herin and copyright thereto) and may NOT be sold, nor given to anyone who may attempt to derive profit from these records. Researchers may copy and distribute this work freely, but with the proviso that it may only be copied and circulated in its entirety-including this notice, as well as all sources, bibliographies and credits. However, permission is NOT Granted to copy ANY Totty Roots Research Files to other electronic locations-whether web pages or list postings. Sincerely, The Totty Roots Research Group.
The 'Records of the Virginia Company' mentions this John Jefferson to be one of the four tasters of tobacco for the company and that they wanted these four to set the price of tobacco for them.

Stith was able to persuade the government of Virginia to make transcripts of the papers as a preservation measure (these transcripts are also in the collections of the Library of Congress) but seems not to have treated the original papers. In 1825, Thomas Jefferson, who had purchased the loose Jamestown papers as part of the library of Peyton Randolph and the two bound Court Books from the collection of William Byrd, said that "I found the leaves so rotten as often to crumble into dust on being handled; I bound them, therefore together, that they might not be unnecessarily opened; and thus have preserved them forty-seven years."3 Not all of the papers were bound, however, when they passed into the collections of the Library of Congress shortly thereafter. During the nineteenth century, a series of prominent scholars of early American history tried to persuade the federal government to publish and care for the papers, but to no avail. A memorandum written in 1901 to the Librarian of Congress by John C. Fitzpatrick, assistant chief of the Library's Manuscript Division, describes the papers as "tattered, worn with age, and rotted with mildew," and asks that the "privilege of consulting them be withheld in every case but the most exceptional one."4 Soon afterwards, the "exceptional one" was found in the person of Susan M. Kingsbury, a professor of economic history trained at Columbia University who was hired by the Library to transcribe and publish the papers. In an ambitious and painstaking project that occupied the next thirty years, Kingsbury edited the four-volume Records of the Virginia Company of London, 1606-1626 (1906-35), which transcribes both the Library's papers and many others relating to the Jamestown settlement in public and private collections in England.

Flower de Hundred, sometimes called Peirsey's Hundred was on the south side of the James River. Curls (or Curles) was a plantation on the north side of the James River, above Flower de Hundred. (Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Volume V, Thompson-Yates (and Appendix), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982)
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/mtjhtml/mtjessay2.html#text5

We find that Captain John West made Governor from this Land Deed: Johnson, Peter-1 June 1636-Warrasquinoke Co.-600 Ac.-PB1 pg 354( Johnson, K-Q~CARD 57of 66 : Lying North East and South West along the South side of Warrisquaick Creek.) To all to whome these p.sents shall come I Capt. John West Esq. Governer &c ???end &c Whereas &c Now Know yee that I the said Capt. John West Esq. doe with the consent of the councill of State accordingly give and grant unto Peter Johnson six hundred acres of land scituate lying and being in the Countie of Warrasquinoke lying Northeast and South west along the South side of Warrisquink Creek upon the head of the said Creek and butting upon the Nanzemond river The said six hundred acres of land ????????ig due unto him the said Pater Johnson as followeth (vizt.) one hundred acres by surrender from John Day due to him for his owne personall aadventure and the transportation of one servant and one hundred and fifty acres by Surrender from Ambrose Meader due to him for his owne p.sonall Adventure and his wife and one servant and one hundred and fiftie acres due to him the said Peter Johnson for the transportation at his owne proper costs and charges of three servants and two hundred acres by surrender from Gabriell ( Wilsoun due to him for the transportation of fouer p.sons into this Colony the names of his and all the aforesaid p.sons being in the records enrolled under this patent ( To have and to hold &c Dated the first day of June 1636 Ut in Alys Peter Johnson Jon: Day Jon: Powell Ambrose Mader Gabriel Wilsoun Jon: Buler? Ann Sharp his wife This pattent was renewed by S.r John Harvey in the name of Robert Brasseur and Peter Rey Test.md Tho Cooke &c[we also find Captain John West was in the deeds of Lawson, Epaphroditus : 23 Dec 1636 : 200 Ac. : PB 1, pg 407, Warrosquyoake County, on Nansemond River joining on William Parker and Haslington, Arthur : 23 Dec 1636 : 200 Ac. : PB 1, pg 408, Warrosquyoake County, on Nansemond River

Finally, We find William Huddleston of 1640: Southern Branch Nansemond River, Nansemond Co., Virginia To all &c. Whereas &c. Now Know yee that I the sd Sr. Wm. Berkeley Kt. do give and grant unto Mr John Bryant three hundred and fifty acres of land at the head of ye Southern branch begining at a marked Oake standing? on a point ? sd. branch &? so runing No. by? W? 320 pole joyning to ye land of Robert Johnson to a marked oake Ea. by No 100 pole to a marked oak N by W? 75 pole to a marked pine Ea ?? No 320 pole by a Pocoson to a marked Pine So by Ea 75 pole to a marked Oake West by S 320 pole to a marked oake So by Ea 320 pole to a marked oake by the branch side So up by the Branch 100 pole to the first station which land sd. land is due by and for the transportation of seven persons wh?? names are in the records mentioned under this patt. To have and to hold. To be held . Yeilding & paying Provided . Dated the Eigth of October 1672 ???? mar 2d, ?? 24? Rud??? Elizabeth ?????? William ?????? apofor? Harrison ????zne William ?????ston Wm Rofev
Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants-Abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent Volume 2: 1666-1695 Published and copyright by Virginia State Library Henry Bishop, 2300 acs. Accromack Co., 9 Nov. 1666, p. 32. On the N. side of Bockatenock Cr. & bay, E. on the deviding line Cr. & partly by the entrance into Selbye's bay & c. Trans of 46 per: Samll. Evins, Jno. Colan, Tho. Pierce, Joseph Sawle (or Sawte), Richard Hawke, Hump. Arscott (or Hescott), Jno. Thomas, Tho. Hickes, Bath. White, Bernard Kendall, David Moyle, Francis Hearle, Nath. Lugger, Rich. Ersly, Edward Hearle, Jno. Cerly, Rich. Carter, George Fletcher, Wm. Dalston, Wm. Hudleston, Jane Wilford, Gilber Thacker, Henry Wilmot, Godfrey Clarke, Symon Degg., Wm. Wolley, Jno. Wright, Francis Barker, Jane Bamfield(or Barnfield), Jno. Roll, Peter Ball, Jno. Skelton, Wm. Jennings, Charles Grills, Will Webber, Jno. Edwards, Stephen Wheeler, Peter Jenkens, Charles Bacawen. ] http://englishamerica.home.att.net/index.html

Virginia Historical Index In Two Volumes by E.G. Swem, Librarian of the College of William and Mary copyright 1934 and 1962 Reprinted, 1965, by permission of Virginia Historical Society page 967 Huddlesee, John~John Huddleston born about 1635 Henrico County death 1691-Henrico County, Pin #146928 Fulton BROCK 1425 N. Woodside Rd Chandler AZ John Huddleston (Jr) Birth: 1635/39 Place: Henrico Co, VA Death: 1691 Place: Henrico Co, VA. Virginia: Beginnings of Its Families: Part I William Clayton Torrence William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Oct., 1915), pp. 116-142. HENRICO COUNTY, VIRGINIA: BEGINNINGS OF ITS FAMILIES. Part 1 Page 133. Jno Huddlesee 2

From the Huddlesy microfilm we know this to be John Huddleston. And John Juddlesee, John Huddlesee, John Huddlesy are all John Huddleston. He shows up with William Hatcher and William Hatcher's two sons-Benjamin and Edward. We know John Huddleston was still alive in 1679 because he shows up in: 1679 Tythables For Henrico At Mr Hatcher's Sen 5 "Mr. Hatcher, Senr." was William Hatcher who on 1 June 1636, received a patent for land for the importation of himself and three others into the colony. Benjamin and Edward Hatcher, of the list, were sons of this William Hatcher. The Elams were represented in Henrico as early as November 1642 in the person of Robert Elam who at that date had a patent for land above Bermuda Hundred, between the lands of Thomas Sheppy and Richard Johnson and among the headrights to the patent is the name of Ann Elam. It appears from the records that Ann, the daughter of Robert Elam, married Gilbert Elam, who appears in the list for 1679 as "Mr Gilbert Elam, sen". How much earlier than September 1661 Gilbert Elam was in the colony does not appear but in that month he had a patent for land on south side of James River, between the lands of Thomas Sheppy and Richard Johnson. At what date William Elam came into the colony is not known. Martin Elam had a patent in 1672. The degree of relationship existing between Gilbert Elam, William Elam and Martin Elam is not dis- closed by the remaining records, nor is the degree of relationship existing between any one of the trio and Robert Elam given, with the exception that Gilbert married the daughter of Robert. William Elam and Martin Elam were, however, doubtless uncle and nephew as William Elam in his will dated 18 February 1688-9 devised property to "my loving cozen Martin Elam", the term cousin being in that day generally applied to nephews and nieces. Then in his will dated 7 March 1691-2, Martin Elam bequeathes several articles which, he says, were "my uncles". Martin Elam also mentions in his will silver spoons "two of them on old Robert Elam's mark". ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/henrico/bios/earlyfam.txt By WILLIAM CLAYTON TORRENCE. Henrico County, Virginia: Beginnings of Its Families: Part II. William Clayton Torrence William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 3.(Jan., 1916), pp. 202-210. HENRICO COUNTY, VIRGINIA: BEGINNINGS OF ITS FAMILIES. Part II. By WILLIAM CLAYTON TORRENCE. ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/henrico/bios/earlyfam2.txt As nothing can be definitely stated as to the European ancestry of these people it does not seem amiss to give here the approximate years of the births of many of them. These years of birth are approximated from statements made by the parties themselves in making depositions in various cases tried in Henrico County Court. The word about should be inserted in every instance between the name of the person and the year. John Howard, 1636; William Hatcher, 1613; Charles Roberts, 1649; James Eakin, 1631; Edward Goode, 1647; Charles Featherstone, 1637; John Willson, 1647; John Juddlesee, 1640; Charles Mathews, 1634; Peter Harris, 1618; Gilbert Jones, 1642; Henry Watkins, 1638; William Giles, 1650; Benjamin Hatcher, 1642 or 4; William Puckett, 1657; Peter Ashbrook, 1649; Thomas Puckett, 1658; Edward Stratton, 1655; John Millner, 1640; Thomas Risbee, 1639; Lewis Watkins, 1641; Abraham Womack, 1644; Edward Hatcher, 1633 or 7; Henry Pue, 1634; Samuel Knibb 1654; Edward Bowman, 1655; Gilbert Elam, Sr,. 1631; Godfry Ragsdale, 1644; Peter Rowlett, 1637; Edward Thacher, 1642; Robert Woodson, 1634; Thomas East, 1640; Giles Carter, 1634; Abraham Childers, 1655 or 6; George Archer, 1654; Bartholomew Roberts, 1637; Thomas Perrin 1639; John Bayly, 1651; Joseph Royall, 1646; William Clarke, 1637; Henry Lound, 1619; Martin Elam, 1635; Charles Clay, 1645; Thomas Gregory, 1622; Edward Lester, 1640; Robert Bullington, 1632; Anthony Tall, 1655; John Greenhaugh, 1615; Timothy Allen, 1639; John Aust, 1650; Nicholas Perkins, 1646.

The Virginia Geneaologist Copyright and by John Frederick Dorman Page 165 The Cheatham Family of Colonial Virginia Thomas Chetham or Cheatham On 2 June 1684 he was impannelled on the Grand Jury with James Baugh, Richard Gower, John Steward (of Curls), Thomas Holms, Gilbert Elam Jr., Henry Pero, Richard Ferris, Francis Cater, Richard Perrin, William Porter, Jr., and John Huddlesee.

Henry Lound was born about 1619 according to later depositions in Henrico County. “Henry Lownee” appeared first in Virginia as a headright when Michael Master obtained a patent for land in Bermuda Hundred, Henrico County in 1645. “Hen. Lownd” was later listed as a headright when Thomas Harris patented land in Lower Norfolk County in 1667. In March 1652 Henry Lowne patented 300 acres on the north side of the Appomattox River in Henrico County. His land was near that of Abraham Wood [7046.W]. Lound assigned this land to Thomas Wells before 1663 according to a 1672-patent issued to Wells. Lound later secured a patent on 516 acres in Henrico County on the south side of the James River in September 1674. He still owned this 516 acres in 1704. In 1690 the court confirmed Lound was due 200 acres for the importation of three “Negroes” and John Drake. Drake had been an indentured servant for Lound for at least four years. In October 1686 Drake ran off and Lionel Morris of New Kent County caught him about ten miles from home. His name was variously spelled “Lowne” and “Lounds.” As “Henry Lounds” he was ordered to provide three men in the defense of Henrico County in 1679. In 1686 three of Henry’s Indian servants ran away, but Richard Embry caught them about ten miles away and returned them. Mr. Henry Lound and his wife Ann, were socially prominent citizens of Henrico County. He served on Henrico County juries. Their children, both daughters, were Anne [3526.1] and Mary Lound [3526.2]. Both are ancestors. Wife Ann died before her husband. On 20 August 1678 Henry Lound presented a deed to the Henrico County court which conveyed livestock to his Hatcher grandchildren: Anne, Henry, Mary, William, and Martha Hatcher. Should they die before becoming of age and marrying then the property would go to his Batte grandchildren. He mentioned also his daughter, then called Anne Moody. Before 1683, an Indian boy named Tom joined the Lound household. The Assembly had just passed an act making Indians slaves so Henry had to bring the child to the court house where the justices judged him to be seventeen. The age of slaves was relevant because it influenced when they appeared on the tax rolls. In 1684 two Indian servants, Jack and Will, “unlawfully absented themselves” from July 13 until July 27. Not only did this resulted in “damnifying ye Crop of their sd master” but also they lost a buck skin coat and a hatchet and ruined their clothes. Further, to get them back, Lound had to give a “match-coat” to an Indian and paid another person 240 pounds of tobacco. In February 1686/7 Lound accused Edward Hatcher [3540.1] of stealing a pig. The jury of twelve good citizens of Henrico County heard Gilbert Elam Sr. [3540.E] and Gilbert Elam Jr. [3540.E.3] make depositions for Lound and listened to William Hatcher witness for Edward Hatcher. The arguments convinced the jury the pig was Hatcher’s. The court ordered Lound pay the Elams 40 pounds of tobacco each and made Edward pay William the same. On 1 February 1703/4 eighty-four-year-old Henry Lound gave a slave to his great grandson, Henry Lound Edloe. Reference to a great-grandchild is extraordinarily rare in Colonial Virginia. By the same deed, he gave William Ligon and his granddaughter Elizabeth half his 1674 patent — 258 acres. Henry Lound composed his will on 2 July 1708.

Will of Henry Lound In the name of God Amen. I Henry Lound of Henrico County, Virginia, being weak in body but of perfect sense and memory praised be Almighty God do will, make, and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in manner and form as follows. Imprimis. I give and bequeath my Soul to God that gave it and my body to the Earth from whence it came to be buried at the discretion of my Executrix hereafter mentioned in sure and certain hope of a Joyful Resurrection at the Last day. Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Batte two hundred fifty acres of land joining upon the land of Capt. John Worsham it being one half of my patent to her and her heirs, executors, and assigns forever. The other half being disposed of already to William Ligon. Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Anne Moody one feather bed now in the chamber upstairs, two blankets, one rug, bolster, and pillow and two silver spoons. Item. I give and bequeath to my Daughter Mary Batte my Negro girl Betty to her and her heirs forever. Item. I give and bequeath to my Grandson Henry Hatcher one Shilling. Item. I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Ann Ward one Shilling. Item. I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Mary Tanner one Shilling. Item. I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Martha Blanks one Shilling. Item. I give and bequeath unto my Grandson William Ligon one gray mare marked with a small crop on the right ear with two small nicks on the left now in his possession and a gun commonly called Berham now in his possession. Item. I give and bequeath to my Daughter Anne Moody one small chest now standing in the chamber upstairs. Item. I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Elizabeth Ligon my horse named Blaze now in her possession and one small trunk and one brass kettle. And all the remaining part of my estate, moveable and immovable, not yet disposed of I give and bequeath to my Daughter Mary Batte. And I do hereby will, make, ordain, constitute, and appoint my Daughter Mary Batte my full whole and sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament she paying all my just debts and legacies. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this second day of July 1708. Henry (H) Lound Witnesses: Thomas Chamberlaine John Wooldridge William Rollo Charles Roberts He left a daughter Mary Batte 250 acres of land — half his patent. He had already disposed of the other half to William Ligon. He identified his other daughter as Anne Moody. To the following grandchildren, he left one shilling: Henry Hatcher [1770.1], Anne Ward [1770.4], Mary Tanner [1770.3], and Martha Blanks. Grandson William Ligon [1760.2] who inherited a gray mare and gun was not a grandson but the husband of Lound’s granddaughter Elizabeth Ligon [1762.1] who inherited Blaze. Widow Mary (Lound) Batte, the executor, presented his will to the Henrico County court on 1 November 1708. After 1708 we can find no record of the name Lound in Colonial Virginia. Though his name disappeared, his descendants are many. Anne Lound, the daughter of Henry and Ann Lound, married Henry Hatcher [1770]. Their Family Henry Hatcher died before 1 September 1677 when Henrico County granted widow, Anne, administration of her deceased husband’s estate. Lound referred to his daughter Ann Moody in a 1678 deed and his 1708-will. She married likely Samuel Moody who was a neighbor of her late husband’s father William Hatcher [3540] in the tithable list of Henrico County 1679. Samuel Moody was a son of Thomas Moody of Charles City County and his wife, Ann. Thomas died by 1656 when they proved his will. His widow married Francis Redford who became guardian to young Samuel. Thomas Moody held land in Weyanoke Parish when he died and in 1688 Samuel Moody, now grown, secured 82 acres with his own patent. He paid quit rents on this tract in 1704. He held also 328 acres in Prince George County. Redford and Moody were in Henrico County together by 1679 when they witnessed the will of John Cumber. Francis Redford died in Henrico County in 1693 (will dated 16 May 1682 , recorded 5 Dec. 1693). He appointed Lt. Col. John Farrar, Robert Bullington, and “son in law [stepson]” Samuel Moody overseers of his estate. His will left one mare to “grandson in law” Samuel Moody Jr. Anne and her husband evidently left Henrico County for no Moody appeared in the deed books of Henrico County for almost fifty years after Henry Lound’s gift to his daughter with that name in 1678. Not until 1726 did Henry Moody witness a deed there. Another witness to this same deed was Anne’s grandson Samuel Hatcher [1770.1.2]. Thirty-six years later, in 1762, Henry Moody Sr. and Henry Moody Jr, witnessed Samuel Hatcher’s will. Mary Lound, the daughter of Henry and Ann Lound, married Capt. Henry Batte [1762]. Virginians - The Family History of John W. Pritchett www.virginians.com Copyright © 2001-2003

Survey Report No. 10017 Virginia Colonial Records Project Depository Public Records Office Class C 24/24/821 Part II Title Chancery Records. Town Depositions. Dates 1657/8 References Court of Chancery Records C24-C243 p.6 Examined 11-3-1975 Exposures 11 Reel No. To be copied No. 108 John and Mary Hawkins c. John Diamond. See 814 Part II No. 30, depositions on behalf of Hawkins: 1p William Odion, November 25, 1657, John and Mary Hawkins engaged in buying and selling tobacco. About a year ago Odion delivered a parcel of tobacco to diamond. 1p John Harrison, November 25, 1657, sold tobacco to Diamond in May or June 1657. 1p Samuel Pensax, September 16, 1657, sold tobacco to Diamond. 2p John Hare, January 29, 1657/8, The Hawkins and Diamonds were partners in the tobacco trade. Describes sale of Barbados tobacco. 2p John Hurlestone [Huddleston], January 19, 1657/8, Repeats above. 2p Thomas Hughes, January 27, 1657/8, Repeats above. 2p Interrogatories.

With Captain John Huddleston of the "Thomas and John" back to England and the birth in 1635 of the third John Huddleston correlating with the "Thomas And John" coming back to Virginia we can see B. J. Huddleston's findings:

Warrents for Land Deeds in South Carolina 1672-1679 #96 John Huddleston. Carolina/ Measure and laid out for Thomas and Jane Smith 550 acres of land for four servants namely, Henry Jones, John Huddleston, Hugh Wigglesworth, Alice Rix. Arriving on the first fleet. In some place not yet laid out. Given unto hand at Charleston, South Carolina, 12 day of April 1675. John Huddleston. Carolina/ measure and lay for John Huddleston one of ye freemen of this province 100 acres in some place not laid out or marked. Given unto hand at Charleston S.C. 31 Mar 1677. Lord John Berkley Palatine and the rest of the lords and absolute propentitors of the province of Carolina do hereby grant unto John Huddleston a plantation containing 100 acres of land English measure now in the possession of the said John Huddleston situated and being upon the waters of Wappoo creek and butting and abounding as appears by a plat thereof hereunto annexed to have and to hold the said Plantation to the said John Huddleston and assigns forever. Yielding and paying yearly to the said Palatine and the rest of the lords propenitors aforsaid their heirs and assign every Nine and Twentieth day of Sept which shall be after the nine and twentieth day of September in the year of our lord one thousand six hundred eighty and nine one penny of lawful money of England on the value thereof for every of the said acres to be holden in free and common soccage. given under the great seal appointed for that purpose at Charleston in the province of Carolina aforesaid this Nineth day of August in the year of our Lord One Thousand Six Hundred and Seventy Nine. Will Owen, John West, John Godfrey and W. Percivals. Registered the Eighth day of August, One Thousand Six Hundred and Eighty.

On May 15, 1630 an agreement was drafted for a Carolana settlement, one of the parties to which was George Lord Berkeley. Governor Sir William Berkeley of Virginia sent an expedition against the Indians along the Chowan River in 1646, presumably in preparation for southernward settlement. About 1648 Henry Plumpton of Nansemond County, Virginia, just north of the Chowan region, in co-operation with Thomas Tuke and several others, bought from the Indians "all the Land from the mouth of the Morratuck [Roanoke] River to the mouth of Weyanook Creek". In 1650 a Virginia merchant, Thomas Bland, was one of a party of eight who explored the Chowan, Meherrin, and Roanoke river valleys. His petition to the Virginia assembly for permission to settle "to the Southward" was approved October 20, 1650. The Assembly instructed him and his associates to "secure themselves in effecting the said Designe with a hundred able men sufficiently furnished with Armes and Munition". In 1651 he published a promotional tract, "The Discovery of New Brittaine, 1650". In 1653 the Virginia Assembly made a grant of 10,000 acres, in response to a petition from the Rev. Roger Green, "unto one hundred such persons who shall first seate on Moratuck or Roanoke river and the land lying upon the south side of Choan river and the branches thereof" and "to the said Roger Green, the rights of one thousand acres of land, and choice to take the same where it shall seem most convenient to him, next to those persons who have had a former grant". In a pamphlet entitled "Virginia's Cure", printed in London in 1662, the Rev. Green cited the colony of Virginia as being bound "on the North by the great River Patomak, on the South by the River Chawan". A manuscript map, drawn in 1657 by Nicholas Comberford, is in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich in London. On the neck of land between the mouth of the Roanoke River and Salmon Creek (now in Bertie County, NC) this shows a neatly drawn house with the label "Batts House" identifying it.

In his journal for 1672, George Fox, the Quaker missionary who visited the area, mentioned "Nathaniel Batts who had been Governor of Roan-oak". Following the execution of Charles I, England was a Republic for 11 years, 1649-60, until the coronation of Charles II. On March 24, 1663, Charles II revoked his father's grant of 1629 to Sir Robert Heath and granted the Carolinas to eight English noblemen who had supported the Royalist cause during and after the English Civil War (1642-49). These were the initial Lords Proprietors: Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon (Lord High Chancellor); George Monck, Duke of Albemarle (Master of the King's Horse and Captain-General of all his forces); William Lord Craven (an old friend of Charles' father); John Lord Berkeley; Anthony Ashley Cooper (Chancellor of the Exchequer, later made Earl of Shaftesbury); Sir George Carteret (Vice-Chamberlain of the King's Household, who had entertained Charles in his Jersey home during a part of the time he was in exile); Sir William Berkeley (who, as Governor of Virginia, had induced the colony to adhere to Charles II as sovereign even while he was in exile); and Sir John Colleton (a Barbadian planter, who had maintained the royal cause in Barbados).

The first official use of the name Carolina occurs in this Charter. In September 1663 the other proprietors sent a series of instructions to Sir William Berkeley. Carolina affairs were left almost entirely in the hands of Berkeley as the nearest resident Proprietor, and it was more than two years before those remaining in England showed signs of being aware that the Albemarle region, as the former Carolana area was now called, was not within their domain. On June 13, 1665, they received a new charter making their northern boundary approximately the same as the present North Carolina-Virginia state line. Prior to this, the Virginia counties of Upper Norfolk/Nansemond and Lower Norfolk would have been the repositories for any records relating to the Albemarle region. The oldest known deed for land in North Carolina, dated September 24, 1660, was discovered accidentally in 1965 among Norfolk County records in Chesapeake. It apparently grants the entire tip of the peninsula which is now Pasquotank County to Capt. Nathaniell Batts. It is signed with the mark of Kiscutanewh, King of the Yeopim Indians. There are old Nansemond County deeds relating to land beside Bennetts Creek which refer to the Creek, named for a Governor of Virginia, now in Gates County and not Bennett Creek now in the City of Suffolk (near the mouth of the Nansemond River): this land was considered part of the Upper Parish of Nansemond County until 1728, when the dividing line betwixt Virginia and North Carolina was finally settled. [Bennett's Farm is very close to Poquoson, Virginia where Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua got his grant.]

Page 209. Thomas Huddleston born about 1675 Henrico County, Virginia death 1748; Virginia Wills and Administrations, 1632-1800 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. copyright Baltimore 1977 Originally Published The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America Richmond, 1930 Compiled by Clayton Torrence page 219 Huddlesey Henrico Thos. 1726-son; Thomas Huddleston born about 1649 Henrico County, Virginia death 1726; son ; Thomas Huddleston born about 1675 Henrico County, Virginia death 1748 in Princess Anne County(This is taken from microfiche files).

Isle of Wight Ships Cowes was also used as a staging post for receipt or dispatch of official correspondenece and instructions by the Virginia Company. For example, on 10 July 1621, at a meeting of the Virginia Company, "Mr. Deputie" informed the court that he had received "divers letters, and one generall letter from the Counsell of State in Virginia" that had arrived on the "Bona Noua ", which was "rydinge att anchor" off Cowes. She was carrying "40 or 50,000 waight of Tobacco" and was waiting for directions from the Company. The court sent down instructions to the Bona Nova at Cowes ordering that she should depart instantly "for the Porte of Middleburrow [Middleburg] in Zealand".(Records of the Virginia Company, 1622-1624. Court Book. 10 July 1621)

In the 1620's, Cowes became a favoured embarkation point for supplies and settlers bound for Virginia. This avoided the expense in supplies of feeding a ship load of settlers on the stage from London round to the Island. By embarking the main supplies for the Atlantic voyage and the settlers at Cowes, it avoided the problem of the added cost of feeding a ship's complement of settlers should the ship be delayed at the Downs, which often happened for days or weeks at a time waiting for a fair wind or tide. The West country ports were too far from London to be practical, whereas the Solent, and more notably Cowes, provided the nearest convenient point for embarking supplies and settlers from London, the Midlands and the Eastern counties. A typical arrangement consisted of the settlers making their way to Cowes, where appropriate supplies had also been collected. A contract was drawn up with the master of a ship, which was then chartered to sail round from London to Cowes to pick them up and then sail a well-known route across the Atlantic to the Bermuda Islands and then to head up the East coast towards Chesapeake Bay. It must be said from the start that most people on the Island had little connection with Virginia and played very little part in its evolution. The opportunities were confined to a few in Newport and the new 'towns' of Cowes. West Cowes developed very rapidly from a very small collection of dwellings around 1620 into a sizeable town by the 1630's.

East Cowes developed from a "storehouse" in 1611 into a small but compact trading port, consisting of a number of wharves, quays, warehouses and a small ship-building premises, all centred around present day Castle Street. From these two ports, a small number of Islanders were able to benefit from the ever increasing number of Virginia Company ships on both outward and inward voyages. Indeed they may even have capitalised on the desparate situation in Virginia in the early days, being in a position to provide the settlers and outward-bound ships with much needed supplies. However, this opportunity had everything to do with geography and advances in navigation. With the demise of Southampton as a terminal port of destination, and the pre-dominance of London as a port, the Solent became a useful and effective transit anchorage. In the early 17th century, advances in navigational aids in the Thames estuary, such as proper beacons, seamarks and lights and more efficient pilotage, thanks to Trinity House, meant that the dreaded and treacherous navigation through the Straits of Dover and up the Thames estuary, which had been feared and avoided by medieval ships if possible, became much less of a danger. The master of ships were now regularly prepared to make London their destination. The cloth trade with Antwerp, the main target for English shipping , declined towards the end of the 16th century and the opening of new markets for new commodities as well as cloth in the Far East and the New World meant an increased use of the English Channel by English shipping and also the Dutch. The ending of the war between the United Provinces and Spain and the commercial and colonial dominance of the Dutch in the Far East also meant a huge increase in Dutch convoys using the English Channel for outward and inward trading voyages. And Dutch ships also seemed to favour the Solent anchorage for shelter and supplies. And so in the 1620's, the two towns of East and West Cowes grew into significant ports, which, if unknown to most English people, tied as they were to the land, then certainly well-known by many English seamen, as well as Dutch and French mariners. Produced by Isle of Wight Historical Review ™. ©2001.

Copied from a book of Virginia Records. Book in genl court office marked No. 1, 1639 to 1652
p 83 to 148. Id 122, Id 126,7 , Id 343 11th. of Dec., 1640 Whereas William Huddleston servant unto Mr. Canhow [or Cantrow ?] hath complained to the board against his master for want of all manner of apparel, the Court hath herefore ordered that the said Mr. Canhor [or Canyrow ?] shall before Christmas next provide and allow unto the said Huddleston such sufficient apparel of linen and wollen as shall be thought fit by Captain West Esq or otherwise that the said Captain shall have power to dispose of the said servant until the said Canhow [or Cantrow ?] do perform this order.

Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1666 Abstracted and Indexed by Nell Marion Nugent Copyright, 1963 by Genealogical Publishing Company originally published Richmond, 1934
page 44 Capt. Christopher Calthropp, 100 acs., being a second devdt., according to a graunt signed by Sir Georg Yeardly to John Hudleston, Marriner, 26 Apr. 16, 1621 & assigned by Richard Cox, Atty. to sd. Hudleston, to sd. Calthropp. 5 July 1636, p. 368. Adj. to the first devdt., whose bounds were, viz: W. upon Waters his Cr. E. upon land of Robert Hutchins, S. the river & N. into the woods. Same. 100 acrs. Chas. Riv. Co., same date & page. Within the new Poquoson at the head of Powells Cr., Nly. upon sd. Cr., Ely. to land formeley graunted to him. Trans. of 2 pers: Christopher Watts, Senr., Christopher Watts, Junr.
From List of First Settlers mentioning Captain John Hurleston and Robert Hutchins in 1626 and the above mentioned graunt of Sir Georg Yeardly in 1621 we can prove that Captain John Hurleston is Captain John Hudleston and they were close neighbors living below 'Blunt Point' for atleast 5 years.

"Poquoson", an Indian word for either "flat land" or "great marsh", is believed to be one of the older English-speaking communities in America that still bears its original name. The City encompasses 14.7 square miles of land, of which, 4,398 acres are salt marsh wetlands. Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge together with privately owned salt marsh lands make up the largest saline marsh in the lower Chesapeake Bay. The City has 89 miles of shoreline. The first mention of Poquoson in Colonial records is contained in a land grant issued to Christopher Calthorpe by a court at Elizabeth City in 1631. By 1635 Messick Point was an important port for the shipping of tobacco, the prime industry of the area until the War of 1812 when the seafood industry was begun by settlers from the Eastern Shore.

Cavaliers And Pioneers-Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants-Abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent Volume 2: 1666-1695 Published and copyright by Virginia State Library Henry Bishop, 2300 acs. Accromack Co., 9 Nov. 1666, p. 32. On the N. side of Bockatenock Cr. & bay, E. on the deviding line Cr. & partly by the entrance into Selbye's bay & c. Trans of 46 per: Samll. Evins, Jno. Colan, Tho. Pierce, Joseph Sawle (or Sawte), Richard Hawke, Hump. Arscott (or Hescott), Jno. Thomas, Tho. Hickes, Bath. White, Bernard Kendall, David Moyle, Francis Hearle, Nath. Lugger, Rich. Ersly, Edward Hearle, Jno. Cerly, Rich. Carter, George Fletcher, Wm. Dalston, Wm. Hudleston, Jane Wilford, Gilber Thacker, Henry Wilmot, Godfrey Clarke, Symon Degg., Wm. Wolley, Jno. Wright, Francis Barker, Jane Bamfield(or Barnfield), Jno. Roll, Peter Ball, Jno. Skelton, Wm. Jennings, Charles Grills, Will Webber, Jno. Edwards, Stephen Wheeler, Peter Jenkens, Charles Bacawen.

With the mention of Miss Huddleston in York county in 1670(per Huddleston Family tables-Buckingham County Group B and the mention of William Huddleston of the masonic lodge, list there, along with the mention of William Huddleston in 1666 in Accromack County on page 32-one can see a relationship, when one takes into account the county name change from Charles River County to York County. Furthermore, Captain John Huddleston's place in Poquoson, which is part of York county helps to fill in pieces. Stella Hardy's book concerning the Southern States Families, also reinforces the link by her mentioning Captain John Huddleston having lands in Newport Newes, which is rather close and on the Cheasapeake.

The name Huddleston or Huddlestone,has its orgin in King Athestan, who reigned in England from 925 to 942; the son of King Edward the Elder, who reigned from 901 to 925; the son of King Alfred the Great, who reigned from 871 to 901; the son of King Estherwolf, who reigned from 837 to 857; the son of King Egbert, who reigned from 827 to 837; and who descended through a line of Princes from the Saxon Chief Cerdoc, and his son Kendric, who landed in the British island in the year 495 A.D. and established the Kingdom of Wessex. The Huddlestons of America are undisputedly descendants of this Royal line. The first that of Captain John Huddleston, commander of the good ship Bova Nova, a vessel of 200 tons, which performed many voyages to Virginia in the interest of the Virginia Company. He patented lands in Virginia in the "Territory of Rappahannock over against James Cittie," and at Blunt Point, near Newport Newes; in this noble Captain who, in the year of 1622, shared his scant store with the Plymouth and thus saved that Colony. Title: Colonial Families of the Southern States of America, Author: Stella Pickett Hardy Publication: Revised Edition, 1958 Page: 297).

© 2000 Copyright and All Rights Reserved by Patricia Scott Deetz and James Deetz (This fort stood until 1634, when in March a building contract was drawn up with Thomas Boardman for the construction of a new fort, to be completed by the end of May 1635. See The Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer (William White, 1855-61; AMS Press, 1968), vol. 1, pp. 33-34.)

For a more thorough account of the conflict, we turn to William Bradford's OF PLYMOUTH PLANTATION, 1620-1647 [Bradford, the Governor of Plymouth Plantation for most of the period covered in his history was critical of the actions taken by Winthrop and the Massachusetts Bay Colony during the Pequot War]. In 1622 a massacre of the settlers at Massachusetts Bay [which was to have been followed by a massacre of the Plymouth colonists, the latter of which was not carried out due to the opposition of the Wampanoags chieftain] had taken place because the Massachusetts Bay Colonists had appropriated corn and other property from the neighboring Natives, were weak from hunger and sickness and treated the Natives with contempt [curiously, much earlier, the reverse situation had occurred in which the tools of the Plymouth Colonists had been stolen by natives, but which were returned due, in large part, to the efforts of Squantos]. Captain John Huddleston placed the overall number of colonists lost in the massacre at above 400.

But the Sparrow also brought a letter from a ship captain off the Newfoundland Banks, Captain Huddleston, warning them of a possible Indian uprising. Sensing a potential friend in a time of dire need, they sailed north to meet Huddleston and seek food, which he gave them free of charge, collecting from other boats in the area what they could spare. This supply enabled the Pilgrims to survive the summer of 1622 until their harvest. It was as if the greed and nastiness of Weston was matched by the generosity of Huddleston and the other ship captains in the area. In mid-summer two more ships arrived, the Charity and the Swan, both sent by Weston containing settlers he was going to establish near what is now Weymouth, north of Plymouth. This time some food was sent the Pilgrims, but again he asked them to shelter and feed his new company until they could establish themselves. The Pilgrim's harvest, when it arrived, was a great disappointment and starvation for yet another year faced them and their unwanted guests. Stealing broke out and stopped only with the departure of the Weston settlers for Weymouth.

WESTON, Thomas, adventurer, born in England about 1575; died in England after 1624. He was a successful merchant in London, and went to Leyden about 1619-'20 to negotiate with the merchants of New Amsterdam with regard to the proposed emigration of a colony to northern Virginia. For some reason the Pilgrims showed deference to his advice, and articles of agreement with the London merchants were drawn up, embodying conditions that were proposed by Weston. He advised them to rely neither upon the Dutch nor the Virginia company, assured them that he and others were ready to supply ships and money for such an enterprise, and reminded them that Sir Ferdinando Gorges and others were moving for a new patent in North Virginia, " Unto which," says Bradford, "Mr. Weston and the cheefe of them began to incline it was best for them to goe." A joint-stock company was then formed to continue seven years, with shares of ten pounds each, and John Carver and Robert Cushman were sent to England to collect subscriptions and to make preparations. Cushman conceded certain alterations in the agreement to please the "merchant adventurers," whose part in the scheme was indispensable. About seventy merchants engaged in the enterprise. The latter, having received glowing and deceptive accounts of the English colonists from Captain John Smith, looked upon them as convenient instruments for the establishment of a permanent trading-post in the new country.

But as time passed and the Plymouth people sent little or nothing to their English partners, Weston charged them with employing their time in arguing and consulting when they should have been trading, and sold out his interest in the company. He then organized an expedition of his own, and during the winter of 1621-'2 was busy in London gathering his company, which was made of the roughest material. Before sending out the main body he despatched a small party in the " Sparrow" to the fishing-grounds off the coast of Maine, whence they skirted the shore to Cape Ann, crossed to Boston harbor, and thence to Plymouth. The main body of sixty men, described by Weston as being " rude and profane," arrived in the " Charity," of 100 toils, and the "Swan," of 30 tons, landed at Plymouth in June, 1622, and remained there for two months, consuming the scanty stores, which they did nothing to increase.

Weston's brother-in-law, Richard Greene, the leader of this party, died during the summer, and was succeeded in command by one Saunders. Finally this body determined to establish a separate colony at Wichaguscussett, or Wessagussett (now Weymouth), near Boston, Massachusetts The colonists became almost at once idle, profligate, and corrupt, and in the extremity of want were objects of contempt for the Indians, whose aggressions they dared not resent, and who determined to exterminate them. Fearful that such an act would be avenged by the Plymouth colonists, the savages decided to fall upon that settlement also; but, before this plan was executed, Miles Standish marched to Wessagussett, killed the chiefs Pecksnut and Wituwamat, and took with him to Plymouth part of the wretched colony, which was then broken up. Weston arrived soon after its dispersion, and a few months later, in 1623, Robert Gorges, who had been commissioned lieutenant-governor, came to Plymouth to look after his grant of land. After exercising his authority, he left suddenly for the coast of Maine in search of Westom whom he proposed to call to account for his various trading misdemeanors, and, meeting him on the way thither, engaged in a heated discussion. Returning to Wessagussett, Gorges sent a warrant to Plymouth for the seizure of Weston's vessel and his immediate arrest, proposing to put him upon trial to answer for the ill conduct of his men at the settlement, whereby the peace of the whole country had been endangered. Weston argued that he could not be held responsible for acts done by others in his absence, and could not answer the other charges against him. Governor Bradford and his associates, remembering the service that Weston had rendered them, convinced Gorges that nothing could be gained by prosecuting him. His vessel was then restored to him, with some compensation for its seizure, and, being allowed to depart in peace, he went to Virginia. The patent of Gorges gave him a vague title to all the main-land known as Massachusetts, and he therefore absorbed Wessagussett, landed his stores, and built warehouses on the site chosen by Weston in September, 1623. In the following spring he returned to England, and the people dispersed, but it is thought that a few colonists remained in Weymouth. Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

In this new crisis another ship arrived, the Discovery from Virginia, on her way to England. The Pilgrims felt that the captain of the ship, in the Weston and not the Huddleson mode, seeing their desperate plight, drove hard bargains in exchanging beaver pelts for trinkets the Pilgrims could trade with the Indians for food.

III-Building of the Fort, June 1622-March 1623 The deaths of 347 English settlers in Virginia on March 22, 1622, that took place during the uprising of the Powhattan under the leadership of Opechancanough, have been believed to be the reason for the building of the fort at Plymouth. It seems clear, though, that it was the threat of attack from the Narragansett and the Wampanoag which was the initial motivation for building the fort, strongly reinforced by the news from Jamestown. It is not clear as to when the letter from Captain John Huddleston, warning the Plymouth colonists of the massacre, was received. All we know is that it arrived "amidst these straits" (the arrival of Weston's sixty settlers at the end of July and early August 1622, and increasing famine), via a "boat which came from the eastward . . . from a stranger of whose name they had never heard before, being a captain of a ship come there a-fishing " Bradford then reprints the letter, from John Huddleston, whom Morison notes was master of the Bona Nova of 200 tons. Huddleston gave the Plymouth settlers warning of the massacre by Indians which had taken place in Virginia of 400 English. Winslow was sent to meet Huddleston with a letter of appreciation from the Governor, and to ask for any food supplies which he could spare, and Huddleston provided what he could. It was not a great deal, and was given out as daily rations, but it sustained them until harvest, giving the inhabitants a quarter of a pound of bread per day per person, supplemented by whatever else they could get. Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, p.111

Written by Mayflower passenger Edward Winslow, Good Newes from New England was published in London in 1624. It is a journal of events that occured between 1622 and 1623 at Plymouth Colony. It includes information about Tisquantum's death (November 1622), the sickness of Massasoit, Thomas Weston's Wessagussett Colony, and much more. Chapter 2, Good News from New England
This was, as I take it, about the end of May 1622. At which time our store of victuals was wholly spent, having lived long before with a bare and short allowance: The reason was, that supply of men before mentioned, which came so unprovided, not landing so much as a barrel of bread or meal for their whole company, but contrariwise received from us for their ships store homeward. Neither were the setters forth thereof altogether to be blamed therein, but rather certain amongst our selves, who were too prodigal in their writing and reporting of that plenty we enjoyed. But that I may return.
This Boat proved to be a Shallop that belonged to a fishing ship, called the Sparrow, set forth by Master Thomas Weston, late Merchant and Citizen of London, which brought six or seven passengers at his charge, that should before have been landed at our Plantation, who also brought no more provision for the present than served the Boats gang for their return to the ship, which made her voyage at a place called Damarins Cove near Munhiggen some forty leagues from us North-eastward; about which place there fished above thirty sail of ships, and whither my self was employed by our Governor, with orders to take up such victuals as the ships could spare, where I found kind entertainment and good respect, with a willingness to supply our wants: But being not able to spare that quantity I required, by reason of the necessity of some amongst themselves, whom they supplied before my coming, would not take any Bills for the same, but did what they could freely, wishing their store had been such as they might in greater measure have expressed their own love, and supplied our necessities, for which they sorrowed, provoking one another to the utmost of their abilities: which although it were not much amongst so many people as were at the Plantation, yet through the provident and discreet care of the Governors, recovered and preserved strength till our own crop on the I ground was ready.
In the time of these straits (indeed before my going to Monhiggan) the Indians began again to cast forth many insulting speeches, glorying in our weakness, and giving out how easy it would be ere long to cut us off. Now also Massasoit seemed to frown on us, and neither came or sent to us as formerly. These things occasioned further thoughts of Fortification: And whereas we have a Hill called the Mount, enclose within our pale, under which our Town is seated, we resolved to erect a Fort thereon, from whence a few might easily secure the Town from any assault the Indians can make, whilest the rest might be employed as occasion served. This work was begun with great eagerness, and with the approbation of all men, hoping that this being once finished, and a continual guard there kept, it would utterly discourage the Savages from having any hopes or thoughts of rising against us. And though it took the greatest part of our strength from dressing our come, yet (life being continued) we hoped God would raise some means in stead thereof for our further preservation. http://members.aol.com/calebj/good_newes2.html

Young's Chronicles and 'The Pilgrim Republic' by John A. Goodwin, Boston Ticknor and Company London: Trubner and Company 1888 Page 205 speak's of John Huddleston but it is best to start at the beginning of the chapter to really get a gist of what was really going on. The story goes on with the Captain to page 206. Chapter XVIII. Weston's Impudence.-Scarcity of Food.-The "Charity" and the "Swan."-The Weymouth Colony.-Tisquantam's death.-Expedition for Corn.
The boat which had appeared so oportunely for Tisquatum was the shallop of the "Sparrow,"-a small ship partly owned by Weston, now fishing on the Maine coast in company with some thirty other English vessels. It brought a series of letters from Weston, extending over three months. The earliest gave assurances of great things that the Adventurers were about to do for the Colony; but in the later epistles Weston announced that he had sold his shares and withdrawn from the Adventurers altogether. He also stated that he was about to establish near Plymouth a settlement on his own account, and sent in the "Sparrow," for the Colony, a ton of bread and a quantity of fish; and closed, as usual, with very pious expressions of regard. Bradford seems to have known his man too well to base any hopes upon this supply. It was well that disappointment was thus saved; for Weston not only sent no bread or fish to the Colonists, but neglected to furnish food for the seven men he thrust upon them. His thorough falsity was now so apparent that even the worthy Cushman began to understand him. The people at Plymouth were at length famishing. For six months they had lived on half allowance; but June found them with an empty storehouse. Wild-fowl and ground-nuts were out of season, bass were plenty in the outer harbor, and cod in the bay; but they had no nets strong enough for the former, and no deep-water tackle suited to the haunts of the latter. Lobsters, clams, and muscles were obtainable with considerable labor, and formed the chief
diet during much of the hot weather. Shell-fish, with no bread, meat or vegetables, and often scanty in amount, proved insufficient to preserve the fresh complexions and the strength of the people; yet the settlers had a wonderful exemption from disease. Such was the community of which Weston besought the sustenance for some months of seven pioneers of a rival, if not hostile, plantation. Hospitality has ever been a leading virtue of the Old Colony, and the seven intruders were welcomed to an equal share of such provision of the Colonists could get for themselves. This shallop brought a letter from John Huddleston, master of one of the fishing-vessels at the East. He was an entire stranger to the Pilgrims, but took this occasion to notify them, in a very kindly letter, of a massacre in Virginia, where the savages had murdered three hundred and fourty-seven setlers, and but for the exposure of their plot at the last moment by a friendly Indian, would have annihilated that Colony. The worthy captain therefore urged the Pilgrims to be forearmed. When the "Sparrow's" shallop returned to Maine, Winslow accompanied her in one of the Colony's shallops (they now had two) to buy provisions. He was cordially received by Captain Huddleston, who, however, could spare very little from his stores. That little he at once furnished, and refused all pay. He also gave Winslow a letter to the other captains on the coast, who with many expressions of regard and sympathy, all followed Huddleston's example; for while none could give much, what might be spared was gladly contributed without price.

[Another source which talks about the beginnning of Thanksgiving in America] But the Sparrow also brought a letter from a ship captain off the Newfoundland Banks, Captain Huddleston, warning them of a possible Indian uprising. Sensing a potential friend in a time of dire need, they sailed north to meet Huddleston and seek food, which he gave them free of charge, collecting from other boats in the area what they could spare. This supply enabled the Pilgrims to survive the summer of 1622 until their harvest. It was as if the greed and nastiness of Weston was matched by the generosity of Huddleston and the other ship captains in the area.

The Sparrow, 1622 Voyages are listed at ship name on Ship List May, 1622 The Sparrow, at Maine from England, sent passengers in a boat to Plymouth, New England. Source: "Saints and Strangers", pages 204-205 Ship and Passenger Information: Fishing vessel Passengers: A boat arrived at the Plymouth Plantation from the Sparrow (fishing vessel at Maine, hired and sent out by Thomas Weston and John Beauchamp, salter of London, for their personal profit) with 7 men passengers sent by Weston to work for him in New England. They remained at Plymouth until the Charity and the Swan moved them to "Wessagusset" (Weymouth, Massachusetts) where they were to establish a settlement. See the Charity, 1622, for further information. The Charity, 1622 Late 1622 The Charity, after returning from Virginia, and the pinnace Swan, which had remained at Cape Cod, were used to move the 60 men they had left earlier at Plymouth, New England, and the 7 men from the earlier boat from the Sparrow, to build Wessagusset, New England (Weymouth, Massachusetts). The Charity then departed for England, leaving the Swan for Weston's men at Wessagusset. "Saints and Strangers" Saints and Strangers By George F. Willison, 1945 Notes: This is primarily a recounting of Bradfords writing, there are useful tables of information relating to the arrivals and other information. There are also a number of other sources cited and explanatory information. Source: "Saints and Strangers", page 208 Ship and Passenger Information: Burthen: 100 tons Passengers to New England: The Charity, accompanied by the pinnace Swan arrived with 60 men and no provisions; Thomas Morton, later of Mare Mount ("Merry Mount"), may have been with this group. The new arrivals remained, temporarily, at the Plymouth colony, placing a heavy burden on the provisions there. July, 1622 The Charity, from England by way of Cape Cod, New England, arrived at Virginia. In "late 1622", the Charity returned to New England. Passengers to Virginia: Parrish, Thomas Age 26 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 Royall, Joseph Age 22 in Virginia Muster, January 24, 1624/5

HOW THE PLANTERS FROM VIRGINIA SAVED THE PLYMOUTH COLONY; Wm. and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. 12, No. 1 Transcribed by Kathy Merrill for the USGenWeb Archives Special Collections Project USGENWEB ARCHIVES NOTICE: These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material, must obtain the written consent of the contributor, or the legal representative of the submitter, and contact the listed USGenWeb archivist with proof of this consent. The submitter has given permission to the USGenWeb Archives to store the file permanently for free access. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb Pages 52-54 HOW THE PLANTERS FROM VIRGINIA SAVED THE PLYMOUTH COLONY The Pilgrim Puritans from Holland sailed under a charter obtained from the Virginia Company, intending to make their settlement somewhere near the Delaware Bay. Under this charter, John Carver was elected Governor, and when, by miscalculation, they landed in Massachusetts, the compact signed in the cabin of the Mayflower simply repeated the substance of the general orders of the Virginia Company. (See Eggleston's Beginners of a Nation, page 173.) The liberal-minded Sir Edwin Sandys, who was such a friend of the Virginia colonists, was also a patron of the Pilgrims as well. Nevertheless, New England writers have not been content with giving the Pilgrims the honor due to them. Hutchinson, in his History of Massachusetts, asserts that the Virginia Colony had virtually failed, and that the Pilgrim settlement was the means of reviving it (Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts, Vol. I., p. 11). This has been often repeated on no other authority than that of Hutchinson, who wrote nearly a century and a half after the event. Now this is a remarkable case of reversing the cause and effect. Bradford's contemporary Narrative shows very clearly that the Page 53. Pilgrims, if they had removed at all, would have gone to Guiana, or settled in New York, under the auspices of the Dutch, had not the Virginia plantation attracted them both from the fact of its successful establishment, and the security under English influence which it afforded. Mr. Eggleston says that "the list of patents for plantations in Virginia as given by Purchas, in which appears that of Master Wincop, under which the Pilgrims proposed to plant, is a sufficient proof that Virginia was not languishing".

At this time Virginia had passed under the administration of the "Patriot Party", and hundreds of settlers were setting out for the colony annually. In 1629, when the Plymouth Colony had only three hundred settlers in it, Virginia had three thousand. The fact is, until the great Puritan emigration began in 1628, few thought of the handful of Pilgrims settled on the bleak shores of Cape Cod Bay, except as located somewhere in Virginia, for the whole coast of North America was popularly spoken of as Virginia even at that time. In the spring of 1622, Virginia was shocked by an Indian massacre, but there were then surviving over nine hundred settlers

This is what I have got so far from studying LDS files, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Susan Kingsbury Papers, Library of Virginia data cards, History of Henricus and Henrico County, USGenWeb, Virginia GenWeb, Historical Virginia Maps, Numerous websites, Survey Reports covering London Ports to Virginia Ports, and personal research through different books.

A great effort is being made to compile as many records as can be found, from various sources for the State Library, and thus we will find more records available for reference and research as time goes by. The record further states that New Poquason Church was in York County in 1636, that the church lay between the "Back River" and the present Poquason River in the lower part of York County, and that on December 11, 1692, the name was changed to Charles River and Charles Church and Charles Parish.
The Olive Tree Genealogy
So to as to recap(I have been more interested in proving my sources rather than following a chronological line of events); We have Huddleston Lords of Millom. The name de Hodelston originated in Yorkshire, England, where the family was from the 900's on. Some ten miles East of Leeds can still be found the ancient village of Huddleston. Nearby is the old manor house Huddleston Hall, now a farm house. In the neighborhood is the celebrated quarry which contributed stone for York Cathedral, also Huddleston Old Wood, formerly an extensive park. All formed in the old days Huddleston Manor, a part of the Barony of Sherburn, which under the feudal system was attached to the See of York. In 1109, Nigel de Huddleston, then the Provost of the Archbishop of York, donated two and one-half carucates (a carucate was a measure of the amount of arable land that a plough team was capable cultivating ) of land (in Hillam), with part of his tithe in Huddleston, to the Convent of Selby.

Thomas (died 24 February 1114), was a medieval archbishop of York. To distinguish him from his uncle, also a Thomas who was archbishop of York, Thomas is usually known as Thomas II or Thomas the Younger. He was the nephew of Thomas I of York, archbishop of York and the son of the elder Thomas' brother Samson, Bishop of Worcester. He was a royal chaplain, and then provost of Beverley in 1092, both appointments he owed to his uncle. He was raised in the cathedral chapter at York, and the clergy of York trusted him, and he proved himself devoted to York's cause against the primacy of Canterbury. Thomas' brother Richard became Bishop of Bayeux in about 1108 until Richard's death in 1133. Thomas and Richard's sister, Isabelle of Douvres, was the mistress of Robert of Gloucester, and their son Richard was Bishop of Bayeux from 1135 to 1142.

The younger Thomas became archbishop May of 1108 at the request of the dean and cathedral chapter of York. Like his uncle he refused to promise obedience to the archbishop of Canterbury; his consecration was then delayed as part of the Canterbury-York dispute. Thomas said that the chapter would not allow him to make a written profession, and the chapter wrote as a body to Archbishop Anselm confirming this. Meanwhile, the dean of York went to Rome to procure the pallium for Thomas, which was sent with a papal legate. The dispute was still unsettled when Anselm died in April of 1109. Anselm had told the bishops before his death that he felt that Thomas must make a profession of obedience, and obediently the bishops appealed to the king's court to make Thomas do so. Henry I and his bishops then decided against Thomas, who was forced to make the necessary promise and was consecrated in London on 27 June 1109 by Richard de Beaumis, bishop of London. He received his pallium from Cardinal Ulrich, the legate, on 1 August 1109.

He worked to extend York's metropolitan authority over Scotland, and consecrated Michael of Glasgow as Bishop of Glasgow. Michael made a written profession of obedience to York before his consecration. Thomas also consecrated Thurgot as Bishop of St Andrews, although Thurgot seems to have managed to insert a reservation of his rights into his oath. Other Scottish bishops he consecrated were Radulf Novell as Bishop of Orkney and Wimund to as Bishop of Man and the Isles. In his own diocese he founded the Hospital of St. John the Baptist at Ripon. He also created more prebends in his diocese, extending the work of his two predecessors in introducing the Norman system of ecclesiastical government. He is said have only been stopped from approrpiating the relics of Saint Eata by a vision of the saint. He also endowed the Augustinian priory of Hexham with lands and books. He had helped found the priory at Hexham when he expelled the hereditary priest from the church and settled canons there from Huntingdon. He died at Beverley on 24 February 1114. He was noted for his chastity, but equally noted for his gluttony, and died of overeating. Thomas was buried in York Minster near his uncle. Hugh the Chantor relates the story that Thomas one time when ill was told by his doctors that he would only be cured by intercourse with a young girl. Some of Thomas' friends then attempted to introduce a young woman into his household, but Thomas instead prayed to St. John of Beverley and recovered. * Bartlett, Robert England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings: 1075-1225 Oxford:Clarendon Press 2000 ISBN 0-19-822741-8 * Barlow, Frank The English Church 1066-1154 London:Longman 1979 ISBN 0-582-50236-5 * British History Online Archbishops of York accessed on 14 September 2007 * British History Online Victoria County History of York accessed on 14 September 2007 * Burton, Janet (1994). Monastic and Religious Orders in Britain: 1000-1300. Cambridge Medieval Textbooks. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-37797-8. * Burton, Janet "Thomas (d. 1114)" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography' Oxford University Press, 2004 Online Edition accessed 11 November 2007 * Cantor, Norman F. Church, Kingship, and Lay Investiture in England 1089-1135 Princeton, NJ:Princeton University Press 1958 * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. * Spear, David S. "The Norman Empire and the Secular Clergy, 1066-1204" The Journal of British Studies Volume XXI Number 2 Spring 1982 p. 1-10 * Vaughn, Sally N. Anselm of Bec and Robert of Meulan Berkeley:University of California Press 1987 ISBN 0-520-05674-4 In 1110, Nigel "being weary of the burden of his sins and the tiresome ways of the wicked world" retired to Selby Abbey 10 miles E. of Sherburn. In 1165 Gilbert, son of Nigel, donated to the Archbishop of York, "his Lord," land in Clementhorpe. Speaking of these charters, Farrar (1 Early Yorkshire Charters, 53) says: "The fact that Nigel gave part of his tithe in Huddleston, combined with evidence in later times of the tenure by the Huddleston family of a knight's fee in Huddleston, Wetwang and other places, prove that Nigel was ancestor of that family." "Nigel, the Provost, was undoubtly the ancestor of the family of Huddleston" The name de Hodelston was assumed by Nigel or by his son Gilbert, it is not clear which, and thenceforth it was the family surname. [from Huddleston Family Tables, by George Huddleston, 1935]

Saint Germain It is difficult to visualise, when looking at Selby Abbey today, that it was once a huge, rich Benedictine monastery complete with chapel, cloisters, stables, brew-house, kitchen, workshop, dormitory, cellars, barns and an infirmary, all surrounded by high walls with a huge gateway. Building began shortly after the Norman conquest, but its foundation is said to originate with Germain, a French nobleman and soldier, who was born around AD378. Germain became a Bishop as his life progressed and twice visited England to help unite Christianity. He died shortly after his second visit in 448 and was given a magnificent funeral at Auxerre where his shrine became a pilgrimage centre. More than six hundred years later a monk called Benedict (or Benoit) experienced a vision in Auxerre Abbey and received instructions from Saint Germain to go to Selby and build an Abbey. SELBY is a historic market town located approximately 14 miles from York. Selby's Life began over 930 years ago in 1069 when Monk Benedict of Auxerre, France, who had been granted a charter by William the Conqueror, built the magnificent abbey which still stands in the town centre today. It is believed that Monk Benedict had a vision that 'told' him he should build a church in England where he saw three swans. As he was travelling up the River Ouse, he spotted these three swans and decided this is where he would build our famous abbey. Selby Abbey is unique in the North Of England, it was the first monastery in the north to be built after the Norman Conquest. The building of the abbey took place between 1100 and 1230. The last piece of construction on the abbey took place in 1935. The abbey is 300 feet in length and 55 feet in height, making it of almost cathedral proportions.

Selby Abbey, is probably most famous for it's 14th Century "Washington" Window. John de Washington was a Prior in the Abbey in the early 1400s, and was related to George Washington. The window shows the Washington family shield, which is the model for the stars and stripes of the present US flag. http://www.selbynet.co.uk/abbey/

Taken from the work of Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr's book "All The Days of my Life"

The pedigree of this very ancient family is traced back to five generations before the Conquest. The first, however, of the name who was Lord of Millom was Sir John Huddleston, Knight, who was the son of Adam, son of John, son of Richard, son of Reginald, son of Nigel, son of Richard, son of another Richard, son of John, son of Adam de Hodleston in co. York. The five last named according to the York MS were before the Conquest.

[From "Lines of English Hudlestons" by Annette Hudleston Nigel Hudleston. alive 1110]

Richard Hudleston. alive. 1160/1190 Richard de Hudleston to Henry de Lascy, Earl of Lincoln : Grant of land in Saltfleetby : (Lincs) Piece details for DL 25/2823 Public Record Office Online Catalogue Public Record Office, Kew Note French

Gilbert. Roger. Alive. 1160/90

Roger de MERFLET, c.1290 Huddlestone in Sherburn [temp.Edward I] Grant of a little land by Adam Pacock of Sherburn to sir John de Meus. Witnesses: sir John de Reygate knight, sir John de Belaqua knight, sir William de Rye knight, William de Spineta bailiff of Sherburn, William Stirchup of Fenton, Richard son of Roger de Levenaton, Richard son of Alexander de Hudelston, Roger his son, Roger de Merflet of the same place, etc. (Huddlestone and Lumby, township and parish of Sherburn in the West Riding of Yorkshire, 7 miles N.N.E. of Pontefract; 1,423 acres.)http://web.ukonline.co.uk/john.marfleet/earlies.htm Copies of the book 'An Index of MARFLEETs pre 1500', which, in addition to the information on the following pages, includes full source references and additional notes, may be purchased by sending a Sterling cheque for £7.50 to: John K. Marfleet, 4, Robotham Close, Huncote, LEICESTER. LE9 3BB U.K. Gilbert(alive 1259..Assize Roll YASRS /44) in which case, the Richard who appears frequently as a witness could be his son, and Roger, his son. Too many Richards! Alexander is a much more unusual name. As to the Richard who had leave to build a chapel...this should have been c. 1249 20 Jan. ("The Huddlestons " Cott. MS claudius BIII 33 b. Cartulary York. ) Dean Sewal de Bovill became Archbishop of York 1256 and died 1258. Sir John de Reygate was bailiff of Sherburn 10 Dec 1290 and later in 1300 was commissioner of army. For "Levenaton" is "Levenachton." Sir John de Bella Acqua appears often as a witness in registers and cartularlries of the 13th/14th cents. Sir John de Meus is the same as "de Melsa" and "Meaux., and married Beatrix de Hudleston (1st wife. died c. 1287) dau. of Sir Richard de Hudleston who died c. 1250. Her brother , yet another Richard, had died also c. 1250, while her 2nd. brother was Sir John who marr. Joan de Boyville. [From "Touring Elmet" Nigel de Huddleston is the first recorded member of the family to have the Huddleston surname which was recorded when he became a monk at the nearby Selby Abbey in 1110 AD, and his son Gilbert, continued to use it. The northern family that took this name “de Huddleston” appear to have had close connections with the Norman barons and Bishops of Bayeux, probably indicating that they were themselves coming from the same region of Normandy. The names “Nigel” and “Gilbert” are of Norman origin. Yet the Saxon family already mentioned seem to have become tenants of deLaci (deLacy) and so it could be that they adopted Norman names in order to fit in with their new lords. Both Gilbert, and a Richard, now also named ‘de Huddleston‘, owned property at Clementhorpe (outside York) in 1175. They also had other local lands in Hillam , in Wetwang and in Poppleton .]

HUDLESTON. Dominus Johannes de Melsay tenet j feod. milit., unde viij car. terrae faciunt feod. milit. Title: The survey of the county of York taken by John de Kirkby, commonly called Kirkby's inquest [videorecording] ; also inquisitions of knights' fees, the Nomina villarum for Yorkshire, and an appendix of illustrative documents. Author: Great Britain. Exchequer. xxvi, 543, 17, [1] p. Durham, Pub. for the Society by Andrews and Co., 1867. Page 213

[From "Lines of English Huddlestons" by Annette Hudleston Harwood 1. Sir Richard> c. 1198-1250 of Huddleston, Yorkshire, England marriage had others][From Touring Emmot-Another Richard de Huddleston who lived from around 1198 to 1250 is said to have married Alicia, the daughter of one William, son of Henry, of Garthorpe. son,[Taken from the work of Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr's book "All The Days of my Life"] DEEDS OF TITLE. YORKS: MILFORD (SOUTH): also LUMBY (see also Steeton) FILE [no title]- ref. DD/FJ/1/247/3-date: n.d. (c.1250) |_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich. de Hudleston, Sir Rob. de Barkeston and Sir. Hen de Stikeswald, kts., etc. FILE [no title] - ref. DD/FJ/1/247/4 - date: n.d. (c.1250) |_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich de Hudleston, Wm. de Widendon, steward, Wm. de Winchecumb, bailiff of Sherburn, etc. FILE [no title] - ref. DD/FJ/1/247/5 - date: n.d. (c.1250) |_ [from Scope and Content] Witn.: Sir Rich. de Hudleston, etc. 12. Elias de Schirburn has not prosecuted against William de Malebranck and Adam Aldric. Therefore he and his sureties for prosecution, namely Robert de Westowe and John de Hodleston, [are] in mercy. (amercement 12 pence) A Plea Roll of Edward I's Army in Scotland, 1296 edited by Cynthia J. Neville From: Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, vol. XI (1990) The following record, classified in the Public Record Office, London, as E39/93/15 is an army plea roll that details nearly two hundred offences allegedly committed by members of the English expeditionary force which occupied Scotland between late March and mid-September 1296. To read the introduction by Professor Neville, please see this webpage. http://www.deremilitari.org/neville.pdf
Siege of Carlaverock
This poem, written in French, is thought to be authored by Walter of Exeter, a Franciscan friar. The story details the siege of the Scottish castle of Carlaverock in July 1300 by Edward I. The first portion of the poem gives a long list of heraldic banners and shields carried by English nobles, while the latter parts give a detailed description of the fighting that took place during the siege. The Chronicle of Lanercost has its own description of events, and it notes that many of the prisoners who surrendered to Edward were hung. Also John de Holdeston, who at all times appears well and prompt in arms. He was with the Count, which makes it proper that he should be named among his followers. He bore gules fretty of silver. This poem is from: The Siege of Carlaverock, edited and translated by Nicholas Harris Nicolas (London, 1828). Some minor alterations were made to Nicolas' English translation.

Sir John de Hodleston, in the year 1270 was a witness to a deed in the Abbey of St. Mary in Furness. By his marriage with the Lady Joan; Sir John became lord of Anneys in Millom. In the 25th, 1297, he was appointed by the King warder or governor of Galloway in Scotland. In the 27th, 1299, he was summonded as baron of the realm, to do military service, in the next year, 1300, he was present at the siege of Carlaverock. In the 25th, 1301, though we have no proof that he was summonded, he attended the Parliament in Lincoln, and subscribed as a baron the celebrated letter to the Pope, by the title of Lord of Anneys. He was still alive in the 4th of Edward IV, 1311. Sir John had three sons-John who died early, and Richard and Adam. son,[Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as 2.] [SETTLEMENTS, WILLS AND COGWATE PAPERS OTHERS 13th CENT FILE [no title]-ref. DD/FJ/4/25/1-date: c.25 Jan. 1287/8 |_ [from Scope and Content] To Rich. & Adam de Hodeleston, 10 marks each. Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/2-DD/FJ/10] © 2002 The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Nottinghamshire Archives Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown]Le Armeteholmes Ref No. D/Bo/D 39 1308 Adam de Hudleston' to Adam do Leght' Demise of 21 acres of land in Le Armeteholmes Term 15 years Rent: 355 p.a. Witnesses Henry de Quallar', Ralph de Bilinton', John son of John de Blakeburn' and others Cotherstone cum Hunderthwaite Manor (1 parchment)[© Copyright 2002, Durham County Council]

CHEW. (fn. 7) -The manor-house standing in a place called the 'Chew' gave name to the manor. About the year 1170 Henry de Lacy enfeoffed Hugh son of Leofwin of half a knight's fee in Altham, half of Billington, and elsewhere; consequently the mesne lordship of this manor descended in the family of Alvetham (Altham) and their descendants until the commencement of the 14th century, if not later. (fn. 8) At the date of this feoffment the manor was undoubtedly held by a local family of whom the first upon record was one Elias or Ellis de Billington, (fn. 9) living in 1203, when he was amerced before John Bishop of Norwich and his fellow-justices in eyre at Lancaster, (fn. 10) and in 1208, when he agreed with his tenant and probably kinsman Elias de Pleasington about the tenure of Pleasington. (fn. 11) He was father of Adam de Billington, a juror from this hundred on the inquest of the Gascon scutage in 1243, in which he was incorrectly returned as holding 'half' a knight's fee in Billington, where a fourth part should have been returned. (fn. 12) At this time, as for twenty-five years after, the half-fee in Altham of which this manor was a member was held in dower by Margaret Countess of Lincoln. (fn. 13) Three years later Adam de Billington was one of the jurors of the hundred at a special county court held at Lancaster. (fn. 14) He had issue an only daughter Avice, who married, first, Henry son of Hugh del Cho, (fn. 15) by whom she had no issue, and secondly, about 1240, Geoffrey son of Henry de Whalley son of Geoffrey the elder, Dean of Whalley, and had issue Adam de Billington, Richard, Roger, Henry, Robert, Ralph and William. (fn. 16) Adam her son and heir had issue an only son Adam, who probably died young, (fn. 17) whereupon his father sold the manor to Adam de Huddleston, kt., about mid-August 1287. (fn. 18)

A very considerable interest in the manor of Chew was acquired during the last half of the 13th century by the Pontchardon family of Little Mitton mainly through the marriage of Richard son of John de Pontchardon to Beatrice daughter and co-heir of Adam de Blakeburn. It is not easy to distinguish the separate interests of Henry son of Hugh del Cho, the first husband of Avice lady of Billington, and of Richard son of the same Henry del Cho by a former marriage, but it is clear that several small estates held by these three persons and by their kinsfolk were given to Beatrice de Blakeburn, (fn. 19) who at the time of her marriage to Richard son of John de Pontchardon in 1280, being well advanced in years, enfeoffed her father-in-law of half a dozen tenements here together with lands of her own inheritance in Wiswell and Blackburn with a view to create a life interest in favour of herself and husband and a reversion to her husband's heirs. (fn. 20) After his wife's death Richard de Pontchardon in 1303 conveyed his manor of Chew, other lands and services in the manor, with all his chattels there and his land of Snodworth, to Adam de Huddleston, kt. (fn. 21) By his deed dated at Upholland in 1302 Adam de Huddleston enfeoffed William younger brother of Robert de Holand, kt., of the manor, who a few months later re-enfeoffed Adam and Joan his wife and their issue. (fn. 22) Joan died not long after, leaving no issue. In 1309, Huddleston, having married Isabella lady of Godested, made a settlement of the manor upon himself and wife and their issue, (fn. 23) but on his dying childless in 1322 his nephew Richard the son of his brother John de Huddleston entered the manor as next heir, and the year following enfeoffed Thomas son of Geoffrey le Scrop. (fn. 24) In 1325 the manor became vested in Geoffrey le Scrop, kt., by release from Isabella Sir Adam's widow and other interested parties. (fn. 25) In 1332 the king directed the sheriff to ascertain by inquest what injury might be caused to the Crown by the assignment of the manor of Chew and half the vill of Billington by Scrop to the Abbot and convent of Whalley. The return showed that the manor was held of Queen Isabella, as of the castle of Clitheroe, by a yearly rent of 3d. for all services, and was worth £20 a year. Six weeks later the royal licence issued to permit the alienation in mortmain, (fn. 26) and the abbey came into possession of this valuable estate lying almost at their doors, and containing a valuable turbary and quarries of good stone suitable for the new monastic buildings then in course of erection. (fn. 27) An attempt was made in 1341 by John son of Richard de Huddleston to establish a title to the manor, but the suit was not successful, and the claimant accepted 80 marks from the abbot to resign his claim. (fn. 28) The subsequent history of the manor is involved in that of the other moiety of the manor of Billington, which passed into the possession of Whalley by somewhat different steps.

There is no evidence that the lords of Clitheroe derived any profit from the other moiety of Billington beyond the free rents of tenants to whom it had been granted before the end of the 12th century. After the death of John de Lacy we find Billington included in the lands assigned to the dower of his countess Margaret in 1241, and then extended at the yearly value of 54s. 9d. (fn. 29) -a sum closely approximating to the total of 54s. 9d. received by the monks of Whalley in the 14th century from this moiety of the vill. (fn. 30) About the year 1287 Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln demised to 'our dear bachelor,' Adam de Huddleston, for the term of his life, for his good service done and yet to be done, his tenements in Billington with the demesne and services of free tenants, and villeinages with the villeins holding them, saving the earl's free chase. (fn. 31) In 1318 Thomas Earl of Lancaster gave to Whalley the reversion of half the manor after the death of Huddleston, and later in the year, after the usual inquiry had been held, licence was given to Earl Thomas to alienate in mortmain. (fn. 32) Notwithstanding the earl's bounty the monks were not permitted to hold this moiety in peace until they had given, during the abbacy of John de Lindelay, to the earl's widow, the Countess Alice, 300 marks sterling for this and other gifts of her ancestors. (fn. 33) An attempt to recover possession of the manor of Chew was made by Miles Huddleston in 1464, but without success. (fn. 34)

The mesne manor of Hacking was held of the lord of Clitheroe by a yearly free rent of 5s. 4d. until the grant of half the manor and vill of Billington to Adam de Huddleston, kt. The amount of the rent is significant, being the exact sum paid before the Conquest as rent of two plough-lands. In 1309 Adam de Huddleston opposed the demand of Alice wife of William de Hopwood for dower in five messuages, 257 acres of land, 51 acres meadow, a water-mill and 50s. of rent in Billington and Witton on the ground that she left her first husband Adam de Billington and lived in adultery with Hopwood her second husband; De Banco R. 179, m. 164 d. Ibid. 980-2. In 1318 Robert de Holand, kt., demanded the manor against Huddleston in the King's Court (De Banco R. 225, m. 438; 229, m. 194 d.) on the ground that William de Holand was under age when enfeoffed of the manor by Huddleston, and recovered it against him. Immediately afterwards he re-enfeoffed Huddleston for life, retaining the reversion; Whalley Couch. 983. In 1304 Adam de Huddleston had a grant of free warren in his demesne lands in Billington; Chart. R. 32 Edw. I, m. 1 (15). Final Conc. (Rec. Soc. Lancs. and Ches.), ii, 2. Whalley Couch.987. Possibly Sir Adam was killed at the battle of Boroughbridge. The inquest after his death was taken at Billington on 28 May 1322. Ibid. 989-93; Final Conc. ii, 60. Inq. a.q.d. file 221, no. 7; Cal. Pat. 1330-4, p. 309. Scrop's charter passed at York on Wednesday after the translation of St. Thomas the Martyr (8 July), 1332, and was attested by Henry le Scrop, Richard de Huddleston, Robert de Shireburne, Adam de Clitheroe, Richard de Hoghton, Adam Banastre and John de Downham, kts., William de Tatham, parson of Witton, Thomas de Osbaldeston, Gilbert de la Legh, Richard de Merclesden, John son of John de Blakeburn, Oliver de Stansfeld and Robert de Plesington. Kuerden fol. MS. (Chet. Lib.), S 370. These had been in attendance upon the king at York. In 1308 Adam de Huddleston had given the newly-arrived monks 120 cartloads of peat during his lifetime from Billington Moor and half as much after his death, the site of a peat-cote by the highway on the north side of 'Beelsetenabbe,' the right to take all kinds of stone in his quarries nigh to the Hermitage on the eastern side of Billington and permission to use all the roads in the vill during the close season and through his demesne lands in the open season, provided they made good any damage committed; Whalley Couch. De Banco R. 327, m. 236 d.; Whalley Couch. 1005. The interests of Dame Alice relict of Richard de Huddleston, kt., in respect of dower and of John de Radcliffe of Ordsall and Joan his wife, sister of William de Holand, in her right were compounded by money payments; ibid. 1004; Final Conc. ii, 100. 29Lancs. Inq. and Extents, i, 158. Ibid. 937-8; Inq. a.q.d. file 135, no. 1; Cal. Pat. 1317-21, p. 237. The yearly value of the moiety was returned as 66s. 8d., and the service by which it was held of the earl a sixtieth part of a knight's fee. For the Huddlestons and Holme Manor see Cal. Pat. 1324-7, p. 214. De Banco R. 331, m. 71; Whalley Couch. 1063. He claimed as heir of Richard de Huddleston, kt.; Pal. of Lanc. Plea R. 26, m. 22. Whalley Couch. 1191-7. From: 'Townships: Billington', A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6 (1911), pp. 325-334.

The Banastre Rebellion of 1315 was closely associated with Standish parish. This was a rising directed against Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and his favourite Sir Robert Holland, whom the local gentry regarded as an upstart; and the outbreak reflected the friction between the Earl and King Edward. by T.C.Porteus The chief confederates met at Wingates, in Westhoughton, on the Wednesday before the Feast of St. Wilfrid, 8 October 1315, and took an oath to live and die together. On Tuesday, 4th November, Sir Adam Banastre and his associates arrived at Preston, where with banners flying they overcame a small force, sent to check them, led by Sir Adam de Huddleston, Sir Richard de Waleys, and Sir Walter le Vavasour; the latter was fatally wounded. The confederates captured the town and made levies on the citizens. But later in the same day the sheriff arrived from the north with his friends and the main county force. The sheriff was Sir Edmund de Nevill of Middleton, near Lancaster. He was accompanied by Sir William Dacre, Sir John and Sir Nicholas de Harrington, and about 300 men. They were acting for the Earl of Lancaster. Sir Walter de Strickland also came up on behalf of the Earl, perhaps with a separate force. After less than an hour's battle, the insurgents were entirely defeated between Deepdale and Preston. Robert de Charnock and others were killed. Sir Ralph de Bickerstaffe fled to Croston Church where he died of his wounds. Reference 9 - A History of the Parish of Standish, Lancashire Author: The Rev. Thomas Cruddas Porteus Published by J. Starr & Son Ltd, Wigan, 1927

Sir Adam de Hudleston "the elder" was the third son of Sir John and Joan de Boyville,and was of Billington. Brother of Sir John 2nd and of Sir Richard. He married twice but dsp. 1322 (Battle of Boroughbridge)His nephew Sir Adam was of Whittington marr. twice(Katherine and Joan) and left one son, John "an outlaw" killed at Cantsfield 1338.(VCH Lancashire) His uncle, Sir Adam 1st. "fought upon his stumps" at Boroughbridge. "Outlaw" sometimes meant one who fought against the King. There may well be some memorial to him on the sundial at Bootle Church.

The manor of Cotherston, Codrestune in Domesday Book, came into the possession of the Fitzhughs, of Ravensworth, soon after the Conquest. They had a house here, which Henry fil Hervey by royal license, obtained in 1201, converted into a castle. A fragment only of this fortress now remains,-a portion of one wall of the keep, 14 or 15 feet high and 10 or 12 feet long. It is picturesquely situated near the confluence of the Balder beck and the Tees. This castle is said by tradition to have been destroyed by the Scots in one of their plundering expeditions, and the fragments of burnt wood which have been dug up on the site seem to corroborate the story. Tradition has also preserved the memory of a chapel, and in Chapel Garth adjoining have been found an ancient font, window heads, both round and pointed, and other fragments of an ecclesiastical character. From the Fitzhughs Cotherston descended to the Stapletons, and thence, by marriage, to the Huddlestons, of Millom, in whose possession it remained until the middle of last century, when William Cavendish, Marquis of Hartington, became lord of the freehold manor, containing about 760 acres. It was subsequently purchased from the Duke of Devonshire by the Earl of Strathmore. Younger son Sir John c. 1222-1334 marriage Joan de Boyville of Millom Cumberland daughter and heiress of Adam de Boyville of Millom ["The Genealogie of the Most Ancient and Right Worshipfull and Honourable Family of Hudleston alias Hodeleston Originally of Hudleston Hall in Yorkshire and of Milham in the County of Cumberland From the Time of King Henry the Third to the Present Reign" |_ [from Scope and Content] Incomplete. First skin only of a series recording all extracts from historical records relating to the family which have been recorded by the College of Arms. This skin records the text of a letter sent by the Earls and Barons of England, including John de Hudleston, Lord of Aneys, to the Pope, concerning "the affair of Scotland" in 1301 © 2002 Public Record Office ] John de Hodleston Fought in the wars against the Welsh. Was at Falkirk, 1298, and Caerlaverock, 1301. He died in 1316. John appears in The Falkirk Roll, H 19; The Caerlaverock Poem, K 11; & St George's Roll, E 415. The Barons' Letter in reply to the Pope, February 1301 Following their defeat at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298, the Scots addressed a letter to Pope Boniface VIII, attempting to persuade him that Edward had no right of superiority over the Scottish king. The Pope sent a letter to Edward from Agnani, dated 27 June 1299, almost a year later. In it, following advice from the French, he claimed the feudal superiority of Scotland for himself. The letter was entrusted to Robert Winchelsey, Archbishop of Canterbury, who gave it to Edward at Sweetheart Abbey, shortly after the siege of Caerlaverock, on about 26th August 1300. At a Parliament summoned by Edward at Lincoln on 13th - 20th January 1301, the letter was composed and sealed, but not sent, probably because the Pope's attention had been diverted elsewhere and Edward had consequently decided to ignore the problem. Seven earls and sixty five barons sealed the letter, which is now in the Public Record Office. The original blazon is from Gerard G Brault, "Eight Thirteenth Century Rolls of Arms", Pennsylvania State University Press, 1973. Johans de Odilstane rouge portoit frettez de argent MILLOM 3170 4803. 1336 Subsidy £27.27. M (Charter) Wed; gr 22 Jul 1251, by K Hen III to John de Huddleston (CChR, 1226–57, p. 364). To be held at the manor. F (Charter) vfm, Holy Trinity (Easter dep); gr 22 Jul 1251, by K Hen III to John de Huddleston (CChR, 1226–57, p. 364). To be held at the manor. DL 25/385 John de Hodleston, knight to Furness Abbey: Renunciation of his right in Angerton Moss, except in the tenements which Adam son of Ralph de Kirkby held therein: (Lancs) 25 Edw.I DL 25/461 Agreement, indented, by John de Hodleston, son of Sir Richard de Hodleston, to pay to Furness Abbey, as rectors of Millom church, 2s. yearly in lieu of a tithe of fish: (Lancs) 1338

Richard Huddleston appears in The Galloway Roll, GA 241, & The Stirling Roll, ST 90, son and heir, succeeded his father. Both he and his brother Adam are noticed in the later writs of Edward I. They were both of the faction of the Earl of Lancaster, and obtained in the 7th Edward II, 1313, a pardon for their participation with him in the death of the King's favorite, Gaveston. Adam was taken prisoner with the earl in the Battle of Borough-bridge in 1322, where he bore arms gules fretted with silver, with a label of azure. Richard was not at that battle and in the 19th of the King, 1326, when Edward II summoned the Knights of every county to the Parliament at Westminister, was returned the first among the Knights of Cumberland. He married Alice, daughter of Richard Troughton in the 13th, Edward II, 1319-1320, and had issue. son,[Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as 4. Sir Richard c. 1282-1334 married Alice (?Colville Troughton) Had int. al

John Huddleston, son of the above named Richard, who succeeded his father in 1337, and married a daughter of Henry Fenwick, Lord of Fenwick, co. of Northumberland, son,[Here a conflict between Amelia Huddleston Barr and Annette Hudleston Harwood occurs, not in the name of John Huddleston and not as Richard Hudleston as being father but as the wife of Sir John because of dates. [Isabella Neville (died 1516) married 1stly: William Hudleston (younger son of Sir John and Mary Fenwick). BOOTLE 3107 4884. Market town c.1600 (Everitt, p. 468). M (Charter) Wed; gr 24 Oct 1347, by K Edw III to John de Hudleston (CChR, 1341–1417, p. 64). To be held at the manor. F (Charter) vf+2, Exaltation of the Cross (14 Sept); gr 24 Oct 1347, by K Edw III to John de Hudleston (CChR, 1341–1417, p. 64). To be held at the manor. They had two sons: John (who succeeded to Sawston through his mother) and Richard , who married Margery Smythe (his step sister) and 2ndly. Sibill Crofts. She marr 2ndly Ralph Dacre and 3rdly Sir William Smythe. She and her 3rd husband are buried in Elford Church The Richard Hudleston who marr. Elizabeth Dacre had no children and was the nephew of William Hudleston and Sir John Hudleston (brothers)...who succeeded to the Millom estates This Sir John Hudleston is actually .6 Sir John c. 1330-1398 marriage Katherine Tempest daughter of Sir Richard Tempest of Bowling. (Y) had int. al as mentioned by Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston"

From Annette Hudleston Harwood
1.) Thomas Huddleston of Dalton in Furness. 26th. October 1573 was one of the "Four and Twenty " of the parish "For the maintenance of the Parish Xhurch of Dalton and for the government and convenience of the aforesaid parish" Also included in the list of "jurors" in Thomas Sanderson Senior and Thomas Sanderson Junior. Same family as Agnes? Thomas Huddleston 1554---guardian (ie church warden ) of Dalton at the Bishop's Visitation to Furness. 2.) Henry Huddleston (1448) of Northamptonshire born c. 1422 son of Sir William Huddleston and Elizabeth Piel/Pyel dau. of John son of Nicholas Pyel. Sir William died 13 Aug. 1422 Elizabeth died 1448 hvaing marr. a second husband ..Brancepeth. "Bridges' History of Northamptonshire" "church of St.Peter, Irthlingborough " "In Belchier's collections are preserved the two following inscriptions" her lieth Sir William Huddleston Knt. sometime bailiff of Alanston, the which died in Normandy in the town of Argentan in the Wars of King Henry Conqueror the fifth the 13 th day of August AD 1422 and Elizabeth his wife - deceased - 1448" On her death her manors passed to her son Henry Huddleston (born c. 1420, d. 1488) who married Margaret/Margery Greene c. 1451 of Drayton and Greene's Norton. Their dau. and heiress was Elizabeth born c.1452/6 the wife of Sir Thomas Cheyney. Henry Huddleston was Sheriff of Northants. 1465 (5 Edward IV )and 1472 (11 Ed. IV. Alanstone is probably Adstone in Northants. Henry's father Sir William may have been a younger son of the Millom family as in a battered copy of John Denton's Cumberland (written c. 1670) ed, by RS Ferguson CWAAS Tract series no 2, 1887 In "Collections" No.32 and 33 "Sir William Huddleston indentured with the King for 6 men at arms and 18 archers. This in 1416 1nd 1417, (just after Agincourt) In 1409 a "Court" was held T Cranford (Northants) by William Huddleston. (NRO Court rolls for Cranford BQ 13 6J) 3.) Sir John (d. 1493) and Mary Fenwick had six sons viz: A, Sir Richard b.c.1440 Fought at Bosworth 1485 and died. marr. 1465 Margaret Neville (d.1498)natural dau. of the earl of Warwick. Served n the commission of peace and as an escheator in Cumberland 1483. "Knight of the Body " Constable of Beaumaris Castle . Captain of Beaumaris and Anglesey, Master Forester and Keeper of Snowdon Forest (A follower and indeed brother in law of Richard Duke of Gloucester (later Richard 111rd.) They had three children---Sir Richard 1476-1502 marr. Elizabeth Dacre but dsp.Margaret marr. Lancelot Salkeld. Issue Joan marr. Hugh Fleming. Issue B. Sir John m.1.) Joan Fitzhugh who dsp. 2.) Joan Stapleton (widow Harcourt) One son Sir John C.)William bc. 1450 (supported Warwick and the D. of Clarence in 1470 and suffered forfeiture. Marr. Isabel Neville, one of the daus.and heiresses of Warwick's brother Marquess of Montague.Inherited through his wife the estates at Sawston . Two sons: Richard of Elford (inherited through his wife and stepsister, Margery Smythe)and John of Sawston who marr. Elizabeth Dudley. D.) Thomas, like William supported Warwick and Clarence, and also suffered forfeiture, but changed allegiance 1471 and was killed at Barnet. No wife or children as far as is known. E.) Henry...fought at Bosworth 1485, but was appointed a gent. of the King's chamber. Died 1489. No wife or children as far as is known F.) Christopher----appointed parson of Sudeley 1480 where his father was Constable for Richard Duke of Gloucester.

Sir Richard Hudleston, Knight, served as a banneret at the Battle of Agincourt, 1415. He married Anne, sister of Sir William Harrington K. G., and served in the wars in France, in the retinue of that Knight, son, [Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as 7. Sir Richard c. pre. 1398-1428 marriage Katherine Harrington daughter of Sir Nicholas Harrington and Isabella D'Engleys. Had int. al][Parties to Indenture: Indentures between the king and the following for service in his invasion of France Robert Gloucestre, Thomas Staunton, William Fitz Henry, John Folville and William Hodeleston 3 Henry V Thomas Archer, John Hodeleston, and Nicholas Broghton, clerk, to grant a messuage in Lincoln to a chaplain at the altar of St. Mary in the church of St. Peter at Pleas there, retaining a messuage in the parish of St. George there. Lincoln. 3 HENRY V. Public Record Office Online Catalogue ]

Sir John Hudleston, Knight, son of Richard, was appointed to treat with the Scottish commissioners on border matters in the 4th Edward IV, 1464; was Knight of the shire in the 7th, 1467; appointed one of the conservators of the peace on the borders in the 20th, 1480; and again in the 2nd of Richard, 1484; and died on the 6th of November in the 9th of Henry VIII, 1494. He married Joan, one of the co-heirs of Sir Miles Stapleton of Ingham in Yorkshire. He was made bailiff and keeper of the King's woods and chases in Barnoldwick, in the county of York; sherriff of the county of Cumberland, by the Duke of Gloucester for his life, steward of of Penrith, and warden of the west marshes. son,[Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" list him as 10 b. Sir John c. 1440/45-1512 marriage Joan Stapleton (d. 1519) daughter and heir of Sir Miles Stapleton of Ingham (Y) and widow of Sir Christopher Harcourt. John and Joan both buried at Hailes Abbey (Glos)]

Sir John Hudleston, second son of Sir John and Joan his wife, married Joan, daughter of Lord Fitz Hugh, and dying the 5th Henry VIII, 1513-1514, was succeeded by his son.[Joane Fitzhugh birth about 1456 Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England death before 1512, daughter of Henry Fitzhugh and Alice Neville; [Earl of Salisbury] mother Alice Montague

Sir John Hudleston K. B., espoused firstly the Lady Jane Clifford, youngest daughter of Henry, Earl of Cumberland, by whom he had no issue. He married secondly Joan, sister of Sir John Seymour, Knight, and aunt of Jane Seymour, queen consort of Henry VIII, and by her he had issue Anthony his heir, [Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as 11. Sir John c. 1488-1547 marriage 1.) Joan Clifford dsp. marriage 2.) Joan Seymour]

Anthony Hudleston, Esq., 501) and heir, married Mary, daughter of William Barrington, Knight, and was succeeded by his son,[Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as .12 Anthony 1518-1598 marriage. 141 Marie Barrentyne daughter of Sir William Barrentyne of Hasely. Oxfordshire Issue.][Anthony Hudleston who married Marie Barentyne, quarrelled violently with Marie and more or less deserted her. He tried to disinherit his son, William, who was brought up at Haseley Court, Marie's estates, but did not succeed. There is a brass in Haseley Church to Marie and her five children, only two of whom grew to adulthood.] M=Millom PR (parish registers) H=Haseley PR R=Romaldkirk PR D=Dugdale b=born c=circa bap=baptised m=married d=died sp=sine prole The Lordship of Millom went: Anthony; son William;son Ferdinand; son William; son Ferdinand; his brother Joseph; his first cousin Richard; son Ferdinand; son William; daughter Elizabeth who married Sir Hedworth Williamson of Whitburn co. Durham. Elizabeth and William sold to Sir James Lowther of Whitehaven 1774 for £20,200

From Paul Chambers the will of John Barantyne
John Barantyne Chalgrave In dei nomn’ amen. The xxviij day of the month of Juyn the yere of lord m cccc lxxiiij and the xiiij yere of the reign of kinge Henri the vijth. I John Barantyne squyere being in gode and hole mynd and memorie thanks be almighty God make and ordayne this my last testament in manner and forme folowynge that is to say Ffirst I biqueth and commend my sole to almighty God my maker and to the blesed virgin Saint Marye and to all the holy company of heven. My body to be buried in the chauncell of the parish chirch of Chalgrave in. the countie of Oxenford. To the moder chirch of Lincoln 6s. 8d. To the high aulter of the parish chirch of Haselay where as I am paryshener for my tithes and offrynges forgoten and withdrawen . . . 20s. Toward the chirch werkes of the parish chirch of Chalgrave aforesaide 40s. To the order of Freres Prechours of London that they the more specially may pray for my soul and alle Cristen soules 40s. To the ordre of Freres Prechours in the universitie of Oxenford. . . 40s. To Austyn Barantyne, my sonne, toward his marriage, with that the same Austyn be ruled and guyded by Elizabeth, my wif, 200 marcs in money. To Johanne Barantyne, my yonger sonne, toward his mariage, with that he be ruled and guyded bi the said Elizabeth, my wif, 300 marcs in money. To Arme Barantyne, my doughter, toward her mariage . . . 200 marcs in money. And if it happen eny of the forsaid Austyne, John, or Anne to decesse afore their laufuil age or mariage thanne I woll that the parte of him or theirn that so decessed be equaly by the oversight of the saide Elizabeth, my wif, devided bitwene thaim that ouirlyvith. And if it happen all mv saide sonnes and doughter to decesse . . . thanne I wolle that all the sommes of money abovesaid by me to thaim biquethen remayn unto the saide Elizabeth, my wife, to dispose for my soule as to her shalbe seme best to the pleasire of God and helth and profite of my soule.

To Elizabeth Kelly, my servant, that she the more specially pray for my soule 20s. To William Styleman, my servant, 6s. 3d. To Thomasyne, my seruauJit, 205. To Mawde Jaynour and Margery Stedeman, my nursez, either of thaim a kowe…The residue of all and singular my goodes and catalls not biquithen as it shewith by an inventory thereof made and thies my bequests abovesaid fulfilled, I bequeth it to the forsaid Elizabeth, my wif, to the entent to dispose it for my soule and to pay and content all my dettes ....Executors : Elizabeth, my wife, principal executrix ; Thomas Hampden of Hampden in the countie of Bukes, squyere, coexecutor. To the saide Thomas Hampden for his labor... 10 marcs sterling. In wittenes wherof I have putt my seale of arrnes.

Probatum fuit suprascriptum testamentum apud Lambeth octavo die Aprilis Anno m c lxx septem et commissa fuit administracio Elizabeth Barentyne relicta et executorde bene et fideliter administrando citra festum purificationem beate Marie virginis proxima.

C 1/1437/8-11 John HARCOURT and Francis STONER, knights, v. Anthony HUDDELSTON, Mary his wife, and others.: Reviver of a suit on a counterbond for a debt of Francis Barentyne, deceased, whose goods have come to complainant's hands.: LONDON. 1556-1558

1. Anthony 1518-1598 marr. 1541 Marie Barentyne of Haseley Oxfordshire They had 5 children: Francis 1545 d.infant; 2 daus also d. inf. William b.c 1549 Joyce bc. 1557 marr. Sir Edward Lawrence. 0f the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset. Also an illegit. dau Albina, probably dau. of his half sister, Anne. 2. William bap 25 July 1549 at Haseley. Marr. mary Bridges of Gloucestershire (she d. 1601 M) At least 13 children several of whom were illegimate. Ferdinand bap.10 July 1577 H d.c.1646 Anthony bap.1578 at H Barentyne bap.1580 H d.1636 M sp William bap.1580 H d.1625M sp Other children included Thomas d. 1663 M; John b and d. 1605 M;George bap.1594 H d. 1628 M Daughters: Dorothy b and d.M Frances bap 1600 H d.1680 M Mary (marr. Christopher Philipson) and d. 1670 M Margaret m. Anthony Latus 1614 M and d. 1631 M Ellen mar. Anthony Lamplugh pre 1625 and d. c.1678/80 Albina bap 1602 H d. 1653 M "Oxford Church Depositions 1592-1596..."...churchwardensof Haseley qnd curate Thomas Jones...had been summoned by Hudleston to baptise a child in his house...Jones had since been told....now commonally reported...that the child had been unlawfully begotten by Hudleston on Elizabeth a single woman who had had other children by him..." William, his wife Mary, and mistress Elizabeth had a "menage a trois" at Haseley, until his father Anthony died , when they moved to Millom. Mary (nee Bridges) d. 1601 at Millom. William died 1628 at Millom. Elizabeth Hartepole (now Hudleston) marr. 2ndly 1631 Samuel Knipe Anthony the 2nd son 1578 had daus. Isabel(1618 M) Bridget (1619 M ) and sons: Barentyne b.M 1620-1644 Andrew 1623 M -1644; John 1625M -1644 all killed in the Civil War. Barentyne the 3rd. son b.1580 H d.1636 M Thomas the 4th.son "of Little Haseley and Gray's Inn"1628/9 had the Bainton and Salthouse estates and had daus, a.Isabella 1646 M mar. her cousin Richard Hudleston of Ulpha (see below)and d. 1687 b. Elizabeth 1651M marr. William Wells Vicar of Millom who drowned on Duddon Sands 1699 His sons Barentyne bap.1642 dsp. 1720 Anthony bap. 1644 M dsp 1720 M 3.Ferdinand the eldest son bap.July 10th 1577 marr. c. 1601 Jane Grey dau. of Sir Ralph Grey (d.1623)of Horton and Chillingham and Jane Arthington (dau of William Arthington of Arthington nr. Harrogate) of Ripley and Catherine Ingleby. Ferdinand and Jane lived mostly at Thwaite Hall Romaldkirk...an ancient Hudleston estate...until 1628 when his father William died. Both were recusants (Roman Catholics) They had 16 children some of whom d. in infancy. 4.William 1603 R -1668 Colonel, knighted 1645 marr. 1624 Bridget Pennington dau. of Joseph Pennington of Muncaster John 1604-1661 Colonel of Dragoons. Lived at Longgarth Ulpha (on the Millom estate) . Marr. Margaret Middleston dau. of Thomas Middleton of Leighton, Lancs. They had two children :Richard and Jane (Richard eventually inherited the estate) Ferdinando b.1607 Major in King's Army Foot. Alive 1648 Richard b.1609 R Lt. Col. killed at York, possibly had a son John alive 1609 Joseph b 1611 R d.1608/9 "The Old Captain" marr. Elizabeth Middleston 1656 dau. of Thomas Middleton of Leighton, Lancs. Ralph b.1612 R Capt. in the King's Army of Foot Will 1644 Ingleby Capt in King's Army of Foot marr. as 2nd husband Grace Brackenbury, widow of Francis Brackenbury. Bur 1653 Edward b.1620 R bap. 18 Nov M of Picknell/Pecknall Romaldkirk, Major in Army. Marr. Katherine Towers da. of Thomas Towers of Bleansley Broughton in Furness. Children: a. Fredinand b. 1652/4 Romaldkirk marr. Margaret Moore 1676..i son Ferdinando (marr. Sarah Watson of Cockfield Hall) Joyce marr. 1695 George Whinfell/Whinfield of Helliwell, Northumberland. and poss. Margaret, William, John , Robert, Richard. Robert b. 1623 Capt .on King's Army d. 1648 Ferdinand and Jane had 4 daus.; Mary 1605; Bridget bap.1617 Ulpha. Frances b and d. 1623 (twin with Robert) Dorothy(b. 1613 IGI ) marr. Thomas Asmall of Anerston co. Durham, sons Ferdinando and John both Catholic priests and Thomas (marr. 1669) 4.Colonel Sir William, Bap.1603 R knighted 1645 marr. Bridget Pennington his cousin 5 Son Ferdinand marr. Dorothy Hewkeley 1649 in London. They had one dau. Mary who marr. 1676/7 Charles West son of Lord Delawarr . she d.sp 1677 Ferdinand died 1686 in King's Bench Prison Southwark (in for debt) sons William b and d. 1632. Patricius b and 1633 dau. Matilda; b 1632 (poss illegit) Bridget b and d 1632 ; Penelope b and d 1636 6.Joseph( Son of William and Bridget) Joseph b.c.1636 d.1700 (inherited from Ferdinando his brother) marr. his cousin Bridget, dau. of Andrew Hudleston of Hutton John (she d. 1715) one son Ferdinando b.1670 d.1682 7.The next Lord was Richard of Ulpha, son of Colonel John of Longgarth, who marr. 1stly. his cousin Isabel, 1670, dau. of Thomas of Bainton and Salthouse. They had a son Ferdinand b.1673. daus. Mary 1671 and Margaret 1676. Isabel died 1687 M and Richard marr, 2ndly Bridget Latus , dau. of John Latus of the Beck and widow of William Kirkby. They had children John, Bridget, Elizabeth and Catherine. Richard died 1718/9 M 8.Ferdinand son of Richard and Isabel, b. 1673 marr. 1696 Elizabeth Falconer. Children Easter (Esther) 1697; William 1698/9; Ann Elizabeth 1699/80; John b.1702; Sarah b.1703 in London. 9.William marr. Gertrude Meredith 1725 dau of Sir William Meredith of Henbury, Cheshire. They had two daus. Elizabeth (Lady of Millom) b.1728 who marr.1748 Sir Hedworth Williamson Bart. She died 1793 The other dau, Isabella b. 1732 d. unm. 1801 (William is also said to have had an illeg. son, Ralph) Millom Castle, estates and Lordship was sold to Sir James Lowther in 1774. Haseley,Ulpha, Bootle, Cotherstone (Romaldkirk) had been sold earlier. Sic Transit Gloria Mundi. I hope some of this research will be of use ...apologies for any errors of typing and ommission! I have the pedigrees in "drop" form covering several sheets of paper. Not easy to transcribe into lists. Apologies for some errors in my listings! 1.)Elizabeth and Hedworth Williamson sold the estates 2.)Mary Hudleston (nee Bridges) wife of William bur.17 Feb 1601 at Millom (PR.) Elizabeth Hartepole dau of Richard Hartepole married Willam Hudleston 20th. May 1601 at Haseley (PR) 3.) Anthony 2nd son of William and Mary was bap. at Haseley 1578(PR) 4.) Jane Arthington wife of Sir Ralph Grey was daughter of William Arthington of Arthington Nr. Harrogate (Y) and Catherine Ingleby of Ripley (Y) 5.)Richard Lt. Col. killed at York 1644 possibly had a son, John alive 1649 6.)Joseph "The Old Captain" son of Ferdinand and Jane nee Grey bap. R 1611 bur. 6 Jan 1709 Millom 7.) Ferdinand and Jane had a dau. Catherine. Her will 1676 8.)Col. Sir William and Bridget Pennington had surviving children; Ferdinand, Joyce (marr---Holtby) Joseph and Isabel who marr. Col. Richard Kirkby as 2nd. wife. 9.)The mysterious Ralph could have been illegit. son of Col. Sir Williamborn c. 1640 Thank you, Annette Hudleston Harwood for your post.

William Huddleston[birth 1549 death 4 March 1627][(All information above) From "All The Days of my Life" by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr-An Autobiography-1913 D. Appleton & Company; lists him as William Hudleston, Esq., Knight of the shire in the 43 Elizabeth, who married Mary, daughter of Bridges, Esq., of Gloucestershim][Annette Hudleston Harwood in her article "Lines of English Hudleston" lists him as .13 William 1549-1628 marriage 1.) Mary Bridges of Glousc. d. 1601 Several children 2.) Elizabeth Hartepoole, his mistress. Several children.] & Elizabeth Hartepoole[birth about 1545]-marriage date about 1566 of Thwaites Hall, England, son

On re-reading and deciphering my notes, I have to apologize for the wrong date! Please note the following alteration; Sir John married Joan Stapleton after 1486.His father, Sir John who married Mary Fenwick c.1440 was born c.1420/1and died 1493 IPM 1495. They seem to have moved to Cambridgeshire and to Court, leaving Millom to the sons and to stewards. (His father Richard married Joan ...no name. c.1420/1 when they were given the manor of Corney and lands in Bootle and Corney "part of the Millom lands" by Sir Richard of Agincourt fame and Katherine, his wife. Ref: Feet of Fines Cumb. and West. Transactions 1907) Sir Richard was still alive in 1433, and may well be the one referred to as "lately dead 1448" in the History of Parliament---Wedgewood. His son Richard was not knighted, but his son, later Sir John, inherited Millom from his grandfather in 1448. 2.) Sir John (c.1440-1593) and his sons were Yorkists (although sons William and Thomas sided with Warwick and Clarence in 1470 suffering forfeiture of their lands, but were afterwards pardoned by Edward 4th.) The eldest son, Sir Richard (c.1440-1495) was married to Margaret Neville, illegitimate dau. of Richard, Earl of Warwick, who acknowledged their marriage and endowed the couple with lands in Yorkshire. Margaret was therefore the half sister of Anne Neville, married to Richard Duke of Gloucester, later Richard 3rd. She was in attendance at the coronation of Queen Anne. After Bosworth 1485, she remarried Sir Lancelot Threlkeld 2nd as his 2nd. wife. She died 1498 (IPM 1502) Sir Richard and Margaret had 3 children viz: Sir Richard born c.1480, who married Elizabeth Dacre and dsp.1502.They also had 2 daughters, Margaret married to Lancelot Salkeld and Joan who marr. Hugh Fleming. On the death of Sir Richard 1502 the estates went to his uncle Sir John marr. to Joan Stapleton. Sir John had probably marr. 1stly. Joan Fitzhugh dsp and then Joan Stapleton (widow of Sir Christopher Harcourt) in circa 1485. (Incidentally, Joan Stapleton's mother, Katherine de la Pole, marr. 1stly. Sir Miles Stapleton and after his death, Sir Richard Harcourt, father of Sir Christopher, as his 2nd,or 3rd wife. The laws of inheritance and wardship complicated the lot of a widow.) The estates being entailed went to his uncle Sir John married to Joan Stapleton) 2nd. son of Sir John and Mary Fenwick. Sir John and Joan had one son, another John born c.1488, (there is a mention of a daughter, Alice in the will of Sir John.)This Sir John married 1. Jane Clifford dsp. 2.Jane Seymour 3. Jayce Prickley. Other sons, not sure of the order, were William who married pre.1486 Isabella, 5th. daughter of John Neville, Marquess Montagu, brother of Warwick, and Isabel Ingoldesthorpe. Warwick and Montagu were both killed at the battle of Barnet 1471, as was Thomas Hudleston. (They had rebelled against the king, Edward 4th.) William and Isabella married c. 1486. William died pre.1509. Their first son John was born c.1488. It is thought that William stayed in Cumberland and was buried at Millom. He was never knighted and his wife received estates in Sawston, Cambridgeshire under the "deed of partition of the Ingoldesthorpe and Montagu estates, 4th. July 1502.”Their son John settled at Sawston. Henry d.1489 fought at Bosworth---not clear on which side, and became a gentleman of the King's chamber. Henry Tudor (Henry 7th. a pragmatic Welshman with a very dubious claim to the throne, pardoned many who had been at Bosworth, in particular the Northern Lords and barons, who were an effective barrier against the Scots. John and his brother William were pardoned by the King (Henry 7th.) and John received several offices and positions at Court and in the Royal service. The Wars of the Roses, like many a Civil War set families against each other. The rivalries and loyalties are very difficult to unravel. Christopher was appointed parson at Sudeley (Glos) in 1480 when his brother, Sir John was Constable at Sudeley Castle 1478, Sheriff of Gloucestershire 1482 and 1499. "Entailed" (not political, and is still used today...)"to settle on a series of heirs.... so that the immediate possessor may not dispose of it..." Burke's Landed Gentry is not the same as "A genealogical and Heraldic History " which I see was published 1834/38/1907 and reprinted 1998. "BLG" was published in 3 Vols, ...it is the 18th. edition, published between 1965 and 1969, and has superseded all the others being more up to date. I use Vol 2 for Hudleston, and also have Vols 1 and 3. I doubt if there will be any more as the publication has been "taken over" I also have a note from the IGI (not always reliable) of James Clifton, son of Thomas marr. Margaret Hudleston, daughter of Sir Richard of Millom Castle, but my reading is that James Clifton died in 1419. Margaret must be a dau. of Sir Richard (of Agincourt fame) and Katherine Harrington. "Clifton-cum-Salwick" is on the Fylde, Lancashire, near Preston, where the Hudlestons had influence and relations amongst the gentry of that area...just South of Millom. I have no other mention of a Margaret. (She may well have been married off again!) By now, I expect you will be completely confused! That is the problem with family history...so many sidelines to follow! Let me know if I can elucidate further. Annette Hudleston Harwood
To show how the Elford Branch of Huddlestons fit in we have to go back to Annette's Lines of English Hudlestons. #9 Sir John c. 1420-1493 married Mary Fenwick, daughter and co-heir of Sir Henry Fenwick (Nothumberland) and Joan Leigh of Isel (Cumberland) 6 sons and 3 daughters. Monument in Millom Church. #9 Sir John Huddleston in her work shows up as the first of the Sawston Branch (Cambridgeshire). Richard Huddleston, esq, son of Sir John Huddleston and Mary Fenwick, which for ease of clarification would be the first of the Elford Huddlestons with Lucy Huddleston as his daughter. Richard Huddleston, esq, the first of the Elford line is shown by Annette by: William Huddleston, third son of Sir John Huddleston of Millom and Mary Fenwick, married Lady Isabel Neville youngest daughter of Marquess Montague (killed at the battle of Barnet 1471) He lived most of his life, when not fighting in the Wars of the Roses, in Cumberland. He and Isabel had two sons: John born c.1488 d.1530 who eventually inherited Sawston, Cambs. and Richard born. c.1490. Returning to the Sawston Branch by Annette: 10 c. 3rd son William c. 1450 d. 1511 married 1482 Isabel Neville, 5th daughter of John Neville, Marquess Montague and Isabel Ingoldesthorpe. As you can see in the Sawston Branch, Richard Huddleston, esq. Lord of Elford doesn't show up there. He comes to be the first in the line of the Elford Huddlestons. Back to Annette's work: Sir William Smythe/Smith of Elford, by 1511, and other manors in Staffordshire. Isabel d. 1516 and is buried at Elford, Staffs. with her last husband. Richard (born c. 1490) married Margery Smythe, his stepsister, who inherited Elford, where apparently they had two daughters, Lucy (born 1540 IGI) who married John Brookes) and possibly Elizabeth who married Bowes. Also a son, Richard who was born at Elford c. 1514 (IGI). It is possible that Lucy was the daughter of this Richard, as there is too long a time gap between the dates. However, Richard (of Elford) married Isabel Williams daughter of John Lord Williams of Thame. Annette gives the connection between the father Richard Huddleston, esq of Elford and the son Richard Huddleston, esq. of Thame, here: Be that as it may, I found in the PCC Richard Huddleston Esq. of Thame Park, Oxon, the administration given to Henry Norris Kt. Lord, of Rycote Park, Oxon (near Thame) in 1590 and again 1598. I also found mention of Richard Huddleston "Her Maj, Treasurer of War" in 1586. He could and indeed probably is, the same as Richard Huddleston of Thame. Indenture between Richard Huddlestone esq., Margerie, his wife, and Walter Smyth, esq., and Dame Mary, his wife, being a covenant between the said parties concerning the exchange of the Manors of Elford and Oakley, co. Staff., with the manor of Sybertoft Sibbertoft co. Northampton, and the manor of Quarnden, co. Leic. Creation dates: 27 October 1530 Reference: MS 3878/67 Quitclaim from John Gemme of Whytynton Whittington, co. Staff., yeoman to Richard Huddylston, esq., Lord of Elforde Elford co. Staff. of a river meadow with appurtenances near the River Tame. Reference: MS 3878/69 © 2002 House of Commons Journal Volume 1 10 March 1576 (This would be nine years before Captain John Huddleston was born) Lady Weyneman, &c. Mr. Doctor Barcley and Mr. Powle do bring from the Lords the Bill touching the Confirmation of an Abitrament to be made between Richard Huddlestone Esquire, and Dame Izabell Weyneman his wife, on the One Part; and Francis Weyneman Gentlemen of the other Part; are sent up to the Lords by Mr. Secretary Smythe and others. (Three times before this Lady Weyneman's Bill was read and she shows up the 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 13 of March 1576) A Sir Rich. Weyneman is admitted to the commons one day and sent to the Tower later and so is a Sir Tho. Weyneman sent to the Tower. House of Commons Journal Volume 1 01 May 1621. -To carry him to the Fleete, and whip him.-And hopeth, upon Search of his papers, to find Matters to hang him.

The wars mentioned show up in the movie "Braveheart" and while the movie by some historians is shown to vary from the truth in some cases; Those places and wars were factual.] Record extracted from Oxfordshire Marriage Transcripts, 1538-1837, compiled by J. S. W. Gibson. (The index was based on the groom index, film numbers 54,396 to 54,397.) From a survey report we find Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Noua to be born in 1587 and from a deposition we get that he was from Ratcliffe, Middlesex; which is of London, England. Virginia Colonial Records Project Survey Report No. 3996 ff.75ro-75vo. 22 June 1620. Like evidence given by John Huddleston, sailor aged 33. Survey Report No. GL.5 References Crick and Alman Guide, pp.64-65. Vol.V No.65 Depositions in the Court of Common Pleas, 17 November 1621. the depositions are made by John Mennys, gent., of Sandwich, Kent; John Huddleston, gent., of Ratcliff, Middlesex, master of the Bona Nova; William Jackson of Ratcliff, gunner of the Bona Nova; John Ward of Ratcliffe, mariner; and George Hooper of Ratcliffe; mariner. The depositions state the deponents were in Virginia during the period January-June, and that they had learned of the death of Mr. William Tracy of Berkeley, Shirley Hundred, Virginia, apparently during or earlier than January. One deposition refers to a Captain Powell, who had married William Tracy's daughter.

The dates given for Ferdinando i.e. 1577-1645 are given in "Cumberland families and Heraldry" by C. Roy Huddleston, and R.S. Boumphrey and are correct (C. Roy Huddleston was a noted geneaologist and antquarian). On checking I note that Ferdinando's eldest son William was not born until 1603. However, I cannot help but think that he still is from either the Millom or Hutton John branches of the family. (There would be many cadet branches at that time and it tended to be younger sons of the gentry who would never inherit the U.K. family estates who got involved in early America.) The fact that he was fishing off the American coast would tie in with William Hilton who arrived at Plimoth in 1621 - he was a member of the Fishmongers Guild of London. Many north sea fishermen were fishing off Newfoundland by 1620. John Huddleston had a very good knowledge of navigation and fishing and would have needed a supply of salt to preserve his catches off the American Coast - the Hiltons had a monopoly on salt production in Elizabethan times. The fact that Edwin Sandys of the Virginia Company gave him the patent also suggests northern connections. (Edwin Sandys father was Archbishop of York). The Huddleston family intermarried with a number of Northumbrian families who were involved in early America including the Fenwicks - See; George Fenwick, the purchaser of Brinkburn, was entered at Gray's Inn in 1622, but embracing the tenets of the Puritan party, he went to North America in 1639, where his first wife died at Say‑brook,' and was buried in a field near the confluence of the Connecticut with Long Island Sound.' Returning to England in 1644, he was elected in the following year to represent the borough of Morpeth in the Long Parliament, and that of Berwick in the Parliaments elected 1654 and 1656. Having served with distinction, in the ‑ armies of the Commonwealth he was appointed governor of Berwick in 1649, and was a principal instrument in the rebuilding of the parish church in that town, where there is a monument, or cenotaph, to his memory.' He died March 15th 1656/7, at Worminghurst in \Vest Sussex, ‑,in estate lie had obtained with or through his first wife. Eric Lambert

The ship Fortune arrived at Plymouth on November 9, 1621, just a few weeks after the First Thanksgiving. The passenger list compiled by Charles Edward Banks in Planters of the Commonwealth, by material published occasionally by Robert S. Wakefield in the Mayflower Quarterly, and by the information found in Eugene Aubrey Stratton's Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691. In 1623, the Pilgrims divided up their land. The people mentioned in the Division of Land came on the Mayflower (1620), the Fortune (1621), and the Anne (1623). A couple may have arrived on the Swan (1622) or the Little James (1623), but these were small ships carrying mostly cargo. The Division of Land is recorded in Volume XII of the "Records of the Colony of New Plymouth", and reprinted in the "Mayflower Descendant", 1:227-230. Each family was given one acre per family member. The fales of their ground which came in the Fortune according as their lots were cast 1623. This ship came Novr 1621 these lye to the sea, eastward. William Hilton 1

DESCRIPTIONS OF THE FORTIFIED TOWN OF PLYMOUTH, 1620-1628
I - Platform for Ordnance built on the hill, 1620 December 28, 1620 - Edward Winslow and William Bradford Thursday, the 28th December, so many as could went to work on the hill where we purposed to build our platform for our ordnance, and which doth command all the plain and the bay, and from whence we may see far into the sea, and might be easier impaled, having two rows of houses and a fair street. "A Relation or Journal of the Proceedings of the Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England," attributed to Edward Winslow and William Bradford. In Dwight B. Heath (Ed.), Mourt's Relation (London 1622), (Bedford, Mass, Applewood, 1963), p. 42. Friday, January 16, 1621 [After a report that there were twelve Indians marching toward the plantation, and they saw a great fire which they made that night, and also had tools stolen in the woods by the Indians] This coming of the savages gave us occasion to keep more strict watch, and to make our pieces and furniture ready, which by the moisture and rain were out of temper. Ibid., p. 49 Saturday, January 17, 1621 After hearing "noise of a great many more [savages] behind the hill [over against our plantation], This caused us to plant our great ordnance in places most convenient. Ibid. Wednesday, February 21, 1621 . . . the master came on shore with many of his sailors, and brought with him one of the great pieces, called a minion [a cannon with 33 inch bore, firing 2 lb shot], and helped us to draw it up the hill, with another piece that lay on shore, and mounted them, and a saller [a misprint for saker, a cannon with 4 inch bore, firing a six pound shot], and two bases [small cannons with 13 inch bore, firing 2lb shot]. Ibid., p. 50 22 March 1621 Peace Treaty made with Massasoit, chief Sachem of the Wampanoag. Ibid., pp. 55-59

II-Town impaled, February-March 1622
In November 1621, the Fortune arrived with thirty-five new colonists, plus Robert Cushman who returned to England a month later. They found only fifty of the original passengers on the Mayflower had survived, so numbers in the colony now increased to eighty-five. Twenty-one of the remaining Mayflower passengers were men, and there were six young adult males, plus twenty-six men who came on the Fortune, effectively fifty-three men who could have been involved in building the palisade to fortify the town. Richard M. Candee, in his "A Documentary History of Plymouth Colony Architecture, 1620-1700," refers to a description in the Plymouth Town Records, MSS., vol. I, p. 146, in the office of the Plymouth Town Clerk, in which there is a description "later in the century" of a palisade such as the one built around the town in 1622. It "was made of sharpened pales 102 feet long, buried 22 feet in the ground, and backed two against a third, and set >against a post and a Raile" (Old-Time New England, vol. 59, no. 3, 1969, pp. 63 and note 23, p. 70). December 1621/January 1622?-William Bradford Soon after the ship's departure [the Fortune, which sailed from Plymouth on 13 December 1621, according to Captain John Smith in New Englands Trials (Barbour), vol. 1, p. 430], that great people of the Narragansetts, in a braving manner, sent a messenger unto them with a bundle of arrows tied about with a great snake skin, which their interpreters told them was a threatening and a challenge . . . But this made them the more carefully to look to themselves, so as they agreed to enclose their dwellings with a good strong pale, and make flankers in convenient places with gates to shut, which were every night locked, and a watch kept; and when need required, there was also warding in the daytime. And the company was by the Captain's and the Governor's advice divided into four squadrons, and everyone had their quarter appointed them unto which they were to repair upon any sudden alarm. And if there should be any cry of fire, a company were appointed for a guard, with muskets, whilst others quenched the same, to prevent Indian treachery. This was accomplished very cheerfully, and the town impaled round by the beginning of March, in which every family had a pretty garden plot secured. William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, Samuel Eliot Morison, (Ed.), (New York: Knopf, 1952), p. 97. February 1622-Edward Winslow [Marginal date] In the mean time, knowing our own weakness, notwithstanding our high words and lofty looks towards them, and still lying open to all casualty, having as yet (under God) no other defence than our arms, we thought it most needful to impale our town; which with all expedition we accomplished in the month of February, and some few days, taking in the top of the hill under which our town is seated; making four bulwarks or jetties without the ordinary circuit of the pale, from whence we could defend the whole town; in three whereof are gates, and the fourth in time to be. Edward Winslow, Good Newes from New England (London 1624). In Alexander Young, Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers of the Colony of Plymouth from 1602 to 1625 (Boston: Little and Brown, 1841), p. 284. February, 1622-Thomas Prince, based on William Bradford This [the threat from the Narragansett] makes us more carefully to look to ourselves, and agree to enclose our dwellings with strong pales, flankers, gates. February [1622]. We impale our town, taking in the top of the hill under which our town is seated, make four bulwarks or jetties, whence we can defend the whole town; in three whereof are gates, which are locked every night; a watch and ward kept in the day. The Governor and Captain divide the Company into four squadrons with commanders; every one his quarter assigned to repair to, in any alarm. And if there be a cry of "Fire!" a company is appointed for a guard, with muskets, while others quench it, to prevent treachery. Thomas Prince, A Chronological History of New-England, in the form of Annals (Boston, N.E., 1736) (Edinburgh, Private printing, 1887-88), vol. 3, p. 53. Beginning of March [1622] By this time our town is impaled; enclosing a garden for every family. Ibid., p. 55 March 1622 - Edward Winslow [Marginal date] Following a discussion as to whether or not it was the right time to send an expedition to trade with the Massachusetts [We] came to this conclusion; that as hitherto, upon all occasions between them and us, we had ever manifested undaunted courage and resolution, so it would not now stand with our safety to mew up ourselves in our new-enclosed town . . . Winslow, Good Newes., p. 286.

III - Building of the Fort, June 1622 - March 1623
1622 The deaths of 347 English settlers in Virginia on March 22, 1622, that took place during the uprising of the Powhattan under the leadership of Opechancanough, have been believed to be the reason for the building of the fort at Plymouth. It seems clear, though, that it was the threat of attack from the Narragansett and the Wampanoag which was the initial motivation for building the fort, strongly reinforced by the news from Jamestown. It is not clear as to when the letter from Captain John Huddleston, warning the Plymouth colonists of the massacre, was received. All we know is that it arrived "amidst these straits" (the arrival of Weston's sixty settlers at the end of July and early August 1622, and increasing famine), via a "boat which came from the eastward . . . from a stranger of whose name they had never heard before, being a captain of a ship come there a-fishing." Bradford then reprints the letter, from John Huddleston, whom Morison notes was master of the Bona Nova of 200 tons. Huddleston gave the Plymouth settlers warning of the massacre by Indians which had taken place in Virginia of 400 English. Winslow was sent to meet Huddleston with a letter of appreciation from the Governor, and to ask for any food supplies which he could spare, and Huddleston provided what he could. It was not a great deal, and was given out as daily rations, but it sustained them until harvest, giving the inhabitants a quarter of a pound of bread per day per person, supplemented by whatever else they could get. 1624 - Captain John Smith, In 1624, a description of Plymouth that includes references to its fortification was published by Captain John Smith. Although best known for his critical role in the development of the English colony at Jamestown, including his rescue by Pocahontas from execution at the hands of Chief Powhatan, John Smith was no stranger to New England. In fact, it was he who gave that name to the region. He first published the result of his 1614 explorations on land and coastal survey in his Description of New England (London, 1616). It includes a Map of New England which he had presented to Prince Charles, son of James I, "humbly entreating his Highnesse hee would please to change their barbarous names for such English, as posteritie might say Prince Charles was their God-father . . ." Among the twenty-nine places renamed was Accomack, which was given the new name of Plimoth by the Prince, later marked on the map as New Plimoth. The account that follows is from Smith's General History of Virginia, the Summer Isles and New England. At New-Plimoth there is about 180 persons, some cattle and goats, but many swine and poultry, 32 dwelling houses, whereof 7 were burnt the last winter, and the value of five hundred pounds in other goods. The town is impaled about half a mile in compass. In the town upon a high mount they have a fort well built with wood, loam and stone, where is planted their ordnance; also a fair watchtower, partly framed, for the sentinel. . . The Generall History of Virginia, the Somer Iles, and New England . . . In Philip L. Barbour (Ed.) The Complete Works of Captain John Smith (1580-1631) (Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina Press for The Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, 1986), vol. 2, p. 472.

ca. 1628 - Isaac de Rasieres to Samuel Blommaert
A fourth description of Plymouth in its early years comes to us from a letter written by Isaack de Rasieres, chief Trading Agent for the Dutch West India Company as well as Secretary to the Director-General of New Netherland, who visited Plymouth in 1627. His is the most detailed description of the four, and the part that refers to Plymouth's fortification is as follows: New Plymouth lies on the slope of a hill stretching east towards the sea-coast, with a broad street about a cannon shot of 800 feet long, leading down the hill; with a [street] crossing in the middle, northwards to the rivulet and southwards to the land.[1] The houses are constructed of clapboards, with gardens also enclosed behind and at the sides with clapboards, so that their houses and courtyards are arranged in very good order, with a stockade against sudden attack; and at the ends of the streets there are three wooden gates. In the center, on the cross street, stands the Governor's house [Bradford], before which is a square stockade upon which four patereros are mounted, so as to enfilade the streets. Upon the hill they have a large square house with a flat roof, built of thick sawn planks stayed with oak beams, upon the top of which they have six cannon, which shoot iron balls of four and five pounds, and command the surrounding country. The lower part they use for their church, where they preach on Sundays and the usual holidays. . . Three Visitors, pp. 75-76 This fort stood until 1634, when in March a building contract was drawn up with Thomas Boardman for the construction of a new fort, to be completed by the end of May 1635. See The Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer (William White, 1855-61; AMS Press, 1968), vol. 1, pp. 33-34. In the text published in Three Visitors to Early Plymouth, there is a footnote, #29, inserted at this point. It reads: "He reverses the actual bearings; and the street first mentioned was longer, 1,150 feet. [J.F.J.]" J.F.J. are the initials of J.F. Jameson, editor of Narratives of New Netherland, 1609-1664 in which de Rasieres' letter to Samuel Blommaert was first published in 1909

GREY, Sheild on four poster bed from Millom Castle, dated 1642 and with intitials FH, now at Hutton John; Ferdinando Hudleston, of Millom, M.P. for Cumberland 1624, marr. Jane, dau. of Sir Ralph Grey, of Chillingham (n). ARms. Gules a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed Argent. Text from Cumberland Families and Heraldry. Jeff Wilde

In the first entry we have Queen Jane Grey and in the second entry we have Jane Grey Huddleston Catalogue Ref. DW1778, D564, D742, D761, D853, D1501, D3074, D3629 Creator(s): Legge family of Sandwell and Patshull, Earls of Dartmouth PAPERS OF THE LEGGE FAMILY, EARLS OF DARTMOUTH Political, personal and estate papers PERSONAL Miscellanea FILE [no title]-ref. DW1778/V/1123-date: (1553) \_ [from Scope and Content] Copy letter from Lady Jane Grey to her sister Catherine the night before her execution. Records of the Shirley family, Earls Ferrers of Staunton Harold, Leicestershire. Catalogue Ref. 26D53 Creator(s): Shirley family, of Staunton Harold, Leicestershire, Earls Ferrers [Access Conditions] No restrictions MAIN FERRERS ESTATES. Northants. - Various parishes, including Helmdon, Little and Great Oakley, Radstone, Silverstone and others. FILE [no title]-ref. 26D53/918-date: 20 Feb. 1581/2 \_ [from Scope and Content] 1. Thomas Thorne of Yardley Hastings and Richard Puresty of Faxton shall bring a common recovery versus Thomas Lovett, William and Jane Grey and George Shirley and obtain possession of Strixton manor and all lands, messuages, etc., belonging to Lovett or conveyed by him to John Shirley and the said Jane in Strixton and Grendon. \_ [from Scope and Content] 2. This is to be held in trust for Lovett for life, then for Jane, and then to Paul Streyteley and his heirs; the fee farm after the death of Thomas Lovett and Jane Grey being paid to George Shirley. \_ [from Scope and Content] 3. If Paul Streyteley shall, after the decease of Thomas Lovett and Jane Grey, pay yearly to George Shirley and his heirs a rent of £13 6s 8d according to a previous indenture, then all rents due to George Shirley shall not be payable to him. Records of the Court of Star Chamber and of other courts Public Record Office Online Catalogue STAC 8/216/4 Mellyns v. Grey, Gardner, Hudlestone, Salmon and others: Oxon. 04/03/1603-27/03/1625 DELAVAL (HORSLEY) of From the A2A: SEATON DELAVAL DEEDS Hartley FILE-Power of Attorney-ref. 1DE/1/27-date: 30 April 1600 \_ [from Scope and Content] From George Ruthall gent, to Robert Burgoyne of Wroxhall esq., John Burgoyne of Rowington, gent and Hugh Ramshaw of Wroxhall, yeo, concerning bonds between George, Robert and Ralph Delaval and Ralph Grey of Chillingham esq. FAMILY SETTLEMENTS FILE-Bond in 200 marks of Thomas Grey of Chillingham knt, and Ralph Grey of Horton, gent, to Robert Delaval esq., to pay 100 marks dowry to Dorothy Grey on marriage to Robert Delaval (under will of late Thomas Grey of Horton)- ref. 1DE/4/11-date: 24 January 1571/2 FILE-Draft settlement between Robert Delaval esq., Ralph Delaval, son and heir of Robert, Ralph Grey of Chillingham, Edward Grey of Morpeth, Talbot Bowes of Richmond, Yorks, and George Bowes of Co. Durham esqs, on the marriage of Ralph Delaval and Jayne Hilton, for lands as specified-ref. 1DE/4/16-date: 18 June 1599 House of Common Journals 1: 24 May 1614 gives this: That, there being there, he called for Sir Geo. Selby; and called only those by name, which he knew to be for Sir Geor. Selby, not taking Notice of any for Sir Ralphe Grey; Not having 24, caused the clock to be set back...Sir Edw. Sands:-That the Country may be wronged, in not having the Party elected, though Sir R. Grey be-

E 134/29Eliz/East23 Garrett Wallys v. Ralph Grey, Robt. Kelfull, Ralph Boyce, Wm. Ward, John Boyce, Wm. Harwood, and other inhabitants of the town of Wittlesey.: Manors and rectory of Whittlesey St. Mary, and Whittlesey St. Andrew. Right of common in the "pingle." Customs of manor. 29 Eliz 1587 E 134/2Geo1/Mich14 John Johnson, Thos. Rotherford, Wm. Atkinson, Wm. Johnson. v. Robt. Lawson, John Hall, Ralph Grey, Edwd. Hall, Ralph Taylor.: Defendants' lands in Cramlington (Northumberland). Touching the usage or method of tything corn or grain, &c., &c.: Newcastle-upon-Tyne; Northumberland. 2 Geo 1 E 210/465 Release by Philip Botelere, esquire, Ralph Grey, Edmund Bardolf, and Thomas Cook, to John Fray, chief baron of the king's Exchequer, of all their right in the manor of Great Munden, with the advowsons of the priory of Rowney and of the church of Great Munden, and in all others lands &c. Bunttyngford, vigil of St. James the apostle, 25 Henry VI. E 321/40/16 John Grey v. Ralph Grey Answer: disputed lease and coal pits [at Butterlaw, Northumb, Cf. (25)]. E 321/40/25 John Grey v. Ralph Grey Replication: lease of the coalpits of Butterlaw (Bytterlaw), [Northumb], from the earl of Northumberland. [Cf. (16)]. E 326/562 Demise by Thomas Hoddesdon, of Ware, and Walter Fader of Amwell, to John Say and Elizabeth his wife, Laurence Cheyne, John Leventhorp, John cheyne, and Ralph Grey, of land in westfeld in the parish of Brokesborne (Broxbourne). Herts. 20 June, 35 Henry VI E 326/2176 Release by Thomas Bawd, of the county of Hertford, esquire, John Leventhorpe, Ralph Grey and others, to William Moyle, John Bekyngham, Ralph Hogman. and William Townland, of land in the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate, in the ward of Faryngdon Without. 28 February, 23 Henry VI. E 326/2177 Demise by Thomas Bawd of the county of Hertford, esquire, John Leventhorp, Ralph Grey and others, to William Moyle, John Bekyngham, Ralph Hogman, and William Townland, of land in the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate, in the ward of Faryngdon Without. 31 January, 23 Henry VI.
This is not the Lady Jane Grey who was Queen for 9 days and beheaded at an earlier date in time but she was kin to that Lady Jane Grey. It is at this point we can cross reference from the House of Commons Journals. House of Commons Journal Volume 1 03 November 1533 pages 31 and 32 covering also 27 November 1533. 1. The Bill for writings made in the Time of the ursurping late Queen Jane, called Jane Grey. Concerning Lord Grey, much mention of Middlesex and Thames is made in the Journals. Lord Grey is shown is conjuction with Lietenant Colonel Ferrer. Mariners and watermen of Thames is mentioned in 1566. We find mention of Sir Ralph Grey mentioned on the same page as Sir Edward Sandys. page 495 House of Commons 24 May 1614 I believe Richard Huddleston of Thames is another son and an older brother to Ferdinand Huddleston. Ferndinand Huddleston has son Colonel William Huddleston who served in the Civil War. And Colonel William Huddleston has a son Ferdinand Huddleston. Both the last two show up in reference in the House of Commons but at later dates. Reference to Richard Huddleston who was married to Lady Izabel Weyneman shows up in House of Commons Journal 1 10 March 1576 on page 113. Lady Weyneman, &c. Mr. Doctor Barcley and Mr. Powle do bring from the Lords the Bill touching the Confirmation of an Abitrament to be made between Richard Huddlestone Esquire, and Dame Izabell Weynerman his wife, on the One Part; and Francis Weyneman Gentleman of the other Part, &c. The Bill for taking the Benefit of Clergy from Persons convict of Rape and Burglary; and the Bill for Redress of Murders and Felonies in the Counties of Northumberland and Cumberland is also is decided with mention of Richard Huddleston and Lady Izabell Weyneman. 3 times it shows Lady Izabell Weyneman attempt to get the Lords to decide in her case on the 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 13 of March 1576. STAC 8/216/4 Mellyns v. Grey, Gardner, Hudlestone, Salmon and others: Oxon. 04/03/1603-7/03/1625 Public Record Office Online Catalogue AO 1/292/1096 Roll 1096 R. Huddlestone (per administrator), Treasurer at War of the Forces in the Low Countries. 2 Aug. 1585-1 Feb. 1586/7 AO 1/292/1097 Roll 1097 R. Huddlestone (per administrator), Treasurer at War of the Forces in the Low Countries. 11 Aug. 1585-1 June 1586 Public Record Office Online Catalogue SP 46/34/fo 277 Henry, lord Norreys to Myldmay: Place conveyed his interest in Buck prebend to Richard Huddleston, whose estate Norreys has, but Place keeps the house. Will put in his bill if lord Henry Seymour will answer him; 29 Nov. 1587. For purposes of cultural history the Low Countries may be understood as lying west of a line between Emden and Sponheim (on the Rhine) and north of a line from Trier to Boulogne: Jozef IJsewijn, “The Coming of Humanism to the Low Countries,” in Heiko A. Oberman and Thomas A. Brady, eds., Itinerarium Italicum, Studies in Medieval and Reformation Thought, vol. 15 (Leiden: Brill, 1975), pp. 193–304, here p. 193.

Hi Roy, from the "Original" Washington, England Firstly let me congratulate you on the amount of research you have done on John Huddleston. From an English perspective, there is a lot of circumstantial evidence to suggest that John Huddleston of the Bona Nova was the second son of Ferdinando Hudleston (1577-1645) of Millom Castle, Knight of the Shire of Cumberland 1623-24. Ferdinando's Hudleston's son, Sir William Hudleston (knighted for his good services and his great personal bravery at the battle of Edgehill, where he retook the Royal Standard, he was made a knight banneret by Charles I on the field) married Bridget, daughter of Joseph Pennington of Muncaster Castle, who was the brother of John Pennington of Muncaster Castle who was listed by John Smith as one of the passengers of the first expedition to Jamestown in 1607; Penington, John Gentleman (Pennington, Robert - died *) Percie, Mr. George Gentleman (Brother of the Earl of Northumberland) John Huddleston, is thought to have fought alongside his brothers; William (who inherited the estates), Ferdinando, Richard, Ralph, Ingleby, Edward, Robert and Joseph, all of whom were officers in the Service of Charles I during the Civil War. Muncaster Castle is approx 20 miles up the coast of Cumbria (was Westmoreland) from Millom Castle. See; www.Muncaster.co.uk Regards, Eric For more information, contact; AncestryUK Family Heritage International PO Box 90, The "Original" Washington, ENGLAND, NE38 OYP E. Mail; Webmaster@www.AncestryUK.com Web Site; http://www.AncestryUK.com
The above information of course raises the issue of Ferdinand Huddleston's birthdate <1577> and Captain John Huddleston's birthdate <1587>. I believe Annette comes to our rescue again. Annette Hudleston Harwood lists 14. Ferdinand Huddleston 1577-d. pre. 1646 married c. 1601 Jane Grey, daughter of Sir Ralph Grey of Chillingham 9 sons 4 daughters. Records of the Court of Star Chamber and of other courts Public Record Office Online Catalogue STAC 8/216/4 Mellyns v. Grey, Gardner, Hudlestone, Salmon and others: Oxon. 04/03/1603-27/03/1625. If Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova is the brother of Colonel William Huddleston then he would have to be the older brother since Colonel William Huddleston is shown to be born in 1603. Die Sabbati, Octobris 26, 1644. Huddleston's, &c. Pass. Ordered, That Colonel Wm. Huddleston, Mrs. Bridget Huddleston his Wife, Mrs. Isabell Huddleston his Daughter, Mary Daften, her Maid, John Huddleston, Christopher Daften, George Dodgson, John Wright, Matthew Makarell, the Colonel's Servants, Francis Horner the Drummer that came with Dr. Bastwick, shall have Mr. Speaker's Pass to go the direct Way into Cumberland; provided they go to no beleaguered Garison: And that they carry with them nothing prejudicial to the State.
The above paragraph could be referring to Captain John Huddleston of the Bona Nova who had lands in Nevis Island in 1642 being back in London, England in 1644 on his way to Millom Castle. Captain John Huddleston would be 67 years old at this time.
There is a great deal of material here about the Hudleston family among the papers of my late colleague C. Roy Hudleston, although it particularly concentrates on his own branch of the family, the Hudlestons (with one d) of Millom and then Hutton John near Penrith, Cumbria. Material about this family is also deposited in the Cumbria Record Office. The pedigree of this branch can be traced in some detail through Burke's 'Landed Gentry'. The Hudleston papers are not yet fully sorted and catalogued. Margaret S. McCollum : Assistant Keeper : Archives & Special Collections : Durham University Library. With Eric's information, We find more on Ferdinando Huddleston who was the father of Colonel William Huddleston. House of Commons Journal 1 19 May 1624 Recusants, Mr. Ferdinando Huddleston (being no Justice of Peace in Comberland) to be spared. House of Commons Journal 1 28 May 1624 Member to serve, tho' outlawed. For Ferdinando Huddleston, Knight for Cumberland; resolved, he may serve, notwithstanding he be outlawed [a].-This also now resolved, upon Question.-

.The original Captain John Huddleston born 1587 in Ratcliffe, England that sails to Virgina and settles in Poquoson, Virginia.

Isle of Man
Ewan Huddleston, sonn to Capt: Willm Huddleston, (and Waterbalife of this Isle), and Elizabeth, bapt. October 9th http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/manxnb/v06p072.htm Nor is this all. Joan Stapleton, one of the descendants of Sir Miles, brother of Sir Brian Stapleton, married Sir John Huddleston, sheriff of Cumberland, in 1451. Her direct descendants married and inter-married with Flemings, Senhouses and the Christians of Ewanrigg and of Milntown in Man. There was a Thomas Huddleston in Man in 1587. A William Huddleston of Ballahott was father of Captain Thomas Huddleston, Water Bailiff in 1700. And, curiously, this property of Ballahott was occupied by a William Fyne in 1760. http://www.isle-of man.com/manxnotebook/iomnhas/v044p527.htm
There was another link between the Stapletons and Man, which, however, runs in later than this. Joan Stapleton, wife of Sir John Huddleston, is said to have been widow of Christopher Harcourt, son of her stepfather. One of his Harcourt ancestors had married a daughter of Sir John Bek of Eresby, brother of Bishop Anthony Bek, who once bore rule in Man. http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/parishes/ca/casltwn.htm " To the Commissioners appointed to manage my Revenue in the Isle of Man. " This is to authorise appoint you to pay unto the Right Revd Father in God Thomas Lord Bishop of Sodor and Man, to Samuel Watleworth one of the Vicar Generals of the said Island ,to Richard Stephenson and Thomas Huddleston Gentlemen, all and every the rents Issues and profits of what kind soever belonging to the Bishoprick of the aforesaid Island due and payable in the vacancy of the said Bishoprick for one whole year ending at Lady day 1697 to be disbursed and laid out by them the said Bishop, Vicar General, Richard Stephenson and Thos. Huddleston in the building and erecting of a new Chappell in Castletown in the said Island and the acquittance of the said Bishop, Vicar Generall, Richard Stevenson and Thor. Huddleston shall be unto you a sufficient discharge herein. Given under my hand at Knowsley the fourteenth day of February Anno Domini 1697. DERBY." Huddleston, Thomas 1612, 1647 Huddleston, Thomas 1663, 1673 Huddleston, Thomas 1685, 1696 Huddleston, Thomas 1735, 1737 http://www.tynwald.org.im/keys/1417-alphabetical.shtml

From Virginia Colonial Records 13 May 1628 Captain John Huddleston master of the Thomas & John, from Virginia Edmond Morgan & Co. imported 2400 pounds(survey report 3973 also imported 15th [The document has been edited and reproduced in full by Neville Williams in "The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography LXV Nc. 4 (Oct. 1957)located in page 5 of the Magazine.(Patricke Kennady loaded some tobacco on the boat), 16th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 24th, 26th, 27th, 30th, June 7th(same year-all preceeding dates), July 9th, August 1st, August 11th(other import by various people other than Edmond Morgan & Co. during this time.]

Next, his son William Huddleston of Jamestown, Virginia servant to Mr. Canhow in 1640. From later records I believe him to be born in 1628 to 1632 depending on how old he was in the December 11, 1640 court order. I base this on having to be 12 years old to be a servant. So far, I haven't been able to come up with any information of a wife for him.

I believe he has a son named William who shows up in land deeds in Accomac County, Virginia in 1666 with wife Ann but do not know her last name. She shows up in records in 1668 and I believe her to be the Mrs. Huddleston in Series 'B' in York County in 1670. Captain John Huddleston's other son I believe to be John Huddleston Jr, of Henrico County, Virginia is born in 1635 and dies in 1691 of the same place [Virginia Historical Index In Two Volumes by E.G. Swem, Librarian of the College of William and Mary copyright 1934 and 1962 Reprinted, 1965, by permission of Virginia Historical Society page 967 Huddlesee, John~John Huddleston born about 1635 Henrico County death 1691-Henrico County, Pin #146928 Fulton BROCK 1425 N. Woodside Rd Chandler AZ John Huddleston (Jr) Birth: 1635/39 Place: Henrico Co,VA Death: 1691 Place: Henrico Co, VA. Virginia: Beginnings of Its Families: Part I William Clayton Torrence William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Oct., 1915), pp. 116-142. HENRICO COUNTY, VIRGINIA: BEGINNINGS OF ITS FAMILIES. Part 1 Page 133. Jno Huddlesee 2 ]. Then, his son John has,

Thomas Huddleston is born in 1649 of the same place and dies in the same place in 1726 [Virginia Wills and Administrations, 1632-1800 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. copyright Baltimore 1977 Originally Published The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America Richmond, 1930 Compiled by Clayton Torrence page 219 Huddlesey Henrico Thos. 1726].

Thomas Huddleston II, is born in 1675 of the same place and dies in the same place in 1748 [International Genealogical Index-North America Thomas Huddleston-International Genealogical Index / NA Gender: Male Birth: <1675>(FamilySearch Film Number 1761138) , Henrico, Virginia . Page 209. Thomas Huddleston born about 1675 Henrico County, Virginia death 1748; Virginia Wills and Administrations, 1632-1800 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. copyright Baltimore 1977 Originally Published The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America Richmond, 1930 Compiled by Clayton Torrence. From information gleaned from the Huddlesy file we know he had a brother named Charles and a sister named Sarah living in Henrico, Virginia.

I believe William Huddleston, servant in Jamestown which is later to be known as James City, County moves to Accomack County and marries to have son William, jr. William Huddleston, jr moves to York County, Virginia where he meets his wife Ann in York County and they move to Spottsylvania Parish where Robert Huddleston is born before 1690 later settles in Saint George's Parish, Spotsylvania County, Virginia. A Henry Charlton is shown on land records in 1644 mentioned in Accomac County, Virginia. I have always felt that John Huddleston who married Elizabeth Charlton was close kin to Robert Huddleston of Spotsylvania County, Virginia. The LDS shows John Huddleston born 1693 to be from England. Elizabeth Charlton and John Huddleston show up in North Carolina: Early Names, Boundaries, and Religion Nansemond County, VA & Bertie Co, NC Contributed by John Collins. May 2000 Bath County was formed in 1696 and, four years later, the Rev. Thomas Bray shipped books from England to St Thomas Parish with the Reverend Daniel Brett for the first public library in the colony. The parish also established a free school for Indians and blacks. In 1705 Beaufort, Craven, and Hyde precincts were established in Bath County. In 1705 Bath became the first town created in the colony. Construction of St. Thomas Church, oldest existing church in the state, began in 1734. Ye Countie of Albemarle in Carolina edited by William S Powell, State Department of Archives & History, 1958. John Huddleston shows up here: Title: Colonial Families of the Southern States of America, Author: Stella Pickett Hardy Publication: Revised Edition, 1958 Page: 297)] also shows up. This John Huddleston born 1693 who has descendants Daniel who marries Sallie Easly of Series "E" and later Benjamin Huddleston (This Benjamin is shown to be born in 1729 and shows up in a microfilm file 1553829 and is my best case that Robert Huddleston born 1690/94 and John Huddleston born 1693 were brothers because when you try differentiate the later descendants of the two brothers you will find the information gets mixed up. In pedigree files you will find Benjamin is part of Robert Huddleston and John Huddleston's lineage. You will also find the Huddleston and Holland familes in the later descendancies. ) He marries Elizabeth Pankey 23 Sep 1762 Cumberland (see in references below) and has a daughter Elizabeth married to Armistead Herring in 27 Jun 1791 Halifax (see in references below)should be the start of Series "M" and later "Q" concerning Joseph Slaton of the "Huddleston Family Tables".

For years we have searched for John Huddleston of 1693 to born in England but knew he lived in Henrico County. Benjamin shows up in Henrico, Goochland and Norfolk counties as mentioned like John Huddleston of 1693 but with Benjamin we have definate proof.] Page 174 Sept. 6, 1746. William Williams of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co. and Elizabeth, his wife, to John Williams of same Par. and County. L35 curr. 100 a. in St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., part of a tract taken up by Nicholas Lankford, and by him sold to John Coller sold to Robert Stubblefield and Ralph Williams, by Deeds, in Spts. Co. Court, and afterwards acknowledged to Wm. Williams, etc. Witnesses, Robt. Huddleston, Danl. x Pruit, John Huddleston. Nov 4, 1746.
http://www.griggfamily.net/cam/brunswickcova/varecords/Rainey.htm 20 Dec 1745. Will. Eliza Raney dau of Thomas Huddleston (Will). From a general listing of Virginia Record. RT 1989, p.112.

Alex Haley's award winning novel, Roots, cast his African ancestor, Kunta Kinte, as a slave of a Spotsylvania family. John Huddleston born 1715 (microfilche number 1553275), reportedly born in England, who was the son of John Huddleston born 1693; makes his first appearance on the scene with his marriage to Sarah Brown in 1734. John Huddlestone and Mary Brown has a marriage which shows with a license 24 DEC 1721 Film Number: 447964. John Huddlestone Birth: About 1696 Of Warton, Lancashire, England Endowments for the dead, 1884-1970; heir indexes, 1884-1961; baptisms for the dead, 1943-1970 Manuscript (On Film) Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1958-1971 on 475 microfilm reels ; 35 and 16 mm. I believe this to be the parents of Thomas Huddleston born 1736 who marries first Usille Moore and then Milly Tanner. I base this on LDS information giving Thomas' birth to be about 1730 when he married Usille Moore and about 1736 when he married Milly Tanner. According to Diane Marie Bailey's research John Huddleston was born in England In 1715 and died in 1785 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. Thomas Huddleston married Usille Moore in Lunenburg County, Virginia 02 Dec 1758. Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 Deed Book D 1742-1751 Page 174 Sept. 6, 1746. William Williams of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co. and Elizabeth, his wife, to John Williams of same Par. and County. L35 curr. 100 a. in St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., part of a tract taken up by Nicholas Lankford, and by him sold to John Coller sold to Robert Stubblefield and Ralph Williams, by Deeds, in Spts. Co. Court, and afterwards acknowledged to Wm. Williams, etc. Witnesses, Robt. Huddleston, Danl. x Pruit, John Huddleston. Nov 4, 1746. I believe that Roxanna Warren More is somehow kin to Usille Moore. Will Book B 1749-1759 page 10 Warren, Thomas, Planter, Spotsylvania Co., d. Apr. 13, 1749, p. Dec. 4, 1750. Wit. Robert Huddlestone, Abram Rogers, Barbara Rogers, Ex. wife, Mary and son, Hackley Warren. Leg. son, Hackley Warren, 95 acres of land which I formerly gave to my daughter Rachel Hasken. Daughter, Elizabeth Brook; daughter Mary Buford; daughter Roxanna More; son, Lancelot Warren. To my wife, mary Warren, all the rest of my estate during her life. This John Huddleston born 1715 is the uncle of Benjamin Huddleston who marries Elizabeth Pankey. Benjamin Huddleston's parents were Daniel Huddleston and Mary Ball. Peggy Pleasants was born in 1713 (according to FamilySearch)and marries in 1734 in Henrico County, Virginia to a John Huddleston. She was the daughter of John Pleasants and her real name was Margaret.

From Accomac County to Spotsylvania County
Thomas Hansford: The First Native Martyr to American Liberty In a list prepared by Sir William Berkeley, and preserved among the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum, enumerating the persons who were executed by him in the seventeenth century for participating in Bacon's Rebellion, occurs the name of one Thomas Hansford, who is described by Sir William as "a valiant, stout man," and "a most resolved rebel."1 The few other references to Hansford in the current accounts2 of the times are in harmony with this description, and justify a natural desire to be still further acquainted with him. Thus are we told that he commanded at Jamestown, under a commission as major from Nathaniel Bacon, Jr., and was there when Berkeley returned from his exile to the Eastern Shore at the head of six hundred, or, as another account has it, one thousand followers It is said that he took a conspicuous part in the insurrection, brilliant as it was brief, and when he was captured after Bacon's death, he supplicated no other favor than that "he might be shot like a soldier, and not hanged like a dog." We are also told that during the short respite allowed him after his sentence, " he professed repentance and contrition for all the sins of his past life, but refused to acknowledge what was charged against him as rebellion to be one of those sins, desiring the people present to take notice that he died a loyal subject and lover of his country, and that he had never taken up arms but for the destruction of the Indians, who had murdered so many Christians.''

St. George Tucker, my revered father, trusting to the statement found in one of the quaint old tracts rescued from oblivion by the indefatigable antiquarian, Peter Force, which ascribes his arrest to the fact that "although a son of Mars, he did some times worship at the shrine of Venus," made Thomas Hansford the hero of a romance3 in which the gentle Virginia Temple was the innocent cause of his undoing.

When I recite the personal history of Hansford, and disclose the fact that he was a married man, it will probably occasion some surprise that he should have been represented as an ardent suitor at the time of his execution, but the truth is that until recent date there was very little reality surrounding Hansford's career. Nor was he an exception among the characters of the period in which he figured. How few and scant are the published facts concerning another of Bacon's officers, Major Edmund Chisman, and his noble wife, who took upon herself the entire blame of his sedition ; or of Major Thomas Whaley and "thoughtful Mr. Lawrence," who when the cause was abandoned plunged into the snows of the unknown backwoods and were lost to the knowledge of their fellow men. The old published chroniclers tell us very little of Bacon himself, and yet, thanks to recent investigations in the county records and the British archives, the material is now abundant for a lull account.

In the same manner careful research has added many new facts to the current account of Thomas Hansford and the only merit of this paper is that it will attempt to present these facts in a connected narrative. In 1651, Richard Hansford was granted a patent for lands at West's creek, in York county, and among the head rights were John and Elizabeth Hansford. In 1658, Mr, John Hansford entered land in the same locality; and in 1662, Thomas Hansford obtained a re-grant for the same. In 1653, John Hansford obtained a grant for 950 acres in Gloucester county, north of the narrows of Mattaponi, and among the head rights were John and Elizabeth Hansford. The probability is that Richard Hansford was a brother of John Hansford, who was the father of Thomas, mentioned as taking out the patent in 1662 for John Hansford's land on West's creek.4

John Hansford might have been a son of the merchant tailor of London of the same name mentioned by Mr. Alexander Brown in his " Genesis," as entered in a list of the Virginia Company in 1620, and who was probably brother of Sir Humphrey Hanford, Handford, or Hanforth, as the-name is variously written. There is no question, however, that the John Hansford of the patents and the John Hansford who was father of the Hansford of history, were one and the same person. He lived on the same creek and in the same county, and was for many years active in the affairs of York county,5 and in 1655 occupied a seat on the Justices' Bench. His will was proved November 24, 1661, and judging from the number of servants and the amount of silver plate, and other property mentioned in his inventory, recorded June 24, 1668, he was a man of both wealth and position. According to his will he left four sons-John and William, to whom he devised a plantation in Glqucester county, upon the "Clay bank" on the north side of York river, and Thomas and Charles, to whom he left 650 acres at the head of Felgate's creek, in York county. He had also three daughters-Elizabeth, who married first Mr. Christian Wilson and afterwards Mr. Randolph Holt,6 of Surry county; Mary, who married Dr. Thomas Robins, of Robins' Neck, in Gloucester county, and whose family history is given by Mr. Stanard in the "Richmond Critic" for August, 1889; and Margaret, who is supposed to have been dead before October, 1667. By the will of Mr. Hansford we are shown another important fact, which is that one Robert Jones was the instructor of his children; and it is not a little remarkable that a man of that name is mentioned by Hening as among those executed with Thomas Hansford for rebellious proceedings.7

Thomas Hansford, the third son of Mr. John Hansford, was born about 1646, as I infer from his deposition, dated January 9, 167/'2, which states that he was then twenty-five years old. He came into possession of his property, both real and personal, November 12, 1667, and the order states that "he was then of age." After his father's death he was under the guardianship of Mr. Edward Lockey, a rich merchant of Virginia, largely interested in the tobacco trade, who had married Mrs. Hansford, the mother of Thomas, on October 10, 1661. Both were dead before the disturbances under Bacon arose. Mr. Lockey died before February 24, 1667, and Mrs. Lockey before January 24, 1675/6, these being the respective dates of the recording of the wills.8

Notwithstanding the testimony of Romance, which represents Thomas Hansford as a single man at the time of his execution, we find the court, on April Jo, 1667, entering an order against Mr. John Roberts, guardian of Mistress Elizabeth Jones, daughter of Richard Jones,9 deceased, to deliver his ward's estate in kind to Thomas Hansford as intermarrying with the said Elizabeth." This Elizabeth had two brothers, Gabriel10 and Richard, but they soon died without issue and she became sole heiress of her father's property, thus bringing a considerable fortune to her husband. Hansford's marriage occurred nine years before Bacon's Rebellion, and his family at that time was of considerable figure, consisting of a wife and five children.

During these nine years we catch an occasional glimpse of him in the courts. A deposition, in June, 1668, declares that passing by the cow-pen he tauntingly bid "Ann Huddlestone's Dame" to go and rob the onion patch again. "Can you prove your words?" she indignantly said. " Yes," was the reply. He was sued for defamation of character. After the same manner, he accused Dr. William Townsend of purloining from Squire Digges's old field a foal which he himself had branded for Digges. In another suit he won 200 pounds of tobacco from Abraham Ray for damages done his (Hansford's) horse. And Thomas Reade, his servant, who ran away, was required by the court to make equivalent service for the cost and trouble of his capture.

The uprising of the people at the call of Nathaniel Bacon, Jr., summoned Hansford to more serious controversies ; but here, I regret to say, we cannot add much to what is already familiarly known. We are aware that many of the leading gentry adhered to Governor Berkeley, but not all, as in York county both Thomas Hansford and Major Edmund Chisman were trusted officers of Bacon, who was himself of the ancient house of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam. Certain, it is, that both sides plundered and pillaged private estates, and a guerrilla warfare prevailed through all the colony. Hansford, according to Robert Beverley,11 was commander-in-chief of four counties and president of the Court of Sequestrations. Probably it was while engaged one day in looking up the sequestered estate of a Royalist that he met up with the gallant Captain William Digges, eldest son of Colonel Edward Diggs, of Beilfield, in York county, and in a single handed fight with him was so unfortunate as to lose one of his fingers. Digges forced him to fly, but the tables were turned shortly after, and Digges had himself to flee to Maryland for safety. The writer of the MS.12 from which this fact is gleaned adds that "for her son's loyalty his mother (Mrs. Elizabeth Digges) suffered considerably in her estate.''

I do not propose to give a history of the Rebellion. Just at the time when Virginia acknowledged no other authority than Bacon's, he was taken ill and died, and thus the cause which he represented feceived a fatal blow. Berkeley re-established his authority as rapidly as he had lost it. Some of the lieutenants of Bacon were hanged, others died in prison, and others left the colony. Hansford was one of those who suffered the first-mentioned fate, and is said to have been the first native Virginian that perished in that ignominious form, and the first martyr that fell in defending the rights of the people. His execution took place in Accomac.13

From June, 1676, the beginning of the conflict, to March, 1676/7 when the end had came, there appears to have been no court held in York county, as far as the records testify. Bacon had compelled the justices, in the celebrated meeting at the Middle Plantation, to administer to the people the oath of allegiance to his cause; and in a letter dated February 17, 1676/7 they now besought the Governor to "indemnify" them by name for obeying the mandate, and to indicate "who should be justices for York county."

The Governor, on March 23d, immediately re-appointed all except John Scarsbrooke, whose case was reserved for the decision of the Council on account of suspicions, connecting him with the rebellion. And on March 31st, he further ordered that the sessions of the county court should be held "in the house lately belonging to Thomas Hansford, whose estate for his rebel. lion and treason is forfeited to his sacred Majesty."14 So said Governor Berkeley, but it appears, however, that the property of Thomas Hansford was not confiscated. In spite of a formal petition (addressed to the commissioners sent over from England to enquire into the late disturbances) by the justices of York county, John Page, John Scarsbrooke (lately restored), James Vaulx, Otho Thorpe and Isaac Clopton, that the property of Hansford should be seized for a courthouse, the want of which in the county had annually imposed a heavy burden in the way of rent upon the people, the commissioners, with a humanity which did them credit, reported to the king in favor of bestowing the property of Hansford and "those other wretched" men lately associated with him upon "their poor wives and children."15 And this was doubtless the explanation why, on November 13, 1678, "a commission of administration on the estate of Mr. Thomas Hansford was granted to Mr. Charles Hansford and Mr. David Condon in behalf of ye decedent's children, &c." Previous to this the same parties had qualified on the estate of Mrs. Thomas Hansford, who within a year had followed her martyred husband to the grave.

An agreement, dated February 26, 1677-'78, was made between the administrators and the justices representing the county, by which the house "lately belonging to Mrs. Hansford" was leased to the county for one thousand pounds of tobacco per annum-an arrangement which continued until January 20, 1679-'80, when the place of adjournment was changed to the "French Ordinary," not far distant on the York road, half way between Williamsburg and Yorktown.

Of the children of Thomas Hansford, John was afflicted and died in 1681. Elizabeth married Richard Burt, Mary married William Hewitt, and Thomas and William married and died in York county leaving descendants. The will of Thomas Hansford's son, William Hansford, was recorded July 24, 1709, and mentions a wife, Mary, who seems to have been a sister of David Morce, called in the will "brother-in-law," and three sons, William, Thomas, and David, and one daughter, Elizabeth, all under age. The will of the other son, Thomas, was recorded June 20, 1720, and his children were Thomas and William, Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, and Martha Hansford. William died in 1733, and left a wife, Mary, and son, Lewis who had four sons living in 1765.16 Mary Steele, in her will proved in York county court, July 20, 1767, calls Lewis Hansford her son-in-law. Thomas was living in 1736.17

Charles Hansford, youngest brother of Major Thomas Hansford, married Elizabeth Moody, daughter of Rev. Edward Foliott, of Hampton Parish, and relict of Josias Moody, son Dr. Giles Mode', a Frenchman, whose name was corrupted into Moody, and who is the founder of that family in Virginia. He left, in 1702,18 three sons, Charles, William and John, and four daughters, Elizabeth and Mary Hansford, Lydia Duke, wife of Mr. Henry Duke," and Martha, who married Samuel Hill. Of these John long kept an ordinary at the half-way house be- tween Williamsburg and Yorktown. Charles Hansford, the second19 of that name, had issue, a daughter Lucy, who married John Hyde, and a son also, named Charles. The third Charles lived till 1778, and on the 21st December, 1778, his will was proved in York county court. He left two sons, Richard and Benjamin, and three daughters-Elizabeth or Betsy, who in 1769 married20 John Camm, the treasurer of the College of William and Mary, and afterwards president of the same; Mary, who in July, 1775, married21 Rev. Samuel Sheild, minister of Drysdale parish, in Caroline county, and Martha, who married Edward Harwood, and subsequently Robert Sheild, of York county, brother of said Samuel, and great-grandfather of William H. Sheild, M. D., assistant physician at the Eastern Lunatic Asylum.

As to the Gloucester branch of the Hansford family, William, elder brother of Major Thomas Hansford, had a son William living there in 1706.22 The Hansford blood mingles with that of the Pattesons, Camms, Hydes,23 Hills, Custises, and many other well known families in Virginia to-day.24

This ends my paper. Genealogical investigations, though necessarily personal, are nevertheless valuable. A people without pride in their past are no people at all. And I cordially echo the sentiment expressed by Professor Garnett in his excellent paper read last night: "Perish the day when the son forgets the father.'' ANNIE TUCKER TYLER. NOTES 1. Neill's Virginia Carolorum. 2. Accounts by "T. M.," Anne Cotton, &c. 3. Thomas Hansford: A tale of Bacon's Rebelion, published by Geo. M. West, Richmond, Va., 1857; republished after the war by a Philadelphia firm, under the title "The Devoted Bride." 4. See Register in Land Office. 5. John Hansford appears as an inhabitant of Chiskiack, subsequently called Hampton Parish, in York county, as early as 1647. 6. See Randolph Holt's receipt to Mr. Lockey, October 20, 1663, York Records. [The name is sometimes rendered Randall Holt-ED.] 7. Hening. Vol.11, p.550. 8. York county records. 9. Richard Jones' will proved 12 November, 1660 10. Will proved January 10, 1670 11. Hening's Statutes, Vol.III, p.567. 12. In Virginia State Library. 13. He was captured by Major Robert Beverley, at the house of Colonel George Reade, deceased. situated where Yorktown now is. Colonel Reade had been a member of the Council. 14. York County records. 15. The petition of the Justices ran as follows: "And whereas Thomas Hansford suffered death as a traitor. and thereby forfeited his Land to the King, the Court humbly prays the seventy acres of Land given him by his flather's will to build a courthouse for the use of the said county forever, having been formerly forced to pay 4000 lb. of Tob. yearly, w'ch hath been very burthensome to the county. (Signed,) "JOHN PAGE, "JOHN ScARSEROOKE, "JAMES VAULX "OTHO THORPE, "ISAAC CLOPTON." On which the commissioners reported: "We humbly hope that his Majesty will be gratuitously pleased to give the Estate of these wretched men to there poore wives and children, w'ch will be an act of great mercy."

Rappahannock to Essex to Caroline Counties
Colonial Caroline: A History of Caroline County, Virginia by T. E. Campbell, published in 1954. Page 10. Political Genesis When the English settlers built Fort Mattapony its site was located in New Kent County. At that time all of Caroline’s Mattapony and Pamunkey valleys’ lands were in New Kent and its Rappahannock lands were in Rappahannock, a county long since extinct. The political genesis of Caroline is as complicated as the genealogies of many of its leading families, but if a lucid history of the county is to be recorded it must be set out here. From the time of Captain John Smith first explored its rivers in 1607-08 until 1634 its area remained, so far as the white man was concerned, Indian country. When the Virginia House of Burgesses divided the colony into its eight original political subdivisions in 1634 it became, nominally at least, along with all the other land north of the watershed between the James and the York basins, a part of the shire of Charles River. Eights years later the Burgesses changed the name of Charles River to York without changing its boundaries and Caroline became a part of York. All of Caroline remained in York until 1648 when the Burgesses cut off the Potomac and Rappahannock valleys from that county and formed a new county which they called at first Chickacoan, and a short time later Northumberland. This division placed the lands that were to become Caroline in two political subdivisions; its lands along the Pamunkey and the Mattapony remained in York while its lands along the Rappahannock went to Northumberland. This split lasted for seventy nine years, which is almost on quarter of Caroline’s total recorded history. The two sections were not reunited under the same local government until the Burgesses established Caroline, as a county, in 1727.

The Rappahannock Valley was not long part of Northumberland. In 1652 the Burgesses separated it from the Potomac Valley and put it in a new county which they called Lancaster. This new county they split four years later along the north and south line which now divides Lancaster from Richmond County, and Middlesex from Essex. The area to the east remained Lancaster and the area to the west became Rappahannock. The Rappahannock Valley section of Caroline was a part of Rappahannock County for thirty-six years, that is until 1692 when the Burgesses obliterated that county and placed its lands north of the Rappahannock River in Richmond and its lands south of the river in Essex. From 1692 until Caroline was established as a county in 1727, Caroline’s Rappahannock River valley was a part of Essex.

Caroline south of the Rappahannock-Mattapony watershed was a part of York until the House of Burgesses organized New Kent in 1654 and fixed its boundaries as extending from Scimino Creek on the east to the headwaters of the Pamunkey and the Mattapony on the west. This act placed a portion of Caroline in a political subdivision by metes and bounds for the first time.

New Kent retained its original limits for thirty-seven years. In 1691 the Burgesses split it along the Pamunkey and established King and Queen County north of the river. This division put all of Caroline between the Mattapony-Rappahannock watershed and the Pamunkey River in King and Queen. Here the lands north of the Mattapony remained for thirty-six years, but the lands south of the river became a part of King William ten years later when the Burgesses created that county from King and Queen’s land between the Pamunkey and the Mattapony.

This was the last change in territorial jurisdiction before the Burgesses reunited the three narrow strips, which were at the time the heads of Essex, King and Queen and King William, and set up Caroline. The first English settlers came to Caroline, when the area, that was to become the county, was split between Rappahannock and New Kent. The white man claimed title to over ninety per cent of its area while it was still divided between Essex, King and Queen and King William. To write a complete history of Caroline the research student must carefully study the papers concerning these five counties, which record events that happened before Caroline was organized, because as Minerva sprang full grown from the head of Jove so Caroline sprang full grown from the heads of Essex, King and Queen and King William.

Page 18 Although the lands between the Golden Vale and the present-day Caroline-Essex line and the land along the north side of the Mattapony westward from the mouth of the Marocossic Creek was filling rapidly with English settlers before Bacon’s Rebellion, the white man showed little inclination to take up land elsewhere in the area to be Caroline. Besides the patents of Smith and Taliaferro at Snow Creek and Henry Corbin eastward from Ware Creek and the Lewis, Warner and Hoomes grants in the upper Mattapony Valley there were only two other grants prior to 1676. In 1672 Col. Thomas Goodrich patented 2,200 acres on Tuckahoe Creek and Francis and Anthony Thornton took up 2,740 acres on the north side of the Mattapony above the stream’s major fork. The Thornton brothers, Francis and Anthony, were born in Virginia and used to pioneer life. In the back country they prospered, and in time their grant became Ormesby, which for many years was a famous seat of the Thornton family in Caroline County.

A petition from the inhabitants of another county prayed that "this present grand assembly would make an act of oblivion that no person may be Injured by the provoking names of Rebells, Traitors and Rogues." To which the commissioners, Sir John Berry, Colonel Herbert Jeifreys and Colonel Francis Morrison, added: "We Joyne with the Petitioners herein to his Majesty that noe pretence may obstruct the obtaining and good effect of it, and thus wee have layd it most humbly before his Maj.ty as a most likely means to secure the quiet of his s'd Colony." MSS. in Virginia State Library. 16. Dr. Lewis Hansford, of Norfolk, was alive in 1805. 17. Thornas Hansford, of Elizabeth City, married Hanuah, daughter of John Davis, and a granddaughter of John R. Davis (who died in 1784), a lieutenant in the State navy during the Revolution. On 18th December, 1784, a Thomas Hansford obtained a license in York county to marry " Elizabeth Lilburne, widow." 18. Charles Hansford's will was proved July 24, 1702. 19. Charles Hansford's will was proved June 15, 1761. The York county records mention Charles Hansford and Susannab his wife executors of Joseph Wade. 20. Virginia Gazette. 21. Ibid. 22. York county records. Petsoe Parish Vestry-Book. 23. Dr. John Hansford Hyde died in Lexington, Va., April 1 1852. Captain Robert Hyde served in the Revolutionary army as an artificer; came to Richmond in 1788. 24. Charles Hansford, at present living in Williamsburg, is descended from Charles, brother of Major Thomas Hansford. His father was Benjamin Hansford, who married Sarah Wynne ; grandfather. Richard Hansford, who married Lucy Dudley Haynes.

John Pleasants shows up on the earlier mentioned tax papers mentioning John Huddleston. (A Jesse Pleasants shows up on the same Heads on Household list that Benjamin Huddleston and Stephen Pankey does in 1782 in Hallifax County, Virginia) From John Pleasants will: From COLONIAL WILLS OF HENRICO CO., VA-1654-1737, by Benjamin B. Weisiger, III: p. 149 Will of John Pleasants of Curls 27 Sept. 1690 To son John Pleasants, (born of the body of my wife, JANE, formerly wife and executrix of SAMUEL TUCKER, dec'd), all of plantation where I now dwell called "Curles", 300 acres, which was purchased by me of William Cookson; also that plantation purchased of Philip Ludwell, called "Timber Slash" 900 acrs; also my part of a tract taken up between JOHN WOODSON, Hen Rowing, and myself, the whole tract being 7000 acres, 1/2 being mine called "Half Sink" If son John has no heirs, then above to son Joseph (also son of wife, JANE) and if he have no issue, to daughter Elizabeth Pleasants, (also daughter of wife JANE), and if no issue to my brother Samuel Pleasants, and if no issue, to my brother Benjamin Pleasants, and if no issue, to my brother Thomas Pleasants, and if no issue to my next of kin. Numerous items to son John and if he die to be divided between Joseph and Elizabeth, when they reach 18. To daughter, Elizabeth, land I purchased of Abram Childers, bordering Curles Swamp, 70 acres; and also land purchased of Hen. Rowing and ROBERT WOODSON, about 400 acres, also livestock and items [ will goes on and on, ) To the Friends (now called Quakers) a small parcel of land purchased of Benjamin Hatcher, next to Thomas Holmes, for a meeting house and burying place. To daughter in law Mary Woodson, 20 pounds sterling To my dear and loving mother, 20 pounds My wife to be sole executrix "(This will was presented in court by JOHN PLEASANTS HIMSELF, apparently wanting to be sure it was probated as he wanted it.)" Recorded 1 Oct. 1690. 1712 April 7th [Henrico County, VA Deeds 1706-1737, Compiled by Benjamin B. Weisiger III, © 1985, pg 33] page 121 William DODSON, Sr. of Bristol Parish, Henrico Co., for 2500 lbs tobacco, to Jno PLEASANTS, land in Bristol Parish on north side of Swift Creek, 100 acres, purchased of Wm RANDOLPH by Wm BENDER and by him sold to Nicho. DISON, and by him to DODSON. Land is bounded by George HUNT, the land James FRANKLIN sold formerly to Mat. Peter FEILD, and Swift Creek. Not dated Wit: Mary (X) TOTTY, THOM. (T) TOTTY Signed: Wm DODSON recorded 7 April 1712 Eliza, wife of DODSON, relinquished her dower right. At a meeting of the commissioners appointed to restore the Henrico Records destroyed by the enemy–Held May 8, 1783.

A copy of the will of John Pleasants decd. was laid before the commissioners and Joseph Pleasants a Quaker solemnly affirmed that the writing now produced here is a true copy of the decedents will–And John Brooke swore to the copy–Thereupon it was allowed, and as the record of it “had been destroyed by the Enemy, It is ordered that the above be certified. And which will follows in these words.” I John Pleasants senr. of Henrico County, third in the name in Virginia bearing in mind my mortality, do make this my last will and testament concerning my real and personal estate which Almighty God in his great and gracious bounty hath bestowed on me, to prevent all manner of disputes concerning the same that otherwise might happen or arise after my death–I do hereby revoke and make void all other wills by me made or hereafter published, and do declare this in writing to be my last will and testament in manner following. “Item–All the rest and residue of my estate of whatsoever nature and kind soever, not herein mentioned, I give and bequeath unto my sons Robert, Samuel, Jonathan and Thomas and to their heirs. Lastly I appoint my sons Robert Pleasants and Jonathan Pleasants, Charles Woodson, Jun. and Thomas Pleasants Junr. executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and annulling all other will by me heretofore made. In witness thereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this eleventh day of August in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred and seventy one.” Signed, sealed, Published and declared to be the last will and testament of John Pleasants in the presence of Peter Strathan, Robt. Pleasants Jr. John Pleasants, S. S. John __X__ Downs. Named: Jonathan Pleasants, son Robert Pleasants, son Samuel Pleasants, grandson Thomas Pleasants, son Jane Pleasants, granddaughter (sister to Samuel) Mary Pleasants, daughter Samuel Pleasants of Philadelphia, son Elizabeth Langley, daughter (husband Robert Langley) Dorothy Briggs, daughter (husband Gray Briggs) Ann Atkinson Charles Woodson, grandson Tarleton Woodson, father-in-law John Pleasants (father of Jane Pleasants, decd.) Margaret Pleasants, granddaughter Elizabeth Pleasants, wife of Joseph Pleasants Ursula Johnson © copyright 1994-2002 by Peggy Hooper All Rights Reserved.

To Fredricksburg, Spotsylvania County&Amelia County, VA to Mississippi&Alabama

Constable Robert Huddleston Of Virginia

SimplyFredericksburg - Simply everything on the web in Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania and Stafford Counties of Northern Virginia.

THE HUDDLESTONS OF BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA Series B The first Huddleston in Virginia--and in America--was Capt. John, who served the Virginia Company, as Master of the BONA NOVA, in 1620. He had tracts of land in the vicinity of Jamestown; little further of him is known.1 There was a Mrs. Huddleston in York County in 1670.2 The next Huddleston traced is Robert, who appeared in Spottsylvania County in 1738, and witnessed numerous documents, etc., up to 1776. In 1741 he had a deed to Spottsylvania land, which in 1770 John conveyed to his brother Robert, by deed which recited that John then lived in Johnston County, North Carolina, that he was the son of Robert, then deceased, who had, by will devised the land to his children (names not given). In 1773 Robert conveyed the land, described as being in Berkley Parish, to Elijah Dismukes. In 1766 Robert witnessed a deed for one Carter, then a resident of Buckingham County. The tax records of Buckingham show Robert, Robert, Jr. and Thomas in 1782; Thomas, Jr. 1783; George 1785; Thomas and Robert 1794; George, Thomas, Sr., Thomas, Jr., Jarratt and Simon 1796; Thomas, Sr., Thomas, Jr., Thomas son of Robert, and George 1798 to 1810. In 1774 Thomas and Millie Tanner, "both of Raleigh Parrish," Amelia County, were married. In 1799 Thomas, then of Buckingham, with Wiley as surety, gave bond to marry Patsy W. Tanner in Amelia County, Thomas, then of Buckingham, giving consent as father. Robert is shown in Amelia by the 1790 census.3,4 1 It was Capt. John who gave succor to the Plymouth in 1622. See Bradford's Plymouth, 150; Young's Chronicles, 293. 2 A William was a member of Killwinning Crosse Masonic Lodge, (Caroline County) about 1760; a George witnessed a will in Cecil County Maryland, 1702; a William made will in Kent County, Maryland in 1728. 3 It may be inferred that Robert of Spottslyvania was the ancestor of the Buckingham group, and that Amelia group was a branch. Probably Robert, Sr., of Buckingham was the son of Robert of Spottslyvania (1739). He was probably father of Thomas, Sr., who had sons Thomas, Jr., Simon, Jarratt and Wiley, and of Robert, Jr., father of Thomas and George. 4 See chapters on "The Fentress County Tennessee Group" "The Huddlestons of Amelia County, Virginia,"and "Robert, the Revolutionary War Soldier." 18 19 THE HUDDLESTONS OF BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA. No..Name Born Died Married Children b1 George 1 1810 Martha Winston (dau. John) b3-b10 b2 Thomas 2 1765 1815 Katherine Stratton b11-b25 1 George died 1810, and his widow and children then migrated to Wilson County, Tennessee, where numerous of their descendents yet remain. 2 Thomas lived in Buckingham, where some of his descendants continue to reside, the remainder being scattered throughtout Virginia SECOND GENERATION Children of George, b1 b3 Anthony 1780 1849 Elizabeth Lewis b26-b31 b4 Lucy 1785 Peter Stratton b32-b35 b5 Elizabeth 1790 Chas. Sullivan unt b6 Martha 1795 Winston Brooks..b36-b42 b7 George 1797 1873 Harriet Cummings b43-b53 b8 Wm. Winston 1800 Mary Tarver b54-b65 b9 Louisiana 1803 William Brooks unt b10 LaFayette 1805 1852 d. unm Children of Thomas, b2 b11 John 1785 1844 Polly Claybook b651/2 b12 Thomas 1788 1869 d. unm. b13 William 1793 1880 Nancy Meadow b66-b72 b14 Robin 1795 1876 Anne Wheeler b73-b81 b15 Littleberry 1799 1842 1. Anne Harper 2. Elizabeth McAhen b82-b84 b16 Daniel 1805..1875 1. Elizabeth Harper b85-b95 2. Susan Baird b17 Drewry 1809 1851 Jane Reese b96-b101 b18 George 1807 1872 Mary Adcock b102-b103 b19 James 1802 1856 Polly Jenkins b104-b105 b20 Elizabeth 1787 1865 Archer Baird b106-b111 b21 Mary 1 1800 1877 Henry O'Brien b22 Katherine 1797 1857 John Druen b112-b118 b23 Caroline 1811 1867 Guliemus Colman 1840 b119-b125 b24 Anna 1792 1862 Edward Baird b126-b135 b25 Martha J 1813 d. c'hood 1 m. Ky. unt THIRD GENERATION Children of Anthony, b3 b26 Martha ___Cook unt b27 John L 1881 Elvira Stratton b33 b136-b140 b28 James M 1820 1881 Isabella Donnell b141-b146 20 HUDDLESTON FAMILY TABLES No Name Born Died Married Children b29 Marshall W 1. ___Sellers b147-b151 2. Ellen Clopton b30 George G 1826 1869 Mahala Williams 1853 b152-b158 b31 Mary d.unm Children of Lucy Stratton, b4 b32 Martha..Samuel A. Davidson unt b33 Elvira John L. Huddleston b27..b136-b140 b34 Lucy J..Jas B. Petit unt b35 Amanda d. unm Children of Martha Brooks, b6 1 b36 Anne; b37 William; b38 Jane; b39 Lucy; b40 James; b41 Hugh; b42 Caroline All unt. 1 All m. W. Tenn.184--(?) Children of George A., b7 b43 G. Perkins 1824 1907 1. Elizabeth Smith 2. Virginia Lewis b159-b160 b44 Indiana 1826 1904 W. A. Simons b161-b171 b45 Josephine 1827 1905 Josiah Burke b172-b178 b46 George M 1832 1862 Jane Burke b179 b47 Jos. Franklin 1834 1908 1. Victoria Spickard b180-b182 2. Nancy E. Sherrill 3. Elizabeth Barrett b48 Adaline 1836 1882 D. C. Shingleton b183-b184 b49 Frances 1838 1884 d.unm. b50 Wm. L 1841 1907 Mary E. Spickard b185-b194 b51 Felix H 1843 1910 Emma Arnold b195-b202 b52 Napoleon J 1844 1883 d.unm. b53 A. Jackson 1852 1926 1. Ludie Comer none 2. Mary E. Lewis Children of Wm. Winston, b8 b54 Samuel T 1828 1848 d. unm. b55 Frances 1831 1903 Erastus Smith b203-b207 b56 Joseph W..1833 Alice Robertson b208-b209 b57 Thomas L 1836 Parthenia Bradley b210-b214 b58 Valeria 1837 1906 G. L. Robertson none b59 Patrick Henry 1839 1862 d. unm. b60 William 1841 1861 d. unm. b61 Elizabeth 1842 1899 Wade Baker b215-b220 b62 Elivra 1844 R. S. Donnell b221-b224 b63 Adelia 1848 Orrin D. Hearn b225-b229 b64 Eugenia 1846 Thos. E. Bradley b230-b234 b65 Henry Clay 1850 d. unm. 21 THE HUDDLESTON OF BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA No Name Born Died Married Children b651/2 Sarah 1849 Mat. Whitlock unt Children of William, b13 b66 Ann Catherine 1825 1908 Seymour Wright b235-b245 b67 William 1827 1863 Margaret Waddell b68 John 1829 1865 d. unm b69 Sarah 1840 1863 Thos. Huddleston b73 b70 Elizabeth 1831 1911 James Wright b71 Martha 1834 1920 ___Huddleston b72 Ellen 1844 1895 Wm. Huddleston Children of Robin, b14 b73 Thomas 1838 1890 Sarah Huddleston b69 unt b74 William 1840 1903 Margaret Waller unt b75 Kate 1842 1887 d. unm b76 Peter 1844 1856 d. unm b77 Robin 1846 1880 d. unm b78 Richard 1848 1920 Mary Sharpe unt b79 Charles 1850 Elizabeth Harvey unt b80 Mary Alex Sharpe unt b81 Lucy Carlyle Christian Children of Littleberry, b15 b82 Thomas 1830 1857 b83 Littleberry 1831 1915 Sallie Ann Wright, b235 b246-b252 b84 Louise 1840 1896 ___Mather b609-b613 Children of Daniel, b16 b85 Daniel 1830 1890 d. unm b86 Lavinia 1832 1920 James Druen, b112 b87 William 1834 1836 b88 Samuel 1836 1924 Nancy Brown b89 Elizabeth 1840 1911 George Huddleston., b103 b90 Polly 1843 George Gilbert b91 James 1845 1913 Eliza Cobbs b92 Mary 1847 1925 Newton Ayers b253-b258 b93 Sarah 1849 George Price b94 Louisa 1852 Archer Dowdy b95 Dancy 1859 1908 d. unm Children of Drewry, b17 b96 Kate, b. 1830; b97 Thomas, b. 1832; b98 David, b. 1834; b99 Virginia, b. 1836, b100 Lucy, b. 1838; b101 Jane, b. 1840. All unt. 22 HUDDLESTON FAMILY TABLES Children of George, b18 No Name Born Died Married Children b102 Stephen 1838 1900 Kate Druen, b116 unt b102 George 1842 1897 Elizabeth Huddleston, b89 unt Children of James, b19 b104 William 1834 1836 b105 Mary 1838 1871 William Tatum unt Children of Elizabeth Baird, b20 b106 Charles b107 Archer b108 dau. b109 dau ___Massey b110 dau ___Loving b111 dau ___Baird b112 dau ___Wood Children of Katherine Druen, b22 b112 James 1822 1863 Lavina Huddleston, b86 unt b113 Martha 1824 1898 d. unm b114 Mary 1830 1898 John Flood unt b115 Thomas 1832 1908 d. unm b116 Kate 1834 1861 Stephen Huddleston, b102..unt b117 Weaver 1836-1866 d. unm b118 Samuel 1838 1864 d. unm Children of Caroline Coleman, b23 b119 Eliza 1841 b120 Edwin 1842 b121 Kate 1844 Thomas Dowdy b259-b268 b122 Littleberry 1845 b123 Luther D 1849 1871 d. unm b124 Mary C 1850 1918 William Wright b410-b419 b125 Anna 1854 1863 Children of Anna Baird, b24 b126 Thomas 1812 Jeanette Darnell b127 Martha 1813 ___Brown b128 William 1815 ___Garrett b129 John 1817 b130 Harriett 1819 ___Davidson b131 Powell 1821 d. unm b132 Jane 1823 ___Jenkins 23 THE HUDDLESTONS OF BUCKINGHAM COUNTY,VA. No Name Born Died Married Children b133 Caroline 1825 ___Tilman b134 Robert 1826 ___Garrett b135 Matthew 1828 d. unm FOURTH GENERATION Children of John L., b27 b136 Virginia 1848 Samuel Alsup b269-b275 b137 John 1850 1923 Nancy Edwards Clara, John b138 Dewitt 1854 1867 b139 Stratton 1856 Georgia Hall Mary Children of James., b27 b141 Sarah C 1851 Wm. Phillips b276-b281 b142 Martin 1849 1918 Grace Rutland Otis, Hugh, Azalia b143 Geogia 1853 1888 d. unm b144 Phillip 1855 Louise Quarles Grady, Lewis b145 Hugh L 1857 1882 d. unm b146 John 1856 Lula Quarles Caesar Children of Marshall W., b29 b147 Indiana Wm. Estis b282-b290 b148 Scipio Nancy Mount b29x-b302x b149 William Frances Hudson b303x-b307x b150 Robert Ellen Short Marshall, Pearl b151 Julia Samuel Jordan b291-b297 Children of George C., b30 b152 Thomas A 1854 1920 Etta Neely b298-b305 b153 Wm. J..1856-1894 d. unm b154 Elizabeth 1857-1886 Dr. M. H. Grimmet Graves, Hill b155 Julia 1859 1919 Dr. J. H. Preston Frank, Morgan b156 Patrick H 1862 1919 Alice Alsup Walter, Stonewall, Adeliade b157 J. Morgan 1864 Ella Preston 1888 b306-b310 b158 Stonewall J 1866 1914 d. unm Children of G. Perkins, b43 b159 Virginia 1900 b160 Bertha 1902 Children of Indiana Simmons, b44 b161 M. Foster 1846 unm b162 Harriett 1849 1880 Thomas Davis Albert, Thomas b163 Abner 1850 1878 d. unm

Robert Huddleston of Spotsylvania County, Virginia (Spotsylvania became a county in (1721) is found to be in the LDS records in Spottsylvania by 1694. Very little is known about him. JOHN SPOTSWOOD, m. Mary DANDRIDGE, dau. of Capt. Wm. DANDRIDGE, R.N., Elsing Green, King William Co., a member of the House of Burgesses and Governor's Council. The latter's wife was Unity WEST, dau. and heiress of Col. John WEST, son of Lord de la Warr. Spotswood was appointed Lieutenant and Commander-in-Chief of the County of Spotsylvania. Member of the House of Burgesses. He resided at Germanna; d. 6th May, 1756. Colonial families of the United States of America: Volume 1 http://westfamilygenealogy.com/west/colfam.html The page above explains a lot about the relationship the Huddleston family has had with the West family over many years when you apply it to information found on this page. In researching the LDS he fits the description as the unknown Huddleston AFN: 1LRL-JV8 with birth about 1694 and as Robert Huddleston in an IGI individual record with birth about 1690 Spotsylvania, Virginia which is part of an ancestral file attached to Robert Huddleston born 1720. With Robert Huddleston, his son shown in many records being born as early as 1713 to 1725; the older Robert Huddleston could even be much older than that. Most websites don't even have the Robert Huddleston of 1690 in them. The Spotsylvania Records show his existance. Also, mention of him shows up in 1735 in Caroline County, Virginia in 1735. Thomas Warren was buried on the homeplace, Mattapon, St. George Parish, Spotsylvania Co., Virginia. Sworn into the Colonial Army August 5, 1729 Listed in the WILL of his mother Rachel Warren, written on February 11, 1705 and probated September 18, 1706 Essex Co., Va. Thomas Warren wrote his WILL April 13, 1749 & died 1750 p106 Dr. Holland book. His will was proved on December 4, 1750 in Spotsylvania Co., Va. In this will he lists his wife Mary and his sons Hackley and Lancelot. He also names his daughters Rachel Hasken and Roxanna More. Virginia County Records Spotsylvania County 1721-1800 WILL BOOK B 1749-1759 page 10, WB B at page 56 I have a copy of it. Warren, Thomas Planter, Spotsylvania Co., April 13, 1749 p. Dec 4, 1750 Wit. Robert Huddlestone, Abrah Rogers, Barbara Rogers, Ex. wife Mary and son Hackley Warren. leg. son, Hackley Warren 95 acres of land which formerly gave to my daughter Rachel Hasken, daughter Elizabeth Brooks, daughter Mary Buford, daughter Roxanna More, Son, Lancelot Warren to my wife Mary Warren all the rest of my estate during her life. pg. 56 Thomas Warren owned land on Occupation Creek, Essex Co., Va. 1714. Thomas Warren a justice of Essex Co. 1715. William Warren appraised estate of Rachel Warren 8 July 1714 S/Anthony Samuel Dr. & Jr. Index to Wills and Administrations: CATALOG CARD NAME Warren, Thomas. DATE 1750. SOURCE Will Book B, 1749-1761 (Reel 26) p. 56-57. Will pro. 4 Dec. 1750. NOTE Part of index to Spotsylvania County Wills and Administrations (1722-1800) PLACE Spotsylvania County (Va.) FORM Wills. aat. COLLECTION Virginia wills and administrations. WILL OF THOMAS WARREN IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN .1 the l3th day of April 1749, I Thomas Warrin of Spotsylvania County planter but of perfect mind and memory Thanks be given unto God therefore calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die Do make and ordain this my Last will and Testament That is to say Princapally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into ye hands of God that gave it: and my Body I recommend to the Earth to be Buried in Decent Christian Burial at ye Discrat lion of my Executors not Doubting but at ye General Resurrection I shall receive the Saffie again by the Mighty power of God and as Touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me in this Life I give dismise and Dispose of ye same in ye following Manner and form - Impremis I give and Bequeath to my son Hackley Warrin ninty five lacres of land which I formerly gave to my Daughter Rachel Hasken land the old orchard and ye convenient Timber to keep it under ~ fence. and also a negro Girl named Dilla and all her increase-Item I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Elizabeth Brook girl named Nanne to her and ye heirs of her Body - a negro II tern I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Mary Buford and ye Heirs lor her Body one Negro Boy named Syrus - II tern I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Rosanna More and ye heirs ~f Her Body one negro wench named Jenny and all her Increase II tern I give and Bequeath unto my son Lancelot Warrin all ye land ~elonging to ye plantation where I now Live and also. one negro ~ench named, Bess after me and my wife Deceased - l item I give and Bequeath unto my Loving wife Mary Warrin all ye ~ 'rest of my Estate During her Life or widowhood and after to be Equally Divided Among all my chilldren that is Living at that time - my Estate is not indebt my will and Desire is it shall not be ~ Praised nor sold at Auction and that my Children Divied it - Equally amongest themselves and if they Cant agree to Chuse To menta Divide it Equally amangest them and if my Estate at that should be Indebt that ye Debts be paid out of ye Insuing Crop and if no crop it is my Desire that ye Debts Be paid out of my estate before my Division - I 1 ike'wise constitute make and ordain my Loving wife Mary Warrin and my Son Hackley Warrin my sole Executrix of this my Last will and Testament and I do hereby Utterly Disallow Revoke and Disanul all and Every Other former Testaments Wills Legaces and Requests and Executors by me in any ways before named willed and bequeathed ratifying and Confirming This and no Other to be my Last will and Testament-IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal ye Day and year above written-Thomas Warrin Signed Sealed & published pronounced and Declared by the said Thomas Warrin as his Last will & Testamt. In the presence of us the Subscribers Test Robert Huddlestone Abraham Rogers her Barbra B Rogers mark (Seal) At a Court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday Decemb. The fourth 1750-Recorded in Will Book B at page 56. The Last Will and Testament of Thomas Warrin Deced. Being Exhibit ted and sworn to in Court By Hackley Warrin Exor. Therein named and was proved by the oaths of Robert Huddlestone and Abrahm. Rogers Witnesses thereto & is ordered to be Record ~ Test ~ Edmund Waller A copy, _-~-i. Cl Cur. Teste: ~ " Deputy Clerk. --1 From researching John W. Pritchett's website and researching Robert Huddleston, We find that one Huddleston married might of married a Morgan and their marriage was probably in Caroline County, Virginia about 1714. From looking at the will of Thomas Warren We can question the birth of Robert Huddleston born 1720 because of Thomas Warren in Essex. Essex is an older county than Spotsylvania. About Essex County Formed in 1692 from Rappahannock County, Essex County was probably named after Essex County, England. It is located in the Tidewater area of Virginia with its county seat of Tappahannock located on the banks of the Rappahannock River. This location has played a significant role in the history of the county - especially during the three wars fought on Virginia's soil.1 As an early Virginia county, Essex has been the county of origin for many families that later migrated westward and southward. Descendants of many of the old Essex families still reside in the area. Fortunately for researchers, Essex County was spared the ravages of the Civil War which saw the destruction of court houses (and their records) in many neighboring counties. It has also escaped natural disaster and fires which have caused record loss in other counties. Its records survive virtually intact providing researchers a wealth of genealogical information. Present-day Essex County covers an area of 265.98 square miles with a population of under 9,000. The county is primarily rural with several small communities such as Millers Tavern, Dunnsville, Champlain, Loretto, Laneview, Mount Landing, Caret, and Hustle located within its borders.2 (Sources: 1. Settlers, Southerners, Americans, The History of Essex County, Virginia 1608-1984 by James B. Slaughter, copyright Essex County Board of Supervisors, 1985. 2. Essex County General Highway Map, Virginia Department of highways and Transportation, 1985.) Old Rappahannock County became extinct in 1692 when it was divided into Essex and Richmond Counties. North Farnham Parish fell wholly into Richmond County at the division. The established Church in Colonial Virginia was the Church of England. As in England, parishes were "local units of ecclesiastical and community organization".2 The Virginia General Assembly, through legislation, created parishes and defined their boundaries. As the population of Colonial Virginia grew, new parishes were formed and boundary lines changed. Although the Church of England was dis-established as the official Church following the American Revolution and most of the duties of the vestry turned over to county officials, the parishes continued in existence. The parish boundaries were also used as geographic designations with the residence of parties to deeds being given by parish and county. These designations may be useful in determining in which part of the county the persons resided and the land being conveyed was located. Richmond County is located at the southwestern end of the Northern Neck peninsula. Bordered entirely on its western side by the Rappahannock River, its remaining borders touches all of the other Northern Neck counties. Settled by the English well over 300 years ago, Richmond County, named for the Duke of Richmond, was created in 1692 when (Old) Rappahannock County was divided into Essex and Richmond County. (Old Rappahannock County was formed from Lancaster County in 1656; Lancaster was originally part of Northumberland County. Northumberland County, originally called Chickcoun, adjoining n Lancaster on the Chesapeake Bay. It originally comprised the whole "Neck of land between Rappahannock `and Potomac Rivers." The date when this county was formed is in doubt; it certainly contained the first settlement or the whites north of Rappahannock River, within all the territory subsequently named "The Northern Neck of Virginia."At what date the first settlement was made there is not known. By an Act of Assembly in June, 1642, it was felony to settle outside of certain limits without permission of the governor and council. It provided "That the Rappahannock River should remain unseated for divers reasons therein contained, notwithstanding it should and might be lawful for all persons to assume grants for lands there,"etc. A similar act to that of June, 1642 was passed in 1647, but in October, 1648, it was reviation of Secacaconies, an Indian tribe once located on that stream. The first public official announcement of the name of Northumberland occurs in the 9th Act of Assembly, February, 1644-5, providing for the erection of three forts, viz.: one at "Pamunkey "(Nest Point), named Fort Royal, one at the "Falls of James River"(Richmond), named Fort Charles, and the third on the ridge at "Chicquohominie" (near Bottoms Bridge), named Fort James, as follows: And be it explained and confirmed by the authorities that the associating counties on the south side of the river are hereby to contribute towards the maintainance of the (Indian) War on that side, without any expectation of any contribution from the north side, and so likewise on the north side by themselves including Northampton and Northumberland." From the above one would conclude it had been made a county at, or prior to 1644, but the writers of the early period, except Hening, were content with their own knowledge that Northumberland was but a "Plantation" in 1644-45. The earliest court records now in the clerk's office of that county are dated 1652. Some of the court records were burned many years ago, therefore it is not known what dates the records bore which were destroyed. The old books are bound with oak board backs, covered with heavy leather. They contain much of interest in the matter of curious wills, and surprising items relating to the sentences imposed by the courts for offenses (stated in the plainest words of the English language), which under the present day ruling of the courts would meet with less rigorous punishment. Life in Old Virginia By James J. McDonald Published by the Old Virginia Publishing Company, Inc., Norfolk, Va., 1907

Sarah Huddeley(Huddleston) helps to bring about the moved of the Huddleston family from Henrico County to Spotsylvania. She was born 1671 according to Compact Disc #24 Pin #898815 in Henrico, Virginia. She is mentioned in the Anna Popejoy file mentioning the above information on the earlier Huddlestons. MARRIAGES-St. John’s Church, Henrico Co.,Virginia 1691: Thomas FARRAR TO Katharine, daughter of Richard PERRIN John FARRAR with Mrs. Temple BATTE, Nov. 11, 1691 license granted; Richard JONES and Joseph PLEASANTS securities. John PUCKETT, Eliza ALLEN. License granted March 18, 1691. George WORHAM , security. Francis CHALMEBY with Sarah HUDDELEY. Robert WOODSON, Jr., with Sarah LEWIS, Peter FIELD with Judith RANDOLPH, relict of Henry RANDOLPH James COCKE with Mrs. Eliza PLEASANTS, Jan. 11th. Capt. Thomas COCKE, surety. HENRICO COUNTY p. 357 Francis Chohneley (Cholmley) m. Sarah Huddlesy. Deeds-Wills etc. 1688-1697. Sarah Lewis b. 4 Mar 1660/1661, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA d. 30 Jan 1731/1732, Hingham, Plymouth, MA, Age: 70 File submitted for use in the USGenWeb Archives by: Patty B. White. In Patty B. White's Individual Record Entry in the LDS, Francis Chalmeby is given with birth as 1666 in Henrico, Virginia and Sarah Huddleley's birth is given as 1671 in Henrico, Virginia. According to her their marriage was 1691 in St. John's Church, Henrico, Virginia. Also at St. John's Church she has an entry for Edward Hatcher's daughter's marriage: 1686: Mathew TURPIN to Sarah, daughter of Edward HATCHER; Thomas FARRAR to Kate PERRIN; John COCKE to Mary DAVIS; John STUART to Susannah BURTON; Thomas EAST to Dorothy THOMAS
The earliest information I can get on the Chomeley and Huddleston families together on one page regards to Sir Hugh Chomeley and Colonel William Huddleston. In 15 March 1642 they are listed right next to each other in "House of Commons Journal" Volume 3. Army Affairs, &c. A Letter from the Lord Fairefax on the 13th of March, desiring, once more, Supplies for this Army; and relating the Answer he received from the Queen; and likewise a Letter directed to Mr. White, his Agent, relating the good Success Sir Hugh Cholmeley had against a Quarter of the Earl of Newcastle's; were all read. Dep. Lieut. of Cumberland Resolved, &c. That Colonel Wm. Huddleston be forthwith discharged from being any longer a Deputy Lieutenant of the County of Cumberland; and that the Lords Concurrence be desired herein. Index - H Huddleston, Colonel William, 1642, to be discharged from being Deputy Lieutenant of Cumberland; Lords Concurrence to be desired, 15 Mar. 1643, to be committed to the Tower; Order for a Reward to the Person who brought him up, 18 Nov. 1644, to be exchanged for Dr. Bastwick, 21 Oct.-To have Pass to go with his Wife, &c. the direct Way into Cumberland, 26. Die Sabbati, 18 Novembris, 1643. House of Commons Journal Volume 3 18 November 1643 Taking of Thurland Castle, &c. A Letter from Colonel Alex. Rigby, a Member of this House, dated at Preston in Lancashire, 16 Octobris, was read; informing the House of the taking of Thurland Castle, and of a Defeat given to Colonel Hudleston, by him; and that he had sent Colonel Hudleston up Prisoner. Ordered, That Colonel Hudleston shall be committed to the Tower, there to be kept in strict Custody, (being taken in actual Arms against the Parliament) till this House give further Order. Resolved, &c. That this House doth approve of Colonel Rigby his Action, in demolishing the Castle of Thurland in Lancashire; and will save him from Indemnity. Ordered, That a Letter of Thanks be written to Colonel Rigby, for his good Services done to the Commonwealth: And Mr. Ashton is to bring in this Letter. Ordered, That Mr. Fogg, who hath been very diligent in the Service of Parliament, and hath brought up Colonel Hudleston, a Prisoner, out of Lancashire, shall have One hundred Pounds, besides his Charges in bringing him up, allowed him; and that it be paid him out of the Rents and Profits of the Estate of Colonel Hudleston, in the Counties of Lancaster and Cumberland: And the Committees there are hereby required to see the said One hundred Pounds, and Charges as aforesaid, accordingly paid to the said Mr. Fogg.
The earliest Cholmeley entry I can find in the House of Common entries is House of Commons Journal Volume 1 19 April 1554 The bill for the shoe-makers of Callays. - Mr. Chomeley. Mr Chomeley kept getting stuck for bills in way or another until 27 January 1558. It is not until 2 March 1621 that we learn of a Sir Richard Chomeley. Priviledge. Sir Tho. Bellassis moveth, an Order for Stay of Trial, till the next Assises; he being sick, and he a Member of the House.-This Motion made for Sir Rich. Cholmeley. He shows up on page 535 of the Journal. 16 March 1621 Yorkeshyre and Mynehead Election. On the other Part, testified by Sir Rich. Cholmeley, that it appeared to him, as he passed with the Sherriff, he taking view of those Parts, the number far above the other. 15 March 1624 to 7 July 1624 a Mr. Cholmeley is mentioned. The July entry though is interesting though because it says Mr. Cholmeley moveth for his father, for some direction in these points. 10 August 1625 a Sir Ro. Chomeley is mentioned. Ro. probably means Robert. House of Commons Journal 3 15 March 1643 Sir Hugh Chomeley is mentioned. In the index it shows Sir Hugh Chomeley deserting the Parliament. 3 April 1643 Sir Hugh Chomeley gets impeached for High Treason. 5 June 1643 we find the first mention of Lady Cholmeley and her two children. With the 3 July 1624 entry of Sir Hugh Cholmeley being restored we have to believe that Lady Cholmeley is Sir Hugh Cholmeley's wife. 10 July 1643 Sir Hugh Cholmeley writes a letter. (In the Journal Middlesex county is still mentioned) 2 August 1643 H. Cholmeley is mentioned and we can surmised it is still Hugh. By 5 August 1643 we can clearly see Sir H. Cholmeley is back in the House of Commons. But I spoke to soon because the H. is for Henry now. Sir Henry Cholmeley is in a list of people compounding with prisoners. This entry must be read carefully because it talks about putting prisoners on ships. 12 October 1643 Sir Henry Cholmeley at two o'clock with others meets at the Star Chamber to decide the decide the fate of Clement Walker, esq. who is sentenced to the tower of London. 16 October 1643 Sir Henry Cholmeley is back in the House of Commons. 2 December 1643 Sir Henry Cholmeley meets with the Coventry. Busy day for Henry. 16 January 1644 Sir Henry Cholmeley meets with Sir William Waller in Journal 3 of the House of Commons. (A possible Waller/Cholmeley connection) 22 February 1644 Sir Henry Cholmeley takes part in a Committee Covenant. 26 February 1644 we find the covenant was about lowering taxes in the Northern counties. 15 April 1644 information is funny to me involving Sir Henry Cholmeley. Sir H. Cholmeley is appointed to go to the Lords, to desire them to sit awhile. Sir H. Cholmeley brings answer, that the Lords do agree to sit awhile. But right under this the "Thomas and John" ship is mentioned. Ship Loyalty, &c. A message from the Lords, by Sir Edw. Leech and Doctor Ayletts,The Lords have received divers Petitions from divers Merchants, whose Ships are stayed by Order of this House: Which they thought fit to communicate to this House; desiring them to take it into a speedy Consideration, time being precious with them; and , if they lose this season, they lose their voyage. The Petition, bearing the Title of the Petition of Sir Tho. Soame, Colonel Sam. Harsenett, Wm. Itham, John Durston, John and Tho. Pettiward, Rob. and Wm. Erle, Owners and Masters of the two ships, called "The Loyalty"' and the "Thomas and John", of London, was this day read; and ordered to be referred to the Committee for Examinations, to consider both the matter of the petition, and of the matter of Privilege. The last entry 22 December 1644 is still mentioning Sir Henry Cholmeley and no other entries mention him after this date.
Information involving the Virginia Huddlestons of Series B is sketchy between Captain John Huddleston being in Virginia in 1628 and Sarah Huddleston's birth in 1671. These 43 years are the hardest to find information on but a little has been gathered as you can see.
William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers, Vol. 2, No.4. Page 236. 35. The arms on the tomb of Dr. Thomas Clayton are: A cross engrailed between four torteaux; crest, a leopard's gamb erased and erect, graspin a pellet, or torteau. From Mr. Stanard's carefully prepared pedigree, based on Le Neve,Wills at Somerset House, &c., printed in Wallace's Historical Magazine, for October, 1891: Thomas1, of Clayton Hall, Lancaster, England, m. Agnes, d. of John Thornell, issue, William2, "2d son but heir," d. 1627. William2 m.----- Cholmeley, issue, 1, John3, 2, Sir Jasper3 of St. Edmunds, Lombard St., Mercer, Alderman, &c., knighted 1660. Sir Jasper3 m. Mary Thompson, d. of William Thompson, "late citizen and haber-dasher of London", issue 1 Sir John4 2, George4, 3, Mary4, 4, Prudence4, 5, Rebecca4. Sir John4 m. Alice Bowyer, d. of Sir William Bowyer, of Denham, Bucks, baronet, and relict of William Buggins, of North Crey, Eng. Issue 1, John5, born 1665, died Nov. 18, 1737; studied at the university, probably Cambridge, and at Inner Temple; and in 1705 was appointed attorney-general of Virginia; was judge of the Court of Admiralty, member of the House of Burgesses, recorder of Williamsburg, &c. Married, not known whom, and had 1, John6, the eminent botanist, and author of "Flora Virginia". (See Chalmers' Biographical Dictionary.) 2, Arthur6, clerk "of a county on the upper part of James River". 3, Dr. Thomas6, educated at the University of Cambridge, and completed his medical studies in London, returned to Virginia, where he married, in 1728, Isabella Lewis, of Warner Hall, and died October 17, 1739. He had one child, Juliana, born May 17, 1731, died 12 May, 1734. The descendants of John6 are numerous in Virginia. William Pryor was an early justice of York county; made his will, proved 25th January, 1646-'47, and appointed his brother-in-law, Jasper Clayton, executor of his English estate, and Capt. Thomas Harwood and Capt. Thomas Harrison, Gent., formerly of Ratcliffe, Middlesex county, Eng., executors of his Virginia estate. He left two daughters, Mary and Margaret who married Thomas Edwards, of the Inner Temple, London.(York county, Va., Records). William Bernard, of Purton, in Glocuester, purchased Pryor's estate in York county, just above Yorktown, and his wife, Anna, sold it to Robert Baldrey, who left it to Thomas Ballard, of the Council.(Ibid.)

PIONEER LEWIS FAMILIES by Michael L. Cook Indicates that Major JOHN LEWIS was the son of Col. John Lewis born about 1616-18 in Monmouthshire, Wales & grandson of the immigrant John Lewis & wife Lidia. Major JOHN LEWIS was born about 1639-40 probably in Monmouthshire or Brecknockshire, Wales and migrated to America approximately 1655 a few years after his father. He lived with the Mostyn family in Denbighshire for a time before emigrating. He married ISABELLA MILLER. They had 15 children. She married 2nd Robert Yard. Children of Major JOHN & ISABELLA were: Mary born about 1665, Edward born September 5,1667, Elizabeth born about 1668, John born November 30, 1669, William born about 1670, Nicholas born about 1671, David born about 1672, Zachary born about 1673, Thomas born about 1674, James born about 1675, Mildred born about 1676, Sarah born about 1678, Gawin born about 1680, Patience born about 1682, and Owen born about 1684. WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE QUARTERLY Series 1 Vol 9 pages 259-261 Lewis Family of Warner Hall…Now there was a John Lewis who has better claims than either Robert or Major William Lewis to be considered the propositus of the family of Warner Hall. This was John Lewis who patented 100 acres in Warwick county at the dead of Deep Creek, and in 1653 patented 250 acres on a branch of Poropotank Creek, in Glouchester county, which branch was then called Lewis’ Creek but formerly Totopotomoy’s Creek. At the foot of the later patent are given the names of those on account of whose importation he was entitled to the land (i.e., 50 acres for each), viz., John Lewis, probably himself; Lydia Lewis, probably his wife; William Lewis, Edward Lewis and John Lewis, Jr. (probably his sons). … "JOHN LEWIS, JR.," had a grant in 1655 for 250 acres at the main swamp of Poropotank Creek. As "Mr. JOHN LEWIS," he patented April 22, 1658, 100 acres in New Kent, northeast side of Cainhow’s Swamp, and in 1667, 2600 acres in New Kent and Glouchester on both sides of Poropotank Creek, "next below the plantation of said JOHN LEWIS," 600 acres of which was granted to said JOHN LEWIS by patent dated November 23, 1663. His residence in 1676 being near Major Thomas Pate’s, where Bacon encamped, he suffered severely from the depredations of his troops. In 1680, he was captain of horse in the militia of New Kent, and one of its justices. New Kent then took in King and Queen county as far down as Poropotank Creek. In 1675 he was termed major (in the foot service) and patented in New Kent 10,000 acres with Lieut. Col. John Smith, Capt. Philip Lightfoot, Mr. Thomas Royston and Mr. John Buckner (General Court Records).

*It is not known how many sons JOHN LEWIS and ISABELLA his wife had. Another son may have been Zachary Lewis who patented land in King and Queen in 1694, and in King William in 1703, and was ancestor of the Lewis family of Spotsylvania. (Haden's Virginia Genealogies p. 379.) OLD NEW KENT COUNTY HISTORY 975.543H Vol 1 Page 139 On 8 November 1658 JOHN LEWIS and James Turner were granted 1000 acres of land of sunken ground and marshes, called Lewis Island in New Kent County. Page 189-90 Chemonkins Dividend Capt. John West, Esquire, was granted on 6 May 1651, 1550 acres of land lying about six miles up York River above the fort (Fort Royal), on the south side of the river, bounded on the west by Mattadequin Creek, and on the east southeast upon Black Creek and southwest upon the mountain [Patent Book No. 2, page 313]. Capt. John West sold a part of his Chemonkins tract to Major William Lewis who was granted by patent 2600 acres of land on the southwest side of the York River including one half the divident commonly called Portholy alias Chymahocans, purchased by the said Lewis of Col. John West containing 1550 acres of land, bounded from the mouth of Mattadequain Creek south southwest towards the head of Tanxe Weyanoke Run. Mr. Joseph Croshaw’s line towards Chimahocans dividend, and 775 acres purchased of Col. John West and 1825 acres for the trqansportation of thirth-seven persons [Patent Book No. 4, page 55]. This was a large tract of land which extended up from Weanoke Creek to Mattadequain Creek and back to the bluff, which was designated mountains in the early patents. This land was devised by the will of Major William Lewis to JOHN LEWIS of King and Queen County [7Hening 377-379]. Col. JOHN LEWIS died before 1689 and his large landed Estate was divided between his two sons, Edward Lewis and John Lewis.

John Lewis received the tract lying in St. Peter’s Parish which was called Chemokins, and soon thereafter John Lewis, the younger, moved to New Kent and established his home on the land. He remained in New Kent until shortly before March 4, 1702, when he moved to Glouchester County and took up residence at "Warner Hall" which had passed to John Lewis and his wife, who was born Elizabeth Warner, daughter of Col. Robert Warner of Warner Hall. Page 266-7 JOHN LEWIS junior followed his father and became an important leader in King and Queen County, then New Kent. He was a justice of the peace, surveyor, an officer in the county militia, and probably, a vestryman in Stratton Major Parish. He married ISABELLA MILLER, daughter of James Miller of York County. JOHN LEWIS had increased his land holding by a patent dated November 23, 1663, to 1700 acres of land, and the head of Porpotanke Creek lying in both Glouchester and New Kent. Four years later he was granted more land as set forth in a patent dated August 16, 1667, which included his previous patents and added nearly a thousand acres more. Col. JOHN LEWIS had in all about four square miles of land in his plantation, and a grist mill to supply its needs. In 1676 Col. LEWIS suffered at the hands of the Rebels, who had a camp at Col. Pate’s plantation, close to Wood’s X roads, where Bacon’s followers under Major Bentley were stationed. This is about two miles away. The plantation of Major Thomas Pate has been called Bacon’s Quarters. Col. JOHN LEWIS and his wife ISABELLA had two sons: Edward Lewis born September 1776 and John Lewis born November 30, 1669. After the death of JOHN LEWIS in 1689, his widow, ISABELLA LEWIS, married for her second husband, Robert Yard, of Petsworth Parish. Robert Yard was a faithful churchman, and he served the church well until afflicted with the gout. Mrs. ISABELLA YARD died in 1703/4, and her body was buried in the LEWIS graveyard (we believe) by her first husband, which was not an unusual practice in early Virginia. There was no marker for the grave of Col. JOHN LEWIS found. Here Lyeth Interred the Body of Mrs. ISABELLA YARD Born the 24th of August 1640 and Departed this life ye 9th day of February 1703/4 aged 6_ years 5 months and 16 days. Edward Lewis, the older son and natural heir to the Lewis Plantation on the death of his father Col. JOHN LEWIS, inherited the large tract of 2600 acres of land, and his brother John Lewis, the Councilor of Warner Hall, Glouchester County, was possessed with an equal tract of 2600 acres of land lying on the south side of the Pamunkey River in St. Peter’s Parish called Chemokins. This had come into the Lewis ownership through Major William Lewis…. Capt. Edward Lewis died at the age of 45 in February 1713, at his plantation of Poropontanke Creek, Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen County. (ARMS) Here (lyeth) Inter’d (the) body of Capt. (Edward Le)wis ye son of Major JOHN LEWIS and his wife (I)SABELLA, who was grandson of John Lewis of (Monmoutshire and) was born near (this place ye 5th of) Septr 1667 and (Departed this life) ye 11th of Feby 1713 (Aged 45 years) 5 months and 6 days. JOHN LEWIS Deed 1667 New Kent Co, Virginia LEWIS To all and whosoever and now know ye that I the said 171 Berkley Knt governor do give and grant and on JOHN LEWIS two thousand acres of Land in New Kent and proper upon fiven of proper banke swamp beginning at the mount of a great branch north below the said LEWIS Plantation by the old and running westerly so the Land lying of the of and by by W ½ point west 2 poles to a hickory in Tymothy Lewis oak Line open along his Line W by N 19 poles to the marked trees of JOHN LEWIS’s line then along Est Lying N by N poles by S 60 poles to a white oake by a N 11 N 120 poles to a Small Red Oak N 1/7 point N 43 poles to a red Oak N 12 by N 111 poles to a Spanish Oak by a brqnch of Mahogany Swamp then along Line on Jim Land on Ely N 404 poles on E 47 poles to two red oakes by a grate No 21 poles to a white oake by a branch Nor five of the aforesaid then up the branch 53 poles to the corner of Geo Majie Land then along his Lyne N:260 poles to a marker the hear of possetion Swamp then Ety along John Chambers Land 2089 poles to a swamp upon the branch and Swamp this land from up land of John Aoy to in South Swamp then up bank swamp to a marked trees in the of said branches Lands from the said Land then N N W 80 poles N E 240 poles to John Land then along his Lyne E S 100 poles to a Mulberry has in his plantation EW By E 350 poles among Geo Sissims lyne of trees to a hickory then N 40 poles to a poplar in a branch oak on said branch E 3/4/ N 39 poles to a red oake S E by S 63 poles to a hickory S S N 84 ples to said road of Cobb branch then Downe along the branch to a poplar the S N ½ S 260 poles to a red oake in of then downe said bridge swamp and Swamp to the and to the Land where it began. Land being as follows. Eighty acres part through of Tymothy Lewis and one Thousand acres of and six hundred acres granted to the same Lewis by plat Dted the 23 November 1663 and the being hundred and Twenty being due by and for the Transfer of ninteen persons to have and to hold provided and Dated this Seventh August 1667. (19 people names-most names unreadable) William Jones, Morgan, Mary Bently, James Shepherd, Jeremy Morgan, Richard Moore, Tho Page, and Sarah.

JOHN LEWIS Deed 1668 New Kent Co., Va LEWIS To all etc to whom go now know yea that I the sayd BerkerlyCty governor etc give and grant unto an JOHN LEWIS one hundred acres of Land Lying in part County and on the NE side fo Caine hole swamp beginning at the red Oake tree of John Leoissone land next Edward Wadkins land and running WS V: 900 poles to Cain hole swamp then on several up along the Swamp to the head spring this land and John Kings then joining to the said Leoissone Land S by V: 140 pole to a red oake corner tree SSE ¼ 134 pole along the lyne of near for trees to the place where it began. The Land Grant being by and for the transportation of two persons and to have and to hold adjoining and paying present 22nd day of April 1668 Tho C. Squire Boone m. Sarah Morgan marriage certificate from Gwynedd Meeting records; Whereas Squire Boone, son of George Boone, of the county of Philadelphia and Province of Pennsylvania, yeoman, and Sarah Morgan, dau. of Edward Morgan, of the said county and province, having declared their intentions of marriage with each other before two monthly meetings of ye people called Quakers, held at Gwynedd, in ye said county, according to ye good order used among them, whose proceedings therein, after deliberate consideration, and having consent of parents and relations concerned therein, their said proceedings are allowed by said meeting: NOW THESE ARE TO CERTIFY whom it may concern that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions this 23rd day of ye 7th month, in the year of our Lord 1720, the said Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan appeared at a solemn assembly of the said people for that purpose appointed at their public meeting place in Gwynedd aforesaid, and the said Squire Boone took the said Sarah Morgan by the hand [and] did in a solemn manner declare that he took her to be his wife, promising to be unto her a faithful and loving husband, until death should separate them, and then and there in the said assembly the said Sarah Morgan did likewise declare [etc., etc., etc.]. Signed SQUIRE BOONE SARAH BOONE [Witnesses] Morgan Hugh, Cad'r Evans, George Boone, John Edwards, Mary Webb, Edward Morgan, Thomas Evans, Elizabeth Morris, Elizabeth Morgan, Cadw'r Evans, Dorothy Morgan, George Boone [Junior], Robert Evans, Elizabeth Hughes, Ja : Boon, Jno. Cadwalader, Mary Hammer, Wm. Morgan, Jno. Williams, Elizabeth Morgan, Jno. Morgan, Jno. Humphrey, Jane Griffith, Daniel Morgan, Jno. Jones, Mary Jones, Morgan Morgan, Jno. Jones, Ellin Evans, Jos. Morgan, Owen Griffith, Gainor Janes, Jno. Webb, Rowland Roberts, Samuel Thomas, Amos Griffith, John Evans and Robert Jones.

In the Rigney Homepage about Thomas Hanford and him being the first Martyr of Virginia in Bacon's Rebellion; We find out about an Ann Huddleston in York County, Virginia-During these nine years we catch an occasional glimpse of him in the courts. A deposition, in June, 1668, declares that passing by his cow pen he tauntingly bid "Ann Huddelstone's Dame" to go and rob the onion patch again. "Can you prove your words?" she indignantly said. "Yes," was the reply. He was sued for defamation of character. After the same manner, he accused Dr. William Townsend of purloining from Squire Digges's old field a foal which he himself had branded for Digges. In another suit he won 200 pounds of tobacco from Abraham Ray for damages done his (Hansford's) horse. And Thomas Reade, his servant, who ran away, was required by the court to make equivalent service for the cost and trouble of his capture. Thomas Hansford First Native Martyr to American Liberty a paper read before the Virginia Historical Society Tuesday, December 22, 1891 By Mrs. Annie Tucker Tyler Williamsburg Virginia. Edward Hearndon, also spelled Herndon which shows up on the deeds of Spotsylvania married Mary Waller and Mary Waller was also married to John Zachary Lewis.

Bruton Church, Williamsburg VA; Wm. and Mary Qrtly., Vol. 3, No. 3, 1895 Transcribed by Kathy Merrill for the USGenWeb Archives Special Collections Project
Bruton Church Lyon G. Tyler William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 3. (Jan., 1895), pp. 169-180. BRUTON CHURCH By the Editor.
NEXT after the College, the glory of Williamsburg is Bruton Church. When, in 1632, Middle Plantation (subsequently Williamsburg) was laid out and paled in(1), a parish of the same name was shortly created(2). Of the early history of this parish very little is known. When counties were established two years later, the line of division between Charles River county, subsequently York, and James City county appears to have passed through the centre of Middle Plantation(3). Charles River county, the parent potential of many new counties, stretched out indefinitely to the north and to the west. At Middle Plantation there was no danger from disease, for the surgeon of the Colony, Dr. John Pott, had given convincing evidence of its health-fulness by the purchase of a plantation called Harop, just on its borders(4), and his judgment was to be confirmed in future years by the unanimous voice of the Legislature(5). In this favored spot there were no mosquitoes(6); the air was "serene and temperate", and crystal springs burst from the "dry and champaign" soil(7). But the Indians inhabiting near were a real menace. The danger, in fact, of sudden death from this source made religion a constant factor in the lives of the early colonists; and the valor and intrepidity of the brave commanders at Middle Plantation, Lieutenant Richard Popely(8) and Captain Robert Higginson (1), did not diminish the people's trust in a higher protection. (1) Hening, I., 139, 199, 208 (2) York Records. (3) Ibid. (4) Hening, I., 208. (5) Hening, III, 319. (6) Hugh Jones's Present State of Virginia (7) Hening, II., 419. (8) Popeley owned 700 acres at the Middle Plantation (York Records). In 1627 he was given 1,500 pounds of tobacco by the Council, "he being a man that bothe heretofore and is still ready to do goo service to the Colony". He was born in 1608, in the parish of Wolley, Yorkshire, England. (Ancient Records, and Sainsbury MSS).

Page 170. By 1654 the "forest" to the northwest had received so many immigrants, that at the session of the Legislature that year "the upper part of York county, from the West side of Skimeno Creek to the head of Pamunky and Mattaponi rivers, and down to the head of the West side of Poropotanke", was created (2) into a separate county, called New Kent; and at the same session, that prt of York county on the river, which lay adjoining, "from the head of the north side of Queen's Creek as high as the head of Skimeno Creek", was made(3) into a distinct parish, and was called Marston. In 1644 a parish in James City, between Archer's Hope Creek and Martin's Hundred, comprising Harop and Farlow's Neck (subsquently Kingsmill plantation), was created (4), and called Harop parish; but in March, 1657-'58, this parish was united with Middle Plantation, and the two became known as Middletown parish (5).

In the same year (1658) Major Joseph Croshaw, whose daughter Unity married Colonel John West, Lord Delaware's nephew, gave to the parish of Marston one acre of his plantation called "Poplar Neck", near the "Indian Fields", for a church-yard, on which land there was already a church (6). There is a deed (7), dated March 5, 1659, from Ralph Simkins and Susannah, his wife, to Samuel Fenn (whose daughter Sarah married Thomas Claiborne, a son of the renowned William Claiborne), conveying 37 acres of woodland, "except two acres, part thereof, given formerly by the said Simkins to the use of parishioners of Middletown Parish, and on which a church is now building". In 1674 the parish of Marston was joined to that of Middletown, and the united parishes became known as "Bruton Parish (8)" (1) The tomb of his only child, Lucy Burwell, at Carter's Creek, Gloucester county, Virginia, speaks of Captain Higginson as of the "ancient family of Higginson", and as "one of the first commanders to subdue the country of Virginia from the power of the heathen". In 1644 he had charge at Middle Plantation. (2) Hening, I., 388. (3) Ibid; York County Records (4) Hening, I., 317. (5) Ibid., 498. (6) York Records. Joseph Croshaw and Robert Cobbs were vestrymen of Marston Parish in 1660, and Rev. Edward Foliott was the minister. (7) York County Records. (8) I have not been able to find the order requiring the change, but in the York records "Bruton" takes the place of "Middletown" and of "Marston" during 1674. In some late accounts Bruton Church has been called "Christ Church" and "St. David's", but the records show that the only name which it ever had was the name of the parish. See Perry's Hist. Coll., Virginia, 208, 298-300, 411, 530; Meade, McCabe, York Records, etc.

Page 171. name ever since retained, and derived from the Ludwell family, or from Sir William Berkeley, the Governor, who were from Bruton, Somerset county, in England. The first entry in the old vestry-book, now lost(1), bore date "April ye 18th, 1674", and from that time the distinction between Middletown and Marston parishes ceased; and in the deeds plantations in Marston parish are described as in "Bruton". Of Bruton parish, Rev. Rowland Jones (1640-1688), son of Rev. Rowland Jones in Oxfordshire, was the first minister. He was a graduate of Oxford, and an ancestor of Martha Washington(2). The two churchwardens in 1674 were Captain Philip Chesley(3) and Mr. William Aylett, both of York county; and the Honorable Daniel Parke(4)(Secretary of the Colony, and an ancestor of Martha Washington's first husband, Daniel Parke Custis), Mr. James Besouth, Mr. Robert Cobbs, and Mr. James Bray, were of the vestry; Alexander Bonnyman was the first clerk of Bruton. In November, 1677, the vestry determined(5) "not to repair either the upper or the lower churches in the parish", but that "a new church should be built with brick at the Middle Plantation". There were then, probably, three wooden structures for worship in the parish, corresponding to Middle Plantation, Harop, and Marston parishes, all three of which now composed Bruton, which stretched in an irregular manner from York River to James River, and was about ten miles square(6). We have evidence certainly of the existence of two such churches: Marston Church is constantly referred to in the York county records as being in the direction of the present (1) In some way the vestry-book disappeared during the late war. Fortunately, Rev. J.C. McCabe had the use of it in 1856, and he published many extracts in The Church Review and Ecclesiastical Register, Vol. VIII., 1855-56. References to the sketch in The Church Review, etc., will be made in this paper as "McCabe". A mutilated register of the parish exists. The entries run: Births, 1739-1792; Deaths, 1660-1751. The early deaths, 1660-1674, being those of persons living in Marston parish, show that the register must have been originally the register of that parish. Mrs. C. B.T. Coleman, of Williamsburg, has the register. I had a copy made for the College library. (2) Virginia "Historical Collections", XI., page 76. (3) Of Welford, Gloucestershire, England. Will proved in York county, Virginia, in 1674. His nephews, who were educated in England, left descendants in Virginia. (4) See Virginia Historical Collections, XI., page 76; also, Bishop Meade's Old Churches and Families of Virginia. (5) McCabe. (6) Rev. James Blair describes the parish in 1724 as being ten miles square. - Perry's Historical Collections - Virginia.

Page 172. Biglow's, "in the Indian fields near Queen's Creek"; and in the December, 1674, Thomas Claiborne and Sarah, his wife (who was Sarah Fenn), joined in a deed to convey the wife's inheritance in the old plantation of Ralph Simkins, "except the two acres on wch the Parish Church of Bruton now standeth, formerly given by Ralph Simkins unto the parishoners of Bruton". To the proposed brick building at Middle Plantation liberal contributions were made(1) by Rev. Rowland Jones, John Page, Gideon Macon, Martin Gardiner, Thomas Ludwell, Esq., and others. On 23d January, 1681, an agreement was signed by Capt. Francis Page to build (2) the brick church for "L150 and sixty pounds of good, sound, merchantable, sweet-scented tobacco, to be leveyed of each tytheable in the parish for three years together". The land on which the church was built, together with sixty feet of the same every way for a church yard, was a gift (3) forever from the "Honourable Coll. John Page".

On November 29, 1683, the new church was at length completed, and on the 6th day of January, 1683-84, being the Epiphany, Mr. Jones preached a dedicatory sermon. Special pews were set apart for the Governor and Council and the families of Col John Page of Middle Plantation, and of Col. Philip Ludwell who had married the Lady Frances, Governor Berkeley's widow, and resided at Greenspring, seven miles distant. The fees were fixed - for burial in the chancel 1,000 pounds of tobacco for L5, payable to the minister; for burial in the church 500 pounds of tobacco, payable to the parish; for a funeral sermon L2, payable to the minister; for reg- istering christenings, and burials 3 pounds of tobacco each, payable to the clerk of the parish; for digging a grave 10 pounds of tobacco, payable to the sexton. The minister's salary was fixed at 1,600 pounds of tobacco and cask annually (4). Among the benefactors of the church, besides those already mentioned, were Sir Edmund Andros, the Governor, who in 1694 gave to Bruton Parish a large silver server (5); Mrs. Catharine Besouth(6), who gave L10 by (1) McCabe. (2) Ibid. (3) McCabe. (4) Ibid. Perry (5) A server presented by Andros to James City Parish turned up in an out of the way place sometime ago, and is now at the Episcopal Seminary at Alexandria. (6) Mrs. Besouth was the wife of vestryman James Besouth, and widow of John Huberd, the brother of Mathew Huberd. Her daughter, Elizabeth Huberd, married Capt. James Archer, an engineer in Sir Herbert Jeffreys' regiment. His daughter, Anne Archer, married Major William Barber, burgess, justice, etc., and had Elizabeth, who married Leonard Claiborne, Capt. James Barber, etc.

Page 173. her will for the purchase of a piece of plate engraved with her name, and Mrs. Alice Page (1), who in 1698 gave "one gold pulpitt cloath and cushion of Best velvett". A church Bible was given by Capt. Mathews (2), which in 1724 "being in danger of spoiling by laying in the chest, Mr. Thomas Cobbs agreed to take, promising to send for another when the same shall bee required". A font stone was imported in 1691 (3), and is doubtless the one now in the church. In 1724 Rev. James Blair reported(4) that the church was provided with "a great Bible, 2 common prayer Books, the Homilies, canons, pulpit Cloths, altar and altar piece, Font, Cushions, Surplice, Bell, &c.", and that "there were 110 families in the parish". The church has at present the use of the following services of communion plate: 1st A service of silver, consisting of a large chalice and a paten, originally presented to the church at Jamestown, each vessel bearing the motto, "Mixe not holy thinges with profane", and about the rim, on the bottom, Ex dono Francisci Morrison, Armigeri. Anno Domi 1661". Francis Morrison, Esq., was at this time acting Governor of the coloney. The maker of this service, whose mark was "T.W." was also the maker of a celebrated cup owned by the Blacksmith's Company, London, 1655, and subsequently purchased at a sale for the large sum of L378. 2d. A service of silver-gilt, consisting of a paten and a (1) Will of Mrs. Alice Page, wife of Col. John Page, proved August 24, 1678. (2) The following notes regarding the Mathews family may be of value: Gov. Samuel Mathews, who married the daughter of Sir Thomas Hinton, lived in Warwick county, and died in 1660. Hening. "John Mathews, son of Col. Samuel Mathews, deceased," Mrs. Anna Bernard guardian, etc., 1671 - General Court Records. "Robert Bullock, son of William Bullock, who was son of Hugh Bullock", sues Col. Peter Jenings, guardian to "orphans of Coll. Mathews, deceased", 1671 Ibid. "William Cole, Esq., and Capt. John Mathews, trustees of Baldwin Mathews, orphan of Capt. Francis Mathews", etc., 1682 Ibid. "John Mathews, Esq., of Warwick county, and Elizabeth, his wife, sole daughter and heiress of Michael Tavernor, of York county," 1684-5 Ibid. "Baldwin, infant and only son of Capt. Francis Mathews, deceased", 1674-5 Baldwin Mathews, of York county, in his 68th year, found dead with his head resting on the table, etc. - Virginia Gazette, 1st April, 1737. Mary, daughter of Baldwin Mathews, married Philip Smith, of Northumberland county, and had Baldwin Mathews Smith, eldest son, and Mary, who married Thomas Buckner.- York County Records, 1751. Samuel Mathews' will, proved in Richmond county in 1718, mentions his sons John, Baldwin, and Francis, daughters Mary and Elizabeth, and kinsmen Dudley Digges and Baldwin Mathews. (3) Calendar of State Papers, I., p. 35 (4) Perry.

This information with the mention of Ann Huddleston in 1668 may give us information on Robert Huddleston born 1690. I say this because when we trace Edward Herndon back we find a Catherine Digges married to William Herndon in 1698. And in Series 'B' of the Huddleston Family Tables we find mention of a Mrs. Huddleston in York County in 1670. Edward Herndon is the son of this relationship and he is born 1678 in New Kent, Virginia and dies in 9 Mar 1758 Caswell, Caroline County, Virginia. His birthplace ties in with Elizabeth Lewis, who is the daughter of John Zachary Lewis and Mary Waller by her other marriage. William Herndon Born: 1649 Kent, England Married: 1677 Spotsylvania Co., Virginia to Catherine Digges Born: 1654 Hampton, Elizabeth City, Virginia Died: 1729 Caroline County, Virginia. Her father was Governor Edward Digges. BELLFIELD-The six hundred acres of land granted to John West extended eastward in the Mine Depot from Poli's Point on Felgate's Creek taking in what was then and is still known as "Bellfield", which was used during the war as an Aviation Training Camp and considered by naval flyers as one of the best landing fields in the country. The abandoned hangers and buildings are being salvaged as occasion arises for use of material. Here his son, John West, the founder of West Point up the York River, was born in 1633, who was the first child of English parents born in the York settlement. In 1650 the older West sold the property to Edward Digges Esquire (later Governor Digges), a son of Sir Dudley Digges, Master of the Rolls to King Charles The First. This plantation is noted as the scene of one of the first attempts by the Colonists to raise silk worms for the production of silk designed to compete with the Orient. He employed two Armenians to help him but the industry proved a failure. To this day there is left on this estate to remind us numerous mulberry trees transplanted from abroad, the leaves of which served as food for the silk worms. A massive tombstone still attests the presence of Edward Digges' grave near the site of the original home. The estate continued in the Digges' family for over one hundred years during which time it was noted for its flavored plant of sweet-scented tobacco known as the "E. Dees" and which never failed to bring in England "One shilling on the pound when other tobaccos brought not threepence". The original Bellfield house was a seventeenth century structure of brick but has long since disappeared, another of wood erected near its old foundations. The house being of no value, is occupied and rapidly going to decay. Naturally this is a particularly revered spot to Virginia antiquarians being from 1654 to 1656 the home of Governor Edward Digges, one time Colonial Governor of Virginia. The burying ground, a short walk from the house, holds four well-marked graves. (1) S To the memory of Edward Digges Esq. Sonne of Dudley Digges of Chilham in Kent Kn t & Bar t Master of the Rolls in the rain of K. Charles the First. He departed this life 15th of March 1674 in the LIII d year of his age, one of his Mag ty Councill for this his colony of Virginia. A gentlemen of most commendable parts and ingenuity, the only introducer and promoter of the silk manufacture in this colony. And in everything else a pattern worthy of all Pious Imitation. He had issue 6 sons and 7 daughters by the body of Elizabeth his wife who of her conjugal affection hath dedicated to him this Memorial. (Governor of Va. March 30, 1655-March 13, 1658, succeeding Richard Bennet) http://www.nwsy.navy.mil/mainpages/report/reportpage3.html

I have combined Robert Huddleston born 1690 of Spotsylvania with the unknown Huddleston born 1694 together to come up with the Robert Huddleston born 1690/94. The wording of what we can loosely call a will beings as John was the heir at law helps to clearify things. It states there was a will and the deceased Robert had wanted all of his children to have his stuff. John's selling of the stuff to a Robert lets us know the buyer Robert was the Revolutionary Soldier who had to buy since the other living Robert was to inherit because of the will and wouldn't have to buy. John seen to this. After determining this we can conclude that Thomas Huddleston who married Milly Tanner and Robert Huddleston the Revolutionary Soldier seem like cousins. If they are cousins means that their fathers were brothers or that Robert Huddleston born 1720 and 1734 are the same person. Two brothers named Robert would be highly unlikely. Therefore the only option left seems like that Thomas Huddleston and Robert born 1759 are halfbrothers because they had the same father but different mothers. After two years of study I found that they were real brothers when I finally discovered that Thomas Huddleston who married Milly Tanner in Amelia was also the same Thomas Huddleston who married Katherine Stratten in Powhattan. This means also that some children attributed to Katherine were actually Milly's. According to microfilm 1553493 Patron sheets, 1969-1991 1 title matching the film number, Thomas Huddleston who married Milly Tanner was born about 1736 and Milly Tanner was born 1740. The Spotsylvania Deeds by Armstrong Crozier concerning Huddlestons shows the first entry is in 1738. No Thomas Huddleston is shown in the Deeds but in 1746 a mention is made of a John Huddleston. Another John Huddleston in 1774 is shown in the Deeds. It is believed that Thomas had a wife before Milly but the only mention of a Thomas Huddleston married in Virginia that I can records of before that marriage is Thomas Huddleston who married Usille Moore in Lunenburg in 1758 and LDS shows that Thomas to be born about 1730 and Usille's father to be William Moore with no mention of a mother.

It is difficult to explain the relationships of the different Robert Huddlestons. Robert Huddleston born about 1690 has son born about 1720. The Robert Huddleston born about 1690 was of Spottsylvania the territory and his son, the one about 1720 came along about the time Spotsylvania the county was started. Robert Huddleston born about 1720 only had two sons that we know about: Thomas and George. What information we have on the Spotsylvania Huddleston on the Spotsylvania Deeds starts in a 1738 entry. There is no Thomas in the Spotsylvania Deeds. Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955
In researching Robert Huddleston born 1720 we find he had a unknown father born 1694 and there was a Robert Huddleston born in 1690. In researching Robert Huddleston born 1734 we don't know anything about his parents.[Submission Number: 333796-061899191740 of FamilySearch which is the work of Ronald Coleman and is one huge file! It shows the descent of the Spotsylvania Huddlestons from Robert Huddleston born about 1690 and his son Robert Huddleston born about 1715.] Preface to Spotsylvania County Records by Crozier

Neal J. Brandon SR. in his submission explains it this way: Robert Sr. Huddleston Birth: WFT Est 1688-1717 Death: WFT Est 1740-1780

In the year 1720 an Act was passed by the Virginia House of Burgesses authorizing the formation of a new county, to be composed from territory constituting the then counties of Essex, King William, and King and Queen. The new county, whose boundaries "extended westward to the river beyond the high mountains"-the Shenandoah-received the name Spotsylvania, in honor of Alexander Spotswood, Governor of the Colony of Virginia. By the terms of the Act creating it, which became operative the first day of May, 1721, it was made one parish, called St. George. In the year 1730 this parish was divided into St. Gerorge's and St. Mark's. the latter parish, lying in the upper portion of the county, became, in the year 1734, the county of Orange, Madison, Culpeper, and Rappahannock counties. In March, 1769-70, St. George's parish was again subdivided, and a new parish was formed, known as Berkeley, lying within the bounds of Spotsylvania County. A History Of St. Mark's Parish, Culpeper County, Virginia By Reverend Philip Slaughter, D. D. Reprinted for Clearfield Company, Inc. by Genealogical Publishing, Co., Inc. Baltimore, Maryland 1994 Page 12 and 13 In May, 1730, the General Assembly, in view of the inconveniences arising to the parishioners of St. George's Parish by reason of the great length thereof, divided it by a line running "from the mouth of the Rapid Ann to the mouth of the Wilderness Run; thence up the said run to the bridge, and thence southward to the Pamunkey River. All the territory above that line to be called and known as St. Mark's Parish." Page 14 (of the same book) The churchwardens settled with the old vestry of St. George's and bought parish books. The parish lines were surveyed. Zachery Lewis was chosen as their attorney. Col. Waller was employed to bring up a copy of the oaths of allegiance to the British Crown, and of conformity to the Church of England, and the test oath against Popery - all of which the vestry had to take.

Writings Col. John Waller (II), Gentleman The following is a transcription of the will of John Waller II, Col., Gentl. Col. Waller's will was executed on the day of his death, 2 August 1753, and probated 1 Oct. 1754 in Spotsylvania Co., Va. John Waller, Gentl. Wit. John Semple, Thomas Collins, Larkin Chew, Harry Beverley. Ex. wife; sons, John, Thomas, William, and my son Benjamin Waller to be executor in trust. Leg. son John, five hundred acres of land in the Parish of St. John, in the Co. of King William, also 400 acres of land in Spotsylvania Co., surveyed by Nathnniel Claybourn, Surveyor, and patented in my own name Sept. 28, 1730: grandson, Pomfrett Waller; son, Thomas Waller, the land bought of Majr. William Todd, in Spotsylvania Co. adjoining the lands of Zachary Lewis, Majr. Rice Curtis, Mr. Vass, William Bradburn and Mr. Stubblefield; grandson John Waller, son of Thomas Waller; granddaughter Dorothy Quarles, daughter of my son Thomas Waller; son, William Waller, 400 acres patented in my name Feb. 21, 1726, now in Spotsylvania Co., formerly in King William Co. adjoining the lands of Zachary Lewis, and after my wife's death, all that tract of land I bought of Majr. William Todd in Spotsylvania Co., whereon I now live, and obtained a patent for Apr. 25, 1726, also my tract of land I bought of Capt. Philip Todd, in Spotsylvania Co., patented in my own name June 3, 1726, adjoining the land I live on, and Mr. Coleman's and Mr. Shackleford's; grandson, William Waller, son of William Waller; grandson, John Waller, son of William Waller; son, Benjamin Waller; son, Edmund Waller; grandson, John Waller, son of Edmund Waller; grandson, Benjamin, son of Edmund Waller; grandson, William Edmund Waller, son of Edmund Waller; granddaughter, Mary Waller daughter of Edmund Waller; daughter, Mary Waller, now the wife of Zachary Lewis; granddaughter, Betty Lewis; granddaughter, Lucy Lewis; granddaughter, Dorothy Lewis; grandson, Waller Lewis; great-grandson, John Zachary Lewis; grandson, John Lewis, my secretare that I left at Mrs. Margaret Gordon's, in the room I used to lie in when there. Unto all the rest of my grandchildren, except my granddaughter, Mary Meriwether, and except those above mentioned, as I have given young negroes apiece in this my will, twenty shillings, to be paid six months after my decease. Wife, Dorothy. To son, William Waller, and grandson, John Waller, son of Edmund Waller, all the residue of my tract of 1,000 acres of land that I took up in my son John's name Sept. 28, 1728, and by him conveyed to me. Codicil to the foregoing will, dated Aug. 15, 1754, with John Minor and John Sams as witnesses, revokes the clause devising to his son, William Waller, and his grandson, John, son of Edmund Waller, the residue of land patented Sept. 28, 1728, in the name of his son, John, and devises the said land to Leonard James Mourning Waller, son of Edmund Waller. (Page 216) On-line version compiled by Michael Wilson © 1998-2004 Michael Wilson © 1998-2004 Genealogy Planet ™. All rights reserved.

From studying the unknown Huddleston records and the birth of his son, it is safe to say that the birth is earlier than that[probably 1715 which does agree with Ronald Coleman's work]. His wife Elizabeth shows up there in about 1723 [She is known as Mrs. Robert Huddleston and as Elizabeth.] Their marriage also shows up as About 1739 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia Microfilm Elizabeth which we later find out is Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis 1621585 born 23 April 1724 New Kent, Virginia death 13 DEC 1780 which aligns with the older son John Huddleston who later shows to be the heir-in-law in the Spotsylvania book. Her birth is also shown to be about 1724 of Buckingham, Virginia. The answer comes in Submission Number: 333796-061899191740 by Ronald Coleman. It is here we find a Robert Huddleston born about 1690, his son Robert born about 1715 and his son Robert born 1739. Robert Huddleston born 1734, 1739 and 1743 are all the same as Robert Huddleston because they are all married to Elizabeth Carter in 1759. In other words, Elizabeth Carter could of been one year older than her husband and she was said to be born about 1738. This also would make John Huddleston born at an earlier date since his is mentioned as the heir inheritor and that also is mentioned as 1737 by Ronald Coleman Submission Search: 333796-061899191740 showing a Robert Huddleston born about 1715 as his father and Robert Huddleston born about 1690 as his father and all three of them match up to the ancestrial files of Microfilm: 1394405 Submission: AF83-104171. We know the older Robert Huddleston of 1690/4 was in Caroline County in 1735: 1735 THOMAS SHURLEY and MARY his wife acknowledged their deeds of lease, release and receipt to Robert Huddleston. (Thank you Shirley Association http://www.shirleyassociation.com/caroline_county_virginia.htm evidence researched by Ken Scislaw) With Robert Huddleston born 1690 being in Caroline County in 1735 and the birth of John Huddleston in 1737; It seems reasonable that Robert Huddleston of 1690/94 might of got married in Caroline County, Virginia.

There seems to be more than one Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis
General Lewis Littlepage of Spotsylvania: Soldier, Spy, and King's Confidant, 1762-1802~12/10/03 By Virginia Johnson, CRRL Staff
To the Spaniards, he was known as young Litlpese. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette knew him as the charming Little Peche. In Russia, to Catherine the Great and her favorites, he was the clever and ambitious Litlpaz. The doomed monarch, Stanislas Augustus of Poland, knew him as his loyal Litelpecz. Whatever the name, this often penniless Virginian's brilliant intellect and exquisite manners won him entry into the chambers, gaming tables, and salons of the last decades of Europe's Age of Enlightenment.
The Young and Orphaned Genius He was born to live the simple, indebted life of a colonial gentleman. His family came to Virginia from England in 1663 and established a plantation called South Wales, four thousand acres at the confluence of the North and South Anna rivers of the Pamunkey in Hanover County. Lewis' father, James Littlepage, married a lady of Spotsylvania's Bel-Air plantation, Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis. She was the daughter of a wealthy lawyer and burgess, Zachary Lewis II. This Lewis family was not related to George Washington's in-laws, but they were certainly respected in the community. James Littlepage would go on to become a member of the House of Burgesses in 1764. Before his death in 1766, he had amassed considerable debt, so much so that he walked about armed to avoid being taken to jail by the local sheriff. Nonetheless, upon his death there were some holdings to be distributed amongst his kin, although South Wales had to be sold to pay the family debts. The large family (young Lewis had one sister, and James Littlepage had five children from a previous marriage) moved in with Betty's brother. Betty married again in 1774, this time to Lewis Holladay of Belle Fonte (Bel Font) on Northeast Creek. Her new husband became a soldier in the Spotsylvania militia and distinguished himself at the Battle of Camden. Lewis' mother was 41 when she married Holladay, who was 23.

Elizabeth Betty LEWIS (AFN: FMCC-43) Birth: 9 Oct 1732, Spottsylvania, Virginia Death: 1809 Burial: 1809 Parents: Father: John Zachary LEWIS (AFN: 3150-36) Family Mother: Mary WALLER (AFN: 8MSL-V1) Marriage(s): Spouse: James LITTLEPAGE (AFN: 16WR-X42) Family Marriage: Virginia Spouse: Lewis HOLLADAY (AFN: FMCB-SD)Marriage: 15 Mar 1774 Belfonte, Braxton, West Virginia

Our Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis was older but had the same father but not necessary the same mother. John Zachary LEWIS (AFN: 3150-36) Spouse: Mary WALLER (AFN: 8MSL-V1) Marriage: 9 Jan 1725 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Va.

Elizabeth (Betty) LEWIS (AFN:Z527-H3) Born: 23 Apr 1724 Place: New Kent, Virginia. Mrs Robert HUDDLESTON (AFN: P6V6-N3) Birth: Abt 1723 Of Spotts. Co, Va

Family Group Record ROBERT HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1719 Of, Spotsylvania, Virginia Marriage: About 1739 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia MRS. ROBERT HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1723 Of, Spotsylvania, Virginia Marriage: About 1739 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia Children ROBERT HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1740 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia Death: 1774 JOHN HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1742 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia

ROBERT HUDDLESTON International Genealogical Index Gender: Male Birth: 1720, Spotsylvania, Virginia MRS. ROBERT HUDDLESTON Birth: About 1724 Of, Buckingham, Virginia Marriage: About 1745, Buckingham, Virginia ROBERT HUDDLESTON International Genealogical Index Gender: Male Birth: 1746, Buckingham, Virginia THOMAS HUDDLESTON International Genealogical Index Gender: Male Birth: 1748, Buckingham, Virginia Huddleston, North America Batch Number: 5007187 Robert Huddleston Spouse: Huddleston Marriage: About 1740 Prob, Spotsylvania, Virginia ROBERT HUDDLESTON Spouse: MRS. ROBERT HUDDLESTON Marriage: About 1745, Buckingham, Virginia Film or fiche number 1553395 Mrs Robert HUDDLESTON Birth: 1720, Spotsylvania, Virginia

When we study the two microfilms Batch Number: F507187 fiche number 1553395 and Batch Number: F502809 fiche number 1553229 we come up with a conclusion that Robert Huddleston of 1720 married two times as evident that his wives have different birthdates and the marriage dates are different. So evidently he married the first lady in 1739 at the Berkeley Parish and had Robert Huddleston born 1740 died 1774 and John Huddleston born 1742 and it doesn't tell us when he died plus it it doesn't tell us if either of these two married; then married the second lady in Buckingham in 1745 and had Robert Huddleston in 1746 and Thomas Huddleston in 1748. In the second marriage the son Robert Huddleston (1746) marries in 1759 and has a son George Huddleston born in 1760 and a son Thomas Huddleston born 1765 both of Buckingham

Mayes/Morgan Deed, 1736 - Amelia Co. VA Henry Mayes to Edward Morgan Amelia County Deed Book 1, Page 20 This Indenture made the Eleventh day of June in the year of the Lord One thousand seven hundred and thirty six Between Henery Mayes of Prince George County of the One part and Edward Morgan of New Kent County of the other part. Wittnesseth that the said Henery Mays for and in consideration of the sum of Twenty five pounds Currant money to him in hand paid by the said Edward Morgan the Recept whereof he doth hereby Acknowledge have granted given Bargained and Sold Aliened Endorsed and Confirmed and by these presents do give Grant Bargain Sell alien Edorsed and confirmed unto the Said Edward Morgan and to his Heirs for ever a certain Tract or parcell of Land lying and being in the County of Amelia on the lower side of Deep Creek and on both Sides the Sweathouse branch containing two hundred acres and bounded as followeth (to Witt) Beginning at Thomas Hobbys corner line and small hicory upon the main Deep Creek Thence East thirtynine degrees south two hundred and forty four poles to his corner white oak Thence North thirtysix degrees East two hundred and forty four poles to his Corner upon the Creek Thence up the Creek as it meanders to the beginning together with all Houses Orchards Gardens Fences and appurtenances whatsoever to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining to have and to hold the said land and premises with their and every of their appurtenances together with the reversion and Reversions Remainder and Remainders thereof unto the Said Edward Morgan his Heirs and Assigns forever and the said Henery Mayes for himself his Heirs Executors and administrators do covenant and promise and agree to and with the Said Edward Morgan his Heirs Executors Administrators and assigns that the said Henery Mayes his Heirs Shall and will at any time hereafter during the Space of Twenty years Make due acknowledge Execute and perform such other and further conveyance for the better conveying the premises unto the said Edward Morgan his Heirs and assigns as by the Counsel (?) of the Said Edward Morgan shall be Devised Advised or Required and that the said Henery the the (ibid) above sold Land and premises unto the said Edward Morgan his Heirs and Assigns against him the said Henery Mayes his Heirs and assigns and against all other persons whatsoever shall and will warrant and forever defend In wittness whereof the said Henery Mayes hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written. Signed Sealed & Delivered in presence of us Henry Mayes Rick Mosby John Bently Memorandum That on the Eleventh day of June One thousand seven hundred and thirty six quiet and peaceable possesion and sezor of the land within mentioned was made and done and delivered by the Lesser within named to the within named Edward Morgan the Lesse according to the form and effect of the within deed In wittness whereof the said Henery Mayes hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written In presence of Rick Mosby John Bently Henry Mayes At a Court held for Amelia County June 11 1736 Henry Mayes acknowledged his deed and Livery of Seisen to Edward Morgan and is admitted to record Samuel Cobbs Submitted by Valerie Burd

After three years of study we find that Constable Robert Huddleston is the son of William Huddleston, servant in 1640 of Jamestown who was transported to Accromack in 1666 to Lieutenant Henry Bishop's large tract of land. Henry Bishop dies and William Huddleston marries Henry Bishop's widow, Anne Bishop two years after William was transported or in 1668. The new couple after Anne Bishop ties up loose ends in St. Marys, Maryland concerning Henry Bishop's land in Maryland then move to York County and in the Huddleston Family Tables she is shown as Mrs. Huddleston of York County of Series B in 1670. They have a son, Constable Robert Huddleston born by 1690 because that is when the Constable first shows up in Spottsylvania Territory records and in 1720 he shows up in Spotsylvania County records. His wife, Elizabeth Morgan shows up first in the Germanna reords and then later in 1723 in the Saint George Parish records. Constable Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Morgan marry in 20 April 1732 and have three children. John Huddleston, the inheritor is born in 1732 (on deeds in 1742), Robert Huddleston is born in 1734 (marries Elizabeth Carter [1738 birth] in 1759) and Thomas Huddleston is born in 1736 {marries Milly Tanner [1740 birth] in 1774.

An Elizabeth Lewis born About 1704 Of, King And Queen, Virginia married James Shackelford Marriage: About 1734, Gloucester, Virginia and her death About 1756, Spotsylvania, Virginia. Her father is shown to be Zachary Lewis.

Then through researching the LDS we learn of an Elizabeth Lewis born in 1726 who was the daughter of John Lewis and Joanna Taylor and an Elizabeth Lewis born in 1696 who was the daughter of John Lewis III and Elizabeth Melson. Both of these Elizabeths were born in Accromack and that is the last known place of our William Huddleston, servant of Jamestown who shows up with Henry Bishop in 1666 at Accromack.

John Lewis, III As the oldest son, he inherited from his father, under the strict English system of primogeniture, which was followed in colonial Virginia, the "Warner Hall" home with all the surrounding estate. He made Warner Hall his home for his entire life. His first wife, Frances Fielding, was the mother of all his children. She died after only 13 years of marriage but John remained a widower only a short time. He had several children, the oldest of whom was only 11, and Warner Hall needed a Mistress too. About 1734, he married the widow of Robert Carter of Nomini, son of "King" Carter. She was born Priscilla Churchill, daughter of Col. William Churchill of Middlesex County. She had two children by Robert Carter; Robert, Jr (known as "Councilor" Carter) and his sister, Elizabeth. They also resided at Warner Hall. There are letters in existence written by John Lewis ordering clothes from England for these two step children from 1735 onward and also, invoices showing, in detail, the articles sent to them at Warner Hall. During its occupation by Col. John Lewis, Warner Hall probably was at its peak of existence as a prominent center of Virginia industry and social life. At this time, and perhaps earlier, the family acquired many of the fine furnishings and household treasures that were later destroyed by fire. Certainly, Warner Hall, at this period, was the home of more young children growing into the promise of prominent future usefulness than at any other time in its history. Col. John Lewis and his first wife Frances Fielding had seven children and though but three are known to have survived to adulthood, they spent at Warner Hall all the years of their adolescence. About 1735, Robert and Elizabeth Carter came to live at Warner Hall with their mother and stepfather. They were then aged 10 and 8 respectively and they remained at Warner Hall throughout their childhood. In addition, Col. John Lewis, with their uncle, Mann Page of nearby Rosewell, co0guardian of the orphan daughters of William Randolph of Tuckahoe - Judith and Mary Randolph (the grandmother of Chief Justice John Marshall).

So far as is known, Col. John Lewis did not take any prominent part in the political life of the Virginia colony until later in life. In 1748, he was appointed to the Council, the highest office to which a Virginia could then be appointed. He held, at one time, the rank of Colonel in the Virginia militia. During the first half of the 18th century, the Warner Hall estate still consisted of its original extent of some 3,000 acres. Like other prominent contemporary estates, it was, of course, a large plantation and farming formed the principal attention of its owner and his assistants. Col. John Lewis, however, was also considerably engaged in the shipping business and he was the owner of a number of vessels engaged in trade with distant ports. Warner Hall was an ideal spot from which to conduct such operations. Situated on the banks of the Severn River, it afforded easy access to the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay for foreign trade and to all its tributaries for communication with other parts of the Virginia colony.

During King George's War (1740 - 1748 - called the War of Austrian Succession in Europe), John wrote to Lawrence Washington, who was on the Cartegena Expedition with Admiral Vernon, saying "I heartily wish you safe here with Honour, that so wished for title, so much desir'd to be gain'd in the field of Battle; but I think I may as deservedly be acquir'd at home in the service of his County, Parish, and neighborhood, in Peace and Quietness". Home, hearth, and children must have been of primary importance to him.

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 9, No. 4.(Apr., 1901), pp. 259-165. "Mrs. Frances, the wife of Major John Lewis, died October 27, 1731." Colonel John Lewis married, second, Priscilla Churchill, widow of Robert Carter, of Nominy, and daughter of Col. William Churchill. He died January 17, 1754. Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 Deed Book E 1751-1761 page 280 Octr. 16th, 1770. John Huddleston of Johnston Co., North Carolina, son and heir at law of Robert Huddleston, late of Spts. Co., Va., Decd., to Robert Huddleston, now of Berkeley Par., Spts. Co., Va. Whereas, Robert Huddleston, Decd., did, by his last will and testament, desire that a tract of 113 a. in Spts. Co., whereon he formerly lived, should be sold and the money arising therefrom equally divided amongst all his children, and the sd. Robt., party to these preseants, having purchased the shares of all the sd. children; and the sd. John, being satisfied with his proportionable part and and being desirous that the will of his decd. father should be carried out, etc., by this Indenture, conveys the sd. Robert, 113 a. in Berkely Par., Spts. Co. Witnesses John Waller, junr., Lewis Craig, James Chiles, Andrew Tribble. No date of record. Deed Book G 1766-1771 Sept. 18, 1766. George Carter of Buckingham Co. to his brother John Carter of Spts. Co. L30 curr. 95 a. in Spts. co. on both sides Robinson's Swamp. Robt. Huddleston, Daniel Lindsay, John x Johnston, John x Pain, John Huddleston. Feby 2, 1767. Deed Book H 1771-1774 Jany. 10, 1773. Robert Huddleston of Berkely Par., Spts. Co. and Elizabeth, his wife, to Elijah Dismukes of Drisdale Par., Caroline Co. L40 curr. 113 a. in Berkelely Par., conveyed by John Huddleston, heir-at-law of Robt. Huddleston, Dced, to the said Robert Huddleston. Witnesses, Jno. Shurley, George Shepherd, Lewis Shackleford, Elizabeth Shurley, Wm. Graves Ashburn, John Kennedy. No date of Record.

Socio-Economic Development: Johnston County was created in 1746 from Craven County and named in honorof Gabriel Johnston, NC's royal governor.It originally contained most of what is now Wake, Wayne, Greene, and Lenoir Counties and part of Wilson. History of Johnston County, North Carolina

Overton County was formed in 1806 from Jackson County and Indian lands. The county seat is Livingston. Overton County, at one time, included part of the territory that eventually became Fentress, Clay, Pickett, and Putnam counties, and since many of the early records of these counties have been partially or entirely destroyed, the extant records of Overton County are important. The courthouse was burned in April of 1865. Neighboring Counties are Clay, Jackson, Putnam, Fentress and Pickett. Overton Roll#33: Register of Deeds: Vol.: A-C Sep 1801-1813 Tennessee State Library & Archives 27 Huddleston Simon Jackson indenture 312 Huddleston Simon / deed Overton: Roll# 33: Register of Deeds: Vol: A-C: Sep 1801-Feb 1813: Tennessee State Library and Archives. 260 Huddleston Simon Overton indenture 27 Huddleston Wiley Overton poa Vol. C: 1811-1813: Register of Deeds Simon shows up in Volume A but not B but does C and Wiley shows up in C but not A or B. Tennessee became a state in 1796. Overton County TN was formed in 1806 from Jackson Co. TN. Jackson County having been formed in 1801 from Smith County and Smith County was formed in 1799. Other Counties were then formed later form Overton County. In 1823 Fentress County TN was formed in part from Overton County. In 1842 Putman County was formed in part from Overton County. In 1870 Clay County was formed in part from Overton County. In 1879 Pickett County was formed from Overton and Fentress County. During the Civil War the courthouse in Overton County was burned. Many of the early county documents were destroyed. The deed books were not in the courthouse and did not burn. Some early court minutes survived also. Wills, marriages, and other important documents are scattered throughout these early deed books. All books can be seen in the Courthouse Annex on University Street or on microfilm at the Overton County Library, just off East Main Street in Livingston, TN. Goodspeed's History of Tennessee Smith County History Goodspeed Publishing Company Nashville, TN. 1887 Smith County was organized in accordance with an act of the General Assembly of the State, passed October 26, 1799, providing “That a new county be established by the name of Smith, to be contained within the following described bounds: Beginning on the south bank of Cumberland River, at the south end of the eastern boundary of Sumner County; thence north with the said eastern boundary to the northern boundary of the State, and with the said boundary east to where it is intersected by the Cherokee boundary, run and marked agreeably to the treaty of Holston; thence with that boundary to the Caney Fork of Cumberland River; thence with said fork, according to its meanders, to the mouth thereof; thence down the south bank of Cumberland River, according to its meanders, to the beginning.” According to this description Smith County originally contained a portion of what is now Trousdale, DeKalb, Putnam, Jackson, Clay and the greater part of Macon Counties. By an act passed November 6, 1801, the county was changed in size by attaching to it a large portion of Wilson County, lying south of the Cumberland River and west of Caney Fork, and by cutting off a portion on the east side to constitute the county of Jackson. And by a subsequent act of the same session of the Legislature Smith County was extended southward to the line between Tennessee and Alabama—thus causing the county to embrace a strip of territory extending from the northern to the southern boundary of the State. In 1805 an act was passed to reduce the county to its constitutional limits of 625 square miles, still allowing its northern boundary to reach the Kentucky line. And by an act passed January 18, 1842, the northern portion of Smith County became a part of Macon County in its formation. And in 1870 a tract in the northwestern part of the county was cut off to form a part of Trousdale County. And thus by these and other acts of the Legislature Smith County has been reduced to its present limits, embracing about 360 square miles. In accordance with the act of creation the first bench of justices of the peace for Smith County, consisting of Garrett Fitzgerald, Wm. Alexander, James Gwinn, Tilman Dixon, Thomas Harrison, James Hibbetts, Peter Turney and Wm. Walton, met at the house of Tilman Dixon, near Dixon Springs, on the 16th of December, 1799, and organized the court of pleas and quarter sessions by electing Garrett Fitzgerald, chairman thereof, and Moses Fisk clerk pro tempore. The next day the following county officers were permanently elected by said court, to wit: Sampson Williams, clerk; John Martin, sheriff; Chas. F. Mobias, coroner; James Gwinn, trustee; Daniel Burford, register; Bazel Shaw, ranger, and Benj. Sewell, State’s attorney. Amos Lacy, Silas Jonokin, Robt. Cotton, James Strain, James Wright, Wm. Levington and Henry Huddleston were then appointed constables, and thus the organization of the county was completed.
Tuesday, March 19, 1801 Transcribed by Janette West Grimes
"Ordered that Harmon Grags (?) be appointed overseer of the road lately laid off by John McDonald, Simon Huddleston and John Morgan, to begin on the South bank of Obed's River, to the top of the Ridge at the head of Eagle Creek, and that all the hands living between Irons (?) road and the Indian Boundary on the South side of Obed's River work under said overseer. And that George Smith be appointed overseer of the said road from the North bank of Obed's River to the State line and that the hands ( work said road ) living within the following bounds: Beginning where the State line crosses Spring Creek, thence a direct line to the Indian Boundary and along same to where it intersects the Northern boundary of the State and North along the same to the beginning." Here is a rather long item, part of which is not clear. We doubt if the name at the beginning "Harmon Grags," is correct, as we made our record for this article from the copy which is in the State Library and not directly from the old records themselves. In other words, we believe a mistake was made by the party copying the old records for the Library. The South bank of Obed's River meant the right - hand bank of the stream as one ascends the little river. Where Eagle Creek is, we do not know. Perhaps some reader can tell us. We suppose it is a stream running into Obed's River from the south or southeast. The Indian Boundary, as has already been set forth in a previous article, embraced a large territory extending from the Kentucky line southward to the present Caney Fork River and eastward, we suppose, to the Cumberland Mountains. It took in the upper part of Obed's River, which the Indians called "Ooccoahustehee." How long it was continued as a reservation for the Cherokee Indians is not known to the writer.
"A Venire for the ensuing County Court: viz: Thomas Draper, James Draper, Henry Huddleston, Lee Sullivan, William Sullivan, William Anderson, Uriah Anderson, John Fitzgerald, Christopher Fuller, William Robertson, Willeroy Pate, Edward Pate, Booker Pate, James Roberts, Isaac Green, Jacob Bowerman, Charles McClennan, William Marchbanks, William Kelton, Elijah Hedgecock, John Steel, Nathaniel Ridley, Thomas Keaton, Henry McKinney, Charles Carter, Thomas Williamson, Esom Graves, Jacob Jenkins, George Ausbrooks, James Fisher, James Armstrong, Thomas Wallace, Henry Sadler, William Holliday, George Leeper and Benjamin Holliday." Here we have a list that included some of the leading Smith County citizens in 1801.
Transcribed by Kathleen Hastings Whitlock
“Fort Blount, Monday, December 15, 1800. Court met according to adjournment, the following members being present: to wit: Garrett Fitzgerald, Charles Hudspeth, Thomas Harmond and Peter Turner, Esquires.” Thus reads the opening item of the beginning of the second year’s record of the Quarterly County Court of Smith County, Tenn. The first Court was held in December, 1799, in the home of Tilman Dixon at Dixon Springs. This, the fifth term, met at Fort Blount, on the east bank of the Cumberland, near the present ferry at the upper end of smith’s Bend of Cumberland River and not far above the mouth of Salt Lick Creek. Readers should remember that at the time of this meeting, Tennessee was only four years old as a State, that John Adams was president, that George Washington had been dead for a year and one day. In our present Macon County, only six years had passed from the first settlement which was made on White Oak Creek by Thomas Driver, who had come from Virginia with his wife and two children on a horse, with a second horse bearing perhaps all their earthly possessions except the two horses, and the axe and gun that Driver had carried. Driver was “heading for Kentucky,” but missed the State line by a half mile. In 1800 practically all of Middle Tennessee was covered with virgin forests and the infant State of Tennessee had hardly shed its “swaddling clothes.” The next item: “The Court then proceded to business, and the Venire being called, the following gentlemen were elected as Grand Jurors: Viz: James Roberts, John Jenkins, Charles McCleenan, Pleasant Kearby, William Marchbanks, Edward Pate, William Anderson, Charles Carter, Christopher Bullar, Stephin Pate, Esom Graves, Jacob Jenkins, Willeroy Pate, John Fitzgerald and John Anderson, James Roberts being appointed foreman of the said Grand Jury. Henry Huddleston was appointed to attend them.”
From the paragraphs above one can see the difficulty of separating Samuel Huddleston and Simon Huddleston which show up in Janie Ridley Bice's entry following because a Samuel and a Simon show up in her entries and there was a Samuel and a Simon attached to the Huddlestons of Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Here is text from Janie Ridley Bice's page: 1. Thomas2 Huddleston (Robert1). He married (1) Unknown Bef. 1762. He married (2) Millie Tanner Abt. 1774 in Buckingham, or Caroline, VA. Notes for Thomas Huddleston: Resided Buckingham Co. VA and Caroline Co. VA. His father was possibly Robert. who resided in Caroline Co. 1735 . Thomas married Millie Tanner in abt 1774. Notes for Unknown: wife name unknown at present; 2 children prob. by this marriage Notes for Millie Tanner: prob. b. Buckingham or Caroline Co. VA-prob. marr. abt 1774 Children of Thomas Huddleston and Unknown are: 2 i. Samuel3 Huddleston, died 1815. Notes for Samuel Huddleston: see pg 215, "History of Pickett County"; in Overton Co. Tn by 1803; dead by 1815 3 ii. Simon Huddleston, born 1762 in Va. Notes for Simon Huddleston: 1st son of Thomas Huddleston, with first wife, (unknown name) see Early Huddlestons, pg 215; in History of Pickett". Married Lucy Page Children of Thomas Huddleston and Millie Tanner are: + 4 i. Jarriott Morgan3 Huddleston, born 27 Jun 1775 in prob. Goochland, Va; died 1855 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. + 5 ii. Wiley W Huddleston, born 1777 in VA. 6 iii. Thomas Jr Huddleston, born 1778 in VA. He married Patsey Tanner 1799 in Overton, TN. Notes for Thomas Jr Huddleston: Married Patsy Tanner in 1799 with consent of father Thomas with Wiley as his bondsman; per "pg 215, "History of Pickett Co." 7 iv. John C Huddleston, born 1784 in VA; died Aft. 1860. Generation No. 2 4. Jarriott Morgan3 Huddleston (Thomas2, Robert1) was born 27 Jun 1775 in prob. Goochland, Va, and died 1855 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. He married Charlotte Hill 06 Jul 1807 in prob.Goochland, Va. Notes for Jarriott Morgan Huddleston: Birth: Overton Co. TN Census of 1850; page 138, Dw. #25; Bible Rec. from book, "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston Family" by T. Huddleston Marriage: 6 July 1807 Marr. date from Bible Records; her BD 19 Aug 1790 also in Fam. Bible & book, "J.M. Huddleston" by T. Huddleston. Death: "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston" T. Huddleston; tombstone record; see photo Notes: May 6, 1834 J. M. Huddleston sold Wm. Hill 118 ac. land in Overton Co. TN on Eagle Creek. William was a brother to Charlotte Hill Huddleston, Jarriott's wife.

On June 2, 1850 John Hale made deed to Benj. Flowers on waters of Eagle Creek land joining Thos. Hill on old Jarriott Huddleston place. For several years J. M. H. apparently lived on Eagle Creek before moving to the Huddleston farm at Byrdstown. Born in VA. parents married in Goochland Co. VA so likely maybe J.M. born there. J.M. married 1st- Nancy Page on 17 Sep 1801 with 2 sons born, George W 1808 & Thos.S. b.1810. After Nancy died he married 2)Charlotte Hill and had 10 more children. Notes for Charlotte Hill: Birth: 1850 census, Ov.Co. TN, page 138, Dw.#25; birth per Bible Records in book, "Jarriott M. Huddleston Family", by T. Huddleston Marriage: per the book, "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston" by Tim Huddleston; in Bible records Death: photo of tombstone taken 10/96 by J. Bice; also "Gone But Not Forgotten" Cemeteries of Pickett Co. TN. pg 165 Children of Jarriott Huddleston and Charlotte Hill are: 8 i. George Washington C4 Huddleston, born 08 May 1808; died 11 Dec 1885. He married (1) Elizabeth Ann. He married (2) Mary Francis Blankenship 03 May 1859. Notes for George Washington C Huddleston: married Eliz Ann ? 2) Mary Francis Blankenship 3 May 1859; 10 ch. by 1st; 11 by 2nd 9 ii. Thomas S Huddleston, born 15 Oct 1810; died 1864. He married Jane Zachary. Notes for Thomas S Huddleston: Birth & Death: per book, "J. M. Huddleston" by T. Huddleston, bible rec. Marriage: Jane Zachary b.1815-1888 Notes: shot by a Confederate guerilla because son was Union army. + 10 iii. Wiley H Huddleston, born 18 Aug 1812 in TN; died 29 Jan 1881 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. 11 iv. John B Huddleston, born 18 Feb 1815; died Jan 1901. He married Mary Ferguson.

Notes for John B Huddleston: Birth: Ov. Co. TN. Census, 1850, page 122, Dw. 841 Death: book, "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston" by Tim Huddleston Marriage: Mary Ferguson + 12 v. Jarriott Anderson Huddleston, born 20 Aug 1817; died 1903. + 13 vi. Lucy A Huddleston, born 20 Jan 1820 in Overton, TN; died 12 May 1876 in Ky. 14 vii. Nancy H Huddleston, born 07 Jun 1822 in Overton, TN; died 27 Jan 1825 in Overton, TN. + 15 viii. Willis Madison Huddleston, born 21 Jan 1825 in Overton, TN; died 12 Dec 1862. 16 ix. Guston Benton Huddleston, born 14 Mar 1827 in Overton, TN; died 18 Sep 1901. He married Juda Story Bef. 1842 in TN. Notes for Guston Benton Huddleston: Birth: age 22 in 1850 Ov.Co.TN census, page 138; Dw.#23 wife, Juda (Story), 22, John 2, Charlotte 1. Juda was dau. of Archibald Story and gr-dau of Roland Flowers 17 x. Charlotte J Huddleston, born 13 Mar 1830 in Overton, TN. She married Greenberry Murphy Bef. 1849 in TN. 18 xi. Wilbern Carroll Huddleston, born 01 Oct 1833 in Overton, TN; died 01 Jan 1906. He married Mary Polly Story Bef. 1860 in Overton, TN.

Notes for Wilbern Carroll Huddleston: Notes: married Mary "Polly" Story 19 xii. Keziah A. E. Huddleston, born 01 Oct 1833 in Overton, TN; died 15 Jan 1838 in Overton, TN. Notes for Keziah A. E. Huddleston: twin to Wilbern Carroll; died at 5 yrs.; prob. bur.Ov./Pickett Co. 5. Wiley W3 Huddleston (Thomas2, Robert1) was born 1777 in VA. He married Elizabeth "Polly" Hood Bef. 1799. Notes for Wiley W Huddleston: Shows to be Capt. of Overland Co. Militia in 1809; married Polly Hood, died after 1860 Children of Wiley Huddleston and Elizabeth Hood are: 20 i. Leonard4 Huddleston. 21 ii. Fielding Huddleston, born Abt. 1799; died 184. 22 iii. Elias W Huddleston, born 1808; died 1860. 23 iv. Pleasant Huddleston, born 1818; died 186. 24 v. Keziah Huddleston, born 1822; died 1853. 25 vi. Wiley J Huddleston, born 1824; died 1863. 26 vii. Vinia Huddleston, born 1829. 7. John C3 Huddleston (Thomas2, Robert1) was born 1784 in VA, and died Aft. 1860. He married Ann Page Abt. 1805. Notes for John C Huddleston: Information from "Early Huddlestons" pg 215; "History of Pickett Co." mar. Ann Page served in war of 1812, under Uncle Wiley Huddleston; 21 when married. Children of John Huddleston and Ann Page are: 27 i. William4 Huddleston, born 1810; died 1847. 28 ii. Thomas Huddleston, born 1814.

Notes for Thomas Huddleston: Married Malinda Stinson 29 iii. Elizabeth Huddleston, born 1815; died 1864. Notes for Elizabeth Huddleston: married James Amonett 30 iv. Joel Green Huddleston, born 1819; died 1864. Notes for Joel Green Huddleston: married Tennessee Goodman Generation No. 3 10. Wiley H4 Huddleston (Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 18 Aug 1812 in TN, and died 29 Jan 1881 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. He married Permelia C Brock 05 Oct 1833 in Overton, TN, daughter of George Brock and Mary Crawford. Notes for Wiley H Huddleston: Birth:1850 Census, Overton Co. TN, age 36, born TN; also Bible Records, "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston" by Tim Huddleston photo of both, pg 53, "History of Pickett Co.", T. Huddleston Marriage: Bible Records & Book, "J.M. Huddleston" by Tim Huddleston, College Press, 1973 - Married to Permelia Brock on 5 Oct 1833; see photo of both, pg 53, History of Pickett County. Death: buried Sims Cemetery, Lovelady Section of Pickett Co. by old family farm; both death dates for Wiley & wife are on page 53 of "History of Pickett County, TN. Notes for Permelia C Brock: Birth: Ov.Co. TN 1850 Census, pg 138; Dwelling #24, age. 35, Marriage & Death: "Jarriott Morgan Huddleston" by Tim Huddleston, College Press, 1973; see Bible Records, "History of Pickett Co. TN" by T. Huddleston Children of Wiley Huddleston and Permelia Brock are: 31 i. James P5 Huddleston, born 25 Sep 1835 in Overton, TN; died 21 Nov 1838 in Overton, TN.

Notes for James P Huddleston: Source:139626; BA:8636303, Sh.31;IGI 32 ii. Hayden B Huddleston, born 1837 in Overton, TN; died 1919 in TX. Notes for Hayden B Huddleston: Birth: age 13 in 1850 Census, Overton Co. TN; pg 138, Dwelling#24 Death: & marriage per book, "J.M. Huddleston Family", pg 2,3 photo on page 2 married: 1, Rebecca Stailey 2. Martha Ashinghurt 33 iii. George A Huddleston, born 24 Mar 1839 in Overton, TN; died 07 Jun 1863 in Chattanooga, TN. Notes for George A Huddleston: Birth: 11 in 1850 Overton Co. Census, TN; pg 138, Dw.#124 Also IGI So:820360;BA: 7213312,Sh 82 Death: CSA, died of disease near Chattanooga and likely bur. there Notes: Get Confederate Record + 34 iv. Charlotte E Huddleston, born 30 Jan 1841 in Overton, TN; died 16 Mar 1862 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. 35 v. Mary Huddleston, born 1843 in Overton, TN.

Notes for Mary Huddleston: Birth: age 7 in Ov. Co. TN 1850 Census; pg 138; Dw.#24 36 vi. Amelia J "Milly" Huddleston, born 1844 in Overton, TN. Notes for Amelia J "Milly" Huddleston: Birth: age 6 in 1850 Ov.Co.TN Census; pg 138, Dw.#24 37 vii. Cassander Huddleston, born 19 Jul 1845 in Overton, TN. Notes for Cassander Huddleston Birth: IGI Film 471821;Ord#01450; age 4 in 1850 Census, Ov. TN, pg 138,Dw.#24 38 viii. Creed T Huddleston, born 1847 in Overton, TN. Notes for Creed T Huddleston: Birth: age 3 in 1850 Census, Ov.TN; pg 138, Dw.#24 Notes: Deeds of Ov.Co. TN pg 591, compiled by E. Whitley,, GPC, 1983, says Creed t. Huddleston, late of Ov.Co, TN. deeded 200 acres on waters of Wolf River, known as Rich Flat to Wiley H. Huddleston; proved Overton Co. Oct. 6, 1857. 39 ix. Jarriott Anderson Huddleston, born 1848 in Overton, TN. Notes for Jarriott Anderson Huddleston: Birth: 2 in 1850 Ov.Co.TN Census, pg 138, Dw.#24 40 x. Janet Caroline Huddleston, born 1849 in Overton, TN. Notes for Janet Caroline Huddleston: Birth: age 1 in 1850, Ov.Co.TN; pg 138, Dw.#24 IGI-So:says 21 Feb 1851 BD, Pickett, TN 41 xi. Russell Wilborn Huddleston, born 24 Nov 1852 in Overton, TN.

Notes for Russell Wilborn Huddleston: Birth: IGI;SO:1396056, BA:8520405, SH.95 + 42 xii. Asa W Huddleston, born 21 Feb 1854 in Overton, TN; died 18 Jan 1909. 43 xiii. Pierson Wiley Huddleston, born 22 Nov 1855 in Overton, TN. 12. Jarriott Anderson4 Huddleston (Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 20 Aug 1817, and died 1903. He married Caroline "Netty" Brock Bef. 1848 in Overton, TN, daughter of George Brock and Mary Crawford. Notes for Jarriott Anderson Huddleston: Birth: age 32 in 1850 Cen, Ov.Co,TN, page 137, Dw.#16, wife Netty, aka Caroline Brock Huddleston; sister of Permelia? age 29, 3 children Death: buried at Hill Cemetery in Moodyville Notes for Caroline "Netty" Brock: Marriage: Jarriott A. Huddleston; buried Hill Cemetery see pg 161 of Pickett Cem. on Sheldon Rich farm, Moodyville TN Children of Jarriott Huddleston and Caroline Brock are: 44 i. Lucinda5 Huddleston. 45 ii. Charlotte Huddleston, born Abt. 1846. 46 iii. Permelia Huddleston, born 1847 in TN. 47 iv. Mary Amanda Huddleston, born 1848 in TN. 48 v. Pernina Huddleston, born 1859; died 1927. 49 vi. George Allen Huddleston, born 1862. 13. Lucy A4 Huddleston (Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 20 Jan 1820 in Overton, TN, and died 12 May 1876 in Ky. She married James H "Joe" Combs Bef. 1843 in Overton, TN.

Notes for Lucy A Huddleston: Married Joe Combs and moved to KY after 1856 Children of Lucy Huddleston and James Combs are: 50 i. Jarriott M.5 Combs, born 09 Aug 1843; died 01 Jun 1856. 51 ii. George Combs, born 02 Sep 1844; died 26 Apr 1864. Notes for George Combs: Died as Union Soldier during Civil War 52 iii. Thomas C Combs, born 01 Dec 1846; died 1922. 53 iv. Charlotte G Combs, born 03 Feb 1849; died 18 Dec 1917. 54 v. Clemansy Ann Combs, born 13 Jun 1851; died 07 Mar 1914. 55 vi. Siddy Combs, born 1852; died 1856. 56 vii. John W Combs, born 1854; died 1861. 57 viii. James Allen Combs, born 05 Aug 1856. 58 ix. Theophilus Offie Combs, born 30 Aug 1858. 59 x. Syntha G Combs, born 16 Jan 1861; died 1921. 60 xi. Ulysses Combs, born 1864; died 1941. 15. Willis Madison4 Huddleston (Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 21 Jan 1825 in Overton, TN, and died 12 Dec 1862. He married Mary "Polly" Ferrell Bef. 1847. Notes for Willis Madison Huddleston: Birth: 25 yrs in 1850 Overton Co.TN Census; page 147, Dw. #89 wife, Mary(Polly) Ferrell, age 26, Sarah 3, James 1, both born TN Notes: When they died during Civil War, his oldest brother, George W., took children until one girl married & took children. In 1856 he sold estate & moved to MO. Served in home guards in MO. Children of Willis Huddleston and Mary Ferrell are: 61 i. Sarah J5 Huddleston, born 14 Oct 1847; died 1908. 62 ii. James W Huddleston, born 12 Jun 1849; died 15 Apr 1863. 63 iii. Jarriott T Huddleston, born 18 Jan 1851; died 1881. 64 iv. Charlotte A Huddleston, born 01 Jul 1854. 65 v. Elizabeth Huddleston, born 01 May 1856. 66 vi. William Carroll Huddleston, born 05 Jun 1860; died 05 May 1933. 67 vii. Willis M J Huddleston, born 28 Apr 1862; died 02 Sep 1863. Generation No. 4 34. Charlotte E5 Huddleston (Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 30 Jan 1841 in Overton, TN, and died 16 Mar 1862 in Byrdstown, Pickett, TN. She married Elias M Ferrell 24 Feb 1856 in Overton, TN, son of James Ferrell and Elizabeth.

Notes for Charlotte E Huddleston: Marr:1860 Census, Overton Co.TN,Ov-70-278 (Sistler) Notes: Appears on 1860 Census as wife, 2 ch. Eliz. & Mary M(argaret) Wiley H. Huddleston father, Permilia Brock mother;film 1396056, Batch 8520405, Sh. 93 See "History of Pickett Co. TN", by T. Huddleston, 1973, College Press, picture of Elias Ferrell on pg 52 w/2nd wife, Mary Amonet and children Death: "J. M. Huddleston Family" by T. Huddleston, pg 3, pg. 12; "Gone but not Forgotten", Pierce, pg 150. Buried at the Griffin Holt Cemetery just east of the Tompkins Cemetery Rd on old Andy Fulton farm, currently owned by Mike Thompson. Only fieldstone markers. Early Ferrells and Griffins also may be here. Notes for Elias M Ferrell: Birth:1870 Census, Overton Co. TN, pg 378-379; dwelling 42 Marriage:1860 Census,Ov. Co. TN,Ov-70-278(Sistler);wife-Charlotte,2 ch.Susan Elisabeth 3,Mary Margaret 1yr; photo of Susan E. Ferrell Flowers, pg.173,174 Death:Charlotte (Huddleston); 1870 Census,Ov.Co.TN,Olympus,12th ED Pg 7,MF378-379), wife-Mary L.4 more ch.since 1860;Also see "Gone but not Forgotten", Pierce, pg 390, bur. Locust Grove Cem. Clinton Co. KY - across border from TN. Photo by J. Bice, 10/97 Notes for Charlotte: Born 20 Jan 1841, Pickett, TN. Parents were Wiley H. Huddleston, Permelia Brock; Susan Eliz. #1396155, B.8603007, S. 17; Mary M. #1395990,B.851208,S.19 Source for ch.names and births: LDS Film #820416,B.7216048, S.13 Elias birth: #820416, B.7216048, S.13; see photo of Elias on pg 52-"History of Pickett Co. TN", by T. Huddleston; A John Tidero, age 23, lives in home in 1860 census; an Alpha Tidero, age 22, living in brother, William's house down road. Children of Charlotte Huddleston and Elias Ferrell are: + 68 i. Susan Elizabeth6 Ferrell, born 09 Aug 1857 in Byrdstown, Overton, TN; died 27 Aug 1934 in OK. + 69 ii. Mary Margaret Ferrell, born 01 Dec 1858 in Byrdstown, Overton, TN; died 20 Feb 1932 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. 42. Asa W5 Huddleston (Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 21 Feb 1854 in Overton, TN, and died 18 Jan 1909. He married Sarah Elizabeth Jones Bef. 1879, daughter of Robert Jones and Jane Ashenhurst. Notes for Asa W Huddleston: See photo of bros & sisters; pg 51, 'J. M. Huddleston Family"; see family pg. 220-221 of "Hist.of Pickett Co."- shows m. Sarah E. Jones (older sis of J.D.Jones) and 8 children; photo of Sarah and all ch. in 1920. No Asa. death date for ASA per "History. Pickett Co."

Notes for Sarah Elizabeth Jones: Birth: 1870 Census, Overton Co. TN pg 382; also; pic. pg 15, "J. M. Huddleston Family" Notes: She was older sister of J.D. Jones; she married Asa Huddleston, younger bro. of Charlotte, who mar. Elias Ferrell; see pg. 220-221, History of Pickett Co.for all children, b. d. etc. married abt. 1879-80, prob. Ov. Co. Children of Asa Huddleston and Sarah Jones are: 70 i. Joseph C6 Huddleston. 71 ii. Robert L Huddleston, born Abt. 1881. 72 iii. Etola Huddleston, born 1883; died 1960. Notes for Etola Huddleston: married Tom Dillon 73 iv. Mae Huddleston, born 1885.

Notes for Mae Huddleston: married Levi Wilkerson 74 v. Ida Huddleston, born 1887; died 1968. Notes for Ida Huddleston: married Tom Lee ; 2. John Holt - no ch. 75 vi. James W Huddleston, born 1889.

Notes for James W Huddleston: marr. Ida Johnson 76 vii. Willie E Huddleston, born 1891. Notes for Willie E Huddleston: married Nannie Cross 77 viii. Permelia J Huddleston, born Aft. 1891. Notes for Permelia J Huddleston: married Tinker Guffey Generation No. 5 68. Susan Elizabeth6 Ferrell (Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 09 Aug 1857 in Byrdstown, Overton, TN, and died 27 Aug 1934 in OK. She married James Milton Flowers 17 Sep 1876 in Overton, TN. Notes for Susan Elizabeth Ferrell: Notes: 1st child of Charlotte Huddleston and Elias M. Ferrell, married Jim Flowers, sheriff of Pickett Co. 1894-1900. They sold the Old Hale farm and moved to OK about 1910. see photo page 90 "J. M. Huddleston Family" abt 1895 He was born 1855 died 1928 prob. in OK. Look for death records. Marriage: James Milton Flowers, 17 Sep 1876, Ov. Co. TN. "Marriages - Overton Co. Genealogical Records, 1867-69, pg 191, Whitley; see photo of family."History of Pickett Co. TN." T. Huddleston, College Press, 1973, pg 51 Notes for James Milton Flowers: Birth: History of Pickett Co.TN, by T. Huddleston; pg 176; photo of James M. & Susan E. Ferrell Flowers on pg 51.; son of Roland Flowers; Roland son of James; James son of Roland born 1764; d. 1837 Children of Susan Ferrell and James Flowers are: 78 i. Loney Bell7 Flowers, born 1877 in Overton, TN; died 1886 in Overton, TN. 79 ii. Roland Lee Flowers, born 1878. 80 iii. Elias Martin Flowers, born 1880 in Overton, TN; died 1947. Notes for Elias Martin Flowers: Married Laura Morgan; 2L Lowhorn; pg 178, Hist.P.C. 81 iv. Mary Evelean Flowers, born 04 Apr 1884 in Overton, TN; died 07 Dec 1923. Notes for Mary Evelean Flowers: She married Archielee Grady Huddleston 10/10/1879 - 8/15/1956; these were parents of Tim Huddleston; author of "History of Pickett Co."; birth death & marr. from this book 82 v. William M "Bill" Flowers, born 1885 in Overton, TN. 83 vi. Laura J Flowers, born 1887 in Overton, TN. 84 vii. Walter C Flowers, born 1889 in Overton, TN. 85 viii. Marvin P Flowers, born 1892 in Overton, TN.

Notes for Marvin P Flowers: twin to Arvin B. Flowers; married Alma? 86 ix. Arvin B Flowers, born 1892 in Overton, TN. Notes for Arvin B Flowers: twin of Marvin P. b. 1892; Marjorie Summers (my mother) knew him when little girl 87 x. Louise M Flowers, born 1894 in Overton, TN. Notes for Louise M Flowers: married Charlie Claborn; mother of Charles Claborn and Vera Claborn, Ok. City; 405/745-2536 descendants of Susan Ferrell & James M. Flowers 69. Mary Margaret6 Ferrell (Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 01 Dec 1858 in Byrdstown, Overton, TN, and died 20 Feb 1932 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. She married Joseph Dalton Jones Abt. 1878 in Overton, TN, son of Robert Jones and Jane Ashenhurst. Notes for Mary Margaret Ferrell: Birth: Family Bible Records owned by Marjorie M. Summers Ridley; and 1900 Census Record of Grayson Co. TX, 1870 Census, Overton Co TN. page 378-379, dwelling #42 Marriage: 1900 Census Record of Grayson Co. Tx, Microfilm # 12488860, Pct. #3, Enum 103, Line 50, St. #5 Death: Death Cert. #186, Okla. State Bd of Health; Rose Hill Cemetery Records and picture of tombstone, Tulsa, OK Notes: 1860 Census shows mother to be Charlotte (Huddleston), 1870 cen. shows Mary L. (Amonett); IGI SOURCE: FILM #1396056, Batch 8520405, S.93 , Elias' 2nd wife (after Charlotte died) Charlotte Huddleston's parents were Wiley Huddleston and Permelia Brock. Notes for Joseph Dalton Jones: Birth: 1900 Census of Texas; Microfilm Roll #1248860, Grayson Co. TX, Pct #3; shows Joseph Jones & wife Mary Jones, both age 41, he is head of household, she is listed as wife; both born in TN, also 1870 Census, Overton CO TN,pg 382, Marriage:1900 Census, Grayson Co. Tx; Pct #3, listed as head of household; wife - Mary, age 41, both born in TN; Microfilm Roll #1248860-/FHL‚/Salt Lake Death: Ok. State of Health, death certificate, reg. #72253, buried Rose Hill Cemetery, Tulsa, OK Children of Mary Ferrell and Joseph Jones are: 88 i. Elthy Maud7 Jones, born Mar 1885 in Pickett, TN. 89 ii. Robert Jones, born Apr 1886 in Overton, TN. Notes for Robert Jones: Son of Joseph Dalton Jones Birth:Grayson Co TX Census of 1900-MF1248860 90 iii. Winburn "Winn" Jones, born Jul 1889 in Pickett, TN. + 91 iv. Nora Evelynia Jones, born 02 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN; died 02 May 1981 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. 92 v. Cora Margaret Jane Jones, born Mar 1892 in Ky; died May 1990 in Bernice, OK. 93 vi. Joseph Edward Jones, born May 1895 in Grayson, TX. 94 vii. Ruby Jones, born Feb 1897 in Grayson, TX. 95 viii. Bessie Jones, born Oct 1898 in Grayson, TX; died Abt. 1978 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. 96 ix. Jack Jones, born 1900 in Grayson, TX. Generation No. 6 91. Nora Evelynia7 Jones (Mary Margaret6 Ferrell, Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 02 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN, and died 02 May 1981 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. She married Lewis Stewart Summers 26 Sep 1909 in Erick, Beckham, OK, son of Louis Summers and Florence Roach.

Notes for Nora Evelynia Jones: Birth: 1900 Fed US Census, Grayson County, TX Microfilm #1248860/FHL SLC; Precinct #3, Listed as 4th child of Joseph & Mary Jones, Born TN in 1891 Marriage: Marriage License; Erick, Beckham County Court, OK. Married 26 Sep 1909 at residence of Rev Ben Vines, ordained Baptist minister of Erick, Ok. Witnesses were her parents, A.F. & T.E. Vines, & Sam Johnston of Erick Death: State of Ok, Dept of Health, Cert.#11446;Buried at Rose Hill Cemetery, Tulsa, OK beside her husband, Lewis Summers Notes for Lewis Stewart Summers: Birth:US Federal Census Records of 1900, Van Zandt Co, TX Pct 3; Microfilm #1248971, FHL/SLC, Page #S562, Enumeration Dst.#129 Marriage:Marriage License; Erick, Beckham County, OK, dated 26 Sep 1909 Death:State of OK, Dept of Health; File #11224; Children of Nora Jones and Lewis Summers are: 97 i. Josephine Florence "Pat"8 Summers, born 17 Mar 1911 in OK; died 21 Oct 1959 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. + 98 ii. Cleo Imogene Summers, born 10 Jan 1918 in Stewart, Hughes, OK; died 10 Oct 1988 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. + 99 iii. Augustus Norman Summers, born 02 Aug 1919 in Stewart, Hughes, OK. + 100 iv. Marjorie Madelyn Summers, born 18 Aug 1924 in Stuart, Hughes, OK. 101 v. Lewis Stewart Junior Summers, Jr, born 06 Jan 1924 in OK; died 14 Apr 1945 in Germany. Notes for Lewis Stewart Junior Summers, Jr: Was killed in Germany during World War II. Served in same unit as Bob Ridley. Generation No. 7 98. Cleo Imogene8 Summers (Nora Evelynia7 Jones, Mary Margaret6 Ferrell, Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 10 Jan 1918 in Stewart, Hughes, OK, and died 10 Oct 1988 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. She married Herb McCray Abt. 1935 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. Children of Cleo Summers and Herb McCray are: 102 i. Robert9 McCray, born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. He married Donna. 103 ii. Pat McCray, born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. She married John Wright. 104 iii. Joy McCray, born Tulsa, Ok. She married Jim Harper. 105 iv. David McCray, born Tulsa, OK 99. Augustus Norman8 Summers (Nora Evelynia7 Jones, Mary Margaret6 Ferrell, Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born 02 Aug 1919 in Stewart, Hughes, OK. He married Helen Hillman Abt. 1945 in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. Children of Augustus Summers and Helen Hillman are: 106 i. Norman Lewis "Rusty"9 Summers, born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. He married Patty. 107 ii. Vickie Summers, born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. She married Dave Mason 1974 in OK. 100. Marjorie Madelyn8 Summers (Nora Evelynia7 Jones, Mary Margaret6 Ferrell, Charlotte E5 Huddleston, Wiley H4, Jarriott Morgan3, Thomas2, Robert1) was born in Stuart, Hughes, OK1. She married James Robert Ridley 26 Apr 1946 in Wichita, Sedgwick, KS2, son of Charles Ridley and Hettie Hendrix. Children of Marjorie Summers and James Ridley are: 108 i. Margaret Jane (Janie)9 Ridley, She married (1) Clarence Genoa "Ras" Allen in Dallas, Dallas, Tx4. She married (2) Richard Edward Bice in Plano, Collin, TX5. Notes for Margaret Jane (Janie) Ridley: Margaret Jane (Janie) Ridley Bice has spent nine years in pursuit of her family tree. Her husband and daughters thought it would be a fun hobby to fill her lonely hours when her daughters went off to college. Now they get a busy signal when she is home because she is usually on her computer or the internet. When she is not searching out her roots, she works full time as a Texas Certified Real Estate Appraiser. She and her husband, Richard, own their own business and specialize in relocation appraisals in the Plano, Texas area. She is a member of several hereditary societies including the Daughters of the Revolution, Colonial Dames XVII Century, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Dames of the Court of Honor, Daughters of the War of 1812, and Daughters of American Colonists. Her greatest pride and joy is her family. Her husband, Richard, has been very supportive in her quest to find her roots. He has spent countless, much needed vacation hours driving all over Tennessee, Virginia, Arkansas and North Carolina looking at old home places, cemeteries, courthouses, and libraries. He has even helped Janie dig up iris bulbs in North Carolina, violets in Arkansas, and day lilies in Tennessee at the sites of her ancestor's former homes. Her daughters think her a bit obsessive about her past at times, but hopefully will appreciate their legacy one day and continue their mother's quest. Janie has given herself a deadline to complete her publication, "Ridley Roots", so she can spend time with her first grandchild, Drew Allen Ducote, who arrived 27 October 1998. Her second grandchild from daughter Wendy, is due to arrive in May, 1999. 109 ii. James Robert Ridley, Jr, born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. He married Connie Creel in Dothan, AL. 110 iii. Robyn Leslie Ridley, born in San Angelo, Tom Green, TX. She married Richard LeBlanc in Metairie, Jefferson, LA. Children of Margaret Ridley and Clarence Allen are: 5 i. Wendy Alane8 Allen, born in Garland, Dallas, Tx6. She married James Randall Lewis in Plano, Collin, TX. + 6 ii. Alicia Anne Allen, born in Dallas, Dallas, TX. 3. James Robert7 Ridley, Jr (James Robert6, Charles Adolphus5, Robert Courts4, James3, James2, George1) was born in Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. He married Connie Creel in Dothan, AL. Children of James Ridley and Connie Creel are: 7 i. Ashley8 Ridley, Stillborn. 8 ii. Jamie Ridley, Stillborn. 9 iii. Christen Ridley, born in Dothan, AL. 10 iv. James Robert Courts Ridley, born in Dothan, AL. 4. Robyn Leslie7 Ridley (James Robert6, Charles Adolphus5, Robert Courts4, James3, James2, George1) was born in San Angelo, Tom Green, TX. She married Richard LeBlanc in Metairie, Jefferson, LA. Child of Robyn Ridley and Richard LeBlanc is: 11 i. Brooke Lindsay8 LeBlanc, born in Metairie, Jefferson, LA. Generation No. 8 6. Alicia Anne8 Allen (Margaret Jane (Janie)7 Ridley, James Robert6, Charles Adolphus5, Robert Courts4, James3, James2, George1) was born in Dallas, Dallas, TX. She married Troy Bertram Ducote in 1994 in Plano, Collin, TX. Child of Alicia Allen and Troy Ducote is: 12 i. Drew Allen9 Ducote, born 27 Oct 1998 in Houston, Harris Co.,TX.

Robert was known as “King” Carter due to his immense wealth. He had a remarkable reputation as a Colonial Official and an agent for Lord Fairfax, V. At the age of 28, Robert entered the Assembly as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726 he served as acting governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Drysdale. He served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia, the first being, 1702-1711, and the second term, 1722-32. During his first term, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock region of Virginia. After acquiring some 20,000 acres for himself, he was succeeded by Edmund Jennings. When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres in the Northern Neck. He also had additional acquisitions beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. Robert’s gifted and productive life centered around the original Christ Church, a smaller wooden structure. His parents were buried within the chancel of the church. A historic marker outside of the Church reads: “Christ Church was built in 1732, on the site of an older Church by Robert (“King”) Carter, who reserved one quarter of it for seating his tenants and servants. It is one of the very few colonial churches in America that have never been altered, a typical early eighteenth-century structure. Robert Carter is buried here. At his death in 1732, his obituary in Gentleman’s Magazine described his estate to be “about 300,000 acres of land, about 1000 Negroes, 10,000 pounds in money.” The tombstones of Robert and his two wives, were placed at the east end of the old Christ Church. When Edmund J. Lee, MD wrote Lee of VA in 1894, he described the tombstones thusly: “They were very large, handsome, and elaborately carved. All are now destroyed, and the ground around is strewn with their fragments. Bishop Meade saw that of the husband, and wrote in his report of that church in 1838: ‘Among the latter [tombs], at the east end of the house, within a neat inclosure, recently put up, are to be seen the tombs of Robert Carter, the builder of the house, and of his two wives. These are probably the largest and richest and heaviest tombstones in our land.’ Bishop Meade adds: ‘Tradition has it that the congregation, which doubtless consisted chiefly of his dependents, did not enter the church on Sunday until the arrival of his coach, when all followed him and his family into it.’ He rebuilt and enlarged the church; the walls are very thick, at least three feet, and are yet sound. It has the old-style, square, high back pews, two of which, those nearest the chancel, are at least fifteen feet square.” The tombstones have been replaced by the church since that was written in 1894, and the inscription on his tombstone (taken from the original), : “Here lies buried Robert Carter, Esq., an honourable man, who by noble endowments and pure morals gave lustre to his gentle birth. Rector of William and Mary, he sustained that institution in its most trying times. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses, and Treasurer under the most serene Princes William, Anne George I and II. Elected by the House its Speaker six years, and Governor of the Colony for more than a year, he upheld equally the regal dignity and the public freedom. Possessed of ample wealth, blamelessly acquired, he built and endowed, at his own expense, this sacred edifice-a signal monument of his piety toward God. He furnished it richly. Entertaining his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal nor a parsimonious host. His first wife was Judith, daughter of John Armistead, Esq.; his second Betty, a descendant of the noble family of Landons. By these wives he had many children, on whose education he expended large sums of money. At length, full of honours and of years, when he had performed all the duties of an exemplary life, he departed from this world on the 4th day of August, in the 69th year of his age. The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and the orphans their lost father.” 3. Robert Carter, II b. 1705, Corotoman, Lancaster Co., VA, d. 12 May 1732, Nomini, Westmoreland Co., VA, m. 1723, Priscilla Bladen Churchill b. 21 Dec 1705, Nomini, Westmoreland Co., VA, d. 1763, Warner Hall, Gloucester Co., VA, (daughter of William and Elizabeth (Armistead) Churchill, Esq.). http://members.tripod.com/~Bonestwo/index-17.html Taken from the Carter Family page, this shows the line that Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis born about 1723 comes from. Priscilla Churchill by a prior marriage to John Lewis explains it. John Zachary Lewis also married Mary Waller and their daughter Elizabeth (Betty) Lewis born in New Kent, Virginia marries Constable Robert Huddleston in the Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania County, Virginia and from the deeds we find they were in the town of Fredricksburg, Virginia.
Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 Deed Book C-1734-1742 page 146 Nov 30, 1738. John Waller, Jr., of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., planters, to William Hawkins of Orange Co., Gent., to Henry downs of St. Mark's Par., Orange Co., Gent. L2 15s. curr. Lot No. 56, in town of Fredksburg. John Waller, Edwd. Hearndon, Jr.; Robt. Huddleston, Z. Lewis. Feby 6, 1738.

Die Sabbati, Octobris 26, 1644 British History Online House of Commons Journal Volume 3 26 October 1644 Subtitle: 1642-1644 Sponsor: History of Parliament Trust Year Published: 1802 Description: The official minute book of the House of Commons, covering the central period of the English Civil War Period covered: 1642-1644 Huddleston's, &c. Pass. Ordered, That Colonel Wm. Huddleston, Mrs. Bridget Huddleston his Wife, Mrs. Isabell Huddleston his Daughter, Mary Daften, her Maid, John Huddleston, Christopher Daften, George Dodgson, John Wright, Matthew Makarell, the Colonel's Servants, Francis Horner the Drummer that came with Dr. Bastwick, shall have Mr. Speaker's Pass to go the direct Way into Cumberland; provided they go to no beleaguered Garison: And that they carry with them nothing prejudicial to the State. (You will find information on Colonel William Huddleston and Bridget Pennington in "Lines of English Hudleston" as #15 in the Millom line by Annette Hudleston Harwood)
Punishment of Waller.
Mr. White reports the Amendments to the Ordinance concerning the Fine and Banishment of Mr. Edmond Waller: The which were twice read; and assented unto: And the Ordinance, with the Amendments, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence. Ordered, That Mr. Waller shall have Liberty to go abroad with a Keeper.
Banishment of Waller.
An Ordinance of Lords and Commons, assembled in Parliament, for the Fining and Banishment of Edmond Waller Esquire; Whereas it was formerly intended, That Edmond Waller Esquire, now Prisoner in the Tower of London, should be tried by the Commissioners appointed for the Hearing and Determining of Causes belonging to Military Cognizance, according to an Ordinance of both Houses of Parliament, made the Twenty-sixth of August last past: And whereas, since, upon further Consideration, and mature Deliberation had of and concerning him, and his Confessions of the Offence for which he stands committed, and of his Petition on his Behalf, preferred the Three-and-twentieth of September last, it hath been, and is thought convenient, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, that he be put to the Fine of Ten thousand Pounds, and Banishment; and that he be not further proceeded against before the said Commissioners, or otherwise put to further Question, concerning the said Offence: And whereas the said Edmond Waller hath thereupon paid and satisfied, to the Use of the Parliament, the said Sum or Fine of Ten thousand Pounds (of which he stands hereby fully acquitted and discharged): Be it therefore Ordained and Established, by the said Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the said Edmond Waller shall from henceforth stand and be a Person banished out of the Realm of England, and the Dominion of Wales; and shall be and stand, from and after the Sixth Day of November next coming, wholly discharged and freed from his Imprisonment aforesaid; and shall, within Eight-and-twenty Days after his Discharge of Imprisonment, go out of, and leave the said Realm of England; and thenceforth shall continue and remain under, and in the Condition of, such Banishment as aforesaid, not to return into the said Realm or Dominion, without the Consent of both Houses of Parliament: And if he shall return into the said Realm or Dominion, without such Consent, he shall incur such Punishment for the same as both Houses of Parliament shall think fit. And it is further also Ordained and Established, by the Authority aforesaid, That there shall be no further Proceeding whatsoever against the said Edmond Waller, by the said Commissioners, or by any of them, or by any other Person or Persons whatsoever, for or by reason of his said Offence, or of any thing concerning the same: And that the Sequestration of his Estate, and of every Part thereof, be wholly taken off, and hereby is wholly taken off, and discharged, from the said Three-and-twentieth Day of September last.

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 9, No. 1.(Jul., 1900), pp. 60-64. Page 63. WALLER. Through the courtesy of Rev. C. M. Ottley, vicar of Newport Pagnall, in Bucks, England, I am able to give the following record, from the Parish Register, of the Wallers of Newport Pagnall: "Doctor John Waller" and Mary his wife had issue: (1) William, born September 24, 1671,(2)John, born February 23,1673,(3)Mary, born May 23, 1674,(4) Thomas, born October 17,1675, (5) Steven, born November 24, 1676, (6) Benjamin, born March 19, 1678,(7) Edmund, born February 3, 1680,(8) James, born May 25, 1683,(9)Jemima, born August 31, 1684. Buried: Ann Waller, July 7, 1678, James Waller, son of John, January, 1683, Alice Waller, September 27, 1699. Mr. Ottley thinks "the family came from Beaconsfield, in the south of Bucks, where probably more and earlier records may be found." At Beaconsfield, in Bucks, was buried Edmund Waller, the poet, who died October 1, 1687, and there may be seen a monument with an inscription written on four sides. He married (1) Ann, daughter of Edward Banks, Esq., by whom he had a son, died in infancy, and a daughter, who married Mr. Dormer, of Oxfordshire, England. He married, secondly, Mary Bresse, or Breaux, by whom he had five sons and eight daughters, viz., Benjamin, Edmund, William, Stephen, a son, name unknown, Margaret, Mary, Eliza, Dorothy, Octavia and three daughters, with names unknown. Most of these names have been family names in the Virginia family. John Waller, of Newport Pagnall, Bucks, born 1673, is supposed to have been Col. John Waller, of Virginia, who married Dorothea King, and had issue: John, Thomas, William, Benjamin, Edmund, Mary, wife of Zachary Lewis. He names in his will, grandson Pomfret Waller, son of John Waller, and his wife names in her will Dorothy Jemima, daughter of Page 64. son Edmund. Col. John Waller's residence in Spotsylvania county was known as Newport, and his arms were the same as the poet Edmund Waller's.

This Elizabeth Carter is the daughter of Joseph Carter and Catherine Ammon. Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 Will Book B 1749-1759 page 10 Page 11 Carter, Joseph, St. George's Parish, d. Feb. 19, 1750, p. May 7, 1751. Wit. Robert Huddlestone, Wm. Pruitt, James Younger, Robert Durrett. Ex. wife, Catherine Carter; Mr. John Minor and my son, John Carter. Leg. wife, Catharine; son, John, tract of land bought of Benj. Matthews; daughter Mary Carter; daughter, Elizabeth Carter; son, George Carter, son, Robert Carter, the land where I now live after his mother's decease; daughter, Caty Carter. Little Caty is the proof because she marries Merideth ANDERSON. We know Robert Durrett at one time was married to Elizabeth Goodloe who was the daughter of Henry Goodloe and Elizabeth Weeks. Henry Goodloe was the sister of Mary Goodloe and she married John Bristow and she also married William Carter. Elizabeth Goodloe also married Joseph Brock. Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Deed Book D 1742-1751 Pages 170 & 171 June 25, 1745. John Talburt of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., and Margaret, his wife, to Jeremiah Stevens of same Par. and county. L12 curr. 36 a. in St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., on Cattail Swamp, of Mattapony River (joining Joseph Brock and the Orphans of Joseph Samms, near the Samms plantation), part of a tract granted granted Larkin Chew, by pat., June 4, 1722, and by him conveyed to Amey Sutton, and by sd. Sutton to sd. Talburt. Witnesses, Robt. Huddleston, Matthew Hubbard. Augt. 6, 1745. Will Book B 1749-1759 page 10 Warren, Thomas, Planter, Spotsylvania Co., d. Apr. 13, 1749, p. Dec. 4, 1750. Wit. Robert Huddlestone, Abram Rogers, Barbara Rogers, Ex. wife, Mary and son, Hackley Warren. Leg. son, Hackley Warren, 95 acres of land which I formerly gave to my daughter Rachel Hasken. Daughter, Elizabeth Brook; daughter Mary Buford; daughter Roxanna More; son, Lancelot Warren. To my wife, mary Warren, all the rest of my estate during her life. Joseph BROCK (AFN: H2PS-NK) B: Abt 1750 Of, Spotsylvania, Va M: Abt 1770 Of, Spotsylvania, Va Elizabeth GOODLOE (AFN: H2PS-GJ) Marriage: Abt 1770 Of, Spotsylvania, Va. Elizabeth Goodloe was the daughter of Robert GOODLOE (AFN: B5R9-Q3) Birth: 17 May 1711 Christ Church Pr, Middlesex, Virginia Christening: 27 May 1711 Christ Church Pr, Middlesex, Va Death: 5 Nov 1790 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania Co, Va Burial: Nov 1790 Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania, Va and Elizabeth GUINEA Birth: Abt 1713 Of Caroline Co., Va Death: Abt 1769 Marriage: 1750 Mary Goodloe and William Carter's children are the people mentioned in Will Book B 1749 just sited in reference. This information shows proof of the Goodloes and Huddlestons in Berkeley Parish, Spotsylvania with the advent of Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Carter marriage. The Brock relationship doesn't end here though because of the marriage of Nathaniel Brock and Mary Huddleston in Princess Anne County. Nathaniel BROCK (AFN: 1LR6-RCP) Birth: 2 Feb 1757, Princess Ann, Va Death: 21 Jun 1815 Farmington, Rowan, Nc Burial: Jul 1813 Farmington, Rowan, Nc Mary HUDDLESTON (AFN: 1LR6-RBH) Birth: 1 Jun 1753 <, Princess Ann, Va> Death: Abt 1784 Burial: Abt 1784 Marriage: 18 Dec 1778 Page 209. Thomas Huddleston born about 1675 Henrico County, Virginia death 1748; Virginia Wills and Administrations, 1632-1800 Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. copyright Baltimore 1977 Originally Published The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America Richmond, 1930 Compiled by Clayton Torrence page 219 Huddlesey Henrico Thos. 1726-son; Thomas Huddleston born about 1649 Henrico County, Virginia death 1726; son ; Thomas Huddleston born about 1675 Henrico County, Virginia death 1748 in Princess Anne County(This is taken from microfiche files). This Robert Huddleston and Elizabeth Carter are the parents of Robert Huddleston, the Revolutionary War Soldier.

Huddlesey, Thomas 1726 HENRICO COUNTY – INDEX TO WILLS AND ADMINISTRATIONS, 1655-1800. Could this 1726 information be regarding Thomas' birth and he was actually be the one who married Elizabeth Ridley Morgan and later Mildred Tanner. Since Mildred was born in Henrico and Thomas Huddlesey and Thomas Huddlesey's father John Huddlesee (Huddlesey) was born in Henrico; it makes sense that this line is different than that of William Huddleston, servant of Jamestown that shows up on in Accromac later and Robert Huddleston of Spotsylvania. The LDS establishes that Thomas Huddlesey is Thomas Huddleston and shows that there was a John Huddleston born in 1635/39.

Spotsylvania County Records by William Armstrong Crozier Copyright Baltimore Southern Book Company 1955 December Court 1750..."The will of Thomas Warren decd being exhibited and sworn in court...was proved by the oaths of Robert HUDDLESTON...." HUDDLESTON...Robert Jr...."Ordered that Robert HUDDLESTON Jr. be fined 350 # of tobacco for not appearing when called as a witness...." "Robert HUDDLESTON is allowed for 2 days attendance (as witness) for Joseph Carter... It is ordered that the sd Carter pay (Huddleston) 50 # of tobacco."

Yet they had the stoutest hearts, the most masculine intellects, and some of them were eloquent to a proverb; a perfect phalanx of Christian Spartans. About thiry of them were put in prison, some of them several times, but by preaching Jesus through the gates and on the high walls many were brought to Christ. Rev. Eleazar Clay, the guardian of the great statesman, Henry Clay, wrote from Chesterfield County to John Williams: 'The preaching at the prison is not attended in vain, for we hope that several are converted, while others are under great distress and made to cry out, What shall we do to be saved?' and he begged him to come down and baptize the converts. Crowds gathered around the prisons at Fredericksburg, in the counties of King and Queen, Culpepper, Middlesex and Essex, Orange and Caroline. They were preached to by Harris, Ireland, Pickett, the Craigs, of whom there were three brothers, Greenwood, Barrow, Weathersford, Ware, Tinsley, Waller, Webber and others whose names will be honored while Virginia exists. And there are some noted cases of holy triumph, as in the prison at Culpepper, whence Ireland, much after the order of Bunyan, who was 'had home to prison in the county jail of Bedford,' dated his letters, from 'my palace in Culpepper.' On the very spot where the prison stood, where powder was cast under the floor to blow him up, and brimstone was burnt to suffocate him and poison was administered to kill him; on that spot where he preached through the iron grates to the people, there the Baptist meeting-house now stands; and the Church which occupies it numbers more than 200 members. These diabolical schemes were all frustrated and, after much suffering, he barely escaped with his life; yet he says: 'My prison was a place in which I enjoyed much of the divine presence; a day seldom passed without some token of the divine goodness toward me.' Waller, a most powerful man, who before his conversion was the terror of the good, being known as the 'Devil's Adjutant and Swearing Jack,' spent 113 days in four different prisons, besides enduring all forms of abuse; but in Virginia alone he immersed 2,000 believers and helped to constitute eighteen Churches. Want of space demands silence concerning a list of most illustrious ministers and laymen, whose names will never be honored as they deserve, until some equally illustrious son of Virginia shall arrange and shape her abundant mass of Baptist material with the integrity of a Bancroft and the eloquence of a Macaulay. For three months in succession three men of God lay in the jail at Fredericksburg for the crime of preaching the glorious Gospel of the blissful God-Elders Lewis Craig, John Waller and James Childs. But their brethren stood nobly by these grand confessors. Truly, in the words of Dr. Hawks, 'No dissenters in Virginia, experienced for a time harsher treatment than did the Baptists. They were beaten and imprisoned; and cruelty taxed its ingenuity to devise new modes of punishment and annoyance. The usual consequences followed. Persecution made friends for its victims; and the men who were not permitted to speak in public found willing auditors in the sympathizing crowds who gathered around the prisons to hear them preach from the grated windows. It is not improbable that this very opposition imparted strength in another mode, inasmuch as it at last furnished the Baptists with a common ground on which to make resistance.' [Hist. Prot. Ep. Ch. in Va., p. 121]
Commissioned December 2, 1769 as Lower Spotsylvania Baptist Church, John Waller founded and became the first pastor of what now is known as Wallers Baptist Church-named in honor of John Waller and his nephew Absalom Waller. Absalom served as the second pastor of Wallers for over 30 years. At its organization, it had 154 members and there were "few, if any less than 1,500 members" during John Waller’s pastorate from 1770 to 1793. With over 230 years of continuous service, Wallers has the longest continuous service of any Baptist Church in the state of Virginia.
When reviewing the life of John Waller, we are also reviewing the life of many of the early settlers who came to the young colonies to escape religious persecution in Europe. England, who ruled the colonies, established the Church of England was subject to the law established by the church and dissenters were punished and jailed for their beliefs. This was especially true of the Baptists.

A GENERAL HISTORY OF THE BAPTIST DENOMINATION IN AMERICA, AND OTHER PARTS OF THE WORLD By David Benedict 1813 London: Printed by Lincoln & Edmands, No. 53, Cornhill, for the Author Read and Harris, particularly the latter, were men of great zeal and indefatigable diligence and perseverance in their Master’s cause. Their spirit was caught by many of the young prophets in Orange and Spottsylvania. Lewis and Elijah Craig, John Waller, James Childs, John Burrus, and others, animated by an ardent desire for the advancement of their Master’s kingdom, sallied forth in every direction, spreading the tidings of peace and salvation wherever they went. These plants were watered by the labors of the Spottsylvania preachers, particularly J. Waller, who, early in his visits to Goochland, baptized William Webber and Joseph Anthony, who, with Reuben Ford, had been exhorting, etc. previous to their being baptized. One William Mullin, afterwards an useful preacher, had moved from Middlesex and settled in the county of Amelia. When the gospel reached his neighborhood, Mr. Mullin cordially embraced it. Going afterwards, in 1769, on a visit to his relations in Middlesex and Essex, by arguments drawn from the scripture, he convinced his brother John, and his brother-inlaw James Greenwood, with several others, of the necessity of being born again. Of these, some found peace in believing, before they ever heard the gospel publickly preached. November, 1770, John Waller and John Burrus came down and preached in Middlesex They continued preaching at and near the same place for three days; great crowds came out. Waller baptized five; but persecution began to rage. Some said they were deceivers; others that they were good men. On the second day, a magistrate attempted to pull Waller off the stage, but the clergyman of the parish prevented it. The next day a man threw a stone at Waller while he was preaching; but the stone missed him, and struck a friend of the man who threw it. James Greenwood and others now began to hold publick meetings by day and by night; much good was done by them. Many believed, and only waited an opportunity to be baptized, there being no ordained preacher nearer than Spottsylvania. A HISTORY OF THE BAPTISTS By Thomas Armitage THE AMERICAN BAPTISTS VIII. THE BAPTISTS OF VIRGINIA
In the first record I found Robert Huddleston born 1734 of Saint Georges Parish, Spotsylvania, Virginia married to Elizabeth Carter born in 1738 of same place and they married there in 1759. Their marriage shows up on 3 microfilms 1394054, 1394338 and 1512608. It shows their marriage to be of Buckingham, Virginia about 1759 of Saint George's Parish, [Saint Mark's Parish is started in this same year so his birth might have been there with the addition of the new parish]. The marriage of Joseph Carter born 30 Apr 1704 who married Catherine Ammon born 1706-marriage 1 Dec 1731 means the Robert Huddleston born 1734 must of been the one who married Elizabeth Carter. Joseph Carter was cousin to Robert "King" Carter who is mentioned in the Germanna Site, which is a part of Spotsylvania County. [From Wolstenholme Towne's death toll was not separated in the death rolls. Wolstenholme Towne was resettled a year or more later but abandoned sometime after 1645. It may be that no trace of the town was apparent by the time planter Robert "King" Carter bought the land about 1709.][ Martin's Hundred Settlement Underground at Carter's Grove lies a history that predates the 18th century. In the 17th century, an English settlement known as Martin's Hundred existed on this land. But in the spring of 1622, a widespread Indian uprising in eastern Virginia left many of the inhabitants of Martin's Hundred dead or captured. Efforts to rebuild the settlement, including the Wolstenholme Towne fort, were eventually abandoned.)[Also, at the Germanna Site we find that Robert "King" Carter, in letters, acknowledges his cousin, Joseph Carter.) JOHN BRISTOW was born ca. 1649, in England; died in 1716, in Middlesex Co., Virginia; married (1st) MICHAL NICHOLS, daughter of JOHN NICHOLS, and, after her death, (2nd) MARY (GOODLOE) CARTER, widow of William Carter and daughter of George and Mary Goodloe, 8 January 1711, in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex Co., Virginia. Thank you, Bristow Family Association All material Copyright 2001 Bristow Association. Joseph Carter was the child of William Carter and Mary Goodloe (also spelled Goodloe and Gudlaw) who were married 2 July 1691 at Christ Church Parish, Middlesex, Virginia. Joseph Carter was born in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex, VA 1704. Joseph died 1751 in St George's Parish, Spotsylvania, VA, at 47 years of age. Mary Goodloe's brother Henry is listed on the road orders of the sources below. The source entry Jan 10, 1773 confirms the relationship of Robert Huddleston having a son named Robert Huddleston and the December 1750 shows the relationship of Elizabeth Carter's father, Joseph Carter. Robert Huddleston and his wife Elizabeth Carter, along with Elizabeth Carter's brothers and sisters were at Joseph Carter's funeral. page 11