Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

O B I T U A R I E S

 

AUNT JANE CONSAUL

BORN -- In Montgomery county, N. Y., Aug. 31, 1811, to Mr. and Mrs. John Lingenfelter, a daughter whom they have named Jane Ann.

DIED -- In Clayton, January 9, 1905, at the home of her son, William H., Jane Lingenfelter Consaul, aged 93 years, 4 months and nine days.

Such is the brief chronology of one of the mothers in Israel. For the past 20 years Aunt Jane has made it (sic) her home with her son in this village, who, with Mrs. Lida Hudson, also of this village, and Mrs. Katy Derosia, of Mankato, Minn., are the only surviving children.

Mrs. Consaul was married in her native county to Henry Lewis Consaul, and within a year or two they migrated to the "Black River country," a term at that time having a broad significance. Then it was a journey of a lifetime upon rough carts behind slow-moving oxen. Settlement was made upon the Peter Hart farm, on the line road. The most of the tillable soil of that farm was then a swamp and its productiveness unknown. Mr. Consaul died a number of years ago. His widow took up the struggle of life without complaint, and no doubt her ever cheerful temperament contributed to the prolongation of her life. Her mind was clear to the last and within a week she conversed cheerfully with friends, manifesting an interest in their affairs, which characteristic made firm friends through all her life.

She leaves, besides her children, two brothers, William H. Lingenfelter, of this town, and D. H. Lingenfelter, of Lafargeville.

Funeral obsequies were held from the M. E. church, of which she was a member, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. W. J. Hancock officiating. (January 9, 1905)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

JOSEPH E. CONSAUL

Clayton people were shocked by the news of the death of Joseph E. Consaul, which occurred at the City Hospital in Ogdensburg at 11 o'clock on Monday night. He had undergone an operation a few days previous, and while it was serious enough he rallied nicely and there was every assurance that complete and speedy recovery would follow. During the afternoon his condition became somewhat worse, and his wife, who was constantly at his bed side, notified members of the family, who left on the early morning train for Ogdensburg. Word reached Clayton of his death a few minutes after they had started, and a message sent to Rivergate brought them back on the morning train. Undertaker Barnhart left on the Club train for Ogdensburg and returned with the remains on the steamer Island Belle the same evening.

Mr. Consaul was born in Clayton in 1874, and spent his entire life here. For the past dozen years or so he had been employed by his uncle, William H. Consaul, and was a most valuable man in the handling of this immense business. His entire time was taken up between his employer and his family. He was strictly a home man, and all are agreed that the home man is the best citizen and the entire community is the loser by his death.

Besides his wife, Mr. Consaul, is survived by three children, Leona, Pearl and Bernice; two brothers, Capt. Herbert Consaul and Elgin Consaul, of Clayton; and two sisters, Miss Delia Consaul, of Clayton, and Miss Vida Consaul, of San Diego, California.

The funeral will be held from the residence of William H. Consaul on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and interment will be made in the family plot in Clayton cemetery. (1912)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

MERRIT E. LINGENFELTER

Merritt E. Lingenfelter (sic), 77, retired farmer, died about 9:30 p.m. Friday at the home of his son, Lee Lingenfelter, near Clayton. Mr. Lingenfelter had been ill for some time and his death was due to infirmities of old age.

He was born in the town of Clayton, Aug. 22, 1854, son of William Henry and Mary Wilson Lingenfelter. He spent his entire life in this vicinity, retiring from farming several years ago. When a young man he married Miss Frances Barney, who died several years ago. Mr. Lingenfelter was a member of the Depauville Methodist Episcpal church.

He is survived by one son, Lee Lingenfelter, Clayton; five sisters: Mrs. Minnie Wetterhahn, Depauville, Mrs. George Daniels, Clayton, Mrs. Nellie Caulderwood, Johnstown, Mrs. Elma Dillenbeck and Mrs. James Bretch, Clayton Center.

A private funeral was held from the home of his sister, Mrs. Elma Dillenbeck, Clayton Center, Monday at 1 p.m. Rev. M. Robinson, pastor of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, officiated. The bearers were Adam Danawaldt, Floyd Danawaldt, Elton May, Earl Fulmer, Charles Youngs, and B. A. Hart.

Floral offerings were many and beautiful.

Burial was made in Clayton cemetery. (May 27, 1932)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

WHITNEY -- Near Clayton, Nov., 23, 1932 Mrs. Helen Charlebois Whitney, wife of Burton G. Whitney, aged 73 years.

Funeral Friday at 2 p.m. from Whitney homestead near Clayton. Rev. Clark Robinson, pastor of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, officiating.

Interment in family plot in the Depauville cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Helen Charlebois Whitney, 73, mother of Miles S. Whitney, trust officer of the Jefferson County National bank, Watertown, died last week Wednesday morning at 5:50 at the Whitney homestead, five miles from this village on the Chaumont county road.

She had been in ill health for several months but her condition became critical ten days ago. Death was attributed to heart disease.

Born Sept. 17, 1859, a daughter of Joseph and Helen Bertrand Charlebois, in the town of Clayton, she had always lived here. She attended district school in the township. She was married on Nov. 13, 1878, to Burton G. Whitney who survives her. Mr. and Mrs. Whitney celebrated their 54th wedding anniversary at the homestead Nov. 13.

She was a member of the Depauville chapter, Order of the Eastern Star and of Depauville Grange.

She is survived besides her husband and son, Miles J. Whitney of Watertown by five sisters, Mrs. Mary Leyare, Baltimore, Md., Mrs. Sophia S. Fitzgerald, Rochester; Mrs. Louis W. Dulmage, Watertown-Sackets Harbor road; Mrs. Thomas Lynch and Miss Angie Charlebois, Watertown; also four brothers, Wellington Charlebois, New Haven, N. Y., E. G. Charlebois, Gus Charlebois and John Charlebois of Watertown, and two grandchildren, Helen and Harace (sic) Whitney of Watertown.

The funeral was held from the homestead Friday afternoon at 2 p.m., Rev. Clark Robinson, pastor of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, officiating. Burial was made in the family plot in the Depauville cemetery.

The bearers were: Norris Wetterhahn, Edwin Sheldon, Carl J. Haas, Ernest Ingraham, Perl Ormsby, Arthur Wood.

There were many beautiful floral offerings.

Depauville Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star of which she was a member attended in a body at the house and cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

PHILLIPS -- Near Clayton, October 22, 1926, Edson G. Phillips, 62. Prayers at the home Sunday at 2 P. M. and funeral services in the St. Lawrence Methodist church at 2:30. Interment in St. Lawrence.

_______

(Special to The Standard.)

CLAYTON, Oct. 22. -- Edson G. Phillips, 62, passed away at his home three miles from this village at 12:30 A. M. today. Mr. Phillips suffered a stroke Wednesday about 5 P. M.

Mr. Phillips was born June 25, 1864, a son of Louis and Amelia Phillips. He had resided in this vicinity for many years having been engaged in farming.

His wife, Mrs. Edith Nims Phillips, is the only survivor. Prayers will be held at the home Sunday at 2 P. M. and funeral services will be held in the St. Lawrence Methodist church at 2:30. Burial will be in St. Lawrence. Rev. B. G. Miller of this village will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Death of C. L. Hudson

This community was shocked by the death this (Wednesday) morning of Captain Chester L. Hudson at his home in this village, aged 55 years, 7 months and 15 days. On October 14, while painting, he ran a nail in his foot, and from this injury, considered slight at the outset, lock-jaw developed, which was the cause of his death. Everything that medical skill and careful attention could suggest was done for him, but it was known for a day or two in advance that his life could not be saved.

Captain Hudson was a well-known and substantial citizen. He was one of the best of family men, and enjoyed the respect and confidence of the whole community. He followed navigation as a profession and during the past season was mate on the steamer St. Lawrence.

On Dec. 21, 1898, he was married to Miss Laura Campbell, who, with three children, survive him. He is also survived by his mother and one brother, Capt. W. C. Hudson. He was a member of Clayton Masonic Lodge.

The funeral will be held from the Baptist church, Rev. W. D. St. John officiating, at a date not yet decided upon.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

MRS. MADELINE MATTICE
DIES AT HOSPITAL HERE

________

(Special in The Standard.)

CHAUMONT, Nov. 10. --- Mrs. Madaline Mattice, 70, of Chaumont, passed away at the City Hospital in Watertown at 4 o’clock, Thursday afternoon following a prolonged illness, and an operation at the hospital. Mrs. Mattice went to the hospital on October 30.

She had been a resident of the village of Chaumont for the past ten years having gone there from Watertown. She resided by herself, having no children.

The body was taken to Clayton for burial from the home of a sister, Mrs. Catherine Schell. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Mrs. Mattice is survived by one brother, John F. Hart of Milo, N. D., and four sisters, Mrs. Catherine Schell and Mrs. Philena Hudson of Clayton, Mrs. George Walter of Johnstown, and Mrs. Celia Larabee of Rochester.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Dewitt C. Hollenbeck, aged 63 years, died at 6:15 last week Tuesday evening, Jan. 3rd., of diabetes. His death was a shock to relatives and friends, as he had been confined to his bed but 5 days.

Mr. Hollenbeck was born in Johnstown, N. Y., the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hollenbeck. He has lived in the town of Clayton since is boyhood. His remains were laid at rest in the Clayton cemetery. Surviving are his wife, a son, Clarence W. Hollenbeck of Clayton; two sisters, Mrs. Esther Connyne and Mrs. A. K. Van Ostrand, both of Johnstown, N. Y.

_______

We wish to thank all friends and neighbors who were so kind and assisted during the sickness and death of our beloved husband, father and grandfather.

Mrs. Nellie Hollenbeck,
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence W. Hollenbeck and family.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

William Campbell Hudson, son of Laura C. and the late Chester L. Hudson, died at 2 o'clock Monday morning, following a brief illness. He was taken ill Friday, but was better Saturday and was riding his wheel about the village. Death was due to heart trouble. The boy was in his 16th year and was in the first year at High school. He was an unusually bright pupil and passed with the highest honors in the freshman class, his average being 91.39. He was employed as night operator in the telephone office and was very popular. His father died about five years ago.

Besides his mother he is survived by two younger brothers. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the house. (1917)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Herbert Consaul

(1914)

After an illness of four months of tuberculosis, Mrs. Herbert Consaul died at her home in this village on Thursday, Feb. 19, in her 34th year. The funeral was held from the Baptist church on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. Mr. St. John officiating. At the close of the sermon, the O. E. S. took charge of the services.

Mrs. Consaul was born in Lafargeville, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Larabee. She was married on Jan. 11, 1898. Besides her parents and husband, she is survived by a daughter, a sister, Mrs. Walter Ross, of Rochester, and a brother, Seth L. Larabee, of White Plains.

Mrs. Consaul was held in the highest esteem, by all who knew her. Her greatest pleasure was in her home life; she was kindly, charitable, broad-minded, and her death will be keenly felt in the community where she had lived so long and is best known.

CARD OF THANKS.

We wish to thank the neighbors and friends for their sympathy and assistance in our recent bereavement and to assure them that their efforts in our behalf are sincerely appreciated.

Herbert Consaul
Ruth Consaul

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Elizabeth Hart Schell.

(1918)

Chaumont, Oct. 25. -- Mrs. Elizabeth Hart Schell, aged 72 years, died yesterday morning at the home of her daughter Mrs. John B. Rogers, at Point Salubrious.

Mrs. Schell was the daughter of the late Peter and Magdalene Hart, of Clayton. She was born at Clayton and lived there until 36 years ago when she came here to reside with her daughter. She had been in poor health for the past five years and had been confined to the house a great deal of the time.

She is survived by one son, William Schell, of Clayton; one daughter, Mrs. John Rogers of Point Salubrious; five granddaughters, Mrs. Harold Byam of Chaumont, Statia, Emma, Ethel and Laura Schell of Clayton; two grandsons, Elmer Schell of St. Johnsville and Clarence Schell of Clayton; five sisters, Kathryne Schell of Clayton, Mrs. Magdalene Mattis of Chaumont, Mrs. George Walters of Johnstown, Mrs. Helena (sic) Hudson, of Buffalo and Mrs. Celia Larabee of Watertown, two brothers John H. Hart, of North Dakota and Peter Hart of Clayton. The funeral will be held Sunday at 12 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Rogers. Interment will be made at Clayton.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

 

CAPT. HUDSON WAS
SAILOR 47 YEARS

SERVED ON RIVER AND GREAT
LAKES SINCE A BOY

FOUND DEAD AT BROCKVILLE

Had Consulted Physician Evening
Before, But Told Crew of Harvey
C. Kendall in Morning He Felt
Better--Later Found Dead, Partly
Dressed.

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

(1917)

Clayton, Oct. 10.--William C. Hudson, the Clayton pilot, who died on board the Harvey C. Kendall at Brockville, Monday, was ill Sunday evening and consulted Dr. Cornell at Brockville, it became known today. Monday morning the engineer went into his stateroom on board the boat, and Mr. Hudson said that he felt better. A short time later one of the sailors went into his room and found him dead on the bed, partly dressed.

Captain Hudson, as he was always known, was born in Clayton in 1855, and had always lived here. His death occurred on his 62nd birthday. He was married 42 years ago to Philena Hart, of this village, who survives him. Capt. Hudson possessed unlimited papers, which allowed him to sail on any kind of boat between Ogdensburg and Detroit. He was a member of the Clayton Chapter, F. & A. M. for 20 years.

He began his career as a sailor at the age of 15, when he sailed on the Great Lakes under Captain W. E. Williams, for the Northern Transportation Company, in whose employ he was for seven years. For two years he was employed by the Whiting Company of Detroit. For two years he was commander of the steamer Juanita, for five years commander of the J. S. Maynard, and for five years captain of the Ontario, one of Captain Sweet's boats.

For 25 years he was captain of the New Island Wanderer, commanding that boat until it was taken out of commission last season.

He is survived by his wife, and two sons, Chester E., of Buffalo, department manager of the "Automatic" Sprinkler Company, and Ross C., a senior in Clarkson Memorial College. Funeral arrangements are being held pending the arrival of the son from Buffalo.

--------------------

CLAYTON, Dec. 13. -- Mrs. Philena Hudson died Wednesday morning at 4 o’clock at her home in Webb street. She was born September 4, 1856, in the town of Clayton where she has resided all her life. She was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Philena and Peter Hart. She was married January 1, 1877, to William Hudson. She had been ill for the past two years.

Surviving are two sons, Ross of Potsdam, Chester of Minneapolis, and one brother, John Hart of Mila, N. D., three sisters, Mrs. Kate Schell of Clayton, Mrs. George Walters of Johnstown and Mrs. Celia Larabee of Rochester.

The funeral will be held from the home Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. W. A. Gardner of the M. E. Church will officiate. (1923)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Death of Captain William C. Hudson

Captain William C. Hudson, of Clayton, was found dead sitting in a chair on board the steamer Harvey J. Kendall lying at the dock in Brockville on Tuesday (sic) morning. The day before he had complained of not feeling well and had consulted a doctor, who did not think it necessary to prescribe medicine for him. He returned to the boat feeling much better and retired at the usual hour. He answered the call of the watchman on Tuesday morning, but when he did not come to the dining room some one went to his room, where he was found dead, partly dressed, sitting in a chair. Clayton relatives were notified and the Barnhart ambulance was sent to Brockville and brought the body to Clayton.

Captain Hudson was born in Clayton exactly 62 years ago, having died on his birthday. He received a common school education and at the age of 15 entered the employ of the Northern Transportation Co., under Capt. W. E. Williams, where he remained for seven years. The following two years, he sailed for the Whitney Co., of Detroit. For two years he sailed in the Junita, for 5 years in the J. S. Maynard, and an equal length of time in the Ontario. For the past 25 years he had been in command of the steamer New Island Wanderer. He was in possession of first-class unlimited pilot's papers for the waters between Ogdensburg and Detroit.

Capt. Hudson was one of the old-time reliable river pilots. He knew the river and he knew how to handle a boat. For many years he was in command of the steamer New Island Wanderer and on her fifty mile ramble among the islands he had carried probably a half million people. He was well known to the traveling public and very popular because of his courteous manner and willingness to accommodate. When the Wanderer was withdrawn from service a year ago Capt. Hudson severed his connection with the Thousand Island Steamboat Co., and associated himself this spring with Capt. Wood on the coal carrying vessel Harvey J. Kendall. He had since been acting as mate on this boat and it was while unloading at Brockville that his death occurred.

Forty-two years ago Captain Hudson was united in marriage with Miss Philena Hart, who survives him, as does also his mother and two sons -- Chester E. Hudson, of Buffalo, department manager of the Automatic Sprinkler Co., of New York, and Ross Hudson, a senior in the Clarkson School at Potsdam.

Captain Hudson was a member of Clayton Lodge, F. & A. M., and the funeral, which will be held from his late home on Thursday afternoon, will be in charge of that order.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

OBITUARY.

________

Last evening Mr. and Mrs. George Walter were called upon to mourn the loss of their daughter, Laura H., a bright little girl, aged 4 years, whose demise occured (sic) at 8 o’clock last night, of diphtheria. She had been sick but a short time and her death will be a great blow to her parents, as her presence had a most benigh (sic) influence on everyone about her. The funeral which was strictly private was held from the late residence at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

 

Death of John Gray

_______

John Gray, aged over 80 years, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edith Halladay, in this village, on Friday night at 11, from diseases of the heart. During the past year or two Mr. Gray had been in rather feeble health.

Mr. Gray was born in Clyde, Wayne county, N. Y., the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gray, who a few years previously had come to the United States from Edinburg, Scotland. Soon after his birth his parents moved to near Redwood, N. Y., and he had since been a resident of Jefferson county. He was married to Nancy, daughter of Lodowick and Julia Dillon, of Alexandria, and to them were born Frederick, Nettie, George, Richard, Edith and Burton Gray.

After spending his early life near Redwood, Mr. Gray removed to the town of Clayton, where for years he was a prosperous farmer, retiring from active life a few years ago.

During the Civil War he enlisted in Co. K, Tenth Heavy Artillery, serving three years, and was honorably discharged. He was always an active member of Albert Denis Post, G. A. R., having served a number of years as commander and held an office at the time of his death. The members of the post attended the funeral in a body.

Besides his daughter, Mrs. Halladay, he is survived by four sons, Fred D., George E., Burton F., and Dr. Richard L. Gray, all of Clayton; also two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Hoffman, of Buffalo, and Mrs. Elizabeth Linnell, of Watertown.

The funeral services were held Monday afternoon from his late home, Rev. F. Lewis Brooks, pastor of the Baptist church, officiating. Interment was made in the cemetery at Lafargeville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Mary M. Mather

_______

In Clayton, on Sunday last, occurred the death of Mrs. Mary Ulmer Mather. Mrs. Mather was born 79 years ago in Germany. At the age of 8 she came to America with her parents. Her father and mother died while she was young. When she was 18 years old she was united in marriage to Enslie Mather, of Utica, who followed the cooper’s trade for many years. She was a tailor by trade. To this union were born two children, a son, Orvis Mather, who died a few years ago, living at the time on a farm near Lafargeville, and a daughter, Mrs. Cora Brougham, who now resides in Lafargeville. Two grandchildren also survive, Harold, the son of Mrs. Orvis Mather, of Clayton, and Glenn, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Brougham, of Lafargeville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Clayton, Feb. 13. -- Word was received here today of the death Tuesday night of Mrs. Lucy Mather, former resident of this village, at her home in Albany. She was the widow of Orvis Mather of Clayton. She had resided in Albany for ten years.

Surviving are one son, Harold Mather of Albany; three brothers, Ora Hawn of Albany, Charles Hawn, Ravina and Dr. Clinton Hawn of Albany; one sister, Miss Elizabeth Hawn of New York.

The body will be brought here Friday and funeral services will be held from the local Methodist Episcopal church Friday at 1 p.m., Rev. B. G. Miller officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Nancy Dillon Gray.

Clayton, June 4. -- Mrs. Nancy Dillon Gray was born in Plessis, June 25, 1837. Plessis was the family home for many years.

Of her father’s family there are now living, Father and Mother Dillon, who reside in Adams Centre with their son, Edwin Dillon. Another brother, James Dillon, lives in Clayton, and the two sisters are Mrs. O. L. Burdick, of Greenwich, and Mrs. Edwin Maxon, of Smithville.

Soon after the close of the war, when Mr. Gray returned from the army, Mr. and Mrs. Gray moved into this locality, where they have resided ever since. Five children mourn the loss of a noble mother---four sons and a daughter, all well known.

This place has always been considered one of the few superior homes. And very much of the credit for all this was due to the wife and mother. There was industry, economy, intelligence and, above all, a Christian character that made itself felt, not alone in the home but also in all the community around. Mrs. Gray made a large place for herself as a wife, mother, neighbor and friend.

She became a Christian in childhood and was for many years and up to the time of her death a member of the Lafargeville Baptist church.

The funeral took place at the home four miles from Clayton, Saturday afternoon, June 2, and was very largely attended. Rev. J. S. Nasmith, of Clayton, officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Anna Schnauber Haas.

(1917)

Lafargeville, Feb. 24. --- Mrs. Anna Schnauber, wife of John Haas, died at her home four miles south of this place Tuesday evening, following a week’s illness with apoplexy. She would have been 58 years old on April 29.

Mrs. Haas was born in the town of Clayton, daughter of the late Augustus and Elizabeth Schnauber. Her entire life had been spent in that vicinity. Thirty-seven years ago she was married to Mr. Haas. She is survived by her husband, one son, Albert A. Haas, and one daughter, Mrs. Norris B. Haller, an infant granddaughter, Irene Haller; three sisters, Mrs. Mary Haas of Redwood, Mrs. J. M. Linnell of Clayton, Miss Emma Schnauber of Depauville.

The funeral will be held from her late home Sunday at 1, Rev. Mr. Sherlock, pastor of the Depauville Methodist church, officiating. Interment will be made in Depauville cemetery

* * * * * * * * * * * *

MRS. BRAYTON C. ROGERS.

(D. September 23, 1913)

At her home at Depauville, Sunday, occurred the death of Mrs. May Belle Rogers, wife of Brayton C. Rogers, who had been ill for a long time with tuberculosis. She was born at Birch Run, Mich., almost 40 years ago, and at the age of 3 moved to the town of Clayton, where she had since resided. She was the daughter of Mrs. W. T. Sampson. She leaves survivng two children, Ina M., and Glenn S., and two brothers, William H. Littlefield, of this city, and Merritt W. Littlefield, of Depauville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

John Hyde.

Lafargeville, Nov. 28. -- John Hyde, a well known farmer residing in Black Creek, died at his home Thursday, Nov. 20, following a short illness. Mr. Hyde was born in the town of Clayton, 58 years ago and had always made his home in this section. He was in his usual good health until about two weeks before his death when he became ill and failed rapidly.

Mr. Hyde is survived by his widow and three sons, Chanucey, Volney and Ellsworth; and by five daughters, Mrs. Charles Allen of Herkimer, Mrs. William Tongway (sic) of Omar, Bertha, Florence and Lula of Clayton, who were all at his bedside at the time of his death. He is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. Russell Allen and Mrs. David Cobb of Camden, and by two brothers, William Hyde and Nathan Hyde of Clayton.

The funeral was held from the Methodist Episcopal church and burial was made in the St. Lawrence cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Horatio Orvis

(Special to The Standard)

(Pencilled in: Oct. 25, 1924)

CLAYTON, Oct. 27. -- Horatio Orvis, 51, a life resident of this vicinity and the town of Cape Vincent, died Saturday evening at 9 o’clock at the Jefferson County Sanatarium, following an illness since June 1. He was taken to the sanatarium at 4:30 o’clock Saturday afternoon in a very weakened condition and death followed a few hours later.

The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the Methodist church here with Rev. Mr. Gardner officiating. Burial will be made at St. Lawrence Four Corners.

Mr. Orvis is survived by one brother, Ira Orvis, of this place, and three sisters, Mrs. Ida Solar and Mrs. Julia Fisher of Watertown, and Mrs. Carry (sic) Matthews of Grindstone Island.

He had been a farmer in this vicinity for many years and was born in the town of Cape Vincent where he passed his early life.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Samuel Orvis

Mrs. Samuel Orvis, aged 68 years, died last Friday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Mathews. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at 1:00 o’clock, old time, from the Methodist Episcopal church, Rev. W. A. Gardner officiating. Burial at St. Lawrence cemetery.

Mrs. Orvis had been in failing health for about three years. She was born in the town of Cape Vincent and formerly lived in the vicinity of Alexandria Bay. Surviving are five children: Horatio Orvis of Clayton, Ira Orvis of Orleans, Mrs. John Fisher, Mrs. George Mathews and Mrs. John E. Solar of Clayton, four brothers, Gilbert Chapman of Clayton, H. D. Chapman of Watertown, John Chapman of Three Mile Bay and James Chapman of Clayton.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. George Orman

Mrs. George Orman died suddenly at her home in Clayton Centre March 7, aged 48 years. Mrs. Orman was born in Orleans, and her maiden name was Miranda Mather. She was married to George Orman, Jan. 9, 1868. She was a faithful wife, a devoted mother, a kind neighbor and a Christian lady. Her husband, daughter and son, with a large circle of friends, are left to mourn. Her funeral was largely attended from her late home Sunday afternoon, March 8, Rev. A. C. Danforth officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Lena B. Britton

Lena B., wife of George W. Britton, and only daughter of John and Carrie Hotis, died at her father’s home near Omar, N. Y., Thursday, Nov. 1, aged 17 years, 10 months and 11 days. She became ill July 5 last, the first anniversary of her marriage. On Aug. 16, a daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Britton and died the second day following her mother’s death aged 2 months and 11 days. About two weeks before her death she named her little daughter, Lena May, and said to her mother at the time:

“I have not had the pleasure of taking care of my baby, I wish I could take it with me when I go.” The little one died the day before the mother’s burial, and the bride of 16 months and the babe of 11 weeks were buried side by side in a beautiful white casket. The little one was laid away, resting on her mother’s arm. She never spoke of the culmination of her disease as death, but always alluded to it as going, for she believed that she would continue to live in that world to which her Saviour had gone to prepare a place. She was a patient Christian sufferer, resting securely on the promises of God. All that a kind husband and fond mother could do was done for her, but consumption had taken hold upon her, and after a lingering sickness “She was not, for God took her.” The funeral was largely attended from her father’s house Sunday, Nov. 4. Rev. D. L. Phelps, a former pastor who officiating at her wedding, was by her request present, and conducted the funeral service.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Deliah Edmonds

Early Sunday morning at her home in this village occurred the death of Deliah, beloved wife of William H. Edmonds, aged 63 years, 3 months and 28 days. She had been in ill health for some time and a stroke of apoplexy hastened her death. She was a daughter of the late Schuyler Sperry and had lived nearly her entire life in this section. She was married to Mr. Edmonds in October, 1859. She was of a cheerful, genial nature and was a most welcome addition to any company. She enjoyed the associations of friends and her happiest moments were spent in her efforts to make others happy. Besides her bereaved husband, she leaves one daughter, Mrs. John Reed, of St. Lawrence, and one granddaughter, Miss Ida Balcom. The funeral was held from the late home on Tuesday, at 1 p.m., Rev. D. L. Phelps,of the St. Lawrence M. E. church officiating. The interment was made in Union cemetery at St. Lawrence.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Preston Ellis

(penned in: Mar 10, 1919)

_______

Preston Ellis died at his home in Clayton Center on Monday after an illness that extended more or less over a number of years and which was acute for a week preceding his death. He was born about 70 years ago in the neighborhood in which he died and where he spent the whole of his life except one year, 1889, when he resided in Arizona. He was a farmer and for the past 30 years had been an extensive buyer of hay and cattle. For several years past he had been associated with William M. Fitzgerald in produce and cattle buying.

Besides his wife he is survived by one son, Clarence (Cad) Ellis, and two brothers, Hiram Ellis, of Indianapolis, and Elvie Ellis, of Calgary, Canada.

The funeral will be held privately from the house on Thursday at 10 a.m. Burial at Lafargeville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Joseph Buechel, of Clayton

(Special to The Times.)


Clayton, April 8. -- Joseph Buechel, 71, a retired cheesemaker, died at 4 p.m. Sunday at his home on the Deferno road about four miles from this village. His death followed an illness of three months, during which time he was confined to his bed two weeks, and was attributed to a stomach ailment.

Mr. Buechel was a native of Switzerland, born in Oberriet, Jan. 19, 1864. He migrated to America when he was 21 years old and came to Redwood where for nine years he worked in the Adam Bickelhaupt limburger cheese factory.

In 1894 Mr. Buechel became cheesemaker at the Deferno road factory, also owned by Mr. Bickelhaupt, and remained there for 34 years.

He retired in 1928 and on June 28 of that year married Mrs. Edith Phillips of Clayton. Since their marriage they had lived on the Deferno road farm.

Besides his widow, there survive a sister, a brother and a nephew who live in Switzerland. Another nephew lives in Milwaukee.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 9 at the home and at 9:30 at St. Mary's Catholic church, this village. Rev. George E. Racette, the pastor, will officiate. Burial will be made in the St. Lawrence cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

MAY -- In the House of the Good Samaritan, April 27, 1927, Mrs. Bertha Alice May, 44, wife of Alton May. Prayers at the home of Mrs. Henry Grant, Clayton, Saturday at 12:30. Services in the M. E. church at 1, with burial in the Clayton cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HAAS--At Chaumont, March 5, 1925, William F. Haas, 85. Funeral at the home Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and burial in Cedar Grove Cemetery. Rev. J. H. Stewart will officiate.

CHAUMONT, March 5. -- William F. Haas, 85, a pioneer settler of this region and a member of the second German family to settle in the vicinity of Lafargeville when it was an isolated wilderness, died this morning at 7:45 o’clock at the home of his son-in-law, Charles Kissel, in Main street.

Mr. Haas had been seriously ill for ten days but had been in failing health for some time. Death was due to complications brought about by old age.

Mr. Haas was probably one of the best known residents of this vicinity, the members of his family having lived in this region since about 1802. He himself had been a prominent farmer for many years before retiring from active life and he has a wide circle of friends.

His parents were born in the city of Hebitzhell, in the county of Hessedarmasladt, Germany. They were Henry and Regina Haas. His parents came to this county in 1801 on their wedding trip, coming over in a sailing vessel on a trip that took 60 days. They landed at Baltimore, going overland to New York, thence up the Hudson to Albany. From there they went to Oswego and thence to the town of Clayton.

Mr. Haas’ mother was Miss Regina Wetterhahn and her father was the burgomaster of the city of Hebitzhell, and prominent in the affairs of the city.

Mr. Haas Sr., bought a farm near Lafargeville of John Lafarge, after whose family the village was named, and he was the second German to settle in that region. He was a music teacher by occupation but was forced to follow farming in order to regain his health.

William Haas was one of a family of several children and was born February 3, 1840. He married Miss Celestine Spencer of the town of Clayton on January 3, 1865 and settled in the town of Clayton on a farm until the following year when he bought a farm on the west shore of Point Salubrious where he lived until retirement 23 years ago. Mrs. Haas died December 20, 1907.

Mr. Haas is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Alice Kissell, wife of Charles Kissel, and Mrs. Edith Warner, wife of J. T. Warner, of this vicinity; one brother, Charles Haas of Iowa Park, Texas; one sister, Mrs. Nancy Vincent of Minneapolis, Minn.; five grandchildren, Mrs. Inez Cean of Chaumont, Mrs. Ruth Adams of Watertown, Mrs. Laurence Kissell, Mrs. Lyle Warner, Mrs. Dorcas Pennock of this place, and two great grandchildren, Miles Cean and Olive of this place.

He was a members (sic) of the Presbyterian church and of the grange for many years. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the home and burial will be in Cedar Grove cemetery. Rev. J. H. Stewart will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

William G. Dorr.

The late William G. Dorr of this city was born in the town of Clayton Oct. 12, 1847, and departed this life Sept. 25, 1908 (unclear). His parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. John Dorr, came from Obitshelm, Germany, in 1832, when young people. They married in 1840 and settled in the southern part of the town of Clayton on a farm where they spent the rest of their days. Unto them was born six children namely, John, David, and Mrs. Elizabeth Eiss of Clayton, Mrs. Rev. C. F. Shoeflin of Cleveland, Ohio, and George E. of Chicago, all of whom survive their brother, the late William G. Dorr.

Mr. Dorr was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth M. Haas, youngest daughter of the late Valentine and Rhoda M. Haas of Clayton, Oct. 14, 1869.

They lived joyfully together until Feb. 24, 1902, when Mrs. Dorr died, survived by her husband and three sons, Manford J., and Perley B., now in the employ of Marshall Field & Co., of Chicago, and Howard G., cashier of the Broadway Central Hotel, New York City.

Mr. Dorr received the better part of his educational training in Old Falley Seminary in Fulton, N. Y., where he spent several terms in hard study with the writer of this notice.

About 15 years ago he came to this city and settled in Bradley street and afterwards sold his Clayton farm, subsequently purchasing the Robinson property on Main street, where he remained the rest of his life.

Soon after coming to this city Mr. and Mrs. Dorr united with the Arsenal Street Methodist Episcopal Church and their children became members of the Sunday School of the same church.

Mr. Dorr was a member of Watertown Lodge, F. and A. M., and Watertown Chapter, R. A. M. The funeral service was held at his late residence, 136 Main street, Friday at 2:30 (sic) a.m. and was conducted by Rev. C. E. Dorr, a former pastor in the city.

* * * * * * * * * *

Photo

DR. B. C. CHEESEMAN.

(photo not included here)

WATERTOWN, April 3. -- Dr. B. C. Cheeseman, 57, died at 11:15 o’clock tonight after illness of several months. He was one of the city’s best known physicians. Dr. Cheeseman was a member of the Elks and the Masons. HIs wife and several brothers and sisters survive.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

GOLDTHRITE -- At Felts Mills, March 7, 1931, Mrs. Margaret Jane Goldthrite, widow of Chester C. Goldthrite, Felts Mills, aged 84 years.

Funeral services at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the home and at 2 at the Church of Christ at Felts Mills, Rev. W. A. Williams, pastor, officiating.

Interment in family plot at Great Bend.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Margaret Jane Goldthrite, 84, widow of Chester C. Goldthrite, veteran of the Civil War, died suddenly Saturday evening about 7:30 at her home in Felts Mills after an illness of only one day. Mrs. Goldthrite had been in her usual health until Saturday when she complained of illness and a physician was called. Death was attributed to heart disease.

Mrs. Goldthrite was born Feb. 1, 1847, in the town of Champion, a daughter of the late George and Ann Hunter Olley, and had been a resident of Felts Mills for the last 50 years. She married Chester C. Goldthrite in 1868. Mr. Goldthrite served four years in the Civil war. He was a member of Company B, 97th New York Volunteers. He died in April, 1915, at the age of 76 years.

Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Goldthrite only three survive, George B., of Felts Mills, Walter C., of Croghan, and James G., of Watertown. Surviving Mrs. Goldthrite are also six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Mrs. Goldthrite was a member of the Church of Christ at Felts Mills for the last 65 years. She also belonged to the Women’s Relief Corps of Black River.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 at the home and at 2 at the Church of Christ at Felts Mills, Rev. W. A. Williams, pastor, officiating. Interment will be in the family plot at Great Bend. The bearers will be S. H. Slack, George A. Drake, Archie Wood, of Felts Mills, and Charles A. Roberts of this city.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

George W. Pettit

(penwritten: 1925)

(Special to The Standard.)

DEPAUVILLE, Feb. 14. -- George W. Pettit, 71, a life resident of the town of Clayton and a widely known farmer of this vicinity, died Friday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bert Hagerman at Scoble’s Corners, following an attack of acute indigestion.

Mr. Pettit was in his usual health and had been a guest of his daughter for several days. Friday afternoon late he was stricken with the indigestion and died a few hours later.

He was born February 9, 1854, in the town of Clayton, a son of Marcus and Cornelia Wright Pettit. His wife, who was Miss Sophrina McIntyre before her marriage, died several years ago. He was a member of the St. Lawrence Brothers (?) of Husbandry.

He is survived by one son, George H. Pettit, of the town of Clayton; two daughters, Mrs. Bert Hagerman, of Scoble’s Corners and Miss Mae E. Pettit, of this place; three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Fluno, of Ithaca; Mrs. Henry Brown, of Gouverneur; Mrs. Marion Cheever, of Chaumont, and one brother, John Pettit, of Brownville.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o’clock at his home near here and at 2 o’clock at the local Methodist Episcopal church. The body will be placed in the vault. Rev. Frank Brown will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

CORSS -- At Glen Park, Oct. 30, 1929, Asher B. Corss, aged 45 years.

Funeral services from the late home Friday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. L. H. Bradley, pastor of Brownville and Glen Park Methodist Episcopal churches, officiating.

Interment at Depauville.

 

Glen Park, Oct. 30. -- Asher B. Corss, 45, died at his home in Glen Park today at 2 a.m., after an illness of three years.

He was born in the town of Clayton, April 12, 1884, a son of Chauncey and Mary Edmonds Corss. He resided there until nine years ago when he came here.

Mr. Corss was married to Ethel Sherman 25 years ago. Mrs. Corss survives together with two daughters, Misses Lillian and Marvel Corss, Glen Park, and one half-brother, John Northrup of St. Lawrence.

The funeral will be conducted from the late home Friday at 2:30 p.m. Rev. L. H. Bradley, pastor of the Brownville and Glen Park Methodist Episcopal churches, will officiate. Interment will be made at Depauville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Lucy Feistel

FELTS MILLS WOMAN, ILL
15 MONTHS, PASSES AWAY

FELTS MILLS, July 23. -- Mrs. Lucy Feistel, 67, wife of Philip M. Feistel, died at the House of the Good Samaritan, Watertown, this morning at 5 o’clock following an illness of many months. She had been a patient at the hospital for 15 months.

Surviving besides her husband are: A daughter, Miss Alice Feistel; a son, Oscar Feistel; a grandson, Keith Feistel, all of Felts Mills; a sister, Miss Anna Walseman of Watertown; five brothers, William, Fred and Henry Walseman of Carthage, Ernest of Syracuse, and Oscar of Bellingham, Washington.

Mrs. Feistel was born in New Bremen June 3, 1861, a daughter of William and Lucy Walseman and had resided in Felts Mills for the past 36 years. She was a member of the Felts Mills Church of Christ.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Felts Mills Church of Christ Wednesday at 2 p.m. Rev. W. A. Williams, pastor of the church, officiating. Burial will be made at Felts Mills cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Olive Tucker

Watertown, Dec. 28. -- Miss Olive M. Tucker, 76, died late today at the home of her niece, Mrs. Grace Waite, 712 Davidson street. Miss Tucker fractured her hip in a fall here September 13, and for 11 weeks was under treatment at a hospital. She returned to her sister's home five weeks ago. Saturday she suffered a stroke.

Miss Tucker was a life resident at the family homestead at St. Lawrence, but for about eight years had passed the winters with her niece in this city. She was the daughter of Amirah and Eliza Conklin Tucker. Surviving are two nieces, Mrs. Waite and Mrs. Eliza Brady of Depauville, and a nephew, Olin Emory of Buffalo.

Funeral was held from the Waite home at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon, Rev. Eldridge officiating. The body was placed in the city vault, pending burial in the spring at St. Lawrence.

Miss Tucker is well known here having resided here several years in Webb street at the home of Albert Emery.

* * * * * * * * * *

Rev. Barton G. Blaisdell

(inked in: 1926)

Rev. Barton G. Blaisdell, 75, retired Baptist minister, was fatally stricken with a heart attack in front of Radder’s jewelry store, Public Square, at 9 o’clock this morning, about five minutes after leaving his bride, Mrs. Eva Van Waters, whom he married Sunday night at her home in the Vassar apartments.

He was on his way to keep a business appointment at his offices in the Paddock Arcade, walking briskly along when suddenly he reeled and toppled backwards, his should grazing one of the store windows as he fell.

Mrs. H. W. Radder, from her place behind the counter in the store, saw him fall. She called to LeRoy E. VanEpps, jeweler who was in the basement and he rushed to the sidewalk with the assistance of a passerby, carried Mr. Blaisdell into the rear part of the store. As they placed him in a chair, Mr. Blaisdell spoke his last words. His eyes fluttered open and he looked at VanEpps, who was an acquaintance, and said: “You know me. This is the end.”

At that time Dr. Clarence E. Phippen entered the store. When he examined Mr. Blaisedell (sic) there was still a spark of life in the stricken man’s body. A moment later Dr. J. M. Crawe examined Mr. Blaisdell and pronounced him dead.

Widow Bears Shock

Rev. Mr. Blaisdell’s death took place at almost the same hour and, to a day, two years after the death of his first wife who passed away April 5, 1924, from heart disease at her home in Brownville.

For a time, after Detective Samuel Roberts and District Attorney E. Robert Wilcox arrived to investigate the death, they were fearful to break the news to Mrs. Blaisdell, thinking that her learning of her husband’s death within a few hours after their marriage would be too great a shock.

Mr. Blaisdell and Mrs. VanWaters were married early in the evening Sunday, by Rev. Clara Clark of Henderson. The marriage ceremony was performed in Mrs. Van Water’s apartment in the Vassar building. They obtained their marriage license Saturday.

When the news was given to Mrs. Blaisdell she bore the shock fairly well. Dewey Sherman of Brownville, foster son of Mr. Blaisdell, was called and was with the widow shortly after she received announcement of her husband’s death.

When Rev. Clark, who is a close friend of Mrs. Blaisdell, learned of the tragic happening this morning, she was greatly grieved and hurried immediately to comfort her friend.

Scores of people in this city were deeply moved when they learned of Rev. Mr. Blaisdell’s death. He was a genial, kindly man who made friends easily. He had been engaged in business here, handling insurance as well as executing his duties as secretary of the Independent Order of Foresters.

Well Known Minister

District Attorney Wilcox, after arriving at Radder’s store, ordered Mr. Blaisdell’s body removed to an undertaking parlor. The articles found on the body, including a gold watch which was presented to Rev. Mr. Blaisdell by a Foresters’ lodge, and a roll of bills were removed and returned to his relatives.

Barton G. Blaisdell was born in Belnap, N. H., in March, 1850, a son of Jacob M. and Anne Blaisdell. He passed his boyhood in Belnap and when a young man he entered a seminary in New Hampshire to study for the ministry.

On his ordination to the ministry he accepted a pastorate in Maine, where he served for a few years. Later he received a call from Dickinson Center and for a few years he served as the pastor of the Baptist church there. From Dickinson Center he came to Depauville where he served his last pastorate.

Ill health forced Mr. Blaisdell to resign from the ministry and in 1894 he entered the insurance business as the representative of the Independent Order of Foresters, a fraternal insurance organization. He was placed in charge of a district in Vermont with his headquarters at Burlington. Later he was transferred to Syracuse, where he made adjustments on the policies of members who had been in the order prior to 1899. He had been a resident of this city and Brownville the last 10 years.

Mr. Blaisdell had been very active in the organization and installation of chapters of the Independent Order of Foresters. He installed practically every new chapter in this district during the last 20 years.

On December 26, 1923, Mr. Blaisdell celebrated the 30th anniversary of his entrance into the Independent Order of Foresters. He was one of the oldest members of the local organization, and probably one of the oldest in point of membership in the country. He had been a deputy for many years.

Two years prior to the death of his first wife, they had celebrated their 50th anniversary.

Surviving is his wife, Mrs. Eva Van Waters Blaisdell; three sisters, all of Lacona, N. H.; a foster son, Dewey Sherman of Brownville, and several nephews and nieces.

The funeral arrangements are incomplete pending the arrival of relatives.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

W. L. Easton.

Brownville, July 5. -- W. I. Easton died July 4 at 5 a.m. Mr. Easton has been sick for a number of months and confined to his home. His funeral will be held on Tuesday in the Stone church at 10 a.m., Rev. B. G. Blaisdell officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Cynthia B. Whitney.

Cynthia M. Whitney passed away Jan. 6. She was born in the town of Adams, Jefferson county, July 21, 1822, and while yet a young lady she removed with her parents to the town of Clayton, to the residence adjoining to the home in which she died. For several years her life was given to teaching and a goodly number of the residents of the town of Clayton and those who have been residents were under her instruction. She was the daughter of Oliver Barrows of Chester, Mass., and Marian Wilkie Barrows, who, on her mother’s side, was a direct descendant of Miles Standish of the Mayflower, and the sixth generation therefrom. In her life she was a regular attendant of the Baptist church of which her parents were members. In 1845 she was married to Floyd Whitney of the town of Clayton and has continued to live and toil with her husband until his death, which preceded hers eight years and nine months. Here they toiled for their family of seven sons, Luther, Lucien, Gilbert, Burton, William, Charles and Martin G., all of whom survive except Gilbert, who died in infancy. She was ever a devoted and faithful mother, her first and every thought being for their welfare, happiness and advancement. She was ever ready to sacrifice for their advancement in education and her sons attribute to her teaching and instruction all the success that they have been able to attain. If faithfulness in the small things of life constitute the total of great and noble lives she possessed those qualities.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Carthage, Oct. 28. -- Gilbert H. Plank, 80 years of age, was found dead in bed this morning about 7 o’clock, by his daughter, Mrs. Margaret Plank with whom he was living. Dr. E. A. Simmonds was called and gave as the cause of death heart failure. He notified Corner M. M. Ryan of Philadelphia. Mr. Plank had been steadily failing for some time. He is survived by his daughter-in-law with whom he was living, a son, Egbert Plank of Watertown, two grandchildren, Claude Plank and Mrs. Earl Williams, both of Carthage. Funeral arrangements are not made.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

CLAUDE H. PLANK
DIES IN CARTHAGE

________

Was a Well Known Electrical
Engineer---Had Been Ill
Two Years.

________

Carthage, Nov. 16. -- Claude H. Plank, aged 33 years, 6 months and 16 days, died Saturday afternoon at the home of his sister, Mrs. Earl Williams, at the corner of Furnace and Mechanic streets. Mr. Plank was born in the village April 28, 1881, and was the son of the late Edward and Mrs. Margaret Plank. He graduated from the Carthage High school with the class of 1900.

After graduating from school, he became a stationary engineer and later became an electrical engineer. For the past year he has been the chief electrical engineer for the Johnson Endicott Co. of Lestershire, N. Y. He held a civil service position.

Mr. Plank had been in poor health for the past two years and had undergone a number of operations. He resigned his position about two weeks ago and came here. The cause of death was dropsy.

He was a member of the Carthage High School Alumni Association and several local lodges. He was also a member of the choir of Grace Episcopal church of this village.

The survivors are his mother, Mrs. Margaret Plank, and a sister, Mrs. Earl Williams.

The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 at the home of his sister, Rev. F. W. Feary, pastor of St. Mark’s Episcopal church of Newark, N. Y., a former pastor of Grace Episcopal church of this village, will officiate. Rev. Mr. Feary will be assisted by Rev. J. W. Barrett, pastor of the First Methodist church of this village. Carthage lodge, I. O. O. F., the Oriental Encampment and the Rebekahs will attend the funeral in a body. Interment will be made in Fairview cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Sarah Haas

(Special To The Times.)

(1927)

Depauville, Sept. 24. -- Mrs. Sarah Haas, 78, a life long resident of this village died at 1:30 this afternoon at her home in Eliza street.

Three years ago Mrs. Haas fell, and broke her hip. Since that time she had been an invalid. A year later Mrs. Haas fell for the second time, injuring her knee.

About ten days ago she suffered a shock, being confined to bed since that time. She was attended by Dr. Fowkes of this village.

She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, the Rebekah lodge and the Grange. The funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Mrs. Haas was the widow of (the) late Fred Z. Haas. She is survived by four children Fred of Detroit, Harold of Depauville, Ward, who is traveling in Africa and Cecelia of Atlantic City.

Ward is a civil engineer. He will be notified by mail of the death of his mother. Cecelia, who is a school teacher in Atlantic City arrived in this village at noon today. Fred has been notified and will arrive in this village Sunday.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Miss Susie Whitney

There is universal and genuine regret at the death of Miss Susie Whitney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. G. Whitney, which occurred at an early hour on Tuesday morning. Deceased, who was in her 17th year, had been ill for about six weeks, but was thought to be rapidly recovering when the end came. She is survived by her parents and a brother, Miles Whitney.

The funeral will be held from her late home on Thursday afternoon.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Obituary

Susie Whitney, the beloved daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. G. Whitney, died at her home about six miles from this village Thursday, Aug. 9th, aged 17 years. Death at all times is sad, but when their only daughter is taken from kind parents, and she their pride and joy, with their hopes centered in the loving and lovely child, it seems heart-rending. But that dread disease, typhoid fever, soon took her strength and although all human skill was used to save her, she died, leaving all who knew her to mourn her loss.

Besides her parents she leaves on brother, Miles S. Whitney, who will sadly miss a loving sister. The family have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement.

Her parents hearts are sore with woe,
Their dearest hope is fled.
The tears in torrents downward flow,
Their only girl is dead.
The friends who gather ‘round the sod
Would fain assuage their grief,
But they alone must look to God
To give their hearts relief.

Like flowers chilled in frosty air
She wilted in her bloom,
And now behold her, lifeless there,
Above her childish tomb.
Her parents’ tears are flowing free
Upon the casket lid,
But in a moment more she’ll be
From human eyesight hid.

Oh! yes, strew flowers on her grave
All you with senses calm,
But for her parents’ hearts I crave
Some (rest of poem covered by the top of Celia Frances Hass’s obit)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HAAS -- In the Lankenau hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., July 11, 1932, Miss Celia Frances Haas of Atlantic City, N. J., formerly of Depauville and Clayton, aged 46 years. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at the home of a brother, Ward Haas, Philadelphia, Pa.

Burial in the family plot in Depauville cemetery Thursday at 11:30 a.m., Rev. F. K. Vogt, pastor of the Concordia Evangelical Lutheran church of this city, officiating.

Miss Celia Frances Haas, 46, of Atlantic City, N. J., formerly of Depauville and Clayton, died Monday night about 11 in the Lankenau hospital at Philadelphia, Pa., where she underwent an operation five weeks ago.

Miss Haas was born at Depauville, April 9, 1886, the daughter of Fred and Sarah Blodgett Haas. She was graduated from Clayton High school and entered Cornell university from which institution she was graduated in 1908.

After her graduation from Cornell university, she taught school for two years in Nevada. Since that time she had been teaching biology in the Atlantic City High school, a period of about 19 years.

Miss Haas spent her summers at Three Mile Point, near Three Mile Bay, where she maintained a summer home.

Surviving her are two brothers, Carl Haas of Depauville and Ward Haas of Philadelphia, Pa., and six nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at the home of her brother, Ward Haas, at Philadelphia, Pa. The body will be brought to Depauville where burial will be made in the family plot Thursday morning at 11:30, Rev. Frederick K. Vogt, pastor of the Concordia Evangelical Lutheran church of this city, officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Carrie Pierce Swartout

(1917)

Three Mile Creek -- Mrs. Carrie Pierce Swartout, age 64, wife of Eugene D. Swartout, died at the old Pierce homestead, Saturday, December 15th, after an illness of two years or more. She was the daughter of Riley and Ann Putnam Pierce, being born on the farm where her death occurred. She had always lived there with the exception of eight years.

Besides her husband, she is survived by one son, George R. Swartout, and one granddaughter, Fern A. Swartout. The funeral was held from the farm home on Monday, Rev. Sherlock of Depauville, officiating.

Card of Thanks

_______

Kind friends and relatives who assisted us in any way during the recent illness an death of our beloved wife and mother, we wish to thank one and all from the depth of our hearts. We also thank the choir for their kind assistance and the loving niece who gave a floral piece in remembrance.

Eugene Swartout
Mr. and Mrs. George Swartout and Family

* * * * * * * * * * * *

JARVIS -- In this village, June 10, 1897, Fred J. Jarvis, aged 20 years, 9 mos., 4 days.

Fred J. Jarvis, son of Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Hollenbeck, passed away at his home on James street at an early hour Thursday morning, in the twentieth year of his age.

A former employe of this office, he was obliged to leave his position on account of failing health in Frebruary last. During the intervening months, sustained by a wonderful ambition, the young man had hoped for recovery, but the frail form althou’ endowed with a remarkable vitality, gradually lost strength and the end came peacefully and quietly.

Perhaps no one outside the family is more capable of judging of the fine character of Fred than is the writer of this short sketch. He was a model young man, faithful and attentive to duties imposed upon him, and possessed of extraordinary ability. Had he lived, no doubt he would have advanced rapidly to the front and become a valued member of society. Hardly more will his loss be felt by those in his own home than by the employes of his office, with whom he had pleasant associations for nearly two years. His vacant post will be filled but the memory of his pleasant word and happy disposition will linger always. ON THE ST. LAWRENCE unites in extending a kind word of sympathy to those upon whom his loss falls most heavily.

The funeral services will be held from the Baptist church Sunday at 2 p.m., Rev. H. J. Baldwin, the pastor, will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Photo - Wm. H. Lingenfelter and Wife of Clayton.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sketch of the Life of William H. Lingenfelter Who
Owns One of the Largest Farms in
the River Town.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A brief sketch of the life of William H. Lingenfelter, a highly respected citizen of the town of Clayton, follows:

William H. Lingenfelter, both as a farmer and a citizen justly ranks among the most valued residents of Clayton. He belongs to a family which was founded in this country by Michael Lingenfelter, a native of Germany. Michael Lingenfelter was born in 1750. He came to America before the Revolutionary War, and settled in Montgomery county, New York, where he and his brother purchased a farm of 800 acres. Here Michael Lingenfelter passed the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. He was the father of nine children.

John Lingenfelter, one of his nine children, was born in 1783, in Montgomery county, where he received his education and then engaged in farming on the homestead. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. He married Elida, who was born in 1790 in Montgomery County, daughter of Conrad and Elida Winnie. The father was born in 1749 (sic) in Montgomery County where he spent the greater portion of his life as a farmer. He and his wife were the parents of eight children. Mr. Winnie ended his days in Cherry Valley, Otsego County, New York and his wife died at the venerable age of 91 years. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and were sincerely loved and esteemed by all who knew them.

William H. Lingenfelter, third son of John and Elida Lingenfelter, was born February 10, 1822, in Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York and received his education in his birthplace and in Clayton. At the age of 17 he began to learn the blacksmith's trade in Montgomery County, and at the end of three years began to work as a journeyman.

After three years he engaged in business for himself in Clayton village and for 20 years followed his trade with success. In 1856 he bought the farm which is now his home, three miles from Clayton, on the road to Depauville, and in 1863 took up his abode there. Here he has resided ever since, on a beautiful estate of 358 acres, one of the largest farms in the township. It is maintained in a highly flourishing condition, the owner devoting the land to general farming and dairying, keeping 45 cows. Mr. Lingenfelter has labored conscientiously and zealously in behalf of the betterment of the town and community in which he lives, advancing its material and moral interest by all means in his power, and has received many tokens of deserved popularity from his neighbors.

He served six years as inspector of election in his town, nine years as assessor. To the latter office he was re-elected three times, and for six years he held the position of chairman of the board. He has also filled the office of supervisor two terms, overseer of the poor one term, and collector several terms. He also received the appointment of state railroad commissioner, an office which he held for eight years, and he is one of the directors of the National Exchange Bank of Clayton. He has been a man of great activity and industry throughout his life, and was never known to champion an injust measure. He was a vigorous opponent of anything that was not for the best interest of the town. He is remarkably smart and active today for one of his years.

In 1846 he was united in marriage to Mary E., daughter of John and Mary Wilson, and for 30 years he and his faithful wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Clayton. Mrs. Lingenfelter died at her home near Clayton Dec. 29, 1905, in the 78th year of her age. During her long illness she bore her sufferings with Christian fortitude and was tenderly ministered to by her devoted husband and children. Her death was regarded as a personal loss by the entire community, which held her in sincere love and affection for her lofty character, magnetic personality, and usefulness of life.

Since the death of her mother, Emma, one of the daughters, has remained at home to care for her father's comfort.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

WILLIAM H. LINGENFELTER

(5-1-1908)

The subject of this sketch was born in the Mohawk Valley Feb. 10, 1823, and departed this life May 1, 1908, at the farm on the line road where he had resided continuously 45 years. He was preceded to the Beyond by his wife two years ago. Both had for many years been consistent members of the M. E. church. In his youth, Mr. Lingenfelter took up the trade of a blacksmith and for several years conducted a shop in this village. At his trade or on the farm his affairs conducted with characteristic thrift and he was eminently successful, leaving one of the largest estates in the town. He was for years active in politics, early affiliating with the Democratic party, and he and those of the name were and are an element to be reckoned with in the town and county campaigns. He was twice elected supervisor, serving with credit as one of the safe members of the board. For 24 years he has been a director in the National Exchange bank and prior to that he was a stockholder in the old Bank of Clayton.

He leaves nine surviving children whose genuine affection for him attested another side of the man and father. His body was laid at rest in Clayton cemetery beside that of his wife, Rev. Mr. Cheesman, officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SAMPSON -- At Clayton, Oct. 1, 1928, Mrs. Eliza Sampson, wife of Warner T. Sampson of Clayton, aged 81 years.

Funeral from home at Clayton Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. B. G. Miller, pastor of Clayton Methodist Episcopal church, officiating.

Clayton, Oct. 2 -- Mrs. Eliza Sampson, 81, wife of Warner T. Sampson, died at her home on Jane Street at 5:30 Monday night following an illness of about two years.

Mrs. Sampson was born in the Town of Clayton January 19, 1847 and had passed her entire life in this section. She was a member of the local Methodist Episcopal Church. She was twice married. Her first husband died some years ago.

Surviving her besides her husband are two sons Merritt and William Lingenfelter (sic); six sisters, Miss Emma Lingenfelter, Mrs. Minnie Wetterhahn, Mrs. Jane (sic) Bretsch, Mrs. George Daniels, Mrs. Robert Calderwood, and Mrs. Fred Dillenback; one brother, Merritt Lingenfelter, all of the Town of Clayton (sic).

Funeral services will be held at the home at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. Rev. B. G. Miller, pastor of the local Methodist Episcopal Church officiating.

Burial will be made in the local cemetery.

Note: Typist has placed the “sic” where information contradicts findings from extensive research she has done on the Lingenfelter family.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Miss Emeline L. Lingenfelter

(1929)

Depauville, Dec. 23 -- Miss Emeline I. Lingenfelter, 79, Clayton, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. Minnie Wetterhahn, in this village Saturday at 4 p.m. after a long illness.

She was born in Clayton on June 14, 1850, a daughter of William H. and Mary Wilson Lingenfelter. Nearly all her life had been spent in Clayton.

Surviving are her brother, Merritt E. Lingenfelter, Clayton, with whom she had made her home for 20 years; four sisters, Mrs. Minnie Wetterhahn, Depauville, Mrs. Kate Daniels, Clayton, Mrs. Elma Dillenbeck, Clayton Center, and Mrs. Nellie Calderwood, Johnstown, N. Y., and several nephews and nieces.

Funeral services were held from the home of Mrs. Wetterhahn today at 1:30 p.m., Rev. Mr. Lawrence of this village officiating. The body was placed in the vault here to await burial in the spring.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SAMPSON -- At Clayton, April 11, 1935, Warner T. Sampson, retired farmer, aged 77 years.

Prayers from the home in Jane street, at 1:30 p.m. Sunday and funeral services from the Clayton Methodist Episcopal church at 2 p.m., with Rev. W. O. Thomas, pastor, officiating.

Interment in Clayton cemetery.

Clayton, April 11 -- Warner T. Sampson, 77, retired farmer, died about 10:15 a.m. today at his home, 312 Jane street, following an illness of about two years. He suffered a slight stroke on Monday which hastened his death.

He was born in Black River, March 17, 1858, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Sampson, where he was educated. He spent his early life farming in the vicinity of Watertown.

He married Miss Eliza S. (sic) Lingenfelter on Dec. 7, 1879. Shortly after their marriage, the couple moved to the Lingenfelter farm outside of Clayton. Twenty years ago they left the farm and removed here. Mrs. Sampson died October 1, 1928.

He is survived by one step-son Merrit (sic) W. Littlefield, Chaumont, and several nieces and nephews.

Prayers will be held at the home at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, and the funeral from the Clayton Methodist Episcopal church at 2 with Rev. W. O. Thomas, pastor, officiating. Burial will be in Clayton cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Almon M. Barney

Almon M. Barney, aged 93 years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. E. Lingenfelter, near Clayton, last week Wednesday evening after an illness of only a few days. Mr. Barney was born in the Town of Clayton and had always made his home here with the exception of one year which he passed in California.

He was a farmer and lived on his farm near Clayton Center until 35 years ago, when he retired and went to live with his grandson, C. A. Ellie (sic). About a year ago Mr. Barney's wife died and after her death he took up his residence with his daughter, Mrs. Lingenfelter.

He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Cora Ellis and Mrs. M. E. Lingenfelter, both of the Town of Clayton, and two grandsons, C. A. Ellis and Lee Lingenfelter.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

LINGENFELTER -- In the town of Clayton, January 23, 1929, Mrs. Frances A. Lingenfelter, 70, wife of Merritt Lingenfelter. Services privately at the home at 1:30 Saturday with burial in Clayton. Rev. B. G. Miller, of the Methodist church will officiate.

CLAYTON, Jan. 24 -- Mrs. Frances Addie Lingenfelter, 70, wife of Merritt Lingenfelter dropped dead at 4:30 yesterday afternoon at their farm home in the town of Clayton. She was returning to the house and just as she stepped inside she was stricken, dying instantly.

Mrs. Lingenfelter was born in the town of Orleans, April 15, 1858, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Almon Barney and had lived in the town of Clayton many years. Fifty-four years ago she was married to Mr. Lingenfelter.

Besides her husband she leaves a son, Lee of Clayton; a granddaughter, Marion of Buffalo; a grandson, William H. of Clayton, and a sister, Mrs. Cora Ellis of Clayton.

Funeral services will be held privately at 1:30 Saturday at the home and burial will be in the local cemetery. Rev. B. G. Miller of the Methodist church will officiate.

.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

William H. Rees

With photo - available on Mark Wentling's Pioneer Portraits site

(headliner of article missing)


Clayton people were shocked Wednesday morning at the announcement of the sudden death at his residence on Hugunin street of William H. Rees. Apparently in his usual good health a few hours before, there was no intimation that the end was so near. He attended the banquet at Masonic hall on Tuesday evening, and as had been his habit at most gatherings was one of the principal speakers. His remarks are spoken of today as particularly happy and in the cheerful vein which he so well knew and which was always appreciated by his bearers, whether addressing a jury, a public or political meeting or upon an afterdinner occasion.

He retired shortly after midnight, and an hour or two later was taken with severe pains. Medical aid was summoned and everything done that could be, but the end came about eight o'clock Wednesday morning.

William H. Rees was born in Clayton in 1848, and had always resided here. From an early age he was actively engaged in business, and as a young man assumed responsibilities that would have looked large to one of double his years. He studied law in the office of the late H. E. Morse, was admitted to the bar in 1878, and has since been in continuous practice in this village.

Deceased had been president of the village, supervisor of the town, justice of the peace, and active in politics and had formed a large acquaintance throughout the county and among the visitors to the Thousand Islands region. Absolutely fearless in his convictions, outspoken to the extent that there never was a doubt where he stood on all matters of public interest, generous almost to a fault, and a loyal and constant friend to the needy, no man in the community will be more missed than Will Rees.

For many years he had been Master of Clayton Lodge, F. & A. M., and so well versed was he in all things pertaining to Masonry and so well could express himself that he put a dignity to the office that has since been the ambition of his successors to copy.

He is survived by his wife, two brothers -- Galen, of Imperial, Neb., and Charles E., of Clayton -- one sister, Mrs. C. A. Ellis, a daughter, Mrs. George R. Kenyon, and two sons, Thomas P., of this village and Carl R., of Detroit, Michigan.

The funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

FRAME -- At the House of the Good Samaritan, January 10, 1927, Dr. Herbert Frame, of 320 John street, Clayton. Funeral Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from his home.


Dr. Herbert Frame, 60, health officer of the village of Clayton, died this morning at 2 o’clock at the House of the Good Samaritan. Heart trouble was the cause of death.

Dr. Frame was born in Three Mile Bay, September 10, 1866, the son of Dr. S. B. Frame and Avis Johnson Frame. He was a graduate of Johns-Hopkins hospital and practiced in Clayton ever since graduation.

He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in all branches, including the Shrine and the Knights Templar. He was a past master of the Clayton Blue lodge. He was also a member of the Elks.

Dr. Frame never married. He is survived by a sister, Miss Vivene Frame of Clayton and two nieces, Mrs. O. F. Maraquardt of Montclair, N. J., and Mrs. Adelbert Devendorf, Rapids City, South Dakota.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from his home in Clayton, 320 John street.

__________________


Clayton Physician Last of a
Family of Doctors -- Well
Known in County


(1927)

(Special to The Standard)

CLAYTON, Jan. 11. -- Funeral services for Dr. Herbert Johnson Frame, 60, one of the well known physicians of this region and a descendant of a family of physicians who gained considerable prominence in the North County, will be held in the M. E. church here Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and the body will be placed in the vault for burial in the spring. Rev. Mr. Miller of the local church and Rev. Mr. Gardner of the Adams M. E. church will officiate.

For four generations the Frame family had furnished to the medical society of the county distinguished practitioners. Dr. Frame’s great grandfather, William Frame, who practiced in the town of Russia in the central part of the state, was the first of his ancestors to take up medicine. He came to Depauville in 1822 to succeed Dr. Page, the village’s first physician. His son, Luke E. Frame began the study of medicine under the guidance of his father and was later prominent in the civic life of Depauville where he served as supervisor and president of the village for several years. His son, the father of the last Dr. Frames (sic), was Dr. S. B. Frame and like other members of the family had a wide practice and was highly esteemed. Two of the last Dr. Frame’s uncles also served in the profession.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

George W. Crandall

(March 2, 1911)

At his home in this village on Saturday night occurred the death of George White Crandall, after an illness of little more than a week.

Mr. Crandall was born in the (sic) Watertown Jan. 27, 1851, the son of John and Mary Crandall, who went with their parents, William P. and Content Crandall, to Watertown when three or four log houses made up the settlement where the city now stands. They came from Massachusetts, and the journey from Herkimer was made with an ox team.

Mr. Crandall was twice married, Sept. 3, 1873, to Miss Nettie Fox, of Depauville, who died in 1889; on June 2, 1891, to Miss Amelia Minnie Eiss, who survives him; also six children, Myron J., of Michigan, and John G., Mary A., Arthur E., Esther E., and Frank D., of Clayton; a brother, Irving I., of North Kingsville, Ohio; two sisters, Mrs. E. R. Adams, of Pillar Point, and Mrs. O. M. Cook, of Watertown.

He received his early Sunday school training at the Methodist Episcopal church in Rodman. After removing to Clayton, he became an active member of the Lafargeville church of the same faith. About five years ago he joined the Congregational church of Clayton.

He was an enthusiastic Republican in politics and had the good will of all factions. For ten or twelve years he had held a position as deputy customs inspector, and last year was in charge of this work at Thousand Island Park. For two terms he was a valued member of the board of education, and at the time of his death was superintendent of the Boys’ Club. Active in village and town matters, a good citizen and neighbor, upright, and of exemplary habits, he will be greatly missed in the locality where he was so well known.

The funeral was held from the house on Wednesday at 2 p.m., and the body placed in the vault. Later it will be taken to Lafargeville for interment in charge of Clayton Lodge, No. 296, F. & A. M., of which he was an active member.

The village school was closed on Wednesday afternoon out of respect to Mr. Crandall’s memory.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

FRANK THIBAULT LOCAL
BLACKSMITH DIES AT HOSPITAL

(1927)

The death of Frank Thibault, aged 66, well known blacksmith of this village, occurred at the Hepburn hospital in Ogdensburg on Saturday, Sept. 24, at 10:30 P. M. Mr. Thibault had been in ill health for several weeks and entered the hospital about two weeks ago. He underwent an operation on Sept. 14th for kidney and bladder trouble, and had recovered sufficiently to sit up in his chair. On the night of his death, and only a few hours before he expired, he appeared to be feeling fine, sitting in his chair and smoking a pipe. He told several of his relatives who were there at the time that he was feeling fine and that they could return to their homes whenever they desired. It was only a matter of an hour or so afterwards that he was dead. It is believed that a heart attack was responsible.

Mr. Thibault was born in this village on March 19, 1861, a son of Benjamin and Sophia Thibault, and has always made his home here. During most of his life he had followed the occupation of a blacksmith and for many years conducted a shop in James street known as Thibault Bros. Blacksmiths, his younger brother, Paul being his partner. With the advent of the auto and the fast decreasing needs of the horse in modern times, the brothers dissolved their partnership business and since Mr. Thibault had been employed at the St. Lawrence River Motor and Machine Co., and the past two years at the Snow plow factor of Carl H. Frink.

Mr. Thibault was a member of St. Mary’s Church, from where his funeral services were held on Tuesday morning, and also a member of the lodge of Elks.

Besides his wife, Mrs. Ellen Thibault, he is survived by 7 sisters, Mrs. Joseph Foley, Mrs. Amelia Hesler, Mrs. Geo. Lalonde, Jr., Mrs. August Brabant, Mrs. Amos Brabant, all of Clayton; Mrs. Matilda Steier (sic) of Syracuse and Mrs. Charles Carpenter of Watertown; and one brother, Paul Thibault, of this village. Mr. Thibault’s father, Benjamin, died in 1893 and his mother expired in 1902.

Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

LUKE E. SCHELL, M. D.

Funeral To Be Held This Afternoon
at 2:30 o’clock from Residence

The announcement of the death of Dr. Luke E. Schell of 12 Milwaukee avenue, Detroit, which occurred at Harper hospital on Wednesday evening at 6:15 o’clock, cast a sudden gloom over this entire community where he had scores of friends to deeply deplore his sudden and untimely demise.

The doctor had been a silent sufferer from stomach trouble for several years, and not until ten days previous to his death was his condition realized. On Sunday, May 7th he was taken seriously ill with appendicitis and despite the skillful efforts of physicians the disease made its fearful progress and he was removed to Harper hospital on Monday where an operation was performed the following day, which revealed to the attending physicians, conditions which made recovery impossible and thus he lingered until the angel of death relieved him from all suffering. We can only say, none knew him but to honor, love and respect him. Ever thoughtful, willing and ready to go where duty called, he gave his strength to the last, to those, his patients and friends, whom he had so closely endeared himself to, thinking not of his own physical weakness.

Dr. Schell was born in Clayton, N. Y., 36 years ago. He came to Detroit 12 years ago and entered the Detroit College of Medicine, where he was a graduate in the class of ‘92 taking a gold medal for high standing in his studies. The following year he was senior house physician at Harper hospital and was a member of the polyclinic board at the time of his death. He was also assistant professor of physiology, at the Detroit College of Medicine. Deceased came to the Northside about seven years ago, and since that time had built up an enviable reputation by his integrity and strict attention to business. June 15th, 1897, he was married to Miss May Somerville of London, Can., whom, with one little daughter two years old, are left to mourn the loss of a devoted husband and father.

He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Oddfellows, National Union, Home Indemnity society, the Detroit Medical & Library association, the Women and Children’s Protective association, Court Woodward, No. 589 I. O. F., and Pingree Tent, No. 322, K. O. T. M.

The funeral services will be held from his late residence, 12 Milwaukee avenue east, this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. M. H. Pettit officiating. The interment will take place at Woodmere.

* * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Jane Schell

(1897)

Dec. 14. The remains of Mrs. Jane Schell arrived from Detroit Tuesday morning, and were interred at Clayton cemetery. Mrs. Schell went West a few weeks ago to visit her son, Dr. Schell, and was taken ill and died Sunday. Mrs. Schell, or Aunt Jane as she was more familiarly called, has always resided in this community and is one whose memory will be cherished by all who know her. Mrs. Schell’s maiden name was Jane Sheldon. Her parents were Potter and Nancy Sheldon. She was the mother of four children, two having died in childhood and one son at the age of 14, Dr. Schell being the only remaining member of the family.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

(part of heading missing)

DIES FROM ANEMIA

_____

MRS. JANIE S. GRAY SUCCUMBS
AFTER LONG ILLNESS, AGED
42 YEARS

(1918)

Clayton, Dec. 9. -- Mrs. Janie Estella Gray, wife of George Gray, died at her home in John street at 1:30 Sunday morning, after an illness of about four years. She was 42 years of age, born in Clayton, and always lived in the vicinity. Besides her husband she is survived by one daughter, Miss Marion Gray, and one brother, Ward Harter, of Depauville. A private funeral will be held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 1. Rev. E. E. Cheeseman of Three Mile Bay, officiating. Friends may call at the home between the hours of 10 and 12 Tuesday morning. Interment will be made in Lafargeville cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * *

SHELDON -- Jan. 31st., 1887, Gertrude E., only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Sheldon, aged 21 years, 10 mos.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

DIES AFTER 3 YEARS’ ILLNESS

________

Mrs. Milo B. Henry, 57, Passes
Away at Clayton.

________

(1918)

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

Clayton, April 19. -- Mrs. Addie C. Henry, wife of Milo B. Henry of this village, died this morning at 4 after an illness of three years. Death was due to pernicious anaemia (sic). Every possible effort was made to save her life. Last September she was taken to the City hospital at Watertown and received treatment there for nine weeks. Transfusion of blood was resorted to, but this proved unavailing. The blood was given by her daughter, Mrs. C. A. Comins of Clayton, and the operation was performed by Dr. G. D. Gregor.

Mrs. Henry was 57 years of age. She was born in this village, the daughter of the late S. R. and Sophronie E. Sheldon, and her entire life has been spent here. She is survived by her mother, who is 80 years of age; her husband; three children, Mrs. Frank W. Tierman of Depauville, Mrs. C. Addison Comins of Clayton, and Melzer G. Henry, who lived at home and one brother, Asa H. Sheldon of San Luis Obispo, Cal. She had been married 37 years.

The funeral services will be held from the late home Sunday afternoon at 2, interment will be made at Depauville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Lina Nichols Whittier

(Feburary 9, 1921)

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES)

Chaumont, Feb. 9. -- Mrs. Lina Nichols Whittier, aged 62 years, four months and 24 days, wife of Manchester Whittier, died at 3:30 this morning at the home in Depauville. Afflicted with tuberculosis, she had been in failing health for two years. Mrs. Whittier had been organist of the Methodist Episcopal church for over 40 years and was a talented musician.

She was born at Philadelphia, the daughter of William S. and Alcesta Bellinger Nichols. Her married to Mr. Whittier took place Dec. 23, 1878, and since that she had made her home in Depauville. She was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and also a member of the Ladies’ Aid, the Sunshine Society and the Rebekah lodge. As organist, she took a deep interest in the church choir. She also taught music for many years. Mrs. Whittier was also prominent in social circles.

Besides her husband, she is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Blanche Lawrence of Depauville, Mrs. L. W. Priest of Plessis and Mrs. J. B. Hart of Clayton; three sisters, Mrs. Mary Nichols of Theresa, Mrs. J. M. Courts of New Rochelle, and Mrs. E. S. Burtis of Antwerp; one brother, Brayton Nichols of Theresa; a niece, Mrs. F. J. Williams of Portsouth, O.; and four grandchildren.

The funeral will be held privately from the home Saturday afternoon at 2. Burial will be made at Depauville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

WHITTIER -- In town of Clayton, Dec. 10, 1927, Manchester Whittier, aged 78 years.

Funeral services will be held Monday at the home of Mrs. John B. Hart, near Clayton, Rev. Mr. Lawrence of Depauville, officiating.

Interment at Depauville.

________

Chaumont, Dec. 10. -- Manchester Whittier, 78, a life resident of the village of Depauville died at 3:30 o’clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John B. Hart, in the town of Clayton.

Mr. Whittier was born March 5, 1859, a son of Stillman and Olive Graves. For many years he was a fiddler of note throughout this region. December 23, 1878 he married Miss Lina Nichols of Theresa who died February 9, 1921.

He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. John B. Hart, Mrs. Blanche Lawrence of Depauville, Mrs. Leroy Priest of Felts Mills; a brother, Lowell of Omar; and two sisters, Mrs. Christiana Hill of Omar and Mrs. Henry Otis of Granby, Mo.; by four grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He was a member of the Masonic lodge of Depauville.

The funeral services will be held at 2 Monday afternoon at the Hart home and burial will be in Depauville. Rev. Mr. Lawrence of the M. E. church will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

DILLENBACK -- At Clayton Center, July 15, 1926, Fred Alvah Dillenback, aged 62 years.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 from the home.

_________

 

CLAYTON CENTER, July 15. - A slight scratch caused by brushing his hand on a nail and not considered serious until pain developed two weeks after the injury brought lockjaw and death to Fred Alvah Dillenback, 62, prominent farmer of this village, who passed away yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at his home.

Heroic efforts on the part of Drs. J.T. Fowkes of Clayton, and David Gregor and G. D. Gregor of Watertown to inject serum to stave off the rapid advance of the disease were without avail. Mr. Dillenback's body had stiffened so that this method, the only one known to science as an aid, could not be followed.

It was as Mr. Dillenback was doing his customary work about the farm that he suffered a small scratch on his hand. The injury apparently healed in the course of several days and Mr. Dillenback had every reason to believe that the scratch was no different than ordinary scratches suffered by farm workers. Even as late as last Friday he drove his car to Watertown, passing part of the day there.

The first real intimation that he was suffering from tetanus came when he returned to his home after his trip to Watertown. Slight pains, similar to rheumatic pains, were developing in his hand. Slightly suspicious of the cause, Mr. Dillenback visited Dr. J. T. Fowkes of Clayton who realized at once the seriousness of the disease. Saturday, Dr. David Gregor of Watertown was called into conference and an effort was made to inject serum.

Sunday Mr. Dillenback's condition was critical and Dr. G. D. Gregor arrived to aid the other physicians. For two hours the three attempted to inject the serum followed by a similar effort on Monday, but his body had stiffened so much that help could not be given him, and he remained in severe pain until the time of his death.

Mr. Dillenback was born in the town of Lyme, December 24, 1863, a son of Mrs. Amelia McCombs Dillenback and the late Alvah Dillenback. On December 22, 1886, he married Miss Elma S. Lingenfelter and had always lived in Clayton Center and the town of Lyme. Besides his aged mother and his wife he is survived by one son, Alvah; one daughter, Mrs. Winfield Scott; three granddaughters, Madelynne and Alvera Dillenback and Elvah Scott of Clayton Center; one brother, Bertine of St. Lawrence, and one sister, Mrs. Myron Lingenfelter, of Limerick.

The funeral will be held at the home Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock with burial in the Union cemetery at St. Lawrence.

* * * * * * * * * *

(in pen: 1928)

CLAYTON CENTER, Jan. 27. Mrs. Amelia E. Dillenback, 93, died at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Fred Dillenback, at 1:45 yesterday afternoon, following an illness of two months.

Mrs. Dillenback was born in the town of Brownville, April 30, 1835, a daughter of Andrew and Emily Dickey McCombs. She was married December 4, 1856, to Alvah Dillenback, who died 63 years ago.

Surviving are: a son, Bert Dillenback of Limerick; a daughter, Mrs. Myron Lingenfelter of Limerick; a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Fred Dillenback, and five grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at the home of Mrs. Fred Dillenback, Clayton Center, Monday at 2 p.m. Rev. Alexander Scott, pastor of the Chaumont M. E. church, officiating. Burial in St. Lawrence cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

PUTNAM -- At Depauville, February 9, 1926, Stanton A. Putman (sic), 42. Funeral Thursday at 1:30 at home and in Methodist Episcopal church at 2.

_______

Native of Three Mile Creek Dies
After Five Months
Illness

(Special to The Standard)

(1926)

DEPAUVILLE, Feb. 10. -- Stanton A. Putman*, 42, a native of Three Mile Creek and for many years a farmer of this vicinity, died last evening at 10 o'clock at the home of his mother, Mrs. Clara Haas, in this village. He had been in failing health for the last five months.

Mr. Putnam was born in Three Mile Creek, September 19, 1883, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Houghton Putman. He married Miss Jennie (sic) Consaul of Clayton 17 years ago and she died in 1918. In July, 1925, he married Mrs. Bessie Byam, who died three months after their marriage.

Mr. Putman was a member of the Masonic Lodge, F. and A. M., the Odd Fellows, the Foresters, and the Patrons of Husbandry.

Besides his mother, he is survived by one daughter, Doris; two stepchildren, Hartley and Bettie Byam, and one uncle, George Loveland of Syracuse.

The funeral will be held at the home Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock and in the M. E. church at 2. The Odd Fellows will have charge of the services. The Masons will also attend in a body.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Familiar Figure To Summer Cot-
tagers Succumbs After Long
Illness

______

(Special to The Standard)

CHAUMONT, Aug. 21. -- John Bolton Rogers, familiarily known to everyone in this vicinity as “Johnnie B.” Rogers, died at his home on Point Salubrious Wednesday afternoon about 5 o’clock.

Mr. Rogers was an adopted son of Charles and Angeline Rogers and was born in Watertown August 2, 1864. With the exception of a few years passed in Michigan he had lived practically all his life upon Point Salubrious. His foster-parents being fishermen and small farmers, he followed that occupation in his early years and finally, when his parents desired to change for another place, he went west with them to Michigan, where they resided for a time and where they both died. He followed the trade of a carpenter and many of the cottages and docks upon Point Salubrious are of his construction. He was known as one of the best men to build a timber dock in this vicinity. At the old homestead, he built a small store, which he conducted during the summer, living in the village in the winters recently, after acquiring property at the corner of Stone and Maine streets. He had been in failing health for five years. On December 24, 1889, he married Alice Schell, who survives him, also a daughter, Bessie, wife of Harold A. Byam, of Henderson, and a granddaughter, Marguerite Byam; one brother, Henry Fish, of California.

He was a charter member of the Independent Order of Foresters.

He was a member of the Patrons of Husbandry or grange of this place. The funeral services will be at the home on Saturday at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, with interment in Cedar Grove Cemetery at Chaumont. Rev. J. H. Stewart, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, will have charge of the services.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Death of Mrs. Charles Lingenfelter.

(1887)

The announcement of the death of Mrs. Charles Lingenfelter, which occurred Jan. 23rd, will be received with profound sorrow by a large circle of friends. It brings to an untimely end the life of one whom we as neighbors and friends esteemed very highly. In her death we feel to lose one of our dearest friends, as the most of her life has been spent among us. Yet the years allotted to many of us were not to be her’s. In this respect her sudden death seems sad enough to her bereaved husband and only son, who are left to mourn the death of one who has been bound to them by ties of strongest affection. She leaves a fond mother, one brother and two sisters. It is the first time that the death angel has visited their home and the blow has fallen with great force. The husband, son and all, have our heart felt sympathy in this, their first bereavement. The deceased was confined to her bed but five days and on Sunday morning began to sink rapidly and at nine o’clock peacefully entered her long, last sleep. She was conscious to the last and bidding farewell to her loved ones she passed calmly away, entering into rest in the hope of a blessed immortality.

Then sleep, thou friend, so true and faithful
We shall miss thee, day by day,
But one glad thought comes to us
When the mist and gloom has rolled away
And our lone bark is drifting,
And nearing the other shore;
We know she waits to greet us
As in happy days of yore.

A FRIEND

* * * * * * * * * * * *

In Memory of Mrs. Glennie Putnam

We are again called upon to bow our heads in grief. The angel of death with its relentless hand has entered our midst and taken to her “Heavenly Rest” our beloved sister, Glennie M. Putnam, who passed to “Eternal Life” Oct. 23. The burial services were conducted from her late home. While we shall sadly miss her presence among us, we trust the bonds of sisterhood are broken here only to be united again over yonder. She has laid down her work of earth to accept a crown of everlasting life.

Sleep till the shadows take
Their endless flight;
Until the morning break
Good night, good night.

Whereas, Believing this last loving tribute to her memory but a feeble expression of our feelings as a chapter; therefore

Resolved, That in the death of Sister Putnam this chapter has lost a beloved and honored member, and we sincerely extend our love and sympathy to the sorrowing family.

Resolved, That our altar be draped in mourning for 30 days as a token of our respect, and

Resolved, That this memorial be enrolled in the minutes of the chapter, a copy thereof be presented to the family of the deceased sister, and that the same be sent to the daily paper for publication.

Beatrice M. Hart,
Lorinda Eckert,
Byron W. Hart,

Committee.

Depauville, N. Y., NOV. 18, 1918,
Chapter 125, O. E. S. ---Adv.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

 

DEPAUVILLE FARMER, ILL A
WEEK WITH PNEUMONIA, DIES

---------------------------

GILBERT PUTNAM WAS WELL
KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE
TOWN OF CLAYTON

(1917)

________

Depauville, March 27. -- Gilbert Putnam, well known retired farmer of the town of Clayton, died Monday morning at his home in this village, following a week's illness of pneumonia, aged 59 years and six months.

He was born in the town of Clayton, son of Mrs. Susan and the late Albert Putnam, and spent the greater part of his life on the old Putnam farm about two miles from this village. He recently retired from active occupation, coming to this village to live.

He was a member of Depauville Methodist Episcopal church and the Depauville grange. He leaves his widow, Mrs. Alberta (sic) Putnam of this village, one daughter, Mrs. Edward Sheldon, who lives at the old Putnam homestead in the town of Clayton, and two sisters, Mrs. A. F. Schnauber of Depauville, and Mrs. Anna Diefendorf, of Chaumont, and his mother, Mrs. Susan Putnam of this village.

The funeral will be held at 2 Wednesday afternoon from Depauville Methodist Episcopal church. Interment will be made in Depauville cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SPENT LONG LIFE
AT DEPAUVILLE

------------

MRS. SUSAN LINGENFELTER
PUTNAM DIED AT ADVANCED
AGE OF 82 YEARS.

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

(in pen: Dec. 9, 1918)

Depauville, Dec. 9. -- Mrs. Susan E. Lingenfelter Putnam, widow of Albert H. Putnam, who died about three years ago at his farm on the Clayton road, passed away Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. E. Schnauber, of this place, aged 82 years.

Mrs. Putnam was born and had spent her entire life in this section. She was married when a girl to Mr. Putnam, with whom she lived for 60 years on the farm near this village, until his death. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church here and of Depauville grange.

Besides the daughter, Mrs. Schnauber, with whom the deceased spent her last days, she leaves one other daughter, Mrs. Ernest Diefendorf, of Chaumont, and five grandchildren, Fred, Susie, and Fannie Diefendorf, and Mrs. Grace Diefendorf MacDougall, of Chaumont, and Mrs. Edwin Shelton (sic), of Clayton.

The funeral will be held from the family home here at 2 Tuesday afternoon, the Rev. J. A. Sherlock, pastor of the M. E. church, of this place, officiating, and burial will be made at Depauville cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

OBITUARY

______

SQUIRE H. WILBUR

Sunday morning at 7:30 Squire H. Wilbur, a lifelong resident of this village, succumbed to a series of paralytic shocks and passed quietly away in a deep sleep which had little appearance of the approach of death.

Mr. Wilbur was born on the Line road July 31, 1833, his parents being Freeman and Catharine Wilbur, who emigrated from the Mohawk country. He was twice married, first to Rebecca Colwell, mother of the three eldest children, who are Mrs. Maggie Pauch, of Carthage; Charles and James, of this village. He married a second time, some few years after the demise of his first wife, Mary Ormsby, of Battersea, Ont., and to them were born three children, George, Daniel and Lottie, all of whom were at his beside in his last moments. There are two brothers surviving, viz.: Freeman, of Johnstown, and Benjamin, of Mason City, Iowa. Mrs. Nancy Shining, of Waukon, is the only sister.

Mr. Wilbur followed the trade of a carpenter, having built and owned many dwellings. He was successful in his quiet career and leaves his family with an independent income. He was an Ancient Odd Fellow, having been a charter member of the old Montcalm lodge of which there are few survivors. He was an ardent Mason, having attended the last regular meeting prior to his demise which occurred less than a week after the first attack. He has held several village offices, and in the discharge of his official as well as private duties he ever acted upon the best principles, was conservative, and with all a man of calm, sound judgment.

Funeral services were held at the James street residence Tuesday afternoon, Rev. W. J. Hancock officiating. At the grave the Masonic burial rites were observed. Despite the boisterous weather the home was filled with friends who came not out of curiosity. A characteristic of Mr. Wilbur was his lenience with people struggling to own a home, and many who have had contracts with him say it was due to this trait that they were enabled to gain a habitation of their own.

_________

CARD OF THANKS.

We wish to publicly thank the friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness during our late bereavement. We are especially grateful to the Masons and church choir.

MRS. S. H. WILBUR AND FAMILY.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Charles Lingenfelter

(May 19, 1917)

Charles Lingenfelter, aged 70 years, died at his home in this village Saturday morning. He was born on the Lingenfelter homestead, three and a half miles from this village. He was married twice. His first wife, was Elizabeth Harter. She died January 23, 1897 (sic), leaving one son, Dr. H. A. Lingenfelter, of Durango, Cal (sic). His second wife was Mrs. Thankful Giltz, who survives him. Besides his wife, he is survived by two sons, Sherman and Charles, one daughter, Hazel, two grandchildren, Irving and Hazel, and one sister, Mrs. Susan Putnam, of Clayton.

The funeral was held at his late home on Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock and at the Methodist Episcopal church at 2:30, Rev. J. S. Eldridge officiating. Interment was in the Clayton cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HENRY HAAS, DIES

March 1, 1923

WAS MASON FOR 67 YEARS

Lived on Farm at Point Salubrious
For Many Years--In Ill Health
For Several Years.

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

Chaumont, March 1. -- Henry Haas, aged 87 years, prominent citizen of this village, died at his home here this morning at 10, following a shock which he sustained earlier in the day. He had been suffering for the past three days from a first shock and the later one brought death. For several years, he had been troubled with arterial weakness. He was a Mason for 67 years.

Mr. Haas was born in the town of Clayton. He was married on Dec. 25, 1861, to Marietta Hart of Clayton, who died March 28, 1863. One son, George Haas of Carthage, was born of the union.

On Feb. 14, 1866, Mr. Haas married Celia Blodgett, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Blodgett. She died Aug. 16, 1918.

Mr. Haas for many years lived on the Haas farm at Point Salubrious, the family moving to this village in 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Haas celebrated their golden wedding Feb. 14, 1916. He was a Mason for 67 years and in July, 1915, was presented with a past master's jewel.

Surviving by his later marriage are four children, Mrs. Hector Adams, Mrs. Jennie Pomeroy, Mrs. O. S. Adams, and Frank Haas, of this village. Another son, Niles Haas, having died in 1909; four brothers, Peter Haas of South Dakota, William of Chaumont, Fred D., of Depauville and Charles of Texas; one sister, Mrs. Nancy Vincent of Minnesota; five grandchildren, Milford and Milton Haas and Marion Adams, of Chaumont, Regina Adams of Syracuse university and Alton Adams of Watertown. Five great-grandchildren are also living.

The funeral arrangements are incomplete.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

J. Lewis Lingenfelter

(April 25, 1910)

In Clayton on Monday occurred the death of J. Lewis Lingenfelter. Deceased was born Aug. 8, 1832, and had lived on the home farm for upwards of 40 years. In the fall of 1903 he suffered a shock and had been in poor health since. He is survived by one son, W. P. Lingenfelter, a brother, Charles C. Lingenfelter, and two sisters, Mrs. Albert Putnam and Mrs. Wendall J. Hyle.

The funeral was held from his late home on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. E. E. Cheeseman officiating. Burial was at Clayton cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

GABLER -- Near Clayton, Jan. 12,1919, Walter Henry Gabler, aged 32 years. Funeral services from his late home, Tuesday afternoon at 1.

__________

Young Farmer Succumbs to In-
fluenza After Ten Days’

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

Clayton, Jan. 13. -- Walter Henry Gabler, 32 years of age, died at his farm home on the state road, between here and Watertown, Saturday, after an illness of ten days of influenza.

Mr. Gabler’s brother, Alfred J. Gabler, a former well known restaurant man of Watertown, died during the influenza epidemic last fall.

Mr. Gabler was born in St. Regis Falls 32 years ago. He moved from there to Lafargeville, and for the past eleven years had been living in this vicinity. He was married a few years ago to Miss Ida Schell of Clayton, who survives him, together with two small daughters, Marie and Gretchen Gabler. He is also survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Gabler of Lafargeville, a twin brother, Wallace, of Waverly, N. Y., and another brother, Clifton, now in France.

The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 at the home, Rev. J. S. Eldridge, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of Clayton officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Chester P. Schell

(Elizabeth Tilly)

A peculiarly sad accident occurred at Island Lake last Friday resulting in the death of Mrs. Chester P. Schell. About eight o’clock in the morning of that day Mr. and Mrs. Schell went to the granary to get out some storm windows which had been stored there during the summer. To reach them, Mrs. Schell climbed a ladder and in some manner lost her balance and fell heavily to the floor upon her head, crushing her skull and rendering her unconscious until she died at four o’clock in the afternoon. Mrs. Schell’s maiden name was Elizabeth Tilly. She was married in 1893 in Minneapolis. Four children were born of the union, three girls and one boy, all of whom survive her. The funeral was held at Bisbee on Monday of this week Rev. Mr. Johnson, pastor of the Presbyterian church of that place officiating. The deceased was a most estimable woman and her untimely death has cast a gloom over the community in which she lived. The bereaved husband and children have the sympathy of all who know them in their sudden and irreparable loss.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Albert G. Snell

Albert G. Snell, of Clayton Center, 71, died Thursday as the result of a complication of diseases. Mr. Snell had been sick about a year. He was a veteran of the Civil War and was one of the best known farmers in this section.

Mr. Snell was born in Herkimer in 1845. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Company A, 186th New York Volunteers, and served throughout the war. In 1868 he married Miss Eliza Wright, at Depauville.

For 38 years he had resided on the Snell farm near here. About a year ago he was taken ill with a number of diseases common to old age, and since that time had failed rapidly.

Besides his widow, he is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Louis Schnauber, of Clayton, two sisters, Mrs. H. C. Fox, of Watertown, and Mrs. David Bretch, of Depauville; one half-sister, Miss May S. Snell, of Dolgeville, and one grandson, Earl Schnauber.

The funeral was held Saturday afternoon. Mr. Snell was a member of Clayton Lodge, No. 296, F. & A. M., and the Masonic service was held at the grave. Burial was made at Lafargeville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

EMPIE -- At Clayton, Oct. 2, 1928, Mrs. Cenema C. Empie, widow of Robert N. Empie, aged 80 years.

Funeral services from home at Clayton Thursday at 10:30 a.m. and from Clayton Methodist Episcopal church at 11 a.m.

Interment at Clayton Center.

_________

Clayton, Oct. 2. -- Mrs. Cenema C. Empie, 80, widow of Robert N. Empie, died at 8:30 this morning following an illness of twelve days.

She was born at Lindhurst, Ont., a daughter of James and Margaret Struthers Middleton. She was married in 1867 to Robert Empie who died 15 years ago. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church here.

She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Charles A. Stowel of Cape Vincent; two brothers, Elijah Middleton of Hamilton, Ont., and Cyrena G. Middleton of Battle Creek, Mich., and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held from the home Thursday at 10:30 and from the Methodist Episcopal church at 11. Interment will be at Clayton Center.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

A photo of Frank S. Reed was inserted below the Empie Death Notice.

Frank S. Reed.

The remains of Frank S. Reed, who died in Florida, Wednesday, were brought to this city on the early morning train today, and removed to the Box’s undertaking parlors. Tuesday morning the body will be taken to the residence of Mr. Reed’s daughter, Mrs. Wallace S. Seymour, 1310 Dewey street, where the funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Rev. E. H. Joy, of Malone, a former pastor of Stone Street Presbyterian church in this city, will officiate. The bearers will be Fred Taylor, Henry Ball, Fred Bisnett and H. L. Stoddard. Interment will be made in North Watertown Cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

LINGENFELTER -- In Evans Mills, July 19, 1913, Spencer Lingenfelter, aged 20 years, 10 months and 5 days. Funeral from home at Evans Mills, Monday at 11. Interment at St. Lawrence.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SCHELL -- At Clayton, May 5, 1924, Mrs. Cathern Ann Schell of Clayton. Funeral at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment at Clayton.

CATHERINE A. SCHELL

CLAYTON, May 5. -- Catherine Ann Schell, a life long resident of this place, died at her home early Monday morning after an extended illness. She had been in ill health for some months and her death was caused by complication of diseases.

She was born here and had resided here practically all of her life.

Surviving are two sons, Chester Schell of Mylo, N. C.(sic), and Emmett Schell of Alcor, Tenn.; three daughters, Mrs. Clara Russell, Mrs. Margaret LaLonde and Mrs. Ida Gablar, all of this village; one brother, John H. Hart of Mylo, N. C.(sic), and two sisters, Mrs. Emma Walters of Johnstown, and Mrs. Celia Larabee of Rochester.

Funeral services will be held at the home here Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock and interment will be in the village cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

LARABEE -- In Rochester, April 30, 1924, Daniel Larabee, 75, a former resident of Lafargeville. Funeral at the Lafargeville Methodist Protestant Church, Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock with burial in the Lafargeville Cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Daniel Larabee

(in pen: 1924)

LAFARGEVILLE, May 6. -- The funeral of Daniel Larabee of Rochester, a former resident here, was held from the Methodist Protestant Church Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock. Rev. I. J. Howland, pastor of the church conducted the services. Interment was in Grove Cemetery.

Service at the grave were in charge of the Masonic order and were led by Walter Loucks, past master of Lafargeville Lodge No. 171. The bearers were nephews of the deceased, Emmett and Clarence Schell of this place being among them.

Besides his daughter, Mrs. Lena Ross of Rochester, Mr. Larabee left two sisters, Mrs. William Schell of this place and Mrs. E. A. Coon of Omar. Three other children who were well known here passed away several years ago. They were: Mrs. Arvilla Consaul of Clayton, who died 10 years ago, Clarence Larabee of Rochester who died nine years ago and Seth Larabee well known New York attorney who passed away eight years ago. All lived here and attended the local school.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Robert N. Empey

The funeral of Robert N. Empey, a lifelong resident of Clayton, was held from the home Saturday afternoon, June 21. Mr. Empey died at his home about three miles from here after an illness of a long duration. He was born in Canada, but came to the States at an early age and had made his home here ever since. He was a farmer, and was well known around this section. He is survived by his wife, one brother and two sister, all of Clayton.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

FALLS FROM DAM
AND IS DROWNED

FATAL ACCIDENT OCCURS AT
BLACK RIVER

________

BODY IS SWEPT DOWN STREAM

_______

Seth Richardson, While Removing De-
bris From Bulkhead of Dexter Chair
Factory, Loses His Balance and
Falls in the Swift Current.

________

(Special to The Times.)

Black River, March 31. -- Seth Richardson, an employe of the Dexter Chair Co., was drowned about 7:30 this morning.

With some other men, he was on the bulkhead of the flume of the mill, removing some debris that had accumulated there on account of the high water. In an endeavor to loosen the debris, he walked to the end of the bulk head. He was warned not to go to this dangerous place, but he ignored the warnings. While endeavoring to dislodge the obstruction, he lost his balance, and pitched head first into the water.

The current is very swift here and he was unable to make any progress against the stream. He was quickly carried down the river. The men ran along the bank below the scene of the accident, but the body had been swept under the surface. Search for the body continued today.

Mr. Richardson was born on a farm near Black River about 65 years ago, and had always lived there, his home being on the street leading from the village to Pine Plains. He was a leading member and a deacon of the Baptist church of that village. He leaves besides his widow, formerly Miss Elnora Perkins, of Black River, two sons, Charles, an electrical engineer employed in the offices of the Wagner Electrical Co., at Chicago, and William, an electrical engineer now living in Iowa; one daughter, Mrs. Etta Biche, wife of Adrian Biche, formerly of Black River, but now of Oklahoma, who has been spending the winter with her parents and was to leave Wednesday to rejoin her husband; and one brother, James Richardson, of Pierrepont Manor.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

FUNERAL SERVICES OF MRS.
FLORA KING.

DEPAUVILLE, NOV. 23 -- The remains of the late Mrs. Flora King, wife of Fred King were brought from Old Forge yesterday, accompanied by her husband and son Ray. The funeral was held from the M. E. church today and interment was made in the cemetery here. She was a life long resident of this vicinity, until about two years ago, when she went to Old Forge for her health. She grew better for a time, but finally death claimed her. Besides her husband and son, she leaves three sisters, Mrs. Fred Fox of Black River, Mrs. Anna Lane of Henderson, and Mrs. Ida Essletyne of Watertown, and many friends.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HERBERT C. FOX
AGED 70 YEARS
PASSES AWAY HERE

(Dec. 19, 1925)

____________

Herbert C. Fox, aged 70 years, No. 668 Cooper street, died at his home this morning after a long illness. Death was due to heart disease.

He was born in the town of Clayton on March 12, 1855, the son of Leonard and Eliza Fox. His early life was passed in the town of Clayton where he attended the rural schools. After leaving school he took up the carpenter trade and has followed this trade all his life. He came to this city 32 years ago where he had since resided. His wife, Jane Snell Fox, died some years ago.

He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Fred Smith, and one brother, A. E. Fox, both of this city.

The funeral will be held from the home on Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Hezekiah L. Pyle, officiating. Interment will be made in North Watertown cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Jane Fox.

Mrs. Jane Fox, wife of Herbert Fox, died at the family home, 668 Cooper street, early this morning, following a long illness, aged 67 years. Death was due to a complication of diseases including stomach trouble and anemia.

She was born in Herkimer county, daughter of the late Leonard and Eliza Sponable Snell. Her early life was spent in Herkimer county. She had spent the past 26 years in this city. Besides her husband, she leaves one daughter, Mrs. Fred Smith, and one sister, Mrs. David Bretsch, both of this city.

The funeral arrangements are incomplete.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Seth Richardson

(May 9, 1919)

The body of Seth Richardson of Black River, who was drowned at that village, March 30, aged 62 years, was found at 2:45 this afternoon ear the Huntingtonville ice house, by James Kaiser, foreman for the Ice Company of Watertown, and Mr. Richardson’s son, Charles Richardson of Black River. Mr. Kaiser will receive the reward of $25 offered for the body’s recovery.

Richardson and Kaiser took a boat to go to what is known as Breen’s island, a small island below Gray’s Island, on the Watertown side of Huntingtonville. The body was found on the head of Breen’s Island, where the water had cast it up and left it when the water receded after the freshet. It was badly decomposed and probably had been there some time. The remains were removed to the C. J. Sweet undertaking parlors at Black River.

Mr. Richardson’s keys were found last Saturday below Black River village and another search for the body was instituted. Paper mill flumes along the river had been carefully watched during the past two weeks for expected appearance.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Maria R. King

Mrs. Maria R. King, widow of Dr. Ferdinand King, died this morning about 3 o’clock at her home, 207 Winslow street. Mrs. King was 80 years old. She was born in the town of Clayton, but had made her home in this city for the past 30 years. She was of German parentage her parents having been among the early settlers of the town of Clayton.

Mrs. King is survived by one son, Fred G. of Depauville, a grandson, Henry King of Depauville and a great granddaughter. Five brothers, Peter Haas of Arlington, South Dakota, Henry and William of Chaumont, Frederick of Depauville and Charles of Austin, Texas; and two sisters, Mrs. Arnold Vincent of Aberdeem (sic), South Dakota and Miss Elizabeth Haas of Depauville, also survive. Prayers will be said at the family home, Thursday at 11 a.m. o’clock, the Rev. Yost Brandt officiating. Interment will be made at Depauville.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

A photo: The Late WILLARD W. BRAWT.

___________

Watertown, Jan. 31. -- The death of Willard W. Brawt, for years a resident of Depauville, occurred there recently. He had been ill for a long time with Bright’s disease. His wife died exactly three years before. Mr. Brawt was born on Pillar Point 61 years ago. He leaves surviving one son, C. Elliott Brawt, of Depauville, and four daughters, Mrs. Charles J. Sherman, of Clayton; Grace A., Ruth W. and Hope M. Brawt, all of Depauville; also a sister, Mrs. Hulda Collins of Rodman, and two brothers, James and Charles Brawt, of Michigan. The funeral was largely attended.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

The following article shows its subject name as "Brant." The typist suspects that the name was meant to have appeared as "Brawt."



SAD AFFLICTION

OF BRANT FAMILY

Mrs. W. Brant, Aged 50, Succumbs
to Disease, while One Daughter
Lies Very Ill with Typhoid and
Another is Just Convalescing

________

DEPAUVILLE, Jan. 20. -- At her home here Monday night, occurred the death of Mrs. Widley Brant, aged about 50 years. She had been sick for the past three weeks with typhoid fever. Her daughter, Ruth, is sick with the same disease, and another daughter, Grace, has just recovered from fever, so as to be able to ride out. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Obituary

MRS. SUSAN M. ELLIS

Died -- At the home of her son, Geo. W. Ellis, near Woodford, Va., Mrs. Susan M. Ellis, aged 90 years, 4 months and 21 days.

She leaves to mourn her loss one son, George W. Ellis, of Woodford, and two daughters, Mrs. Mary E. Cox, of Seattle, Wash., and Mrs. Henry Grant, of Clayton. Also seven grandchildren, Mrs. Alton C. May, Ross, Ray and Myrl Parker, Kenneth, Gladys and Harold Grant, and two great-granchildren, Ermine May and Edna Parker; also one sister, Mrs. Lorinda Lalonde, of Chicago.

Fourteen years ago Mrs. Ellis went to Virginia with her husband and made her home with her son. It was there ten years ago she buried her husband near Guineys.

She was of a sunny disposition; none know her but to love her, and she had made many friends there, as was testified by the large gathering, which came to pay their respects to the departed one. She was kind and hospitable; she never turned a hungry person from her door. Her friends were always welcome, but her family was always first in her thoughts. Her greatest pleasure was in reading her Bible and sermons. We have spoken of her love for her family, but the love she bore her grandchildren and other relatives was warm and true. Her grandson, Ray L. Parker, was always attentive in his visits.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SCHNAUBER -- In the township of Clayton, December 19, 1920, William J. Schnauber, 61. Funeral at the house Wednesday at 1 o’clock in the Depauville M. E. church at 2 o’clock. Rev. Frank Brown and Rev. Mr. Moore will officiate.

(Special to The Standard)

CHAUMONT, Dec. 20. -- William J. Schnauber, 61, a prominent farmer living between Clayton and Depauville in the township of Clayton passed away at 1:15 o’clock yesterday afternoon after a brief illness. Mr. Schnauber suffered a stroke last Wednesday and was in a critical condition until his death.

The funeral will be held at the home Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock and in the Depauville M. E. church at 2 o’clock. Rev. Frank Brown assisted by Rev. Mr. Moore will officiate and the Masons and Eastern Stars will have charge of the services. Burial will be in the Depauville cemetery.

Mr. Schnauber was born in the township of Clayton, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Schnauber and had always lived in this region. His first wife, Sarah Garlock, whom he married 39 years ago, died 14 years ago. His second wife, who was Jesse Edmonds survives him. He also leaves three sons, Horace of Lafargeville and Vernet and William, jr., of Depauville; one daughter, Mrs. Josephine Hartlein and one brother, Lewis of Lafargeville; three sisters, Mrs. William Haas, Mrs. Eugene Radley and Mrs. Jacob Esseinhour (sic) of Lafargeville.

Mr. Schnauber was a Mason, and O. E. S. member and prominent in the Depauville Grange for many years.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

CLAYTON NEWS.

Funeral of Dr. Joynor Largely Attended

Clayton, June 26. -- The funeral of the late Noble P. Joynor, M. D., was attended by a large number of his many friends from his late home on John street, Friday morning at 9 o’clock. A selection of scripture was read by Rev. J. H. Baldwin, and prayer by Rev. A. C. Danforth. Six gentlemen of the medical profession attended as bearers. The remains were then taken to Kingston, Ont., where the regular church service of the Episcopal church, of which the doctor was an active member, was held. The following neighbors accompanied the remains to Kingston: R. P. Grant and wife, H. R. Tubbs and wife, R. H. Hambley, G. E. Morse, Charles Kent and wife, Rev. A. C. Danforth and wife, Mrs. E. M. Hubbard, S. H. Johnson and wife, George F. Hill and wife, F. D. Rogers and wife, James Hambley, Mrs. Dr. Mills, Mrs. C. E. Rees, Mrs. H. S. Barker, Mrs. G. H. McKinley, Mrs. Thomas Rees, Miss Martha Fitzgerald, Miss Viva Frame, Miss Mina Ackert, Miss Bell Fitzgerlad, W. L. Webster. A large number of relatives and friends from Kingston and Gananoque were present. Doctor Joynor will be greatly missed from Clayton and for many miles around, for he had a large and growing practice and was an able physician. May his manly mantle fall on some worthy young man, is the prayer of many.

____________

DR. JOYNOR’S DEATH.

A Physician Could Have Saved His Life if
He Had Been Near the Scene.

Clayton, June 23. -- The sad drowning accident in which our esteemed citizen and skilled physician, Dr. N. P. Joyner, lost his life at Murdick’s bay Wednesday forenoon has cast a gloom over this entire community. The doctor was sent for by a patient, Mr. Rutting, who sent his hired boy, Alexander Burguess, a lad about 17 years of age, with a sailboat. As they reached the bay a puff of wind capsized the boat and the doctor, not being able to swim, went to the bottom and did not rise, while the boy clung to the boat until a rescuing party reached the scene and the body of Dr. Joyner was recovered in from five to nine feet of water, after about half an hour.

Word was immediately sent to Clayton and the steamer Junita and a large sail boat left with Undertaker Rogers and friends aboard. Unfortunately, there were no doctors in attendance, as upon taking the body in charge it was seen that life was not entirely gone. There was a feeble action of the heart and blood was slowly gathering at the mouth. Those who had the body in charge worked faithfully over him and the steamer put off for Clayton at her best speed.

As the boat landed at the dock at the rear of Ellis’ drug store, where a crowd had collected, a cry was heard from the boat to send a doctor aboard, as there were some signs of life. Drs. Mills and Vebber were soon in attendance and the boat slowly passed out into the channel, where the resuscitating party were more free to operate. After about half an hour’s effort all hope fled, as the last spark of life of a young, talented physician, a true and loving husband and honored and respected citizen passed out under circumstances that make the loss more sad.

As soon as the news reached Clayton, R. P. Grant broke the sad news as best he could to the loving wife, whose heart is nearly broken over her great loss.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

WILLIAM M. FITZGERALD

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES.)

Clayton, Aug. 11. -- William M. Fitzgerald, 38, supervisor of the town of Clayton, died here at midnight following an attack of paralysis with which he was stricken while driving his automobile from the farm of Tad Ellis about 10:30 Sunday evening. With him at the time was Miss Catherine Hayes of Clayton, his fiancee.

Mr. Fitzgerald and Miss Hayes had been spending the evening at the Ellis farm and were returning at the time of the fatal attack. They were about a half mile from the farm when he complained of a severe pain in the back of his head. Seeming to realize that his condition was serious and would probably result fatally, he notified Miss Hayes and both went through the last rites of the Catholic church. Immediately, following, Mr. Fitzgerald gave a shriek and became unconscious.

About this time, a carriage containing two young men approached and Miss Hayes called for assistance. One of the men drove the automobile to Clayton and three physicians, Drs. H. G. Frame, R. L. Gray and Fowkes, were called. Mr. Fitgerald never became conscious and died about midnight.

He was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Theopilus Fitzgerald. Surviving him are two sisters, Misses Mollie and Bessie Fitzgerald and an aunt, Mrs. Maurice Fitzgerald, with whom he lived. He was born on a farm near Clayton and has been an extensive farmer, managing several farms on his father’s estate and also a hay and cattle buyer.

Mr. Fitzgerald was president of the village for two years and was on his second year as supervisor. He was also a former Grand Knight of the Clayton Branch of the Knights of Columbus and a member of the Elks.

It is believed that Mr. Fitzgerald realized his exact condition as he had been in ill health for some time, having high blood pressure.

The funeral will be held from the family home at 8 Thursday morning, Rev. Father W. J. Larocque of St. Mary’s Catholic church, officiating. Burial will be made at Clayton.

Out of respect to Mr. Fitzgerald the Clayton flag is today at half mast.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

BURGESS -- At Clayton, Jan. 23, 1930, George Burgess, aged 60 years.

Funeral from First Baptist church, Clayton, Sunday at 2 p.m., Rev. William Adam, pastor, officiating.

Interment in Clayton cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

At the top right hand corner of the page where the following obit appears is a photo of Joseph H. Brabant. The caption under the photo reads: “JOSEPH H. BRABANT, of Clayton.” PROMINENT CITIZEN WHOSE SUDDEN DEATH IS DEEPLY DEPLORED.

NOTE: The photograph can be found on Mark Wentling’s Jefferson County, NY Pioneer Portraits Project.

________

CLAYTON’S LOSS

(in pen: 1914)

Death of H. Brabant a Great Shock
to the Community.

Watertown, Jan. 30. -- Joseph H. Brabant, a lifelong resident of Clayton and one of its best known and most highly respected men, dropped dead on the street there the night of January 22. Mr. Brabant had been attending a banquet at the M. E. Church and was on his way home when he was stricken. He was alone at the time, but was found a few moments later. Death was attributed to heart failure and diabetes. The funeral services were held Monday from St. Mary’s Catholic Church of which he was a member and the Knights of Columbus were in charge. A large delegation of members from Watertown Lodge of Elks attended the services.

Mr. Brabant was born in Clayton January 27, 1856, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leander Brabant. He had been engaged in the grocery business for many years, 18 years ago having bought the drug and grocery business of F. L. Hall. This he conducted alone until about three years ago, when A. J. LeFaivre entered the concern as a partner. Mr. Brabant had held office as a member of the village Board of Education. He was a member of Thousand Island Council, Knights of Columbus, Watertown Lodge Of Elks, the Foresters, the Maccabees, the Holy Name Society, and was an exempt fireman. He had long been a member of St. Mary’s Church and for 20 years was a trustee and its treasurer. For over 25 years he had been treasurer of the village court of Foresters. He was one of the most popular citizens of the village and his sudden death caused a general shock throughout the community in which he had always taken the deepest interest. In politics Mr. Brabant was a Democrat, and while always deeply interested in the success of his party he was of a nature which brought him no enemies. About 35 years ago he married Miss Josephine Sharlow, who survives him. He leaves also three sons, Amos and John, of Clayton, and George, now a student at Montreal; four daughters, Mrs. Joseph Bazinet, Mrs. Paul Thibault and the Misses Gertrude and Florence Brabant, all of Clayton; two brothers, Augustus F., of Clayton, and Peter F. Brabant, of Chicago; three sisters, Mrs. Louis Amio, Mrs. Lucy Loveland and Mrs. G. A. Thibault and a half-sister, Mrs. Stephen Peleow, all of Clayton.

George H. McKinley, formerly president of Clayton, and who was a competitor in business of Mr. Brabant’s for 25 years, paid this tribute to him: “No man in Clayton will be more missed than ‘Joe’ Brabant. I sold goods in competition with him for 25 years and during that quarter of a century I never found him once when he was not square, honorable and upright in his every dealing. He was loved and respected by all. I could pay no man in Clayton or elsewhere a higher tribute than to Mr. Brabant.” And so say all those who knew him.

 

 

WETTERHAHN -- In Clayton, October 30, 1920. Gus G. Wetterhahn of Depauville, aged 63 years. Funeral services at the home Wednesday afternoon.

RESOLUTIONS

The following resolutions on the death of Brother G. G. Wetterhahn, were adopted by Depauville Grange at a regular meeting held November 6, 1920.

Again our fraternal circle has been broken and our friend and brother G. G. Wetterhahn has been called to the Heavenly Grange above.

We feel there is little we can say at this time to express our respect or to add to his reputation in the community, and his loyalty in the grange. In disposition, he was genial and kindly, and his cheerful words and hearty greeting will be missed by every member.

Resolved that the faithful discharge of his duties during the years he served as master and as secretary of our order as well as the many responsible positions held by him during his membership, makes it fitting that we, as members of Depauville Grange acknowledge our appreciation of him and extend to his sorrowing family, our sympathy.

Resolved, that in the passing of Brother Wetterhahn, this grange has lost an able and faithful member, the community a highly respected and esteemed citizen and the family, a kind and loving husband and father.

Resolved, that the members of Depauville Garnge, extend to the bereaved wife and son, their deepest sympathy, assuring them, that in our order they will find kind and loyal friends.

Resolved that, as a token of respect to the memory of our brother, our charter be draped for a period of thirty days, that these resolutions be entered on our minutes, and a copy sent to the family. Also that we have them published in the daily papers.

"After awhile, when the hearts that are broken
Have been touched by the healer's hand,
And we hear the 'Come' softly spoken, After awhile we will understand."

LENA E. VALLEY.
CHARLOTTE HAAS,
NELLIS ORMSBY.

Committee -- Adv.

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to our relatives and friends, the orders and societies for the many acts of kindness shown during our recent great bereavement; also for the many beautiful flora offerings.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

May 31, 1932

MRS. CLARA P. HAAS, 73,
OF DEPAUVILLE DIES

Depauville, May 31.-- Mrs. Clara Putnam Haas, 73, widow of George Haas, of Depauville, died at 3:40 Sunday morning in the House of the Good Samaritan, Watertown, where she had been a patient since May 26. Mrs. Haas had been suffering from heart trouble for some time and was under treatment in the Watertown hospital in April.

She was born in the town of Clayton, March 26, 1859, the daughter of the late Arlow and Caroline Henry Tracey, both of whom were born in the town of Clayton also. Mrs. Haas had always resided in the town of Clayton. For the last 15 years she had lived in Depauville.

She was married twice. On Dec. 6, 1877, she was married to Hoton T. Putnam. He died Aug. 28, 1905. The only child born to the couple, Stanton Putnam, died about five years ago. In 1917 she was married to George Haas. Mr. Haas died in 1921.

Mrs. Haas was a member of the Depauville grange. The only near survivor is a granddaughter, Miss Doris Putnam of the town of Clayton.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 from her home here, Rev. C. A. Robinson, pastor of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, officiating. Burial will be made in Depauville cemetery.

The bearers were Ernest Eckert, E. L. Stotler, William Valley, H. G. Jones, Fred Sternberg and Peter Cardiff.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

MARVIN -- In this city, March 9, 1927, Mrs. Florence May Marvin, 37, wife of Leon L. Marvin, of 327 State street. Funeral services at the home, Saturday at 2 p.m., Rev. J. W. Wilson, officiating. Burial at Brookside cemetery.

(a partial obit)

Mrs. Florence May Marvin, 327 State street, passed away at the family home Wednesday afternoon about 4 o’clock. Mrs. Marvin had been in ill health for more than a year, suffering from a complication of diseases.

Mrs. Marvin was born in the town of Clayton September 1, 1890, a daughter of Frank and Elizabeth Keyes Reed and spent her early life there. She came to this city 23 years ago.

Mrs. Marvin was married to Mr. Marvin on April 8, 1908 by Rev. Mr. Peck, then pastor of Asbury church. Mrs. Marvin was a member of Asbury church.

Besides her husband, two sons, Leon E. Marvin, aged 10, and Richard L. Marvin, aged 11 months; two sisters, Mrs. Carrie Hayes, Atlantic City, N. J., and Mrs. Maude Seymour of Detroit; and one brother, Earl Reed of Buffalo, survive.

Funeral services will be held at the home, 327 State street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. J. W. Wilson, pastor of Asbury church officiating. Burial will be at Brookside cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

(ST LINE OF HEADING MISSING)
DIES AT AGE OF NINETY FOUR

(1916)

Depauville, Jan. 7. -- Mrs. Katherine Spaeth, the oldest and one of the most highly respected residents of this section, passed away at her home Saturday morning, Jan. 1.

Mrs. Spaeth was born in Raenhaem, Germany, Jan. 22, 1822, and in 1848 was united in marriage to Philip Spaeth. In 1867 Mr. and Mrs. Spaeth, with their five children, came to this country and settled about one mile east of this village, on what is known as the George Haas farm.

Mr. Spaeth passed away in 1894 and since that time she had made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Dintelman, of this village.

Forty-nine years ago she united with the Methodist church and had every (sic) since been a faithful member. At times she had walked ten miles to attend church.

Mrs. Spaeth possessed a loving, generous and cheerful disposition and her wonderful faith was an inspiration to all who met her. Up to the time of her death her memory and judgment were as clear as ever and many of the younger ones went to “Grandma Spaeth” with every day trials for consolation.

The funeral was held at her home Tuesday at 1 p.m., Rev. Joseph Eldridge of Lafargeville officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sternberg and Mr. and Mrs. Horace Jones rendered her favorite hymn, “Nearer, My God, to Thee.” Interment was made in the family plot at Depauville.

She is survived by two sons, Rev. Phillip Spaeth, who has been a Methodist minister in Buffalo, twelve years, and Rev. George Spaeth, who is a Methodist minister in St. Paul, Minnesota; two daughters, Mrs. Katherine Zimmer, Watertown, Mrs. Elizabeth Dintelman, Depauville; twenty grandchildren, and fourteen great-grandchildren.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

DINTLEMAN -- In Depauville, January 16, 1927, Mrs. Elizabeth Dintelman, 68. Funeral Wednesday at 2 at the home with burial in the Depauville cemetery. Rev. Frank H. Brown of the M. E. church will officiate.

 

Partial obit:

Mrs. Dintleman was a native of Germany, coming here when 9 years of age with her parents. She had always lived in this village since then. She was married to George Dintleman, who died 21 years ago. Mrs. Dintleman (sic) was a member of the Depauville grange and of the Rebekahs.

She is survived by one son, Edward; a grandson, Carl; by one brother, Rev. George Speath (sic) of St. Paul, Minn., and by one sisters, Mrs. Kate Zimmer, of Watertown.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES)

(1921)

Chaumont, March 15. -- The funeral of George Haas, aged 71 years, who died at his home in Depauville yesterday afternoon at 1, will be held Thursday afternoon at 2, from the home and at 2:30 from the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church. Burial will be made at Depauville.

Mr. Haas’ birthday took place on Feb. 28 and on that day he attended a funeral, acting as one of the bearers. He was taken ill the following night and suffered a shock, pleurisy developing. On Sunday he seemed to be improving but there came a sudden change for the worse and he passed away yesterday afternoon.

He was twice married, his first wife being Janette Dorr, the marriage taking place 45 years ago. She died ten years ago last Thanksgiving. His second wife was Clara Putnam, who survives with one daughter, Mrs. Lester G. Provo of Boston, Mass.; one son, Charles E. Haas of Lafargeville; and one step-son, Stanley E. Putnam of the town of Clayton. Mr. Haas’ second marriage took place Sept. 2, 1916.

Mr. Haas followed farming until the death of his first wife, when he retired. He was a member of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, the Depauville grange and the Depauville Lodge of Odd Fellows, who will have charge of the funeral services. The Rebekahs will attend in a body.

Owing to the death of Mr. Haas, the meeting of the Ladies Aid Society of the Lafargeville Methodist Episcopal church to have been held Thursday at the home of Mrs. Will Schnauber, has been postponed until next week Thursday.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Tuesday

______

(in pen: May 29, 1932)

-May 31, 1932

Depauville, May 31.-- Mrs. Clara Putnam Haas, 73, widow of George Haas, of Depauville, died at 3:40 Sunday morning in the House of the Good Samaritan, Watertown, where she had been a patient since May 26. Mrs. Haas had been suffering from heart trouble for some time and was under treatment in the Watertown hospital in April.

She was born in the town of Clayton, March 26, 1859, the daughter of the late Arlow and Caroline Henry Tracey, both of whom were born in the town of Clayton also. Mrs. Haas had always resided in the town of Clayton. For the last 15 years she had lived in Depauville.

She was married twice. On Dec. 6, 1877, she was married to Hoton T. Putnam. He died Aug. 28, 1905. The only child born to the couple, Stanton Putnam, died about five years ago. In 1917 she was married to George Haas. Mr. Haas died in 1921.

Mrs. Haas was a member of the Depauville grange. The only near survivor is a granddaughter, Miss Doris Putnam of the town of Clayton.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 from her home here, Rev. C. A. Robinson, pastor of the Depauville Methodist Episcopal church, officiating. Burial will be made in Depauville cemetery.

The bearers were Ernest Eckert, E. L. Stotler, William Valley, H. G. Jones, Fred Sternberg and Peter Cardiff.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Mrs. Laura Patchin

Mrs. Laura Patchin died at her home near Three Mile Bay Tuesday last after a long and painful illness. She was the daughter of C. B. Carey, of St. Lawrence and had been a great sufferer for many weeks and all that willing hands and loving heart could do was done for her but it was of no avail. She leaves a husband and two little children besides a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn her loss. She will be greatly missed in the neighborhood where she lived for she had many friends who loved her dearly for her many good qualities. Her family have the sympathy of all in their (word missing) bereavement.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Native of Clayton Had Been Ill
Long -- Funeral to Be
Held Wednesday

(inked in: 1926)

(Special to The Standard)

BLACK RIVER, Feb. 22. -- Mrs. Mary Patchin, 81, wife of George H. Patchin of Felts Mills passed away this morning at her home after being in ill health for some time. The funeral will be held in the Church of Christ in Felts Mills on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock and burial will be in the local cemetery, Rev. W. A. Williams will officiate. Prayers will be said at the home at 1:30 o’clock.

Mrs. Patchin was born in Clayton, a daughter of Lewis and Mary Donner and was married to George F. Patchin 65 years ago. She had passed all of her life in the vicinity of Clayton and Felts Mills.

Besides her husband she is survived by one brother, Lewis, of Traverse City, Mich.; one son, George H. Patchin, of this village; four daughters, Mrs. Emma Hart and Mrs. W. W. Gale of Clayton, Mrs. Joseph Lancaster of Santa Barbara, Cal., and Mrs. Eugene Russell, of Ariona (sic); 19 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren.

She was a member of the Depauville Baptist church, the O. E. S., Rebekahs, W. R. C of this village and of the Fortnightly club of Felts Mills.

* * * * * * * * * *

Obituary

______

Last Wednesday morning death invaded the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Lancaster and took away their baby daughter Dollie, aged eleven months and seventeen days. The little one had been sick for several days , and the cause of death was inflammation of the bowels. Mr. and Mrs. Lancaster desire to express their heartfelt thanks to friends and acquaintances who lent a helping hand during the illness of their daughter, and hope to return the kindly attention of all who were so good in the time of distress in their home.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

LANCASTER -- Near Paso Robles, Aug. 19, 1891, Dollie P., youngest daughter of Mr. Mrs. J. H. Lancaster, aged 11 months and 17 days.

Another snow white rosebud
Called from this earth so soon
To show how fair a flower
In Paradise could bloom!

Angels guard the little footsteps
That have climbed the golden stair,
Yet we know that naught can harm her,
In that home of God’s so fair.

Now we miss our angel baby
No tongue or pen can half express,
But we hope ere long to meet her,
In that land of perfect bliss.

-- EMMA EXLINE.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

HART -- In the town of Clayton, March 31, 1920, Peter B. Hart, aged 60 years.

Funeral Saturday afternoon at 2 from the Episcopal church, Rev. A. Q. Davis officiating.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Retired Farmer Was Charter
Member of Clayton
Grange,

______

(SPECIAL TO THE TIMES)

Clayton, April 1. -- Peter B. Hart, a retired farmer of the town of Clayton, died at his home in the village of Clayton shortly after 7 Wednesday evening, aged 60 years. Although in ill health for the past three years, death was due indirectly to the result of an operation performed two years ago.

Mr. Hart was born in the town of Clayton and had always lived there. He was a member of the Clayton Lodge, I. O. O. F., a charter member of the Clayton Grange and also a member of the Episcopal church. He married Miss Emma Patchen of Clayton in 1882, who survives with one son, John Burt Hart of the town of Clayton; one daughter, Mrs. Charles Dixon, also of Clayton; one brother, John Hart of Milo, N. D.; five sisters, Mrs. John Mattis of Chaumont, Mrs. Kate Schell and Mrs. William Hudson of Clayton, Mrs. Ella Larabee of Rochester and Mrs. George Walters of Johnstown.

The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 from the Episcopal church, Rev. A. Q. Davis officiating. Burial will be made at Clayton.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

PATCHIN -- In this city, Feb. 22, 1919, Fred C. Patchin, of Rutland Hollow, aged 21 years.

* * * * * * * * * *

FRED C. PATCHIN OF
E. WATERTOWN DEAD

(penned in: 1919)

______________________

Watertown, Feb. 22. -- After an illness of two weeks from influenza which terminated in pneumonia, Fred C. Patchin of East Watertown died today at St. Joachims hospital, aged 21 years and 7 months.

He was a son of George H. and Anna Patchin of East Watertown and was born at Depauville and attended school there. Later the family resided for a time at Great Bend, and afterward moved to East Watertown. For the past year the young man has been employed on the Wilbur Wadsworth farm at Rutland Hollow. He was a member of Riverside lodge, No. 334, I. O. O. F., of Black River.

Besides his parents there survive three brothers, James L. Patchin, who returned wounded from France after having been discharged from the service a week or two ago, Lorenzo, who is employed at farming near East Watertown, and Ralph, who is a student at the Carthage High school, also an older half-brother, Ray Patchin, residing in Massachusetts.

The funeral will be held from the Wadsworth farm homestead at Rutland Hollow at 2 Tuesday afternoon, the Rev. B. F. Ceigler, pastor of the Congregational church at Carthage officiating. Burial will be made in Black River cemetery.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

ARNOLD -- On May 25, 1886, Ida, wife of Allen Arnold and daughter of Peter Hart, aged 32 years.

Oh, the absent are the dearest,
To a father’s loving heart;
And the depth of our affection
Is not known until we part.

 

Yes, we miss three, dearest Ida,
And our hearts are sore oppressed,
Yet we know thou art with our mother
And your babe among the blest.

 

We know how patiently you waited,
For thy spirit’s upward flight;
‘Till He called you with the angels,
To dwell with Him in light.

*************

PINNED UNDER CAR

_____

FLAGMAN W. B. PATCHEN SERIOUSLY
INJURED AT CARTHAGE.

_____

ARM AND LEG WERE CRUSHED

_____

He Displayed Great Nerve and Personally
Directed the Work of Removing Him
from Beneath the Car Wheels.

Carthage, April 6. -- A serious accident occurred in the new freight yards near the Boyd road crossing about 8:45 this morning.

While freight train 584, in charge of Conductor H. Schindler, was shifting out its cars, Flagman W. B., Patchen of the same train was uncoupling two cars when his left foot was caught in the guard rail and he could not release it. The train, which was backing toward him, knocked him down under the cars. In falling he put out his left arm to try to save himself, but this also became wedged between the two rails.

One car passed over his left leg and arm and the train was stopped with the forward wheels of the second car resting on his arm and pinning him down so that it was impossible to get him out until the guard rail was removed from its place. It took about 40 minutes to do this, and during this time, Mr. Patchen displayed great fortitude and courage, even directing the men how to extricate him.

E. S. White, a brakeman on train 584, who was near Patchen when the accident occurred and was the only one who witnessed it, exhibited much nerve and presence of mind by crawling under the cars and binding up Patchen’s injured arm and leg so as to check the flow of blood. Dr. C. F. Adams soon reached the yard and assisted in caring for the injured man.

Mr. Patchen is a married man about 32 years of age and has a wife and a son about 12 years old residing at Felts Mills. He has been in the employ of the railroad company since July 17, 1901. He is a Mason and a member of the Black River lodge.

Mr. Patchen was taken to a Watertown hospital on the milk train.

* * * * * * * * * *

REMARKABLE VITALITY OF FLAG
MAN CRUSHED BENEATH TRAIN

________

PROSPECT OF RECOVERY GOOD

________

The Nerve That Sustained Him While
He Directed the Work of Removing
Him From Beneath the Wheels May
Enable Him to Retain His Grip on
Life.

________

The condition of W. B. Patchen, the flagman who was seriously injured while coupling cars near Carthage yesterday morning, is still in a critical condition, although the statement is made at the City hospital this afternoon that the man’s prospect of recovery is far more favorable than it was thought he could be, after the left arm and left leg were amputated Thursday.

At that time it was said that the man’s condition was extremely critical and that it was probable he could live only a short time. Dr. C. E. Pierce said Thursday that he feared that the man could never survive the shock. Late Thursday afternoon, shortly after 5, he seemed to be in a worse condition than at any time after the accident happened. It was thought then that he could live only a few minutes, and his physician was speedily summoned. He rallied, however, and during the evening and during a portion of Thursday seemed to be resting comfortably. Friday a.m., it was evident that his condition was much improved and hope is now held forth that he may recover.

Physicians at the hospital who are familiar with his case assert that, if he does recover, the case will be one approaching a miracle and that present indications are that he will live despite the terrible conditions he is compelled to combat.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

BRAKEMAN PATCHEN DEAD.

_______

William B. Patchen, who suffered the loss of his left leg and arm while uncoupling cars at the Carthage freight yards Thursday, died at the City hospital in Watertown on Saturday. Mr. Patchen was brought to the hospital shortly after the accident, and it was thought his recovery was doubtful. Sunday, however, he seemed better than the doctors had anticipated, and hopes were entertained.

Mr. Patchen was born in the town of Clayton 32 years ago. He resided in that town until four years ago, when he moved to Felts Mills where he has since made his home. He had been employed as a brakeman on the N. Y. C. for about four years. He was a member of the Black River lodge, F. and A. M., and was deservedly popular among a large circle of friends.

Mr. Patchen is survived by his wife and one young son, Clarence Ralph Patchen; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. F. Patchen of Clayton; one brother, Geo. H. Patchen of Depauville; and four sisters, Mrs. P. B. Hart and Mrs. W. W. Gale of Clayton; Mrs. A. H. Sheldon of San Luis Obispo, Cal., and Mrs. Joseph H. Lancaster of North Yokma, Wash.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

The funeral of William B. Patchin (sic), the flagman who died at Watertown yesterday as a result of the injuries received here Thursday, will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Black River. W. Allen, E. S. White, . B. O’Hara, P. Schantz, H. A. Dennis and B. L. Booth, all fellow workers with and associates of Mr. Patchin, will act as bearers. Mr. Patchin, besides being a Mason, was an Odd Fellow and a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Beautiful emblems of flowers have been sent by each of these organizations.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Card of Thanks

_____

We wish to extend our thanks to the friends and neighbors, who so kindly assisted in caring for our beloved husband and father during his sickness and death. Also for the many beautiful floral offerings and automobiles.

Mrs. Emma P. Hart
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hart
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Dixon.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

GRANT -- At Clayton, June 21, 1931, Mrs. Lettie Clara Hayes Grant, Clayton, widow of Col. Robert P. Grant, aged 77 years. Funeral services Wednesday at 2 p.m. at her home, Rev. A. Q. Davis, retired Episcopal minister of Clayton, officiating. Order of Eastern Star will have committal services at grave in Clayton cemetery.

___________

Clayton, June 22. -- Mrs. Lettie Clara Hayes Grant, 77, prominent resident of Clayton for many years and widow of Colonel Robert Parks Grant, died at 11 Sunday night at her residence in John street, this village, after a long illness. She had been an invalid for the past few years.

Mrs. Grant was very active until her last illness. She was a charter member of Calumet Chapter, Order of Eastern Star, No. 274 of Clayton; long a member of the W. C. T. U. of Clayton; first president of the Civic club of Clayton; trustee of the Clayton library since its organization many years ago; member of the Chautauqua association, and the first president of the Travelers Club of Clayton.

Mrs. Grant had the honor of being the first elected district deputy of Jefferson district, O. E. S., from Calumet Chapter of Clayton, and was the chapter’s first worthy matron.

Col. Grant, a former president of the Watertown Produce Exchange, with A. F. Barker, established the Bank of Clayton here in 1876, now the First National Exchange bank. In 1884 he bought the interests of the Bank of Clayton and with 50 others organized the Exchange bank, and in 1897 he brought about a reorganization which placed the institution under the National banking system as the National Exchange Bank of Clayton with a capital of $50,000.

From the time of the founding of the bank to the time of his death he occupied the two-fold position of cashier and general manager and was also one of the largest stockholders of the bank. His son, Robert Daniel Grant, is executive vice president of the bank and his grandson, Robert Parks Grant, is assistant cashier and trust officer.

Robert F. Grant, paternal grandfather of his namesake, Col. Grant, was a second cousin of Ulysses S. Grant.

Mrs. Grant was born June 6, 1854, in the town of Boonville, daughter of the late Daniel and Isabella Love Hayes, and was married to Col. Grant Sept. 14, 1870, at Hawkinsville, N. Y. She had been a resident of Clayton since 1877.

Surviving are a brother, Oscar W. Hayes of Hawkinsville, N. Y.; a son, Robert D. Grant, Clayton; a grandson, Robert P. Grant, Clayton, and two great-grandchildren, Robert D. Grant and William James Grant of Clayton. She also leaves several nephews and nieces among whom is Robert Daniel Hayes of Albany, commissioner of canals and waterways of the state of New York.

Funeral services will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday at her residence, Rev. A. Q. Davis, retired Episcopal clergyman of Clayton, officiating. The Order of Eastern Star will have a committal service at the grave in the family plot in Clayton cemetery.

Col. Grant, who died Oct. 22, 1918, served in the Civil war with the 92nd Regiment of the National Guard. He was widely known among state and national legislators. In 1874, he went to Fort Madison, Iowa, where with Senator W. G. Kent he founded in 1875 the Farmers and Mechanics bank coming to Clayton in 1876 to establish that village’s first banking institution. His family came to this village from Boonville the following year.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

CLARKE -- At Clayton, Nov. 2, 1931, William Deloss (sic) Clark, aged 79 years. Funeral from home at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Rev. A. O. Davis, officiating.

_________

Clayton, Nov. 2 -- William Delos Clark, 79, chairman of the board of directors of the First National Exchange bank, prominent local merchant, former bank president, founder and former editor of the defunct Clayton Independent, died at 9 this morning at his home at 535 John street, this village.

He had been confined to this home for the past three weeks by ill health and had been in bed for the three days preceding this death.

Mr. Clark was born at DeRuyter, June 20, 1852, to Ronson F. and Clarissa Lansing Clark. His mother died only a month ago at her home in DeRuyter and her son attended the funeral. At the time of her death she was 96 years old, being the oldest resident of that village.

A photo of Mr. Clark was included here.

When he came to this village as a young man of 18 in 1870 he started the Clayton Independent, a weekly paper which he ran for two years. Discontinuing this he opened a general store and continued to be engaged in the mercantile business for the 59 remaining years of his life. His son had joined him in the business in late years. The Clark store has supplied the community with groceries and hardware for nearly 60 years.

He was married to Miss Cornelia L. Eddy at Christ church rectory on April 2, 1874, by Rev. James O. Drumm. She survives.

Mr. Clark was connected with the National Exchange bank from its beginning and served as its president from 1920 until its consolidation with the First National bank to form the First National Exchange bank, a year ago. Since that time he has served as chairman of the board of directors of the consolidated institution.

Mr. Clark attended Christ Episcopal church.

He was long prominent in Masonry, being a member of Clayton lodge; No. 296, F. and A. M.: Clayton chapter, No. 301, R. A. M.; Watertown Commandery, No. 11, Knights Templar, and Media Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S He was the first high priest of Clayton chapter, R. A. M.

Surviving besides his wife are one sister, Mrs. Ella Fox, Bloomfield, N. J.; one brother, Leon E. Clark, DeRuyter; two sons, Fred and William, this place; one daughter, Mrs. John A. Breen, Utica, eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren

The funeral will be held from the home Wednesday at 2 p.m., Rev. A. Q. Davis, former rector of Christ church, will officiate. The bears will be: Albert Ettinger, New York; Arthur Breen, Rochester; Clayton Breen, Syracuse; Glenn Hall, Charles Clark, James Fitzgerald and Frank Foley, this place.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

(January 7, 1932 - computed from article and Barlett’s Cemetery Inscriptions)

Clayton, Jan. 7. -- John Foley, 87, for years a prominent Clayton business man, died this morning at 9:15 at his home, 306 James street.

Mr. Foley was born Feb. 7, 1844, near Brockville, Ont., a son of John and Margaret McCarthy Foley. When a young man he resided in Grieg, Lewis county. In 1879, he came to Clayton, buying out the (photo inserted here) Perry Caswell shoe business then located in Riverside drive. In 1890 he bought out the store which the business now occupies in James street. Mr. Foley had been a shoemaker for 60 years. He retired in June, 1924, at the age of 80 and his son, Frank, took over the Foley shoe store.

On Jan. 3, 1872, Mr. Foley was married to Margaret O’Hora in St. Peter’s church, Lowville, by Rev. Father Nyhan. Six children, Eugene, Fred, Ellen, Anna, Frank and Gertrude, were born to them.

Mr. Foley was a charter member of Thousand Island Council, No. 350, Knights of Columbus, and a director of the First National Exchange bank of this village. He was one of the founders of the Exchange bank which was organized in 1884 and which a few years ago was merged with the First National bank.

Always active in civic affairs, Mr. Foley was a former chief of the fire department, a former village trustee and a former member of the board of education. He was a communicant of St. Mary’s church.

Surviving Mr. Foley are two sons, Fred J. Foley, Plattsburgh, and Frank E. Foley, Clayton; two daughters, Mrs. William Gillick, Clayton, and Miss Gertrude M. Foley, Utica; two brothers, Bernard Foley, Minnesota, and Frank Foley of Manitoba, and four grandchildren, Katherine M. and Mary E. Gillick, Clayton, and John E. Gillick, Clayton.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 9:30 from St. Mary’s church, Rev. George E. Racette officiating. Interment will be made in the family plot here.

Col. R. T. Grant, of Clayton

(with photo - see Rootsweb Message Boards)

Clayton, Oct. 22. -- Col. R. P. Grant, former president of Watertown Produce Exchange, died this morning after a two years’ illness.

_______

He was born in Neversink, Sullivan county, May 6, 1844.

The Grant family is of Scotch origin, and that its members yet preserve the qualities of the ancestral stock is attested by the career of Colonel Grant, whose attainment to prominence and success in life was due to unflagging industry and indomitable resolution.

Robert P. Grant, paternal grandfather of his namesake, Col. Robert P. Grant, was second cousin of the illustrious Ulysses S. Grant. Col. Robert P. Grant of the family named, was reared to a life of industry. He acquired the fundamentals of an education in the district schools and afterwards managed to obtain two winters’ tuition in the High school, and this preparation, with his natural ability and subsequent attainments, proved an ample equipment for the duties of a stirring and useful life.

After leaving school he took employment as clerk in store at a wage of 25 cents a day boarding himself. His compensation was afterward increased to 50 cents a day, and by dint of close economy he made some savings with which he purchased from (sic) sheep, adding to his flock from time to time as his increase would permit, until at the end of five years he sold out and found himself in possession of a capital amounting to $500.

Young Grant then learned the tanner’s trade in which he was employed in 1863, when he temporarily abandoned his work to respond to the call of his country. He enlisted in Company 6, 92d regiment. When the rebel general moved up the Shenandoah valley in the invasion of Pennsylvania in 1864, Captain Grant participated with his regiment in a movement to the state line. Captain Grant displayed fine soldierly qualities during his service, and in 1865 he was promoted to the colonelcy of the regiment, although he was its youngest commissioned officer.

After his return from military service, Colonel Grant, with two others, purchased the tannery in which he had served his apprenticeship, but a year later relinquished the business to engage in farming and storekeeping in Neversink.

In 1869 he removed to Hawkersville, N. Y., where he conducted a store. In 1871 he went to Cameron county, Pa., where he bought the bark on a 10,000 acre tract, and also erected a tannery which he operated until 1874. In that year he disposed of his holdings and with a capital of a few thousand dollars went to Fort Madison, Iowa, where in association with State Senator Kent, he founded in 1875 the Farmers and Mechanics bank. The business did not satisfy and he sold his bank stock and came the following year to Clayton, N. Y., where with A. F. Barker he established the Bank of Clayton which four years later was reorganized under the same name under the state banking system.

In 1884 Colonel Grant bought the bank interest, and with 50 others organized the Exchange bank, an institution which under his direction, gained success beyond all expectations, and afforded opportunity for expansions. In 1897 he brought about a reorganization with 120 stockholders and Jan. 1, following, placed the bank under the National banking system as the National Exchange bank of Clayton with a capital of $50,000, with a surplus at the time of $73,000.

From the founding of the new bank to the present time Colonel Grant had occupied the two fold position of cashier and general manager and was also one of the largest stockholders.

He was a member of the National Bankers’ Association. He enjoyed a wide acquaintance with state and national legislators by whom he was frequently consulted with reference to financial and economical questions. He was also actively interested in the industrial life of the community and state, and was recognized as a leader in bringing dairying and its interests to their present importance.

About 25 years ago he became interested in cheese manufacturing, and he was instrumental in building several factories in the section. As president of the Watertown Produce Exchange he was instrumental in procuring the enactment of various instructive laws. In 1901, his long continued efforts found this result in the formation of the State Dairy Board of Trade, of which he was elected president.

Colonel Grant was elected supervisor in 1901 but refused an election in 1903. At an entertainment given in 1903 at Thousand Island Park by Jefferson county to the State Board of Charities, Colonel Grant was chosen by the board of supervisors to deliver an address of welcome in behalf of this body.

His activities in the community reach into various fields. He conducted a large fire insurance business; was treasurer of the Anglers’ of the St. Lawrence River, a member of the Fish, Game and Forest League, president of Thousand Island Park association, also a member of Clayton grange, 647. In politics he was a Republican. He was a distinguished member of the Masonic fraternity, member of Clayton Lodge F. & A. M., Clayton Chapter R. A. M., Watertown Commandery, K. T., also attained to the 32d degree Scottish Rite.

Colonel Grant was married Sept. 14, 1870 to Miss Lottie C. Hayes, daughter of the late Daniel Hayes of Hawkinsville, N. Y. To Colonel and Mrs. Grant was born one son, Robert D. Since the illness of his father he has filled the position in the National Exchange bank formerly held by the father to the satisfaction of its many patrons.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Clayton Resident Passes Away at
Florida Home After Suf-
fering Stroke

JANUARY 25, 1926

FIRST R. W. & O. ENGINEER

______

At Throttle of First Locomotive
into Boonville and Theresa,
and Drove First Train into
Clayton

______

Irving Dailey of Clayton, a pioneer of the “iron trail,” passed away yesterday in Hollywood, Fla. He was 76 years of age.

Though his active career as a railroad man ended 10 years ago, Irving Dailey will be remembered by hundreds of North New Yorkers as the man who piloted the first engine over the Clayton line, after he had helped to lay the first tracks into northern New York from Utica.

Starting as a fireman at the age of 18, he earned his position behind the throttle a year later and then for nearly a half century he ran trains over northern line to retire only when the age limit forced him out. He left a record that has not been equalled on the St. Lawrence or Ontario divisions.

He was at his winter home in Hollywood, Fla., with his wife when death came. News of his death was a shock to his friends in this section for he seemed in good health when he left Clayton early in December. A recurrence of an old illness, combined with diabetic complications, caused his death after a few weeks’ confinement.

His funeral will be conducted at Hollywood and in the spring the body will be brought to Clayton for burial.

Mr. Dailey was born in Trenton, Oneida county, in 1850. When he was 16 he started to serve an apprenticeship in a machine shop in his home town.

At the time railroads north of Utica were in their infancy and it was a year or two after he had started in the machine shop that the construction crew laying the rails to Boonville, came through Trenton.

The engineer on the train that moved along with the crew chanced to meet young Dailey and offered to let the boy “fire” on his engine. So Dailey fired the engine as it worked slowly up with the completion of the Boonville road. By the time that job was finished the call of the road had decided Dailey as to his life work. When he was offered the job of engineman on the Boonville road he accepted and from that time until 1916 he missed very few days in the cab.

When the road came through to Carthage he was right along with the builders and when the road to Theresa was opened up, he took the throttle on one of the first engines over the line. That was in 1872 and Mr. Dailey established a residence in Theresa while he continued to run over the Philadelphia-Theresa line.

Drove First Train to Clayton.

In 1873 the railroad into Clayton from Philadelphia was laid. In the fall of that year, with snow on the ground Dailey operated the first engine, “The L. D. Doolittle,” over the line. When he halted his engine at Clayton a group of open-mouthed little boys stood in the village and marvelled at their first sight of a locomotive. Today these youngsters, grey-haired business men, mourn the death of Irving Dailey.

After he took the train over the Clayton line, Mr. Dailey stood by that branch.

For the next 44 years he drove his engine daily over the Clayton line until the people along his route began to consider Irving Dailey and his snorting old engine, each a part of the other. In that respect, the engineer agreed. He often said he considered his engine among his best friends.

Old veterans of the railroad will remember Dailey as a hard worker among hard workers. Through many a storm he brought his train safely to its destination and was on the job in more than one instance when doctors averred his bed was his rightful place.

Yet in 1916 when the New York Central retired him on a pension, he felt fully repaid for his life’s efforts by the praise he received for his record. It was a record as nearly perfect as possible.

At the time of his retirement he was the oldest engineer in the employ of the St. Lawrence and Ontario divisions.

Since that time he lived in Clayton during the summers, going south with his wife for the winter months. He never had a serious illness until about five years ago when he suffered a paralytic stroke which left him feeble for some time. He seemed entirely recovered, however, before he was stricken again a few weeks ago in Florida.

He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Ellen Clarke, whom he married when he first came to Clayton, and two sons, Frederick and Merle Dailey, both of Clayton.

He was a member of Clayton Episcopal church and Clayton Lodge, F. and A. M.

Typist's Notes: With great earnestness in preserving history as accurately as possible, a railroad historian has notified me of discrepancies in the above article. He wrote:

".... he could have not been the first RW&O engineer, unless he drove itwhen he was one year old. The railroad was opened in 1851. More likely hewas first engineer over the Clayton branch......it seems like.....would only have been about five years old when the railroad was built from Utica to Boonville...."

My correspondent added:

"What I think it might be is that the headline should probably have read something like 'First Engineer on the Clayton Branch....' But if that's the way it was written, it shouldn't be altered. That would be tampering with history, even if a mistake is made. At least something was preserved. I imagine that down through the years many interesting stories like thiswere published in the Watertown Times." (6-6-2004)

* * * * * * * * * * * *

(1910)

(Mrs. Mary Dewey)

No death of the year has caused more genuine regret than that of Mrs. H. B. Dewey, which occurred at her home in this village on Sunday afternoon, after an illness of three or four weeks.

Mrs. Dewey was born in Clayton 43 years ago, the daughter of John and Emily Swart. She was married Oct. 8, 1890. Possessed of an amiable disposition, active in church work and kindred societies, a good neighbor and ever ready to respond in the misfortunes of others, she will be greatly missed in the community in which she had lived so long.

Mrs. Dewey is survived by her husband, a sister, Mrs. E. A. Burlingame, and two daughters, Lois G., and Naomi.

The funeral was held from the house on Tuesday afternoon, and was very largely attended.

____

CARD OF THANKS.

We wish to publicly thank the many kind friends and neighbors whose sympathy and assistance has meant so much to us in our bereavement.

H. B. Dewey and Family.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

DEWEY -- At Clayton, June 26, 1931, Holland Benjamin Dewey, aged 72 years. Private funeral from the home Sunday, Rev. William Adam of the Clayton Baptist church officiating, assisted by Rev. W. O. Thomas of the Clayton Methodist Episcopal church. Interment in Clayton cemetery. Please omit flowers.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SWARTWOUT -- In the Township, Clayton, Mary 20, 1927, Mrs. Mary E. Swartwout, 89. Services at the home at 1 o'clock Thursday and in the St. Lawrence M. E. Church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in St. Lawrence Cemetery.

_________

Mary E. Swartout, 89, for many years a resident of this region, passed away at 9:30 o'clock yesterday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gilbert Putnam, between Clayton and Depauville, in the township of Clayton.

Mrs. Swartwout was born in Massachusetts, April 19, 1838, and when a child came with her parents to this vicinity, where she had resided in the townships of Clayton and Cape Vincent. August 17, 1856, she was married to Hezekiah D. Swartwout, who died 15 years ago. She was a member of the Methodist church of St. Lawrence.

Besides her daughter, Mrs. Putnam, she is survived by two sons, Eugene D., and Ellsworth L., of Depauville and vicinity, and by two grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

The services will be held at 1 o'clock at the home and 2 o'clock in the St. Lawrence M. E. church. Burial will be in St. Lawrence. Rev. Mr. Miller of Clayton M. E. church will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * *

SWARTWOUT -- In the Township, Clayton, Mary 20, 1927, Mrs. Mary E. Swartwout, 89. Services at the home at 1 o'clock Thursday and in the St. Lawrence M. E. Church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in St. Lawrence Cemetery.

Mary E. Swartout, 89, for many years a resident of this region, passed away at 9:30 o'clock yesterday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gilbert Putnam, between Clayton and Depauville, in the township of Clayton.

Mrs. Swartwout was born in Massachusetts, April 19, 1838, and when a child came with her parents to this vicinity, where she had resided in the townships of Clayton and Cape Vincent. August 17, 1856, she was married to Hezekiah D. Swartwout, who died 15 years ago. She was a member of the Methodist church of St. Lawrence.

Besides her daughter, Mrs. Putnam, she is survived by two sons, Eugene D., and Ellsworth L., of Depauville and vicinity, and by two grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

The services will be held at 1 o'clock at the home and 2 o'clock in the St. Lawrence M. E. church. Burial will be in St. Lawrence. Rev. Mr. Miller of Clayton M. E. church will officiate.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

GEORGE DONNER, CIVIL
WAR VETERAN, DIES
AT CLAYTON HOME

______

George Donner, 87, a veteran of the Civil War, died suddenly late Saturday night at the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Hart, of Clayton. Death was due to heart disease. He was born in St. Elizabeth, Quebec, Can., the son of Joseph and Mary Donner.

When he was a young man he came to New York State to live. This was at the time of the Civil War and he enlisted in Company K, 94th New York Infantry. Upon his discharge from service, he went to Traverse City, Mich., where he worked for many years as a lumberman.

For the past seven years he has been living at various times with a sister, Mrs. Mary Patchin, in Felts Mills, and his niece, Mrs. Hart. He is also survived by a brother, Louie Donner of Traverse City and a sister, Mrs. Lewis Herbert of Arkansas.

The funeral was held from the Hart home at 2 o’clock standard time, this afternoon and burial was made in Black River Cemetery.


FastCounter by bCentral
Return to Hart Scrapbook Table of Contents

Return to Shirley Farone's Homepage