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bullet Jerry Walker was born on 6 Sep 1945.

He was married to Joyce Murleen Barfield uk. Children were: Joyce Ann Walker, David Paul Walker.


bullet Joyce Ann Walker was born on 15 Mar 1967. Parents: Jerry Walker and Joyce Murleen Barfield.


bullet Adeline Warren was born in 1855. Parents: Andrew Jackson Warren and Hulda Kight.


bullet Andrew Jackson Warren was born in 1824 in Tattnal County,Ga.. He died in 1864. Andrew Jackson Warren came to Ware Co,Ga when he was 21 yrs old.He worked as a farm laborer on the farm of Jesse S. Sineath.He enlisted in the 50th Ga Vol,Reg Co B,4 Mar 1862 and died in service in 1864.
His widow Hulda married John Reid in 1867 an aged widower and school teacher of Ware Co.She had one son by him named:Thomas Joshua Reid b.1868 who married Sarah Jane James,dau of Rev Richard A. James of Clinch Co,Ga. Parents: William Warren and Mary Kight.

Children were: Mary Warren, Nancy Warren , Adeline Warren, Fannie Warren .


bulletFannie Warren was born in 1857. Parents: Andrew Jackson Warren and Hulda Kight.


bullet Mary Warren was born in 1852. Parents: Andrew Jackson Warren and Hulda Kight.


bullet Nancy Warren was born in 1854. She died on 18 May 1936. Parents: Andrew Jackson Warren and Hulda Kight.

She was married to William Joshua Thomas 29 feb 1882. Children were: Queen Victoria Thomas.


bullet William Warren was born in Tattnal County,Ga..

He was married to Mary Kight uk. Children were: Andrew Jackson Warren .


bullet Hazel Wigglesworth

She was married to Forest Jasper Jr. Beverly on 20 Aug 1947.


bullet Albert Remer Wildes was born in 1874. He died in 1952. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Alexander Flournoy Wildes was born on 29 Oct 1853. He died on 7 Feb 1933. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez .

He was married to Nancy Ellen Robinson uk. Children were: Ransel Hatteras Wildes.


bullet C.Walter Wildes was born in 1853. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet Cole Manning Wildes was born in 1881. He died in 1948. Parents: William Washington Wildes and Eliza Jane Beverly .


bullet Cora Mae Belle Wildes was born in 1909. She died in 1910. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas .


bullet Dewey Melvin Wildes was born on 15 Dec 1905. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.


bullet Donald Wildes Parents: William Wallace Wildes and Jean Shuman.


bullet Emma Wildes Parents: Gilbert Stanley Wildes and Ann Eunice.


bullet Etta Lugenia Wildes was born in 1858. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet George Martin Wildes was born in 1857. He died in 1887. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Gilbert Stanley Wildes was born on 16 Nov 1931. He died on 18 Nov 1992. Parents: Ransel Hatteras Wildes and Emma Mae Thrift.

He was married to Ann Eunice uk. Children were: Emma Wildes.


bullet Gladis Irene Wildes was born in 1915. She died in 1978. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas .

She was married to Aubrey Hand uk. Children were: Theron Hand, Virginia Victoria Hand, Patricia Hand, Loretta Hand.

She was married to George Lang uk. Children were: Patricia Lang.


bullet Issie Elizabeth Wildes was born in 1874. She died in 1946. Parents: William Washington Wildes and Eliza Jane Beverly .


bullet James Christopher Wildes was born on 14 Jul 1828. He died on 19 Aug 1912. Wildes,James C.,enlisted in the Confederate Army 20 Nov 1862,in Savannah,Ga. by Captain Jippins for three years or the duration of the war.Private,Company G,47th Georgia Infantry. Parents: Maximillan Wildes and Elizabeth Wilkinson.

He was married to Smantha Cowart on 11 Nov 1850.


bullet James Daniel Wildes was born on 6 Aug 1850. He died on 5 Nov 1923 in Nashville,Ga.. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.

Children were: Laura Wildes .


bulletJames Leonard Wildes was born in 1866. He died in 1945. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Jesse Wildes was born in 1826. He died in Nov 1857 in Collins,Ga. Parents: Maximillan Wildes and Elizabeth Wilkinson.

He was married to Matilda Cowart on 27 Dec 1849.


bullet Jessie Mae Wildes was born in 1922. She died in 1924. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas .


bullet John Wildes was born in 1830. He died on 30 Mar 1881. ST MASSACRE
“Boy’s, get your guns and let’s kill these damn Indians!” shouted Maximillan Wildes

THE LAST MASSACRE
“Boys, get your guns and let’s kill these damn Indians!” shouted Maximillan Wildes

The outburst was a bluff, and the Seminoles, who camped in the Okefenokee Swamp,
knew it. The Georgia pioneer heard a reply in broken English: “We know how many of
you there are, and how many guns you have.”

The husky man, who once remarked, “I’m able to take care of me and mine,” realized
now that he was powerless. The thought the he could have avoided this situation flashed
through his mind. Sarah and the children could be safe at a neighbor’s home if he had
listened to his wife, but his Scotch pride would not allow him to leave what was his.
And, he never dreamed the Indians would dare attack his farm. Weren’t Captain Dade
and the United States Dragoons, stationed less than four miles away? Forty soldiers
would surely put an end to any surly, resentful, and drunk savages. He had confidence in
himself and the militia. Where were they NOW?

The piney woods and SCOTCH SETTLEMENT IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY
whirled through his brain. Cheaper lands in Appling County had beckoned him. The
north side of the Altamaha River was being settled by many families in the early 1800’s,
but the land across the river, the “Red Side”, tempted him to move there. This Indian
territory that would become Ware County.

An inherent love for adventure dominated “Maxey” Wildes’ nature. He liked hunting
and fishing and during his youth, he developed a robust body and an unconquerable
mind. He knew how to blaze his way through the forest, so he established a home where
danger and death from the Indians were a constant menace. The forest afforded food for
himself and his marsh pony, and he little heeded the stress of the times, as long as he had
powder and lead for is “flint and steel” rifle.

In 1809, he married Sarah Wilkerson, who would bear him ten children. These children
now entered his thoughts: Mary Anne, only eighteen-years old, was frightened, not for
herself, but for the infant, his youngest, whom she clutched tightly in her arms; his sons
who would not see manhood or carry his name to succeeding generations. And the
visiting neighbor children, Alice Wilkerson and her little brother, what about them? And
his house? He had worked hard on the structure. Typical of the cabins found in
Southeast Georgia during the pre-Civil War period, his home was constructed of logs,
mortised and pinned together with wooden pegs. The floors were of puncheons, made of
flat slabs split from whole tree trunks, and the doors were swung on great wooden hinges,
while the chimney was made of “stick and dirt” with the fireplace extending halfway
across the end of the log cabin. There were no windows, only round holes for cocked
rifles.

Now, facing the circular openings, was the position of the father and son, Reuben, the
only one big enough to shoulder a gun, on that early July 22nd Sunday morning in the
summer of 1838. Wildes, however, had only one weapon.

His mind flashed back to wife Sarah. Her intuition should have been heeded – she knew
they were in danger. And, it was he who first saw signs of trouble, and had paced the
floor of the cabin, airing his anxiety: “I’ll tell you, I don’t like what I saw this afternoon,
I don’t like it.” His wife had questioned him repeatedly, but he refused to discuss his
“hunch” for fear of alarming them. Sarah begged him to take her and the children to a
neighbor’s house for the night. Pride aroused, he told her that she need not fear.

The day before the tragedy, early in the afternoon, he and Sarah had gathered and burned
“scenia” bushes for lye to make soap. Max heard the rustle of bushes a short distance
away. Looking in that direction, he saw several people hiding in ambush. His wife
didn’t stop to question his haste until that evening. It was at this time that a wagon drew
up, and the family went out to greet the two relatives who had come to spend the night.
All fears were briefly forgotten as the children played around a huge bonfire.

But, uneasiness was evident if one should have noticed the barn and domestic animals.
All during the night the dogs would bark furiously, stopping at intervals. Little thought
was given this disturbance because, usually, a stranger’s approach would have created
barking lasting until someone in the house made an appearance.

Daybreak presented a horrifying site. Going into the yard to gather embers from the
almost dead bonfire for a light, Mrs. Wildes heard a bottle hit the ground. She became
paralyzed with fear when she turned and saw the cause of the “thud”. Rushing into the
house, she awakened her husband. “Wildes, the Indians are outside!”

Maximillian Wildes had relived his life up to the moment. His decision came with the
firing of the first shot. The Indians, in a body of about fifty warriors, charged him,
wrenched his gun from his hand, and shot him through his chest. Mary Anne, holding the
baby, was beaten with a club. There was still one avenue of escape for the survivors.
The path to DuBuss Bay, near the home, was open. Mary Anne, holding the baby,
dashed toward the water’s edge, followed by Mrs. Wildes with the other children. The
teenage girl, the baby and five of the youngsters were beaten down with clubs. Mrs.
Wildes manages to get to the outer edge of the bay. She hid in some bushes and looked
back. Praying that some of her family would join her. She lost hope as she saw one after
the other of her children slain. Feeling that she had nothing more to live for, she gave up,
fell upon a log, and awaited her fate. Through DuBuss Bay, however, unknown to the
mother, four sons -- the oldest, Reuben, and Jim, Jesse, and John – and Alice, the little
girl who had come to spend the night, escaped.

News of the massacre spread to the neighbors who had heard gun shots. They hurried
toward the Wildes’ place and met the other boys who had escaped. Immediately, they
took word to a small company of soldiers under Captain Elias Waldron, stationed on the
edge of Kettle Creek about four miles away. The captain, fearing the Indians might
continue their march, ordered all the women and children in this section to gather in an
old fort and placed them under guard. The men and soldiers rushed to the scene of the
bloody massacre.

The home, so dearly loved by Wildes, was burned to the ground; the penned-up cows
were bellowing because of the odor of blood coming from dead bodies lying about. Teen
Mary Ann, still clinging to the now-dead baby, called out in a weak voice for water. A
soldier rushed to get his canteen for her, and with the first sip, she fell dead. The final
total of deaths in the last Indian massacre in Georgia was Nine; Mr. and Mrs.
Maximillian Wildes and seven children.

Responding troops noticed that the Indians had taken what they wanted and destroyed
what remained – their ceremonial dance of victory completed. They were gone. The
soldiers, unable to find a covering for the bodies, took the saddle blanket from their
horses, wrapped the bodies and laid them in the new cart Wildes had recently made and
buried them all in the same grave. The stump of a four-foot-high chinaberry tree, with its
spread branches, marked the grave.
** end of section I

BEGINNING OF DOCUMENT II (Information on the wife of M. Wildes)

Most accounts regarding the woman who married Maximillan Wildes lists her as either
“Elizabeth” or “Sarah” Wilkerson. Another possibility exists: on page 512 of the
Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia Vol. 5, an account of the descendants of John and
Wilkinson and Elizabeth Lee, show a “Mary” Wilkinson b.1805, as the wife of “Maxey
M. Wildes, b. 1803.

John Wilkinson was born in North Carolina about 1774 (or between 1770 –80) and came
to South Carolina where he was married Oct. 29, 1796, in Marlborough District, to
Elizabeth Lee, born 1777 in North Carolina. Nothing is known about their parents. They
moved to Georgia and settled in Bulloch County where they lived some twenty years or
more before moving to Ware County. Their children included the following who came to
Ware County: James, B. 1798, Willis, b.1799, Elizabeth, b.1803 – married Elisha Green;
Mary b. 1805 – Married “Maxey M. Wildes”, William Riley b. 1806, Daniel b.1809,
John Jr. b.1811, Jincy b. 1817 and Charlton, b. 1826. It is possible that Elizabeth and
Mary’s spouses were recorded in error and therefore Elizabeth would have rightly been
the spouse of Maxey and Mary the spouse of Elisha. Future research is necessary to
confirm such a theory. Co. Thomas Hilliard, in his report to Govenor Gilmer, on the
tragedy of the Wildes massacre, referred to Maximillian Wildes and “Maxey M. Niles”
(sic) making a link to this family of Wilkinson’s a strong possibility. Just how, I don’t
know.

Another Wilkinson, Delilah, b. 181-, according to the same account, headed a family in
Ware County in 1840 and 1850 and had several children. Whether she was a daughter or
widowed daughter-in-law of John and Elizabeth Wilkinson, cannot be determined. Her
children were definitely grandchildren of the elder Wilkinson and wife. Possible ties to
the wife of Maximillan Wildes have not been established either.

John and his family moved to Ware County about 1826. He was 1st Lieutenant of the
584th District Militia from 1828 – 1830. He was in the Indian War, serving as Capt.
James A. Stewart’s company of Ware County Militia, July 9th to Aug. 19, 1838 and Aug.
31st to Dec. 31st, 1838. His widow made her bounty-land application, Nov. 26, 1856 and
each time was granted 80 acres of bounty land for his Indian War Service. He lived in
Ware until about 1845 when he and his wife returned to Bulloch where he died Aug. 3,
1849. (His bounty land was not applied for until 1856) Stephen Carter was the
administrator of his estate which included lands in Bulloch and Ware Counties.

The Wilkinson widow returned to Ware County and made her home with son Daniel,
who lived awhile in Ware before moving to Wayne County .
END OF PART II

INFORMATION ON JOHN WILDES
John Wildes was born in 1830 and d. 30 Mar 1881. He married in 1848 to Sarah Jane
Nunez b. 30 Sept 1830 and d. 19 Aug 1909. John ran to a neighbor’s after escaping the
massacre. Harmon Van Renneslaer Jeffords had left home early that morning to help his
neighbor butcher a cow. Eurydice, his wife, like Sarah Wildes earlier, felt concern about
something unseen. And her husband was leaving to go four miles through the woods.
Pushing the only gun they had into his hands, she said, “I can bar the door, but you know
the Indians may be prowling around.” “All right, I’ll take it to keep you satisfied, but the
soldiers are on Kettle Creek almost in hollerin’ distance. We wont’ be seein’ no Indians
‘round these diggins’!” Harmon laughed. Eurydice barred the door, looked to see if the
children were properly covered and then went back to bed to rest a little before full
daylight. The sound of scampering feet, rasping breath and broken cries, alerted Mrs.
Jeffords that someone was outside. She rose quickly, opening the door in the pale dawn
to see little John Wildes. His clothes were wet and torn to ribbons and his face, hands
and legs were scratched and bleeding. When Eurydice heard his broken, sobbing words,
she froze with fear. Expecting the savages any moment, she work her own three children
and dashed four miles through the forests and swollen creeks to a neighbor’s house.

MARY ANN WILDES b.1850 d.1852
WILLIAM WASHINGTON WILDES b.Aug, 26, 1851 d. June 20, 1922 m. Eliza Jane
Beverly b.Aug 16, 1855 d. June 21, 1921
ALEXANDER FLOURNOY WILDES b. Oct 29, 1853 d.Feb. 7, 1933 m. Nancy
Robinson b.Jan2, 1855 d. Mar 30, 1938
MARGARET WILDES b.Nov. 17, 1855
GEORGE MARTIN WILDES b.Dec. 1, 1857 d.Apr. 21, 1887 m.Mar, 28, 1879 to
Elizabeth Harris b.Oct 14 1856 d. Oct 2, 1921
SARAH JANE WILDES b. Dec 1, 1862 d. Dec. 1, 1928 m. Edward Robinson b. Sept.
15, 1855 d. Feb. 21, 1932
JAMES LEONARD WILDES b. June 8, 1866 d. Sept. 21, 1945 m. Martha Malissa
Dixon b. Apr. 30, 1876 d. May 19, 1921 m.2nd on Nov. 28, 1921 to Maggie Tatum
PAGE WILDES – b. 1867 d. 1870
PHILIP EUGENE WILDES b. Mar 7, 1869 d. Mar 31, 1919 m. Mar 31, 1887 Laura
Jane Musgrove b. Nov. 14, 1868 (note: Philip had diabetes and lost a foot as a result of
infection shortly before his death at his brother’s home.)
ROSA BELLA ELIZA WILDES b. May 5, 1870 d. Jul. 27 1908 m. on Nov. 15, 1888,
James Edward Jones b. Nov. 28, 1876 d. Mar 24, 1955
ALBERT REMER WILDES b. Mar 12, 1874 d. Apr. 4, 1952 m. on Apr. 21, 1901 to
Sallie Rogers
End of this section

SCOTTISH ACCOUNT – POPULAR VERSION OF MAX’S ANCESTRY
Written by Carolyn Wildes Cunningham

Many of us have heard from our parents and read in our family history that Maximillan
Wildes came to the US from Scotland as a stowaway on a boat around 1800. I never
heard anything else about is parents or whether he had brothers or sisters.

From our family history, we learned that Maximillan Wildes joined “a Scotch settlement
in Montgomery county, a part of which was set aside to Tattnall County in 1801”,
according to an article published on page 47 of Descendants of Maximillan Wildes of
Scotland and Georgia, UPDATED 1984 , compiled by Mrs. Willis (Hazel Wildes). “he
learned of cheap lands in Appling coutny and , together with Willis Cason. William Guy,
Elijah Mattox and others from Tattnall county, located on the north side of the Altamaha
River, which was called the “White Settlement”, according to this same article. “He
moved later on the “Red Side” of the Altamaha - the Indian side, where he joined a small
settlement of Tattnall county contemporaries. This land was called the Red Side, of the
Altamaha afterwards was organized into the county of Ware. Also, we learned from this
article that Maximillan Wildes was married to Elizabeth Wilkerson in the year 1809.

In my research, at both the Federal Archives and Record Center, in East Point, Georgia,
and at the Georgia Archives in Atlanta, I have not been able to find any records to verify
these statements. For example, at the Federal Archives and Record Center, I found a
book titled Federal Naturalization Oaths for both Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, S.C.
for 1790 through 1860. The list of names contained in the book came from the Federal
Court Records, District of Georgia, Savannah. I could not find a listing for “Wilde” or a
“Wildes” or any name close to that spelling in the Name catalogue at the Ga. Archives. I
did find this listing: Maxey M. Wildes, lieutenant, Ware County; Jan 25, 1827- Mrch 18,
1828. (M.R. 1808-1829 p. 179)

But I have not been able to find any record that Maximillan or Maxey M. Wildes lived in
Savannah or the he resided in Tattnall County he and his family moved to the area that
became Ware County. I also cold not find any marriage records of our ancestor to
Elizabeth Wilkerson in the Marriage Records Abstracts 1805-1852, Chatham County, Ga.
at the Ga. Archives. If he had lived as a young teen in Savannah and moved from there
to the interior of Georgia, I thought it might be possible the he married Elizabeth
Wilkerson in Chatham County, I also could not find a record in case he married her in
Tattnall County.
NOTE: this is another account of the life of Maxey Wildes.
End of this section
NOTE: THERE IS ONE ADDITION TO THIS FILE TO FOLLOW – A PERSONAL
LETTER FROM A MEMBER OF THE WILDES FAMILY. WILL GET IT OUT
ASAP.
Sincerely,
Judy Strickland
Please excuse any typos – it’s 2:30am and I’m sure to have made some!!!!
-----------------------------------------------------------------
.
.John Wildes,Private Company K.26th Georgia Infantry.Living in Ware County,mustered in Savannah,Ga. 3 May 1862.Captured near Petersburg,Virginia 25 Mar 1865.Released 22 Jun 1865.Enlisted for duration of war by Captain McDonald.In hospital January 1863.Discription:Dark complexion,5 ft.8inches tall,grey eyes,iron grey hair.Signed payroll with his mark X.Ill in Savannah,furloughed to go home to recover.
(Muster Roll of Company H,26th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry,Army Northern Virginia,C.S.A.,Clinch and Ware Counties Georgia,"Forest Rangers").shows:Wildes,John--Private 3 May 1862.Captured at Ft.Steadman,Virginia,25 Mar 1865.Released at Point Lookout,Maryland 22 Jun 1865.

Parents: Maximillan Wildes and Elizabeth Wilkinson.

He was married to Sarah Jane Nunez in 1848 in Appling County,Ga. ST MASSACRE
“Boy’s, get your guns and let’s kill these damn Indians!” shouted Maximillan Wildes

THE LAST MASSACRE
“Boys, get your guns and let’s kill these damn Indians!” shouted Maximillan Wildes

The outburst was a bluff, and the Seminoles, who camped in the Okefenokee Swamp,
knew it. The Georgia pioneer heard a reply in broken English: “We know how many of
you there are, and how many guns you have.”

The husky man, who once remarked, “I’m able to take care of me and mine,” realized
now that he was powerless. The thought the he could have avoided this situation flashed
through his mind. Sarah and the children could be safe at a neighbor’s home if he had
listened to his wife, but his Scotch pride would not allow him to leave what was his.
And, he never dreamed the Indians would dare attack his farm. Weren’t Captain Dade
and the United States Dragoons, stationed less than four miles away? Forty soldiers
would surely put an end to any surly, resentful, and drunk savages. He had confidence in
himself and the militia. Where were they NOW?

The piney woods and SCOTCH SETTLEMENT IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY
whirled through his brain. Cheaper lands in Appling County had beckoned him. The
north side of the Altamaha River was being settled by many families in the early 1800’s,
but the land across the river, the “Red Side”, tempted him to move there. This Indian
territory that would become Ware County.

An inherent love for adventure dominated “Maxey” Wildes’ nature. He liked hunting
and fishing and during his youth, he developed a robust body and an unconquerable
mind. He knew how to blaze his way through the forest, so he established a home where
danger and death from the Indians were a constant menace. The forest afforded food for
himself and his marsh pony, and he little heeded the stress of the times, as long as he had
powder and lead for is “flint and steel” rifle.

In 1809, he married Sarah Wilkerson, who would bear him ten children. These children
now entered his thoughts: Mary Anne, only eighteen-years old, was frightened, not for
herself, but for the infant, his youngest, whom she clutched tightly in her arms; his sons
who would not see manhood or carry his name to succeeding generations. And the
visiting neighbor children, Alice Wilkerson and her little brother, what about them? And
his house? He had worked hard on the structure. Typical of the cabins found in
Southeast Georgia during the pre-Civil War period, his home was constructed of logs,
mortised and pinned together with wooden pegs. The floors were of puncheons, made of
flat slabs split from whole tree trunks, and the doors were swung on great wooden hinges,
while the chimney was made of “stick and dirt” with the fireplace extending halfway
across the end of the log cabin. There were no windows, only round holes for cocked
rifles.

Now, facing the circular openings, was the position of the father and son, Reuben, the
only one big enough to shoulder a gun, on that early July 22nd Sunday morning in the
summer of 1838. Wildes, however, had only one weapon.

His mind flashed back to wife Sarah. Her intuition should have been heeded – she knew
they were in danger. And, it was he who first saw signs of trouble, and had paced the
floor of the cabin, airing his anxiety: “I’ll tell you, I don’t like what I saw this afternoon,
I don’t like it.” His wife had questioned him repeatedly, but he refused to discuss his
“hunch” for fear of alarming them. Sarah begged him to take her and the children to a
neighbor’s house for the night. Pride aroused, he told her that she need not fear.

The day before the tragedy, early in the afternoon, he and Sarah had gathered and burned
“scenia” bushes for lye to make soap. Max heard the rustle of bushes a short distance
away. Looking in that direction, he saw several people hiding in ambush. His wife
didn’t stop to question his haste until that evening. It was at this time that a wagon drew
up, and the family went out to greet the two relatives who had come to spend the night.
All fears were briefly forgotten as the children played around a huge bonfire.

But, uneasiness was evident if one should have noticed the barn and domestic animals.
All during the night the dogs would bark furiously, stopping at intervals. Little thought
was given this disturbance because, usually, a stranger’s approach would have created
barking lasting until someone in the house made an appearance.

Daybreak presented a horrifying site. Going into the yard to gather embers from the
almost dead bonfire for a light, Mrs. Wildes heard a bottle hit the ground. She became
paralyzed with fear when she turned and saw the cause of the “thud”. Rushing into the
house, she awakened her husband. “Wildes, the Indians are outside!”

Maximillian Wildes had relived his life up to the moment. His decision came with the
firing of the first shot. The Indians, in a body of about fifty warriors, charged him,
wrenched his gun from his hand, and shot him through his chest. Mary Anne, holding the
baby, was beaten with a club. There was still one avenue of escape for the survivors.
The path to DuBuss Bay, near the home, was open. Mary Anne, holding the baby,
dashed toward the water’s edge, followed by Mrs. Wildes with the other children. The
teenage girl, the baby and five of the youngsters were beaten down with clubs. Mrs.
Wildes manages to get to the outer edge of the bay. She hid in some bushes and looked
back. Praying that some of her family would join her. She lost hope as she saw one after
the other of her children slain. Feeling that she had nothing more to live for, she gave up,
fell upon a log, and awaited her fate. Through DuBuss Bay, however, unknown to the
mother, four sons -- the oldest, Reuben, and Jim, Jesse, and John – and Alice, the little
girl who had come to spend the night, escaped.

News of the massacre spread to the neighbors who had heard gun shots. They hurried
toward the Wildes’ place and met the other boys who had escaped. Immediately, they
took word to a small company of soldiers under Captain Elias Waldron, stationed on the
edge of Kettle Creek about four miles away. The captain, fearing the Indians might
continue their march, ordered all the women and children in this section to gather in an
old fort and placed them under guard. The men and soldiers rushed to the scene of the
bloody massacre.

The home, so dearly loved by Wildes, was burned to the ground; the penned-up cows
were bellowing because of the odor of blood coming from dead bodies lying about. Teen
Mary Ann, still clinging to the now-dead baby, called out in a weak voice for water. A
soldier rushed to get his canteen for her, and with the first sip, she fell dead. The final
total of deaths in the last Indian massacre in Georgia was Nine; Mr. and Mrs.
Maximillian Wildes and seven children.

Responding troops noticed that the Indians had taken what they wanted and destroyed
what remained – their ceremonial dance of victory completed. They were gone. The
soldiers, unable to find a covering for the bodies, took the saddle blanket from their
horses, wrapped the bodies and laid them in the new cart Wildes had recently made and
buried them all in the same grave. The stump of a four-foot-high chinaberry tree, with its
spread branches, marked the grave.
** end of section I

BEGINNING OF DOCUMENT II (Information on the wife of M. Wildes)

Most accounts regarding the woman who married Maximillan Wildes lists her as either
“Elizabeth” or “Sarah” Wilkerson. Another possibility exists: on page 512 of the
Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia Vol. 5, an account of the descendants of John and
Wilkinson and Elizabeth Lee, show a “Mary” Wilkinson b.1805, as the wife of “Maxey
M. Wildes, b. 1803.

John Wilkinson was born in North Carolina about 1774 (or between 1770 –80) and came
to South Carolina where he was married Oct. 29, 1796, in Marlborough District, to
Elizabeth Lee, born 1777 in North Carolina. Nothing is known about their parents. They
moved to Georgia and settled in Bulloch County where they lived some twenty years or
more before moving to Ware County. Their children included the following who came to
Ware County: James, B. 1798, Willis, b.1799, Elizabeth, b.1803 – married Elisha Green;
Mary b. 1805 – Married “Maxey M. Wildes”, William Riley b. 1806, Daniel b.1809,
John Jr. b.1811, Jincy b. 1817 and Charlton, b. 1826. It is possible that Elizabeth and
Mary’s spouses were recorded in error and therefore Elizabeth would have rightly been
the spouse of Maxey and Mary the spouse of Elisha. Future research is necessary to
confirm such a theory. Co. Thomas Hilliard, in his report to Govenor Gilmer, on the
tragedy of the Wildes massacre, referred to Maximillian Wildes and “Maxey M. Niles”
(sic) making a link to this family of Wilkinson’s a strong possibility. Just how, I don’t
know.

Another Wilkinson, Delilah, b. 181-, according to the same account, headed a family in
Ware County in 1840 and 1850 and had several children. Whether she was a daughter or
widowed daughter-in-law of John and Elizabeth Wilkinson, cannot be determined. Her
children were definitely grandchildren of the elder Wilkinson and wife. Possible ties to
the wife of Maximillan Wildes have not been established either.

John and his family moved to Ware County about 1826. He was 1st Lieutenant of the
584th District Militia from 1828 – 1830. He was in the Indian War, serving as Capt.
James A. Stewart’s company of Ware County Militia, July 9th to Aug. 19, 1838 and Aug.
31st to Dec. 31st, 1838. His widow made her bounty-land application, Nov. 26, 1856 and
each time was granted 80 acres of bounty land for his Indian War Service. He lived in
Ware until about 1845 when he and his wife returned to Bulloch where he died Aug. 3,
1849. (His bounty land was not applied for until 1856) Stephen Carter was the
administrator of his estate which included lands in Bulloch and Ware Counties.

The Wilkinson widow returned to Ware County and made her home with son Daniel,
who lived awhile in Ware before moving to Wayne County .
END OF PART II

INFORMATION ON JOHN WILDES
John Wildes was born in 1830 and d. 30 Mar 1881. He married in 1848 to Sarah Jane
Nunez b. 30 Sept 1830 and d. 19 Aug 1909. John ran to a neighbor’s after escaping the
massacre. Harmon Van Renneslaer Jeffords had left home early that morning to help his
neighbor butcher a cow. Eurydice, his wife, like Sarah Wildes earlier, felt concern about
something unseen. And her husband was leaving to go four miles through the woods.
Pushing the only gun they had into his hands, she said, “I can bar the door, but you know
the Indians may be prowling around.” “All right, I’ll take it to keep you satisfied, but the
soldiers are on Kettle Creek almost in hollerin’ distance. We wont’ be seein’ no Indians
‘round these diggins’!” Harmon laughed. Eurydice barred the door, looked to see if the
children were properly covered and then went back to bed to rest a little before full
daylight. The sound of scampering feet, rasping breath and broken cries, alerted Mrs.
Jeffords that someone was outside. She rose quickly, opening the door in the pale dawn
to see little John Wildes. His clothes were wet and torn to ribbons and his face, hands
and legs were scratched and bleeding. When Eurydice heard his broken, sobbing words,
she froze with fear. Expecting the savages any moment, she work her own three children
and dashed four miles through the forests and swollen creeks to a neighbor’s house.

MARY ANN WILDES b.1850 d.1852
WILLIAM WASHINGTON WILDES b.Aug, 26, 1851 d. June 20, 1922 m. Eliza Jane
Beverly b.Aug 16, 1855 d. June 21, 1921
ALEXANDER FLOURNOY WILDES b. Oct 29, 1853 d.Feb. 7, 1933 m. Nancy
Robinson b.Jan2, 1855 d. Mar 30, 1938
MARGARET WILDES b.Nov. 17, 1855
GEORGE MARTIN WILDES b.Dec. 1, 1857 d.Apr. 21, 1887 m.Mar, 28, 1879 to
Elizabeth Harris b.Oct 14 1856 d. Oct 2, 1921
SARAH JANE WILDES b. Dec 1, 1862 d. Dec. 1, 1928 m. Edward Robinson b. Sept.
15, 1855 d. Feb. 21, 1932
JAMES LEONARD WILDES b. June 8, 1866 d. Sept. 21, 1945 m. Martha Malissa
Dixon b. Apr. 30, 1876 d. May 19, 1921 m.2nd on Nov. 28, 1921 to Maggie Tatum
PAGE WILDES – b. 1867 d. 1870
PHILIP EUGENE WILDES b. Mar 7, 1869 d. Mar 31, 1919 m. Mar 31, 1887 Laura
Jane Musgrove b. Nov. 14, 1868 (note: Philip had diabetes and lost a foot as a result of
infection shortly before his death at his brother’s home.)
ROSA BELLA ELIZA WILDES b. May 5, 1870 d. Jul. 27 1908 m. on Nov. 15, 1888,
James Edward Jones b. Nov. 28, 1876 d. Mar 24, 1955
ALBERT REMER WILDES b. Mar 12, 1874 d. Apr. 4, 1952 m. on Apr. 21, 1901 to
Sallie Rogers
End of this section

SCOTTISH ACCOUNT – POPULAR VERSION OF MAX’S ANCESTRY
Written by Carolyn Wildes Cunningham

Many of us have heard from our parents and read in our family history that Maximillan
Wildes came to the US from Scotland as a stowaway on a boat around 1800. I never
heard anything else about is parents or whether he had brothers or sisters.

From our family history, we learned that Maximillan Wildes joined “a Scotch settlement
in Montgomery county, a part of which was set aside to Tattnall County in 1801”,
according to an article published on page 47 of Descendants of Maximillan Wildes of
Scotland and Georgia, UPDATED 1984 , compiled by Mrs. Willis (Hazel Wildes). “he
learned of cheap lands in Appling coutny and , together with Willis Cason. William Guy,
Elijah Mattox and others from Tattnall county, located on the north side of the Altamaha
River, which was called the “White Settlement”, according to this same article. “He
moved later on the “Red Side” of the Altamaha - the Indian side, where he joined a small
settlement of Tattnall county contemporaries. This land was called the Red Side, of the
Altamaha afterwards was organized into the county of Ware. Also, we learned from this
article that Maximillan Wildes was married to Elizabeth Wilkerson in the year 1809.

In my research, at both the Federal Archives and Record Center, in East Point, Georgia,
and at the Georgia Archives in Atlanta, I have not been able to find any records to verify
these statements. For example, at the Federal Archives and Record Center, I found a
book titled Federal Naturalization Oaths for both Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, S.C.
for 1790 through 1860. The list of names contained in the book came from the Federal
Court Records, District of Georgia, Savannah. I could not find a listing for “Wilde” or a
“Wildes” or any name close to that spelling in the Name catalogue at the Ga. Archives. I
did find this listing: Maxey M. Wildes, lieutenant, Ware County; Jan 25, 1827- Mrch 18,
1828. (M.R. 1808-1829 p. 179)

But I have not been able to find any record that Maximillan or Maxey M. Wildes lived in
Savannah or the he resided in Tattnall County he and his family moved to the area that
became Ware County. I also cold not find any marriage records of our ancestor to
Elizabeth Wilkerson in the Marriage Records Abstracts 1805-1852, Chatham County, Ga.
at the Ga. Archives. If he had lived as a young teen in Savannah and moved from there
to the interior of Georgia, I thought it might be possible the he married Elizabeth
Wilkerson in Chatham County, I also could not find a record in case he married her in
Tattnall County.
NOTE: this is another account of the life of Maxey Wildes.
End of this section
NOTE: THERE IS ONE ADDITION TO THIS FILE TO FOLLOW – A PERSONAL
LETTER FROM A MEMBER OF THE WILDES FAMILY. WILL GET IT OUT
ASAP.
Sincerely,
Judy Strickland
Please excuse any typos – it’s 2:30am and I’m sure to have made some!!!!
Children were: Mary Ann Wildes, William Washington Wildes, Alexander Flournoy Wildes , Margaret Wildes, George Martin Wildes, Sarah Jane Wildes, James Leonard Wildes, Page Wildes, Philip Eugene Wildes, Rosa Belle Eliza Wildes , Albert Remer Wildes.


bullet John Lewis Wildes was born in 1875. Parents: William Washington Wildes and Eliza Jane Beverly.


bullet Joyce Aldene Wildes was born on 20 Oct 1926. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.

She was married to Lewis Cotton uk. Children were: Lewis Michael Cotton, Tessa Claryce Cotton, Victor Lewis Cotton, Larry Dean Cotton.


bullet Julia Ann Serene Wildes was born on 16 Jan 1868. She died in 1957. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet Laura Wildes Parents: James Daniel Wildes.

She was married to Hiram M. Thomas uk.


bullet Margaret Wildes was born in 1855. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Mary Ann Wildes was born in 1850. She died in 1852. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Mary Louise Wildes was born on 29 Oct 1913. She died on 27 Jun 1973. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.

She was married to Claude craig uk. Children were: Carol Wilbourne craig.

She was married to William Leonard Parrish uk. Children were: Doris Louise Parrish, Mary Monetha Parrish.


bullet Mary Teresa Wildes was born in 1854. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet Maxey Millan Wildes was born on 17 Oct 1860. He died on 2 Nov 1932 in Jacksonville,Fla. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet Maximillan Wildes died on 27 Jul 1838. This family was massacred by indians on the edge of Waycross,Ga. in 1838.

He was married to Elizabeth Wilkinson unknown. Children were: Reuben Wildes , Jesse Wildes, John Wildes , James Christopher Wildes.


bullet Nancy Thelma Wildes was born on 8 Jun 1911 in Manor,Ga. She died on 7 Nov 1989 in Brunswick,Ga. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.

She was married to John Frederick Barfield-Cowart on 26 Aug 1927 in unknown. Children were: John Virgil Barfield, Eugene Tooney Barfield, Lott Frederick Barfield, Earl Slater Barfield, Thelma Faye Barfield, Joyce Murleen Barfield.


bullet Ogle Marie Wildes was born on 10 Oct 1917. She died on 11 Dec 1982. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.

She was married to Frederick William Gray uk. Children were: Wilford Marion Gray, William Frederick Gray, Thomas Wallace Gray.


bullet Page Wildes was born in 1867. He died in 1870. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Philip Eugene Wildes was born in 1869. He died in 1919. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Ransel Hatteras Wildes was born on 27 Dec 1891. He died on 19 Jun 1974. Parents: Alexander Flournoy Wildes and Nancy Ellen Robinson.

He was married to Emma Mae Thrift on 29 Mar 1914. Children were: Gilbert Stanley Wildes.


bullet Reuben Wildes was born in 1824. He was born in 1824. He died on 6 Apr 1900. Reuben Wildes was born in 1824 and moved with his parents,Maximillan and Elizabeth Wilkerson Wildes,from Tattnail to Ware County,Ga.They lived in a log cabin near Dubuss Bay,which is near the corporate limits of Waycross.The family was attacked by a band of Indians from the Okefenokee Swamp on sunday morning,22 Jul 1838.The father,mother,six of the children and a little Wilkerson boy,who was visiting them,were massacred.Reuben,the oldest son,and three of his brothers escaped to the home of friends and told of the tragedy.
MILITARY RECORD CONFEDERATE ARMY

WILDES,REUBEN-Private,company K,26th Georgia Infantry.Enlisted 1 Oct 1861 by Captain McDonald for a period of 6 months.Re-enlisted for duration of war 14 Mar 1862 in Brunswick,Ga.In hospital no.2 Richmond,Virginiaa 3-10th May 1863.No physical description given. Parents: Maximillan Wildes and Elizabeth Wilkinson.

He was married to Nancy Eliza Smith uk. Children were: James Daniel Wildes, C.Walter Wildes, Mary Teresa Wildes, Etta Lugenia Wildes, Maxey Millan Wildes, William McDonald Wildes, Thomas Jackson Wildes, Julia Ann Serene Wildes.


bullet Rosa Belle Eliza Wildes was born in 1870. She died in 1908. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.


bullet Sarah Jane Wildes was born in 1862. She died in 1928. Parents: John Wildes and Sarah Jane Nunez.

She was married to Edward Robinson uk. Children were: Harry Edward Robinson, Margaret Inez Robinson.


bullet Sarah Jane Wildes was born in 1883. Parents: William Washington Wildes and Eliza Jane Beverly.


bullet Thomas Jackson Wildes was born on 28 Mar 1866. He died on 11 Nov 1933. Parents: Reuben Wildes and Nancy Eliza Smith.


bullet Verdie Estell Wildes was born on 23 Nov 1907. She died in Oct 1991 in Brunswick,Ga. Parents: William Jackson Wildes and Queen Victoria Thomas.

She was married to Tennell Marcilus Parrish uk. Children were: Gerald Eugene Parrish, Tennell Marcilus Jr. Parrish, Tully Jackson Parrish, Sarah Nell Parrish, Frank Russell Parrish, Earl Vernon Parrish, Verdie Idelle Parrish, Joyce Nyoka Parrish, Lewis Carlton Parrish, Jo Ann Parrish, Janice Marie Parrish.


bullet William Jackson Wildes was born on 27 Jan 1880 in Waycross,Ga. He died on 6 Dec 1977 in Brunswick,Ga. Parents: William Washington Wildes and Eliza Jane Beverly.

He was married to Queen Victoria Thomas in 1904. Children were: Dewey Melvin Wildes, Verdie Estell Wildes, Cora Mae Belle Wildes, Nancy Thelma Wildes, Mary Louise Wildes, Gladis Irene Wildes, Ogle Marie Wildes, William Wallace Wildes, Jessie Mae Wildes, Willie Grace Wildes, Joyce Aldene Wildes.

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