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Francois PELLETIER
(-1610)
Simone PICHENEAU
(-)
Nicolas PELLETIER
(1590-1674)

 

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Spouses/Children:
Jeanne ROUSSEY

Nicolas PELLETIER

  • Born: 1590, St. Pierre, Gallardon, Beauce, France
  • Christened: 4 Jun 1596, St. Pierre and St. Paul, Gallardon
  • Marriage: Jeanne ROUSSEY about 1632 in St. Pierre, Gallardon, Beauce, France
  • Died: 1674-1681, Sillery, Quebec, Quebec at age 84
picture

bullet  General Notes:

Master carpenter and cathedral builder

Pelletier Family Association researched family in Gallardon, France; found apprenticeship contract and church register of baptisms for the family.

After the death of his father, whose trade is not known, Nicolas' mother apprenticed himn to a carpenter named Michel Deloval, in nearby Epernon, 10 km (less than 5 miles) from Gallardon, in Feb 1612. He was 15 at that time, having been baptized in Jun 1596. He was apprenticed for a period of four years, according to that contract.

From http://pelletier-genealogy.org/nicolas1.htm, George Pelletier's web site:

Originally from the Parish of Saint-Pierre Saint Paul of Gallardon in Beauce (France), they arrived in this country on Jume 11, 1636, accompanied by their sons Jean and François. Livingfirst at the Habitation of Québec City, they settled on the côte Saint-François-Xavier in Sillery about 1645. Governor Charles Huault de Montmagny granted to master-carpenter Nicolas Peltier 50 acres of land on September 12, 1645. Father Jean de Quen, Superior of the Company of Jesus in New France, granted him another 50 acres in May 1659. This monument rests on a part of the lands bestowed upon the Peltier family.
First, in order to undertake this task, I based myself uniquely upon what was already known about the origins of this ancestor, according to the archives of New France. The parish register of Notre-Dame de Québec reveals that master-carpenter Nicolas Peltier was originally from the parish of Saint-Pierre Saint-Paul de Gallardon in Beauce. The census of 1667 indicates that he was born about 1590. And, very important, different notarial contracts prove that he could sign his name. Conversely, neither his parents' names nor his date of birth appear in documents available at the National Archives of Québec; no genealogist has ever known these two pieces of important information. (from speech by member of Pelletier family association)

Nicolas consistently signed his name Peltier; on his apprenticeship contract and in Quebec. He wrote in a gothic sort of script that is also found in the church registers and the apprenticeship document; it is how people around him in his time were writing.

From http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/d132.htm

Nicolas PELLETIER was born around 1590 in St-Pierre de Galardon, diocese of Chartres, Beauce (Chartres, Eure-et-Loire), France. He was a master carpenter (Maitre charpentier) at the citadel. He married Jeanne ROUSSAY before 31 Dec 1632 <union180.htm>. He arrived in 1637 with his wife and two boys, 4 and 2 years old. Six daughters and a son were born in New France. Nicolas was probably the first man to whom D'Ailleboust granted a plot of land on the territory that the Jesuits wanted to keep for their converts. The family was absorbed in the Native Seigneurie in 1651 and was still there in 1663. He died before 1675. (1)(8)


From http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2885435&id=I572567177

[blended.FTW] Nicolas Pelletier, the first Pelletier known to emigrate from France to New France, is born about 1590. In 1632, Nicolas marries Jeanne de Voissy (de Vouzy) (de Roussy), age 18, at Saint-Pierre Church in Gallardon (Galardon). Gallardon is located in the Beauce region of France, southwest of Paris between Chartres and the forest of Orléans
Two of Nicolas' children, Jean (1633) and François (1635) are born in Gallardon. Nicolas and his family leave France in the Spring of 1636 and arrive in New France, at Québec City, on June 11 of the same year. Arriving on the same ship is Charles Huault-de-Montmagny, the new governor general of New France, succeeding Champlain. Nicolas is a carpenter-woodworker, and among the Québec City buildings he is known to have worked on are Louis Hébert's house, the first private home to be built outside the Québec fortification, the frame of Notre-Dame Church's steeple, and the roof of the Chateau Saint-Louis.
Six other children are born in New France, five girls, Marie (1637), Louise (1640), Françoise (1642), Jeanne (1644), Geneviève (1646), and another son, Nicolas(1649).
In 1649, Nicoals is granted land outside Québec City, to the southwest, adjacent to St-François-Xavier Fort, near Cap Rouge, along the St-Lawrence River. In 1650, his family is attacked by 2 Iroquois indians, but Nicolas successfully defends his family and the homestead against the intruders.
In 1669, Nicolas rents out a large portion of his property to his son Jean for five years , and in 1670, he joins his son François, who now is known as Pelletier-dit-Ontaya (or Anthaïa, later Antaya), and his family in Saurel (Sorel). In 1677, at the latest, Nicolas and his son acquire property across the St-Lawrence River at Dautray (Seignneurie d'Autray), near what is now Berthierville.
It is here that Nicolas apparently dies in 1679, the exact date is unknown. His wife, Jeanne, dies at Sorel on December 12, 1689.
[Demarce.FTW] Of St-Pierre de Gallardon, Beauce, Orleanais, France. Maitre-charpentier.


http://association.pelletier.net/GrandesFamilles/NicolasPelletier/NicolasPelletier_eng.htm Pelletier Family Association web site

A Historical Glimpse of Nicolas Peltier and His Family in New France:
Signature abstracted from the registry of Antoine Adhémar, 10 October 1673
The first Pelletier family to settle in New France was that of Nicolas Peltier (1596-c.1679), who arrived in Québec City accompanied by his wife Jeanne de Voisy (c.1612-1689) and their two sons Jean and François (c.1633-1692 and c.1635-c.1688, respectively). The first time we encounter Nicolas Peltier in New France is at the baptism of his daughter in the spring of 1637, and we can deduce from this that he was aboard one of the three or four vessels that arrived in Québec on 11 June 1636. Under the command of Charles du Plessis-Bochart, this fleet included one carrier transporting forty-five people, commanded by Savinien Courpon Delatour, and two or three other ships, including the Saint Joseph. Among the one hundred or so people who arrived that day, historian Marcel Trudel has been able to identify ninety-one colonists, including Nicolas Peltier, Jeanne de Voisy, and their two young sons Jean et François (Catalogue des immigrants, 1632-1662, page 62).
Photos : ©2005 Pascal Pelletier private collection. Nicolas Peltier was originally from the parish of Gallardon, found in the Beauce region of France southeast of Paris at the confluence of the Voise and Ocre rivers. The parish church, like many Catholic edifices, is dedicated to saints Peter and Paul. Founded in the eleventh century by Herbert de Gallardon under the auspices of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the church was consecrated again definitively in the thirteenth century. Furthermore its construction evinces three architectural movements, Roman, Gothic and Renaissance. It was in this church that Nicolas Peltier was baptized 4 June 1596.

Master-carpenter Nicolas Peltier and his wife Jeanne de Voisy lived in Québec City from 1636 to 1645. In 1639 Nicolas and fellow carpenter Pierre Pelletier appraised the timber frames of the house of the late Guillaume Hébert [Editor’s note: The identity of this Pierre Pelletier is unknown; he might be a brother of Nicolas Peltier; it is certain that he is not the ancestor from Saint-Martin-de-Fraigneau, who was still in France at this time]. Later, in 1647, he constructed the steeple of Notre-Dame de Québec Church, and the next year he installed the roof of Château Saint-Louis, the governor’s residence. Finally, over the next decade, Nicolas continued to hire himself out to construct and maintain various houses and barns in the area. On 12 September 1645, Governor Charles Huault de Montmagny granted Nicolas a fifty-acre concession of land in the seigneury of Sillery, where the Peltier family settled soon after.

Gallardon’s town hall, circa 1900 Gallardon’s town hall, july 2005

Nicolas Peltier and Jeanne de Voisy arrived with two sons, Jean (c.1633-1692) and François (c.1635-c.1688), and over the years, their family grew to include eight children: Marie (1637-aft. 1711); Louise (1640-1713); Françoise (1642-1707); Jeanne (1644-1715); Geneviève (1646-1717) and finally Nicolas (1649-1729). As is true for many other pioneers, the children and grandchildren of these early colonists went on to settle in different regions New France, and several ventured west to explore the American continent. Two sons in particular, François and Nicolas, were pursued a life of adventure. The first is known to have been a fur-trader in the company of Noël Jérémie de La Montagne, who wed François’ sister Jeanne in 1659. Many years later, on October 22, 1675, François Pelletier dit Antaya and his wife, Marguerite Morisseau purchased the Seigneurie d’Orvilliers from Philippe Gauthier de Comporté; found on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River, this fief ran one half-league along the river and extended inland one league. François and Marguerite went on to bequeath one-half of their estate to son Jean-Baptiste dit Pierre Pelletier dit Antaya (1676-1757), while dividing the remaining half among their other surviving children: Michel (c.1674-c.1744), Marguerite (1666-????), Marie-Angélique (1662-1741), Geneviève (1668-aft. 1716), and Catherine (c.1672-aft. 1716). Nicolas Peltier dit Marolles, the youngest of the Peltier family, lived at the trading post at Tadoussac, at the mouth of the Saguenay River, and was the first white pioneer to settle permanently in the Saguenay – Lac Saint-Jean region. Inspired by Victor Tremblay’s Histoire du Saguenay, Claire Domey’s novel Ilinishu recounts the lives of Nicolas Peltier dit Marolles and his son, Charles, called “Ilinishu” in the book, as pioneers of Lac Saint-Jean. Elsewhere, author Arthur Buis imagined a fantastical character and wondered if this Peltier was a “coureur des bois,” a philosopher, or a hermit. Here is an extract taken from “l’Almanach historique du Saguenay,” which appeared in Chicoutimi’s Le Quotidien newspaper in June 1988: “One of a kind, Nicolas Peltier lived on the shores of the Saguenay, at a place that today still bears his name. In fact, on the map of the Domaine du Roy that shows the part of the region visited by land surveyor Joseph-Laurent Normandin in 1732, we can see the location of the home of a particular ‘Monsieur Peltier,’ 183 miles from Lac Saint-Jean.” All the same, not everyone has spoken admirably about Nicolas Peltier dit Marolles. Monsignor Amédée Gosslin, for instance, made this harsh remark: “He was neither a philosopher nor a hermit, but a ‘coureur des bois,’ a mere errand-boy, and, worst of all, a French-Canadian with the morals of a Savage.” We end here by citing some thoughts shared by Mona Gauthier at the second annual Pelletier Family Association Reunion in Laval in 1988. Reminiscing about a time when she snow-shoed along the Saguenay in Saint-Fulgence, she said, “I wanted to know the man who had admired, as I was doing, the magnificence of the Saguenay, at this place where it is lost among the mountains, having formed in its flow the famous Baie-des-Ha.” Indeed, with her words, Ms. Gauthier reveals her search for this individual who, surely never dreaming of it during his lifetime, left his name to as poetic a spot along the Saguenay as “Anse-à-Peltier.”
Claude E Pelletier, m.g.a. and Laure Gauthier, m.g.a. Text revised and translated by Benoit Pelletier Shoja, october 2005.


http://www.rootsweb.com/~wioconto/belongia2.htm

Notes for Nicolas Pelletier: Nicolas Pelletier, his wife Jeanne de Voissy or du Roussy, age 22, his two sons, Jean, age 3 and Francois age 1 arrived at Quebec on the 11th of June 1636 aboard a vessel carrying 45 people. The captain of that vessel was Savinien Courpon de la Tour...who would become the Admiral of the Fleet the following year. Some names of the other passengers were: Charles Huot de Montmagny, Champlain's successor, Achille Brehant dit Deslisle, 7 Jesuits and numerous other Frenchmen and their families. Our ancestors were amongst the first white settlers in New France (Quebec today). In the 1642 census, there were less than 200 people and 6 of them were Nicolas Pelletier, his wife and 4 children. We can truly say that our family is one of the pioneer families of Canada.

Nicolas Pelletier, the first Pelletier known to emigrate from France to New France, is born about 1590.
In 1632, Nicolas marries Jeanne de Voissy (de Vouzy) (de Roussy), age 18, at Saint-Pierre Church in Gallardon (Galardon). Gallardon is located in the Beauce region of France, southwest of Paris between Chartres and the forest of Orléans

Four of Nicolas' children, Jean (1633), Philippe (bef1632), Pierre (bef1632), and François (1635) are born in Gallardon. Nicolas and his family leave France in the spring of 1636 and arrive in New France, at Québec City, on June 11 of the same year. Arriving on the same ship is Charles Huault-de-Montmagny, the new governor general of New France, succeeding Champlain.

Nicolas is a carpenter-woodworker, and among the Québec City buildings he is known to have worked on are Louis Hébert's house, the first private home to be built outside the Québec fortification, the frame of Notre-Dame Church's steeple, and the roof of the Chateau Saint-Louis.

Six other children are born in New France, five girls, Marie (1637), Louise (1640), Françoise (1642), Jeanne (1644), Geneviève (1646), and another son, Nicolas(1649).

In 1649, Nicolas is granted land outside Québec City, to the southwest, adjacent to St-François-Xavier Fort, near Cap Rouge, along the St-Lawrence River. In 1650, his family is attacked by 2 Iroquois Indians, but Nicolas successfully defends his family and the homestead against the intruders.

In 1669, Nicolas rents out a large portion of his property to his son Jean for five years , and in 1670, he joins his son François, who now is known as Pelletier-dit-Ontaya (or Anthaïa, later Antaya), and his family in Saurel (Sorel). In 1677, at the latest, Nicolas and his son acquire property across the St-Lawrence River at Dautray (Seignneurie d'Autray), near what is now Berthierville.

It is here that Nicolas apparently dies in 1679, the exact date is unknown. His wife, Jeanne, dies at Sorel on December 12, 1689.


picture

Nicolas married Jeanne ROUSSEY about 1632 in St. Pierre, Gallardon, Beauce, France. (Jeanne ROUSSEY was born in 1611-1614 in St. PEirre, Gallardon, Beauce, France and died on 12 Dec 1689 in Sillery, Quebec, Quebec.)



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