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TWENTIETH CENTURY

  Louisa lived to see the turn of the century and the many changes that were coming to the countryside she had pioneered.

The 1900 Census places Louisa with the William Turnbo family and showed their composition as follows:

Name: Age:

William C. Turnbo 42

N. E. Turnbo (wife) 41

Andrew Jackson (son) 16

Etta Turnbo (daughter) 7

Louisa Turnbo (mother) 77

Sketch of Turnbo Children

  Hugh Turnbo, the oldest son of Andrew J. and Louisa Turnbo, was born April 11, 1856 in Tennessee and came to Texas with his parents as an infant.

  He married Ellenora Feich Sands on September 14, 1876, in Bell County, Texas. Their first child was a daughter named Olla who was born in 1880 and apparently died before she was 10 years old. The 1890 census record makes no mention of her and her grave has never been located. Their second child, James Allen, was born in June 1885, and their third child, Charles Anderson, was born October 10, 1892.

  Ellenora died on November 12, 1895, at the age of 39. This left her husband with two young boys to raise.

  Hugh remarried a neighbor girl, Lucy Jane Bailey, on October 10, 1896. By this marriage, they had the following children: Nettie, born July 28, 1897; Dewey, born January 31, 1899; Roy Jackson, born October 19, 1900, and Seth, born September 17, 1902. They later moved from the Youngsport area to the small community of Long cove, located in central Lampasas County, near the present day town of Lometa. It was there in 1917 that Lucy Jane Bailey died at the age of 49.

  At the time of the second wife's death, the three oldest children had already married and moved away from the family home. However, the three youngest children, Dewey, Roy and Seth, remained to depend on their father for their care.

  Roy Turnbo, recalling those times gives the following account of his father's care of the three remaining children:

  "Part of the time he was chief cook and bottle washer. He did the cooking and kept the house. He lived a very quiet life and was a law-abiding citizen. He always treated the neighbors and friends like he wanted to be treated, always lending a helping hand to any one in need or in trouble. He was even tempered and seldom got mad. He was a very happy kind of person. He always had some scripture from the Bible to settle any discussion that came up among the boys."

  "His home in Long Cove was a meeting place for all the boys around the countryside. When around the boys, he acted just like one of them. "

  In 1931, his son Dewey contracted tuberculosis and died at Austin, on May 8, of that year.

  On October 8, 1935 after a brief illness, Hugh Turnbo passed away. He was buried at the Lometa cemetery near his second wife and his son, Dewey, who had preceded him in death.

  The 1900 Census record lists the family of James Allen Turnbo at that time as follows:

Name           Age

James A. Turnbo 39

Leora Turnbo (wife) 33

Earl Turnbo (son) 15

Eva Turnbo (daughter) 12

Lilah Turnbo (daughter) 8

Nannie Turnbo (daughter) 8

William Turnbo (son) 4

John Turnbo (son) 1 month

  The James Turnbos had another son born September 2, 1903, who was named James Jackson.

  James and William Turnbo bought substantial amounts of property near the Lampasas River and at one time had approximately 2000 acres they farmed. One section of land purchased by James Turnbo had a "mountain" on it, which stood far above the rest of the land. In this area of the country there are a number of places where erosion has reduced the greater part of the highland and small mesas stand from 50-200 feet above the present land surface. They are generally referred to as mountains or "knobs". The mountain that was located on the James Turnbo place still carries the name on the official state maps as "Turnbow Mountain". From it, one can get a beautiful view of all the land originally settled by the Turnbo family. It stands across from the Live Oak Cemetery where many Turnbos are buried.

  William C., "Bill", Turnbo was the first Texas-born Turnbo. He was born May 29, 1858, in Florence, Texas. He married in the mid 1870's and likewise his wife was also a native Texan.

  At the time of the 1900 Federal census, the William Turnbo family looked like this:

Name;    Age;     State of Birth:

William c. Turnbo 42 Texas

N.E. (Wife) 42 Texas

Jackson (Andrew Jackson) 16 Texas

Etta 7 Texas

Louisa (Mother) 77 Tennessee

  The census-taker also noted that this family had two non-family boarders living with them at the time. We believe these must have been farm hands who lived with or near the family.

  The William Turnbo family had four children in total. The two not listed by the 1900 census were their daughter Evva (who died on Movember 7, 1882) and their son John. We know very little about John except that he never married.

  William and Nancy Turnbo lived long, productive lives. He died on September 29, 1936, and his wife lived to be 90 years old dying on February 11, 1948. Both were buried in Live Oak Cemetery near Youngsport.

  Lucinda Turnbo, the oldest child of A.J. and Louisa, was born December 3, 1850, in Wayne County, Tennessee. She moved to Texas with her family when she was only six years old. In 1875, she married David Benjamin Franklin Cosper, who was born in Randolph county, Alabama on February 3, 1851.

  Ben and Lucinda Cosper raised a large family of six children. They were:. Jack, Joel, Bulah, Mattle, Ida and William. This was a very handsome family as can be seen in the family portrait shown later in this book.

  Ben Cosper died on July 30, 1934 and was buried in Live Oak Cemetery. His wife proceeded him in death on August 23, 1928, and she too was buried at Live Oak.

  By 1900, there were a number of Turnbo/Turnbow families living in other parts of the State. A large number of Turnbows lived in and around Erath County. These particular families are described in some detail in a book by Mr. Raymond Hancock entitled: PURVES; ERATH COUNTY, TEXAS. Other Turnbo/Turnbow families lived in Grayson, Galveston, Navarro, Comanche and other counties. We've never been able to tie these particular families directly to Andrew Jackson Turnbo but if one were to trace back far enough there would probably be a relationship established.

  To digress for a moment, there are several places across the country, which carry the Turnbo/Turnbow name. There is "Turnbow Mountain" in Bell County and the "Turnbow Cemetery" in Erath County, Texas. There is also a Turnbow Cemetery on Truce Creek in Tennessee. According to Mrs. Laura Turnbow Williams, there's also a Turnbow Valley in Utah (apparently named by or after some of the Mormon Turnbows of whom there are a considerable number). Other places carrying the Turnbo(w) name have been mentioned from time to time, but the author has not been able to verify them.

  On April 4, 1907, the mother of the Turnbo family passed away. She was 80 years of age and according to older relatives she died simply of "old age". Louisa was buried not with her husband in the lonely field that had since been abandoned by all traces of civilization, but rather in the Live Oak Cemetery. It was here that her son, John, and her grandchild Evva were already buried. Her former daughter in-law, Ellenora Turnbo, the first wife of Hugh Anderson Turnbo had also been buried nearby. Except for her late husband and one son, James Allen Turnbo, all of her immediate family would come to be buried here. This cemetery is currently the resting spot for some sixteen Turnbos who were descendants of Louisa.

  With Louisa Turnbo's death, these pioneers of Youngsport turned over their legacy to the younger Turnbo descendants.

  The children of Andrew and Louisa raised large families who soon married and began their own families. Some remained who soon married and began their own families. Some remained in the Youngsport area, but many moved to the neighboring towns of Killeen and Belton, Texas. Today, there are hundreds of Turnbos who are the descendants of this early pioneer family. They reside throughout Texas as well as in many states across the nation.

CONTENTS

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From the book "The Texas Turnbo's"
By: Charles A. Turnbo

Page 47

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