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Ancestors of Warren Graham Trest


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First Generation  next



Warren Graham Trest 
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1. Warren Graham Trest, son of Wendell Hamilton Trest and Neddie Graham , was born on 8 Oct 1957 in Memphis, Tennessee. Other names for Warren were Bub, and Bubba.

Trest Herald 
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Noted events in his life were:

• Heraldry: Trest Heraldry. "The coat of arms so reproduced has been painted by a heraldic artist in England according to the blazon for the family surname of Trest.
Motto: None recorded.

Ref: L'Armorial General, Page 938
Rolland's Illustration, Plate XLIV.

Arms granted to Triest of Ghent, Belgium; elevated to the rank of Barons on 26th May, 1753. Appearing to be from an Italian place-name, the variants Trest and Triest are more likely to be from German source word 'Trester'-grape-husks; brewers grains; residue from brewing. In middle high ger. Trester = winepress. A brewer or other specialized worker in the winemaking industry."
(British Heradry Research)

• Occupation: Petroleum Service Industry, 1978 until now. 1 "Warren G. Trest hired on with Sperry-Sun (then the NL Industries Baroid Company) on January 10th, 1978. He worked for the company in the Gulf of Mexico until 1979. In 1979, he transferred to Singapore, as an Applied Drilling Technolgy Engineer, and worked in Asia Pacific Operations until 1981. In 1981, he transferred to Houston for 6 months, as Assistant Product Line Manager H2S Safety Systems and then to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma until 1984 as Mid Continent District Manager. In 1984, he transferred back to Louisiana and worked as an ADT Engineer until 1989, when he transferred to West Africa (Nigeria). He worked in Nigeria until 1991 when he transferred to the MWD (Realtime Measurement While Drilling) department in Louisiana. He stayed in Field Operations until July, 2000 when he took over the position of Training Coordinator. He ran the training department in Lafayette, Louisiana until November, 2001 when he went into operations as a Service Coordinator. He is a lead Nuclear Engineer and has logged 5 years of oil wells in over 5,000' of water depths and 2 wells over 7,000 of water depths (both were records at that time). He logged the depest turnkey well for D.O.T.S. in over 7,000 of water depth in the year 2000. He is presently a Service Coordinator for Halliburton in Lafayette, La."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Marriage: Marriage of Warren and Bonnie Trest, 1 Oct 1992, Lafayette, Louisiana. 1 "I was married to Bonnie Willingham on 1 October, 1992 at the courthouse in Lafayette, Louisiana. Our witnesses were Karen Trosclair and Rene Foreman.

The Justice of the Peace was Lynwood Broussard."
(Warren G. Trest)
Morten and Cassie Trest 
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• Pets: 1 "Bonnie's children were grown when we got married. Instead of children, we had pets (the same as children to animal lovers). Bonnie had a cat, Mister Duck and a Chihuahua named Cassie Marie when we met. She brought Morten Anderson Trest, a male Chihuahua, home right before we got married (while I was in Nigeria). Until this day, May 30, 2003, these have been our children.

Morten Anderson passed away on August 31, 2003.
Cassie Marie passed away on March 9, 2004"
(Warren Trest)
Homer 
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• Pets: "Tami replaced Morten with a Jack Russell Terrier that we named Homer Simpson Trest. She gave Homer to us in October, 2003."

• Residence: 1 "After leaving home and starting his career, Warren Trest lived in Lafayette, Church Point and Basile, Louisiana. He transferred to Singapore for two years, returning to Houston, Texas and transferring to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He transferred back to Lafayette, Louisiana and lived in several places in Lafayette and Alexandria, Louisiana. After his divorce from his first wife, he moved to Jackson, Mississippi and then back to Butte La Rose, Louisiana with his second wife. They bought their first home in Broussard, Louisiana, where they remain."

"Growing up, I lived in Tennessee, Arkansas, North Carolina, Michigan, Mississippi and Louisiana."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Warren married Rhonda Ann Matte , daughter of John Matte and Shirley Olivier , on 19 Aug 1978 in Church Point, Louisiana.1 The marriage ended in divorce on 29 May 1990.


 
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Warren next married Bonnie Jean Weifenbach , daughter of Richard Weifenbach and Francis Sue Moore , on 1 Oct 1992 in Lafayette, Louisiana.1


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Wendell Hamilton Trest 
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2. Wendell Hamilton Trest, son of Warner Alexander Trest and Lillian Ersell Miller , was born on 13 Oct 1928 in Louisville, Mississippi.

Hugh Lamar Trest Home 
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Noted events in his life were:

• Birthplace: 1928, Louisville, Mississippi. 1 "My father was born in the home of Hugh Lamar Trest, whom my Grandparents were living with at the time".
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Letters: 21 Mar 1929. 1 "The following excert is from a letter that Warner A. Trest wrote to his parents in 1928:

Yes, Little Wendell is as fine as ever. It seems that he is growing more and more each day. He spends a large portion of his time jabbering and playing with his little playthings. I know that theere is none sweeter than he."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Wendell Hamilton Trest 
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• School: Ford High School. 1 "Wendell was forced to leave his regular high school because he wrote an "underground" newspaper. He knew that he had to be back in school before his father returned from a trip (to Colorado - his Uncle Walter was watching him) that he was on, so he transferred to Ford High.

Graduated from Ford High School (Small High School Outside Louisville, Mississippi). The graduation class had a total of 6 students !

After going overseas with the 5th Army Air Corp. and discharged, he entered the summer session at Hinds Junior College in 1949. On the 6th of June, 1950, while in registrars line of Hinds Junior College, Wendell met Neddie Graham. They were married on the 31st of August, 1950.

Wendell and Neddie moved to Starksville, Mississippi and he attended Mississippi State University, Their first trailer (on campus) was 6 feet wide and he was 6' 4" and had to sleep, at times, with his feet out the window of the trailer. He said that either he had to sleep with his legs curled, or open the window and stretch his legs out.

He graduated Mississippi State and went into Industrial Sales."
(Warren G. Trest)

Wendell in 5th Army Air Corp 
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• Military Service: 5th Army Air Corp, 1947-1949, Japan and Korea. "Entered the US. Army (5th Army Air Corp) (later U.S. Air Force) as a Private in 1947 and mustered out as a Seargent in 1949.

Duties included Japan and Korea.

Wendell traveled to to Japan on a troop ship from U.S.A. to Japan via the Northern Route and suffered from seasickness the rest of his life. He stated that if he would have had to muster out of the service in Japan and pay his own airplane ticket home, he would have done it to keep have having to ride a troop ship home."
(Wendell H. Trest)

Neddie Graham and Wendell Trest on Wedding Day. 
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• Marriage Notes: Roxie, Mississippi. 1 "Wendell and Neddie were married in Roxie, Mississippi on August 31, 1950 by Reverend Green, a Baptist Minister"
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Hobbies: 1 "Hunting (Wing Shooting) and Fishing (freshwater). Bream and Sac-a-Lait. My father loved fishing and made numerous trips to Butte La Rosse and even lived there just for the fishing in Lake Henderson, Louisiana.

Collecting:
Collections of anything that Wendell took interest in. If he was collecting matches, he would have 200 shipping boxes filled with different matches. If he collected model cars, he would have every car of that scale.

As children, his sons would have every toy that was available for whatever genre he wanted. One Christmas, his children (who wanted toy soldiers) awoke to a Christmas tree that had exploding bridges, every toy soldier kit that was available (at that time), parachute troops in the Christmas tree and hundreds of soldiers across the floor (arranged in armies), Wendell must have spent all of Christmas Eve setting this up for his sons.

Whatever his collection genre was, he was always the consummate collector. In latter years, with the introduction of the Internet, if he wanted a certain item, he would make sure that he received it (between e-mails and faxes).

At different times, he collected books, matches, soaps, miniture whiskey bottles, model planes, trains and automobiles."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Wendell Trest 
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• Occupation: Industrial Sales. "Industrial Sales:

Choctaw Incorporated
U.S. Steel Corporation (Gerrard Strapping Division).
Saint Regis Paper Company (Panelyte Division).
Crossett Lumber Company (Purchased by Georgia-Pacific Corp.)
Saint Regis Paper Company (Panelyte Division).
Tennessee Flake Board Corporation
Self Employed
Louisiana Pacific Corporation
Georgia Pacific Corporation (Retired from).
During retirement, Wendell Trest kept selling for GH&L.

After over 18 moves with his family, Wendell Trest says that the reason he did not want to make a career out of the military is that he did not want to relocate his family very many times! Relocation gave his children the background they needed to make careers out of the military and petroleum industry.

His children were amazed, latter in life, at what Wendell achieved at such young ages. When they looked back, at their present ages, at what he had accomplished, at the same age, they were amazed at his accomplishments.

At a sales meeting, his sales manager stated that if his (the sales manager) life depended on getting an order, he would send Wendell to get it.

Wendell Trest was the kind of person who enjoyed people and relished the relationships that he was able to establish over the years."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Wendell married Neddie Graham 2 on 31 Aug 1950 in Roxie, Mississippi.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Warner Neil Trest (born on 20 Jun 1952 Jackson, Mississippi)

1        ii.   Warren Graham Trest (born on 8 Oct 1957 Memphis, Tennessee)

        iii.   Wayne Hamilton Trest (born on 18 Jan 1960 Kalamazoo, Michigan)

Wendell next married Louise Long in Lafayette, Louisiana.


Neddie Graham Trest 
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3. Neddie Graham,2,5 daughter of Ned Bufkin Graham and Carrie Edith Collier , was born on 4 Feb 1932 in Roxie, Mississippi, died on 10 Mar 1992 in Jackson, Mississippi, at age 60, and was buried in 1992 in Lafayette Memorial Park, Lafayette, Louisiana 3.,4

Neddie outside her home in Roxie, Ms. 
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Noted events in her life were:

• Origin of the name Neddie: 6 "Mom always told the story that the way she got the name of Neddie was that they thought they were having a son that they would name Ned. When Mom was born and they found out they had a daughter instead, Grandfather named her Neddie for the fact that "Ned" had "Died".

She stated once, to a friend of mine, that she always hated her name because it made her sound so country. Dad lowered his glasses, looked over at her and stated, Hell Neddie, they are going to see Roxie tomorrow." There was not a whole lot to Roxie. The same friend of mine, after meeting her for the first time, made the comment that he didn't care if her name was Queen Elizabeth, she was real, she was sweet, but she was country. He meant this as the a compliment concerning her honesty and straightforwardness. Plus, we had just left an "all you can eat catfish house" and she had matched him fish-for-fish."
(Warren Trest)
Neddie Trest 
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• Neddie Trest at age 6: Roxie, Franklin County, Mississippi. "This is a picture of my mother at age 6 (1938) in Roxie, Mississippi. This picture would have been made about the time that her father died."
(Warren Trest)
Neddie Trest in 1940 
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• Neddie Trest at age 8: "This is a picture of my mother at age 8 (1940) in Roxie, Mississippi."
(Warren Trest)
Neddie Graham Trest on wedding day. 
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• Marriage Notes: Roxie, Mississippi. "Neddie married Wendell Trest on August 31, 1950 in Roxie, Mississippi by Reverend Green, a Baptist Minister."
Neddie Graham 
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• General Memories: 1 "During her eulogy, the Reverend Sandra Lynn Trest stated, "not only was she willing to laugh, she was willing to laugh about herself." This is a rare trait.

Her son, Warren, remembers that she would sit through a movie, knowing that she did not like it, just for the fact that she was spending that two hours with her child, with her only concern being, "Did you enjoy it?". It was never that SHE didn't enjoy it.

She had a smile and a laugh that was contagious. When the Graham sisters got together, you could not help but laugh when the Graham stories were told. Of all the sisters, she was the innocent one, the one who would ask, "Do they really do that?"

Neddie was the type of person that during a family get-to-gether would cook, clean and wait on everybody else. Her enjoyment was that everybody else was happy, well fed and content. This was her joy!

On the last mothers day that she was with us, she was just so happy to have her "boys" with her (one in the Petroleum Industry and one in the Military). She stated that all she wanted was "breakfast in bed". She stated that she did not want any presents, she was happy in just having her sons home at one time. She awoke hours before anybody else, combed her hair and waited (poised) in bed. After a few hours, she cleared her throat and exclaimed to all, "Hey, I'm ready!" Her sons had an empty box wrapped (besides her true gift). When she unwrapped the empty package, and her sons told her that they had given her exactly what she had wanted, their was not a drop of disappointment in her, she was just happy to have her "boys" with her. This is not to say the same of our father (who had given us the money to pay for her mother's day gift and exclaimed, "Hell, I knew that I should not have trusted them with that money!"). All worked out and this was the type of family reunion that always ensued. At Christmas, she just wanted to make sure that EVERYONE else got what they wanted before she would start (after much encouragement) to open her own gifts.

If there was every a lamb of God and a pure kindred spirit, it was Neddie Trest."
(Warren Trest)

Neddie Graham in the last years 
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• Death: 1 "Neddie Graham Trest went into the hospital on her 60th birthday and was diagnosed with cancer. She passed away on Mar. 10, 1992 in Baptist Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi and was buried in Lafayette Memorial Park in Lafayette, Louisiana."
(Warren G. Trest)

Neddie Trest Tombstone 
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• Tombstone: "In the Lafayette Memorial Park, Neddie Trest's tombstone reads:

NEDDIE TREST
Beloved Wife and Mother
Feb 4, 1932 - Mar 10, 1992"

Neddie married Wendell Hamilton Trest on 31 Aug 1950 in Roxie, Mississippi.
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Warner Alexander Trest 
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4. Warner Alexander Trest, son of William John Trest and Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson , was born on 14 Nov 1904 in Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi, died on 9 Feb 1988 in Tupelo, Mississippi, at age 83, and was buried in 1988 in Haughton Memorial Park, Amory, Mississippi.

Warner A. Trest in 1910 Census 
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Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1910 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, Beat 3, 1910, Jones County, Mississippi. 7 "Jones County, Mississippi, Beat 3 - Warner Trest is listed as age 5 (youngest child) living with his father, William J. (age 50), mother, Mack E (age 50), Mary E. (age 20), Hugh L. (age 15), Nancie L. (age 13), Walter C. (age 11), and Ella V. (age 8)."
Warner and William John Trest 
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• Childhood: Jones County, Mississippi. "His father, WIlliam John, was always described as a kind man and a good man. Being the youngest child, it is easy to picture his father giving him much attention and affection throughout his life. He lost his youngest sister at 17 years old. He was the last child at home (in the 1920 census) and was the witness for both his mother and father's death certificates."
(Warren G. Trest)
Warner A. Trest with his dog 
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• Census: 1920 U.S. Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1920, Jones County, Mississippi. 8 "Jones County, Mississippi - Warner is listed as the only child still at home (age 15) with his Father, W.J., and Mother, M.E., who are both listed at 60 years old."

• Religion: Presbyterian. Religion - Presbyterian

"Grandfather always said the most beautiful prayers and blessings, in Kings English. You never, ever touched your food (breakfast through dinner) until he said the family blessing, with his wife's hand in his hand in prayer. To this day, my meal blessings are based on the memories of blessings given by my grandfather. As family patriarch, every special meal's blessing was given by Grandfather when the family got together. I will always remember the way he said his blessings and can only attempt to match the meaning of each and every blessing he gave."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Warner A. Trest is listed as Superintendent of Sunday School in the Louisville, Mississippi Presbyterian Church in 1941-1942..

"Mr. W.A. Trest continues his faithful leadership as Superintendent of the Sunday School 1941 - 1942"
(Mrs. Annie B. Davis - Church Historian in the Louisville, Mississippi Presbyterian Church Newsletter)

His daughter, Sandra Lynn Trest, is an ordained Presbyterian Minister.

"When he and Ersell would put bourbon in the bourbon balls or spice cakes around Christmas, they would pull the blinds down so that the neighbors could not see.

He would not abide any infidelity or wrongdoing. If a brother or family member divorced because of infidelity, he would have nothing to do with them in the future. Once, a brother, as the story goes, sold one of grandfather's mules and he would not talk to him again."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Warner A. Trest 
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• Hobbies: Hunting and Fishing. 1 (Fishing and Hunting)

"He would make two trips to Sandersville, Mississippi (the old Trest homestead in Jones County) every year. Once in the spring to fish and once in the fall to hunt at the old Trest home, staying with his sister "Bell" and her family."
(Wendell Hamilton Trest)

"Grandfather would take me fishing for bream when I was visiting with him. He would use a little outboard motor (with a Jon Boat) to get us near his spot and then paddle the rest of the way in. He would fish with a fly-rod for bream or pearch. I remember that my father had put a knife in my tackle box and that my grandfather pulled it out and told me the merits of the knife. My grandfather showed me how to fly-fish and gave my brother his first shotgun (at Lake Tia-Kota) on his 16th birthday. During that same trip, my grandfather interested me in fishing, for the rest of my life, by stating that I had the patience of a fisherman one evening, after watching me, at the end of a fishing dock all day. This meant a lot to me. There was one thing about grandfather, when he said something, it was not pretentious and meant everything to his children and grandchildren.

Grandfather was a very proud man. He was very stoic and old world. He didn't want to go into much geneology because he was afraid that he would find a "pirate" in the family. During the late 1970's, I would not visit grandfather, for a year or so, because I had a beard and long hair. I knew that this would only upset him.

After retirement, he would carve walking sticks out of dogwood saplings. When he walked through the woods, he could tell you the name of every tree and plant."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"After retirment, some of his most enjoyable times were fishing trips to Butte La Rose, Louisiana where he would stay at Nell "Graham" Standefer's house on the bayou and fish for bream or sac-a-lait."
(Wendell Hamilton Trest)
Warner Alexander Trest 
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• Occupation: District Storekeeper for Gulf, Mobil and Ohio Railroad. (District Storekeeper for G.M.&O. Railroad)

"Grandfather was a District Storekeeper for the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad. He worked for G.M.&O for 47 years as an accountant. The amazing thing was that he was that he held a senior accountant position for 47 years for G.M.&O., with less than a high school education. This type of position, today, would require a degree in Accounting. He started with the railroad in Louisville, Mississippi and retired in Jackson, Tennessee."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Education: 1 "Grandfather went through the grades of school that were available to him at the time (around the 8th grade). Yet, he had the most beautiful penmanship and was District Storekeeper (Senior Accountant) for the G.M.& O. Railroad."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Letters: Letter to his parents, 21 Mar 1929, Louisville, Mississippi. The following is a letter written to his parents on Gulf, Mobile and Northern Railroad Company Letterhead:

"Louisville, Miss.
March 21, 1929

Dear Mother and Dad:

We recieved your letter two or three days ago, and we were, as usual, glad to hear from you all, and we were also glad to learn that Dad is improving.

All here, except Titus, are doing nicely. Titus has been in bed for two days with the "flu", but is improving fast. If no unforseen complications arise, we feel sure that he will be up within the next day or two.

We are having some rainy, bad weather here. It has been raining all morning, and no prospects of any change in the near future.

Yes, Little Wendell is as fine as ever. It seems that he is growing more and more each day. He spends a large portion of his time jabbering and playing with his little playthings. I know that theere is none sweeter than he.

Will close for this time, hoping to hear from you all at an early date.

Love and all good wishes from the children.

Warner, Ersell and Wendell"
Warner in Colorado Springs 
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• Hospital: Respritory Problems, 1944-1945, Colorado Springs, Colorado. "Grandfather was sent to Colorado Springs, Colorado somewhere around 1944 or 1945, according to my father. They thought that he may have tuberculosis which he did not and sent him to Colorado for approximately 6 months. Uncle Walter, Warner's brother, stayed with the children in Mississippi while he was in Colorado"
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Warner dear:
Just being near you always gives me strength to live each day. My first thought, my first love, has always been you and only you.
A woman never had a better husband or children ever had a better daddy than you have been to us. Our love to you: Ersell"
(Letter written on the back of the picture of Grandfather in Colorado by Ersell Trest)
Walter Colon Trest 
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• Hospital: 1 "While Warner A. Trest was in Colorado, my father's Uncle Walter (Warner's brother) stayed in the Trest home and raised the children while Warner was recuperating.

My father has told me many times of how much everyone loved "Uncle Walter". He said that he was always a happy man, always jovial, and always had a smile. According to my father, Walter was one of my granfather's favorites and that all the family and children, loved him."
(Warren Trest)
Warner and Ersell Trest 
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• Residence: "Warner Trest moved from Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi to Louisville, Mississippi and lived with Elizabeth (Auntie) Trest and Titus Parks. He hired on with G.M.&N. Railroad (later to become G.M.&O. and then Illinois Central Gulf). After he married Ersell Miller, they moved in with Hugh Lamar Trest and Eva Trest. Wendell was born in Hugh's house.

They had multiple homes in Winston County. Illinois Central closed the office in Louisville and Warner moved to Jackson, Tennessee until retirement. After retirement, Warner and Ersell moved to Tupelo, Louisville, Amory (across the street from Sandra and Charles Sisson (daughter and son-in-law). They moved to Jackson with Wendell and Neddie Trest (son and daughter-in-law) and then to Tupelo, Mississippi."
(Wendell Trest)

• Automobiles: Grandfather's Preference. "Grandfather loved a Chrysler! He had a black Chrysler for years and years that was always spick and span. When he traded it in, for another Chrysler, they put it inside the dealer showroom on display."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Obituary: Newspaper Obituaries, 1988. NEWSPAPER OBITUARIES:

TREST
"Warner Alexander Trest, 83, died Tuesday at the North Mississippi Medical Center after a short illness. He was born and reared in Sandersville, and lived in Louisville and Amory before moving to Tupelo in 1986. He was a retired district storekeeper for the Gulf, Mobil and Ohio Railroad with 47 years service and a member of the Presbyterian church. Services will be at 2:00 PM today at Pickle Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jim Dollar and the Rev. Glenn Miller officiating. Burial will be in Haughton Memorial Park. Survivors include his wife, Lillian Ersell Miller Trest of Tupelo; two sons, Wendell H. Trest of Jackson and Warren A. Trest of Mongomery, Ala.; one daughter, the Rev. Sandra Lynne Sisson of Amory; seven grandchildren. Pallbearers will be Max Word, Herbert Harold Miller, Jess Dunlap, Herschel Lockhart, Charles A. Sisson and Ed Sisson."
(Newspaper Article - Unknown Source).

WARNER ALEXANDER TREST
"Tupelo - Warner Alexander Trest, 83, died Feb. 9, 1988 in Tupelo. Services are 2 PM today at Pickles Funeral Home in Amory with burial in Haughton Memorial Park. Mr. Warner, a Sandersville native, had also lived in Louisville and Amory. He was a retired district storekeeper for the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad. He was a Presbyterian. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Lillian Miller Trest; two sons, Wendell H. Trest of Jackson and Warner A. Trest of Montgomery; daughter, the Rev. Sandra Sisson of Amory; and seven grandchildren."
(Newspaper Article - Unknown Source).


Warner Trest Funeral Notice 
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• Funeral: Funeral Notice, 1988, Haughton Memorial Park, Amory, Mississippi. 9 "In Memory of: Warner Alexander Trest
Born: November 14, 1904, Sandersville, Mississippi
Date of Death: February 9, 1988 in Tupelo, Mississippi
Services from: E.E. Pickle Funeral Home Chapel
Clergymen Officiating: Rev. Jim Dollar and Rev. Glenn Miller
Final Resting Place: Haughton Memorial Park
[Followed by the Twenty-Third Psalm]"
(Funeral Notice from E.E. Pickle Funeral home, Amory, Mississippi)

Warner married Lillian Ersell Miller on 12 Jul 1926 in Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi.10

Children from this marriage were:

2         i.   Wendell Hamilton Trest (born on 13 Oct 1928 Louisville, Mississippi)

         ii.   Warren Alexander Trest (born on 13 Feb 1931 Louisville, Mississippi)

        iii.   Sandra Lynn Trest (born on 28 Jul 1940)


Lillian Ersell Miller 
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5. Lillian Ersell Miller, daughter of John Henry Miller and Pennetta Agnes Clark , was born on 6 Feb 1904 in Noxapater, Winston County, Mississippi,11 died on 14 Jul 1989 in Tupelo, Mississippi, at age 85, and was buried on 17 Jul 1989 in Haughton Memorial Park, Amory, Mississippi.

Noted events in her life were:

• Place of Birth: Noxapater, Winston County, Mississippi, 1904, Noxapater, Mississippi. 11 "Lillian Ersell Miller was born in 1904 at Noxapater, Mississippi, at the home of her Grandfather Clark. She was a homemaker and teacher."
(The Hugenot Millers - Page 322)

"If she was born in Noxapater, they must have been with her grandmother, since her grandfather had died by 1904."
(Warren G. Trest)
1920 US Census, Neshoba County, MS. 
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• Census: 1920 US Census, Neshoba County, Mississippi, 1920, Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 12 Ersell is listed as age 16 and living with her parents, John H., age 37, and Agnes, age 35. Also listed are a brother Sam, age 14, brother Herbert, age 12, sister Willie, age 10, and sister Doris, age 1year and 11 months. John H. Miller's occupation is listed as Drygoods Salesman.
(Page 13-A)

(Note: 4 children had already passed away before the 1920 census. This is why there is such a gap between Willie and Doris.)
Lillian Ersell Miller 
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• Picture of Lillian Ersell Miller Trest: Young Teens, Louisville, Mississippi. "This picture was supplied by my Uncle Warren. It is a picture of Lillian Ersell Miller in her early teens. It was taken at the Scroggins Studios in Louisville, Mississippi. You can see facial features that are the same as her father in this picture."
(Warren Trest)

• Marriage: Marriage to Warner Alexander Trest, 12 Jul 1926, Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 10 "Warner Alexander Trest of Sandersville, Mississippi and Lillian Ersell Miller of Philadelphia, Mississippi were by me united in matrimony according to the ordinance of God and the laws of Mississippi at Philadelphia, Mississippi on the 12th day of July in the year of our Lord 1926."
(Reverend M.R. Jones - Methodist Minister)

"Witnesses: Mrs. S.E. Miller (My grandmother), my mother, my father, sisters Doris and Willie, brothers Glenn and Cooper and friend and neighbor, Mrs. L.J. Storey."
(Lillian Ersell Miller)

"I was married at home."
(Lillian Ersell Miller)
Lillian Ersell Miller Trest 
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• Occupation: School Teacher. 1 "Grandmother was a school teacher until she married Grandfather. She use to wear a little ruby ring that her father had given her when she became a schoolteacher. After that, she was a wife and mother."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Lillian Ersell Miller (Trest) was "the kindest person you would ever meet". She gave all of her time to her family.

She said that one of the worst things she ever did as a child was to pluck the feathers off a chicken and release it from under the house while the minister was visiting "Papa" Miller on the front porch. She told Herbert and Sam, her younger brothers, that if they would catch the chicken, she would pluck it. She would always giggle, with her hand over her mouth, when telling this story!

Every grandchild (and wives of grandchildren) loved "Grandma" Trest. When she told her stories of growing up and her adult years, they would keep you enthralled. She was the "keeper" of family history. She was always very sweet and soft spoken but had a hidden "liberated woman spirit" that came out in her latter years. Everyone loved her!

As children, when we would visit, it was always nice to spend the day with her in the kitchen. She would give us change to go to the 5 and 10 cent store to buy something to occupy our extra time. It seems like she spent the day preparing for Grandfather's return in the evening.

The little smile that is on her face in pictures was always present. Nobody ever remembers her showing anger or raising her voice.

Once, she got mad at her husband because of something that she "thought" he may have done. Sitting up in bed, she slapped him while he slept and then quickly laid back down. Warner rolled over and said, "Ersell, you must have had a nightmare, because you just hit me".

"Oh. I'm sorry, go back to sleep now" she told him as she went back to sleep, patting him on the back but content that she had retaliated.

When she was pregnant with her youngest child, they moved to a boarding house in Laurel, Mississippi until Sandra was born. Ersell said that she use to hold a newspaper in front of her and go out to the front porch for some sun in the afternoons. When asked why she held a newspaper in front of her, she meekly explained, "If somebody would have seen me, they would have known what we had been doing and that was none of their business!" With Grandma, that was logic that you could not debate!

She was an outstanding cook. Most of the day was spent in the kitchen. She kept my grandfather's childhood lunch pail on the kitchen window sill. She would cook and talk throughout the day until Grandfather returned from work. If children showed up unannounced, she would make a meal (out of a little of this and a little of that) that would leave everyone full when they left the table. She made drop biscuits that nobody could match.

Grandmother was the consumate grandmother. She was proud, religious, the teller of family history, the keeper of old world pride, funny and full of love. She was, in all ways, Grandma Trest. I have never heard a bad word about her. She was truely a sweet soul."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Hospital: 1948. 1 "Ersell Miller Trest survived a massive mastectomy in 1948, at Jackson, Mississippi, when it was still a new and very radical procedure."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Lillian Ersell Miller Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Picture of Lillian Ersell Miller Trest: "This picture was supplied from my Uncle Warren. It is a picture of Lillian Ersell Miller Trest that was photographed at the Lynn-Hall Studios, Philadelphia, Mississippi."
(Wrren Graham Trest)
Letter from Grandmother 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Letters: 1944 or 1945. "Warner dear:
Just being near you always gives me strength to live each day. My first thought, my first love, has always been you and only you.
A woman never had a better husband or children ever had a better daddy than you have been to us. Our love to you: Ersell"
(Letter written on the back of the picture of Grandfather in Colorado by Ersell Trest)

Lillian Ersell Miller Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Religion: 1 Methodist/Presbyterian

"Grandmother's father was a Methodist lay minister. She was very devout, old world and proper. She told me that her first beer (alcohol) was at my first wedding in 1978. She became a Presbyterian after marrage to grandfather.

When Grandmother would put bourbon in her bourbon balls or spice cakes around Christmas, they would pull the blinds down so the neighbors would not see.

Grandmother told the story of her and grandfathers first date. They double dated and when they picked grandmother up, she smelled alcohol on grandfather's breath. She asked him if he had been drinking and he said, "Yes, I had one drink with the boys at the boarding house." She told him, "Well, you can take me home, because I will not go out with any man who indulges.

Her daughter, Sandra is an ordained Presbyterian Minister."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Funeral: 17 Jul 1989, Amory, Mississippi. 9 "In Memory of Mrs Lillian Ersell Trest.
Born: February 6, 1904, Philadelphia, Mississippi
Date of Death: July 14, 1989, Tupelo, Mississippi
Services From: E.E. Pickle Funeral Home Chapel, July 17, 1989
Clergyman Officiating: Rev. Jim Dollar and Rev. Glenn Miller
Final Resting Place: Haughton Memorial Park
Funeral Conducted By: E.E. Pickle Funeral Home"
(E.E. Pickle Funeral Home Notice)

Lillian married Warner Alexander Trest on 12 Jul 1926 in Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi.10
Ned Bufkin Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

6. Ned Bufkin Graham,2,5 son of Claudius Claborne Graham and Clara Dodd Bufkin , was born on 15 Feb 1887 in Roxie, Franklin County, Mississippi,13,14 died on 20 Jul 1938, at age 51, and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Roxie, MS.

Ned Bufkin Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: Cafe Owner, Constable, Ice House Owner and Saw Mill Worker. 1 "Ned Graham ran an ice house and cafe until his death. Carrie Graham started running the boarding house (and cafe) until her death. Ned also had various other businesses such as a cab company (car and a driver) that would take people from the Roxie Train Station to Natchez."

"He is also listed in the 1920 Census as a Mill Man for a Saw Mill. In the 1910 Census, he is listed as a Loader at a Tie Mill (Saw Mill).

Ned Graham was also a constable or marshall. There was a two room jail house in the property behind his house, near the water tower. One room was for the whites and one room was for the colored."
(Warren Trest)

• Military: 14 "Ned Bufkin Graham shows in the WWI Civilian Draft Records as being born on 15 Feb, 1887 in Roxie, Mississippi, Franklin County."
(WWI Civilian Draft Records)
Ned Graham - age 13 - in 1900 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The Claude Graham family is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin COunty, Mississippi, Beat 2 as follows:

Claude Graham - head of family - born Jan, 1860 - age 40 - all family born in MS. - Farmer
Clara - wife - born Mar, 1868 - age 32 - all family born in MS.
Claudia - daughter - born Jan, 1885 - age 15
Ned - son - born Feb, 1887 - age 13
Betty - daughter - born Dec, 1889 - age 10
Edith - daughter - born Dec, 1892 - age 7
Katie - daughter - born May, 1897 - age 3
David - son - born Sep, 1898 - age 1 (This should have been Dewitt)"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 2 - Page B? - sheet 24)

Ned Graham in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 1910. 16 "Clara Graham is shown in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Beat 2 with her children (her husband died in 1903). She is listed as follows:

Clara D. Graham - Head - widowed - age 42 - all family from Mississippi - Farmer
Ned B. Graham - son - age 22 - Lumber Manufacturer
Edith M. - daughter - age 18
Kate L. - daughter - age 13
Dewitt C. - son - age 11"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 17-A)

Grahams in 1920 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Claiborne County, Mississippi, 1920. 17 "The Ned Graham family is listed in the 1920 US Census, Claiborne County, Mississippi, Beat 2 as follows:

B. Ned Graham, age 33, Occupation - Mill Man - Saw Mill
Carrie - wife - age 26
Pauline - daughter - age 3 1/2
C. Claude - son - age 2"
(1920 US Census, Claiborne County, Ms., Page 1B and 2A)
Ned Graham

• Cartoon: 1923. "This is a postcard that Ned Graham drew and sent to Mr. Mack Menasco in Faraday, Louisiana (prior to a visit). It is posted with a one cent stamp and is post marked Dec. 23, 1923 in Roxie, Mississippi. I would assume that Ned wanted to have a drink with Mack Menasco when he got there."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Ned Graham in 1930 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Missississippi, 1930. 18 "Ned Graham is shown in the 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi (Roxie District) as owning a cafe and is listed with his family as follows:

Ned Graham -age 40 - Personal worth $1500 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi - Cafe Owner
Carrie - age 39 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi
Pauline - age 13
Claude - age 9
Roy - age 8
Fay - age 5
Nell - age 3 1/2
Joy (Joyce) - age 2 and 11 months
(Blank) - age (age 2 months) (This would have been Billie Jean)

Newman Collier - father in law - age 63 - all births in Mississippi
Katherine - mother in law - age 58 - all births in Mississippi
Clara - sister in law - age 20
(1930 US Census, Franklin County, Roxie Village, District 1, Mississippi - page 3-A)

Ned Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Grandfathers Dog: 1938. 6 "There was a verbal family history story that Grandfather had an old cur dog that followed his funeral procession to the graveyard. They had to take the dog from Ned's grave and tied him up in the back yard of the Graham home. He howled the first night and got untied from the rope. They found him laying next to Grandfather's grave, dead from grief the following day."
(Warren Trest)

Ned married Carrie Edith Collier 2 on 30 Jun 1911 in Franklin County, MS..2

Marriage Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(volume 4 page 158

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Pauline Graham (born on 31 Jul 1916 - died in 2002 in Jackson, Mississippi)

         ii.   Claude Claiborn Graham (born on 2 Jul 1918 - died on 19 Sep 1977)

        iii.   Roy Edwin Graham (born on 27 Mar 1921 - died on 17 Aug 1987 , buried in Deridder, La.)

         iv.   Fay Marie Graham (born on 21 Nov 1923 Roxie, Franklin County, MS. - died on 30 Oct 1981 in Lafayette, La.)

          v.   Nell Bufkin Graham (born on 21 Sep 1926)

         vi.   Joyce Graham (born on 3 Apr 1928)

        vii.   Billie Jean Graham (born on 19 Jan 1930)

3      viii.   Neddie Graham (born on 4 Feb 1932 Roxie, Mississippi - died on 10 Mar 1992 in Jackson, Mississippi)


Carrie Edith Collier 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

7. Carrie Edith Collier,2,5 daughter of John Newman Collier and Catherine Lula Graves , was born on 25 Feb 1893, died on 5 Jul 1964 in Roxie, Mississippi, at age 71, and was buried in Old Union Baptist Church, Franklin County, Roxie, Mississippi.

Carrie Collier in 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, District 49, page 5-A as follows:

(Page 5-A)
John Collier - born Oct, 1866 - age 33 - married 8 years - Farmer
Catherine L. - wife - born Mar, 1884 - age 26 - 4 children - all alive
Carrie - saughter - born Feb, 1893 - age 7

(Page 5-B)
Lula - daughter - born Dec, 1894 - age 5
Myrtis - daughter - born Feb, 1896 - age 4
John H. - son - born Mar, 1900 - age 2 months

Willie E. McMillan - boarder - white male - born Sep, 1877 - age 22 - Farm Laborer"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Page 5-A and B)
Carrie Collier in 1910 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1910. 19 "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, District 61, Beat 1, page 20-A as follows:

John N. Collier - Head - age 40 - married 18 years - Farmer - all family from Mississippi
Clara L. - Wife - 6 children with all living - age 36
Carrie - daughter - age 17
Lula - daughter - age 15
Myrtis - daughter - age 13
John H. - son - age 10
Claude - son - age 2
Clara - daughter - age 5 months"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Graham Boarding House 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Boarding House Owner. 1 "Grandmother worked as a bus driver and at the school cooking after her husband passed away. She turned her home into a boarding house for oilfield workers and railroad men. In the boarding house, she also had a kitchen and eating area where lunches and dinners were served. Downtown Roxie was a square with the railroad station in the middle of it. Grandmother's boarding house was on a corner across from the station.

I wa making a business call in Jackson, Mississippi in 2002 and the conversation came up about where we were from. One of the gentlemen stated that when he had just gotten out of college, he worked in Roxie for an oil company and the best fried chicken he ever ate was served at a boarding house by the train station. This was my grandmother's house!""
(Warren Trest)
Carrie Esith Collier Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Memories of Carrie Graham: "Carrie Graham never drank, smoked or put up with behavior she thought was unbecoming.

My father said that he use to embarrass her by pulling up to a store (with his wife and Mrs. Graham) and saying that he would take two cokes and a beer for Mrs. Graham.

My father went in halves for a pool hall in Roxie, just to have something to do when he was visiting Roxie, and somebody almost got into a fight with him. Grandmother overheard the argument and made him sell his interest in the hall because she would not have a family member almost get into a fight in Roxie.

She was a very proud person and she drove the school bus and cooked at the Roxie School so that all her children would get lunches.

My Uncle Claude, who had a speech impediment, was trying to get in the door and was calling to his sister, Joyce, nicknamed "Baby" and kept saying, "Open up the door, baby." "OK, open up the "dod-damn door bay-bee." When Grandmother opened the door, even though he was a WWII veteren, he exclaimed, "Sorry Mama, I thought you was Bay-bee!" and had to suffer her anger at that type of language.

EVERYONE who remembers her has nothing but good things to say about her. I have never heard a negative comment about Carrie Graham."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Roxie Scool in 1930 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Roxie School: "This is a picture (from a Newspaper Article) showing the children outside the Roxie School in 1930. Aunt Fay is the sixth from the left on the first row. Uncle Roy is on the far right on the fourth row and Uncle Claude is the second from the left on the top row."
(Warren Trest)
Claude and Granmother 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• World War II: 20 "Frankie and Ozell stayed with Carrie Graham during the war while Clude and Roy were away."
(William Hadsky)

"Roy and Claude fought in World War II. Claude came back shell shocked after fighting in the European Theater."
Carrie Collie Graham and Polly 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Polly the Parrot: 1 "Grandmother had a parrot named Polly that stayed on the L-shaped screen porch that went down the front and around one side of the boarding house. Railroad workers had taught the parrot to "curse" in three languages.

Polly was given to Grandmother by her daughter, Billie Jean Graham.

Once, my brother kept hitting Polly with a Tootsie Roll Pop. Polly whistled him over and said that she wanted a cracker. He stuck his nose near the cage and she latched on and laughed after he went running in with a bloody nose.

Polly lived on after Grandmother's death and died in the home of Nell Bufkin Graham due to pesticides in the seed she was given."
(Warren Trest)
Carrie Edith Collier Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Color Photograph: Roxie, Franklin County, Mississippi. "This photograph was supplied from Billie Jean Graham and is the only color photograph I remember seeing of my grandmother."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Carrie married Ned Bufkin Graham 2 on 30 Jun 1911 in Franklin County, MS..2
picture

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William John Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

8. William John Trest, son of Samuel Caper Trest and Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray , was born on 12 Nov 1859 in Jones County, Mississippi,21 died on 4 Apr 1929 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 69, and was buried in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. The cause of his death was heart Failure. Another name for William was Billy Trest.

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 22 "William Trest is listed in the 1860 Census with his mother and father and is 11 months old. His father will soon leave for years to fight in the Civil War."
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - Page 34)

 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1870, Jones County, Mississippi. "The Samuel Caper Trest family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi (Ellisville PO area) as follows:

Samuel C. Trest - age 37 - Occupation Teacher - value of Real Estate - $80 - value of personal estate - $325
Elenor - age 25 - keeping house
William - age 10
Angus - age 8
Sarah - age 7
Joseph - age 2
Colon - age 3 months

They also have a white female, Josephine Creel - age 28 - without occupation and a William W Creel - age 2 - at Samuel's home."
(Page 3 - Township No. 6)

W.J. Trest in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census 1880: 1880, Jones County, Mississippi. 23 "William John Trest is listed in the 1880 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi and is 20 years old and a farmer by trade. He is still living with his Mother and Father (Samuel Caper Trest and Eleanor Trest, along with 5 brothers and 1 sister).

Birth Year 1860. Birthplace MS. Age 2.0 Occupation Farming. Race W.( White). Head of Household S. C. TREST. Relation Son. Father's Birthplace AL. Mother's Birthplace MS. "
(Page 331)

• Occupation: Farmer. 1 "William John Trest was a farmer by trade according to census records and his newspaper obituary."
(Warren Trest)
Map of Trest home from Sandersville, MS. 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Land: 3 Jun 1891, Jones County, Mississippi. 1,24 "William J. Trest bought 160 acres of land in the Jackson, Mississippi Land Office on June 3, 1891. Document number is 4288. These land sections were SESE, St. Stephens Base Line, Township 9N, Range 10 W, Sections 4, 9 and 9."
(Mississippi Land Records)

"In pictures of he and his wife, they are usually standing in front of their home in Jones County, Mississippi. It appears to have a long front porch with rockers on it and most pictures are taken in front of a tree in the front yard. My father thinks that he remembers that tree as a pecan tree."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"According to my father's memories, William John Trest's land was outside Sandersville and Erata. You would have taken Pleasant Grove Road (South east) out of Sandersville to Red Hill Crossing Road. You would turn left onto Red Hill Crossing (or Ned Dillard Road). In the enclosed picture, there was a church about where the "V" in Pleasant Grove is located. The William John Trest home was on the south side of the road (first house) when you turned onto Red Hill Florence Rd. It would be located about where the "R" in Pleasant Grove Rd. is located.

Dad said the barn was across the road (North) of where the homestead was. Further up the road at the corner of Steven's Drive and Ned Dillard Road was "Aunt Bell's" house. Dad said that the Steven's had a daughter that use to come down and play when they were there. This is also where the McLaurins now live. Further up the road would have been the John Ferguson III home."
(Warren Graham Trest from Wendell Trest)

• Census: 1900, Jones County, Mississippi. 25 "William Trest is listed in the 1900 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi records as 40 years old and a Farmer by trade. His wife, "Mack" is listed as 40 years old. They are listed with the following children still at home: Daughter Lucille, age 17, Son Oscar, age 14, Daughter Bell, age 13, Son Johnnie, age 12, Daughter Mary, age 10, Son Boyce, age 7, Son Hugh, age 5, Daughter Nancy L, age 3 and Son Walter, age 7 months. They are being visted by an Aunt, "Betey" McGill, age 85."
(Page 135-A)
William John Trest in 1910 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910, Jones County, Mississippi. "Jones County, Mississippi, Beat 3 - William J. Trest (age 50) is living with his wife, Mack E (age 50), Mary E. (age 20), Hugh L. (age 15), Nancie L. (age 13), Walter C. (age 11), Ella V. (age 8) and Warner (age 5). There is also a sister in law staying with them, L. E. Ferguson (age 38)."


Willam John Trest Signature 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Letters: Letter to Daughter, 28 Sep 1916, Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 The following is letter from William J. Trest to his daughter. It is believed to be to Mary Elizabeth who was to marry Titus Parks.

"Sandersville, Miss.
Sept. 28th 1916

Dear Daughter:

Your letter recieved and in reply I will say I have nothing to say against your getting married as I feel that I have done all that I can ever do to.......(The rest of this paragraph is not descernable)....I will do the best I can. this leaves me not feeling well. I have a very bad cold and fevor and am taking medicine to prevent having fevor as there is lots of chills and fevor over the country. Ransom is having fevor and night chills. I thought night before last, it sure had me beat. I hope it is nothing more than cold. All the rest is about like you left them except Nancie and Ella, they are getting along all right. As I have no news of importance, I will close for this time.

Your Father
W.J. Trest"

(Letter to his daughter. The photocopy I had was in such disrepair, faded, that there was part of a paragraph that I could not bring out).

William John Trest in 1920 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920, Jones County, Mississippi. 26 "W.J. Trest is listed as 60 years old in the 1920 US, Jones County, Mississippi Census, along with his wife, M. E., also age 60. Warner is the only child still living at home at age 15."
(Page 21-A)
Warner and William John Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• General: 1 "He was described as a "sweet and loving man" by Lillian Ersell Trest (Daughter in Law) in his latter years. She said that he would come up every afternoon and say, "Ersell let's take a walk". He would hold her by the hand and walk around the farm and to the neighbors with her. William John Trest was always described as a "good man" and a gentleman."
(Warren Graham Trest)

William John Trest and Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Preferred Names: 1 "In most of what I have found, WIlliam John Trest is listed as "Billy", so it is assumed that he must have gone by Billy Trest. Flora Elizabeth Ferguson is usually listed as "Mack E.". so it is assumed that she must have gone by the name of Mack Trest."
(Warren G. Trest)
WJ Trest - Deliquent Poll Tax 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Newspaper Article: Delinquent Poll Tax, 1909, Jones County, Mississippi. 27 "WJ Trest is shown on an entire page of listings of delinquent poll taxes under Red hill in the April 1, 1909 Laurel Ledger Newspaper."
(Laurel Ledger)
William John Trest and Flora Ferguson 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Memories from Roy Trest: 28 "I was three years old when he died. We were living in the house with them. I was told that I was a sickly child, in fact had pneumonia, and they were afraid that I would not make it. As a result of that, I was his pet. They said that he carried me around on his shoulders everywhere he went. I have always been told, that he was a good man. He fell over a hog pen and broke some ribs and from that he took pneumonia. Of course, because there were no antibiotics, there was not much they could do for you back then."
(Roy Trest - memories of WIlliam John Trest in an e-mail to Warren Graham Trest)
W.J. Trest Obituary 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Obituary: Newspaper Obituary Article, Apr 1929. "W.J. "Billy" Trest, 70 year old resident of Sandersville died at his home at 03:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon. He had been a semi invalid for four or five years but became seriously ill only a short time ago.

Mr. Trest was a native of Jones County, having been born at Ovett and he spent the greater part of his life in Jones County, where he was engaged in farming.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Trest, six sons and three daughters: Warner and Hugh Trest of Louisville; Walter Trest of Soso; John Trest of Meridian; P.B. Trest of Birmingham; Mrs T.A. Parks of Louisville; Mrs. W.F. McLaurin of Sandersville and Mrs O.M. Underwood of Richton.

Among other surviving relatives are a number of grandchildren an, eight brothers and one sister. THe brothers are: J.A. Trest of Laurel, N.m.; J.R., R.F. and Albert of Sandersville; A.G. Trest of De-Funiack Springs, Fla.; Dan Trest of Carriere and Angus Trest of Wilmer, Alabama. The sister is Mrs. J.A. McGill of Sandersville.

Funeral services were held at the Ovett Church at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon. Reverend Grayson L. Tucker, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Laurel, officiating. Interment followed in the McGilvery cemetary."
(Article from the Jones County Newspaper, April, 1929 - Title "W.J. Trest of Sandersville - Death Victim")

His death certificate states that the cause of death was heart failure and that he also had bladder desease and old age.

William John Trest Death Certificate 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cemetery: Lancaster Cemetery, Jones County, Mississippi, 1929, Jones County, Mississippi. 29 "William John Trest 1859-1929 is buried with his wife, Flora McGill Trest 1860-1936 in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. The cemetary is located in Sec. 13 & 24, Township 6 North, Range 11 West. He and his wife are buried in the same cemetary as his father and mother, Samuel Caper Trest and Eleanor McGilvray. None of his brothers or sisters are buried there."
(US GenWeb - Joni Jackson, MSWebGen Coordinator)

William married Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson on 11 Jan 1882 in Jones County, Mississippi.21

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Ida Lucille Trest (born on 27 Nov 1882 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 26 Jan 1911)

         ii.   William Oscar Trest (born on 14 Jul 1884 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 31 Mar 1966)

        iii.   Eleanor Catherine Isabelle Trest (born on 25 May 1886 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 28 Nov 1975)

         iv.   Samuel John Trest (born on 5 May 1888 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 4 May 1975)

          v.   Mary Elizabeth Trest (born on 16 Feb 1890 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 13 Nov 1979 in Louisville, Mississippi)

         vi.   Hector Camel Trest (born on 13 Jul 1891 - died on 13 Aug 1892)

        vii.   Porter Boyce Trest (born on 8 Jan 1893 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 15 Jul 1969 in Alabama)

       viii.   Hugh Lamar Trest (born on 16 Nov 1895 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 2 Jul 1959 in McComb, Pike County, Mississippi)

         ix.   Nancy Laura Trest (born on 12 Mar 1897 - died on 2 Feb 1976)

          x.   Walter Colan Trest (born on 31 Oct 1899 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 22 Nov 1975 in Forest County, Mississippi)

         xi.   Ella Victoria Trest (born on 18 Nov 1900 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 14 Oct 1918)

4       xii.   Warner Alexander Trest (born on 14 Nov 1904 Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi - died on 9 Feb 1988 in Tupelo, Mississippi)


Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

9. Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson, daughter of John Ferguson III and Catherine Boyce , was born on 10 Jan 1860 in Jones County, Mississippi, died on 2 Aug 1936 in Louisville, Mississippi, at age 76, and was buried in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. Another name for Flora was Mack E.

Ferguson Tartan 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Heraldry: "Fergus(s)on
The clan is most numerous in Argyllshire, but various branches can be found all over Scotland. In Perthshire there were the Fergusons of Dunfallandy and Balquhidder, in Aberdeenshire, the families of Kinmundy and Pitfour, in Fife the Fergusons of Craigdarroch, who claim their descent from the Prince of Galloway in the 12th Century. The principal family were the Fergusons of Perthshire (in the Highlands), with chiefship in the Dunfallandy family, where the chief took the name MacFhearghuis, 'son of Fergus'.

There appears to be a connection with the Fergusons of Strachur and the Fergusons of Kilkerran. The Kilkerrand were prominent in politics and in 1735, when Sir James, 2nd Baronet took the title of Lord of Kikerran he was also appointed Lord of Session. His son took the title Lord Hermand.

The Fergusons acquired the estate of Raith in Fife in the early 19th Century, and one of its members, General Sir Ronald C Ferguson, Colonel of the Cameron Highlanders recieved a medal from George III for his services in Portugal."
(www.camelotintl.com)

• Ancestry: Ferguson Ancestry. 30 In the book, Family, School, Church and Pioneer History that was written by Reverend Angus Ferguson (Flora Elizabeth Ferguson's brother), his ancestry is as follows (which would be the same as hers):

"My father was John Ferguson, born Feb. 24, 1820, one mile southeast of Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi, where he lived until he married. He died, May 3, 1884, and was buried in the family cemetery at the Ferguson old home, one mile southeast of Sandersville. This old cemetery is about one hundred yards east of where the old Ferguson home was built more than a century ago and stands today as a marker of the location of this old pioneer home. For the benifit of those it may concern, I may say that once upon a time back in the years, I gave a deed to the trustees of this cemetery for five acres of land embracing the cemetery, against all claims or trespasses of anyone forever.

My mother, Catherine Boyce, was born at Milledgeville, Georgia, April 26, 1838. She died, May 23, 1899, and was buried in the old Ferguson cemetery beside her husband, John Ferguson. John Ferguson and Catherine Boyce were married, March 12, 1857, by Reverend W.H. Singletary, a Presbyterian minister. They lived about two miles east of the old Ferguson home during their entire married life. My mother gave herself in faithful Christian service to this home of twelve children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood except one little sister, Harriet Lenora Vernon, who died with fever at the age of three years, three months, and twenty seven days. Mother was loved and esteemed by all who knew her.

My grandfather was John Ferguson, a native of Richmond County, North Carolina, and his father was MAlcolm Ferguson, a native of Scotland, and his father was John Ferguson, also a native of Scotland and connecting us with the Scottish Clans.

My father's grandmother, on father's side was Margaret McDonald. His great grandmother on father's side was Catherine Crawford. His grandmother on his mother's side was Elizabeth Walker. My grandmother on father's side was Flora McGill. My grandfather on father's side was Angus McGill, and his father was Archie McGill, and his father was Allen McGill.

My father's grandmother McGill was Annie Fairley. His great grandmother Fairley was Margaret Stewart, a member of the Royal family of England.

My father's great grandfather Fairley's mother was a Watson. His grandfather McGill's mother was a McCormick. They were all from Cantyre, Scotland, near a little town on the Clyde River named Granoch. As I understand, they all attended the same Presbyterian church. THey were all farmers except my great grandfather McGill, who was a weaver by trade."
(Family, School, Church, and Pioneer History - written by Angus Ferguson - pages 8 & 9)

• Migration: Mississippi Migration. 1 "When you do research into Mississippi records, you find most of the family names that came from North or South Carolina into Mississippi. When you research into Jones County and Perry County, Mississippi, you will find the Trest, Ferguson, McGilvray, McSwain, Fairleys, McLeod and Smith families. All of the families came from the Carolinas and settled into Mississippi (within a county or two). These were mostly from the Scottish decent and seem to have traveled or migrated into Mississippi as clans."
(Warren G. Trest)
Flora E. Ferguson in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 26 Oct 1860. 22 "John Ferguson and Robert Porter Boyce are listed in the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Ellisville Township, Mississippi as follows:

(house 400)
John Ferguson - age 40 - farmer - Value of Real Estate $3000 - Value of Personal Estate $1283 - born in Mississippi
Catherine - age 21 - born in Alabama
Angus - age 2 - male - born in Mississippi
Flora E. - age 1 - female - born in Mississippi

Robert P. Boyce - age 70 - mechanic - value of real estate $1000 - value of personal estate $50,500 - born in Delaware"
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 61)
Flora Elizabeth Ferguson in 1870 census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1870, Jones County, Mississippi. 31 "Flora E. Ferguson shows up in the 1870 census as 10 years old. The census of her family is as follows:
John Ferguson - age 50
Catherine - age (35 or 32?)
Angus - age 12
Flora E. - age 10
Margaret - age 8
Mary - age 7
John - age 6
Sarah - age 5
Laura - age 2
and Malcolm age (11 or 5?) months."
(1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)




Flora Ferguson in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1880, Jones County, Mississippi. 32 "The John Ferguson family is listed as follows in the 1880 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi:

John - age 60 - Farmer - born in Mississippi - both parents born in N.C.
Catherine - (wife) age 40 - born in Alabama - father born in Del - Mother in NC
Angus - (son) age 27
F.E. - (daughter) age 20 (This would be Flora Elizabeth Ferguson)
M.E. - (daughter) age 19
M.C. - (daughter) age 18
J.C. - (son) age 16
S.A. - (daughter) age 15
Laura - (daughter) age 12
M.H. - (son) age 11
I.C. - (daughter) age 10
E.L. - (daughter) age 9
R.P.L. - (son) age 3

(Pages 9 & 10 - 330B)"
(1880 US Census)

Flora Ferguson - Age 18 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Marriage: 11 Jan 1882, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 "Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson was 22 years old when she married William John Trest. They were together for 47 years and raised 11 children to maturity, even though Ella Victoria Trest died when she was only 17 years old, but was married at the time. Hector Camel Trest died in infancy. She would also outlive her daughter, Ida Lucille who died at the age of 28 years old."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Occupation: 1 "Flora Elizabeth or Mack E. was a mother and wife and raised 11 children to maturity and one child who died as an infant. She lost her youngest daughter, Ella Victoria when she was newly wed and only seventeen years old."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Census: 1900, Jones County, Mississippi. 25 "William Trest is listed in the 1900 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi records as 40 years old and a Farmer by trade. His wife, "Mack" is listed as 40 years old. They are listed with the following children still at home: Daughter Lucille, age 17, Son Oscar, age 14, Daughter Bell, age 13, Son Johnnie, age 12, Daughter Mary, age 10, Son Boyce, age 7, Son Hugh, age 5, Daughter Nancy L, age 3 and Son Walter, age 7 months. They are being visted by an Aunt, "Betey" McGill, age 85."
(Page 135-A)

Mack E. in 1910 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1910, Jones County, Mississippi. 33 "Jones County, Mississippi, Beat 3 - William J. Trest (age 50) is living with his wife, Mack E (age 50), Mary E. (age 20), Hugh L. (age 15), Nancie L. (age 13), Walter C. (age 11), Ella V. (age 8) and Warner (age 5). There is also a sister in law staying with them, L. E. Ferguson (age 38)."

Mack E in 1920 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920, Jones County, Mississippi. 8 "W.J. Trest is listed as 60 years old in the 1920 US, Jones County, Mississippi Census, along with his wife, M. E., also age 60. Warner is the only child still living at home at age 15."
(Page 21-A)

Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Residence: 1936, Jones County, Mississippi. "After the loss of her husband, she lived with "Auntie" Mary Elizabeth Trest Parks (her fifth child) in Louisville, Mississippi until she became too sick to stay there. She then moved in with Warner Alexander Trest (her youngest child) and Ersell Miller Trest's home until she passed away in 1936 (in Louisville) and was buried with her husband in Jones County, Mississippi (near Ovett)."
(Wendell Trest)
Death Certificate 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cemetery: Lancaster Entry, Jones County, Mississippi. 29 "William John Trest 1859-1929 is buried with his wife, Flora McGill Trest 1860-1936 in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. The cemetary is located in Sec. 13 & 24, Township 6 North, Range 11 West."
(US GenWeb - Joni Jackson, MSWebGen Coordinator)

Flora married William John Trest on 11 Jan 1882 in Jones County, Mississippi.21
John Henry Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

10. John Henry Miller, son of Samuel Clark Miller and Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham , was born on 12 Jan 1882 in Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi, died on 10 Oct 1948 in Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi, at age 66, and was buried in Sandtown Methodist Church Cemetary, Neshoba County, Mississippi. Another name for John was Papa Miller.

John Henry Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Death of Father: 1897, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 1 "John Henry Miller was 15 years old when he was semi-orphaned by the death of his father in 1897. After reaching the age of maturity, as eldest son, he would take over the role of raising his family as male of the house. He would also suffer the loss of four children of his own at an early age."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• WWI Draft Registration: 1917-1918, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 34 "John Henry Miller registered for the WWI draft in 1917-1918. He is listed with the birth date of 12-Jan-1882 and registered in Philadelphia, Mississippi."
John H. Miller in 1920 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 12 "The Millers are listed in the 1920 census as John H., age 37, and Agnes, age 38. Also listed are a daughter Ersell, age 16, son Sam, age 14, son Herbert, age 12, daughter Willie, age 10, and daughter Doris, age 1year and 11 months. John H. Miller's occupation is listed as Drygoods Salesman."
(Page 13-A)

(Note: 4 children had already passed away before the 1920 census. This is why there is such a gap between Willie and Doris.)

 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Loss of Children: 11 "They suffered the loss of four young children. Both are buried (The Millers) at Sandtown Methodist Church Cemetary, Philadelphia, Mississippi."
(The Huguenot Millers - Page 321)

""Pennetta Agnes (Clark) Miller and John Henry Miller would lose 4 children at early ages and 3 children within two months. They would lose Thomas at 2 days old, Moses in May, 1918 at age 7, and Mary Sue at age 4 and Annie Ruth at age 2 in Jun, 1918. This was during the Spanish Flu era. It is interesting to note that Pennetta Agnes Clark's parents also lost 4 children at early ages."
(Warren Graham Trest)

John H. MIller in 1930 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1930 US Census, Neshoba County, Mississippi, 1930, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 35 "John H. Miller is listed in the 1930 US Census in Neshoba County, Mississippi. He is 48 years old and his wife, Nettie A., is listed as 49 years old. They have the following children still at home, a son, Sam R. (age 24), a daughter, Willie E. (age 20), a daughter, N. Doris (age 12), a son, Rush G. (age 10) and a son, C. Cooper (age 7).
(Page 6B)"
(1930 US Census, Neshoba County, Mississippi)
John Henry Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Storekeeper and Lay Minister. 1,11 "John Henry Miller was a merchant, storekeeper and Lay Minister (Methodist)"
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Uncle John Henry Miller, the eldest, and his family lived in Philadelphia, Mississippi, at my earliest remembrance. He was a man of slight build and had dark hair and eyes. His daughter, Doris, was near the ages of my sister and me, and I recall some happy times we had visiting in their home. There was a grassy slope at the back of their house that was an ideal place for children to play. My most vivid impression of Uncle John Henry was his devotion to the church. He was very active in the Methodist Church and sometimes served as a lay minister."
(Margaret Miller White)

• Residence: 11 "The John Henry Miller clan lived in North Pisgah, and Sandtown communities before moving to Philadelphia, Mississippi."
(The Huguenot Millers - Page 321)

John married Pennetta Agnes Clark 11 on 24 Dec 1902 11.,36

Children from this marriage were:

5         i.   Lillian Ersell Miller (born on 6 Feb 1904 Noxapater, Winston County, Mississippi - died on 14 Jul 1989 in Tupelo, Mississippi)

         ii.   Samuel Reuben Miller (born on 5 May 1905 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 6 Nov 1969 in Amite County, Mississippi)

        iii.   John Herbert Miller (born on 8 Sep 1906 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 20 Jul 1993 in Tupelo, Mississippi)

         iv.   Thomas Earl Miller (born on 8 Mar 1908 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 10 Mar 1908 in Neshoba County, Mississippi)

          v.   Willie Elizabeth Miller (born on 5 Jan 1910 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 7 Feb 1991)

         vi.   Moses Clark Miller (born on 21 Aug 1911 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 31 May 1918 in Neshoba County, Mississippi)

        vii.   Mary Sue Miller (born on 29 Jan 1914 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 4 Jun 1918 in Neshoba County, Mississippi)

       viii.   Annie Ruth Miller (born on 2 Jan 1916 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 22 Jun 1918 in Neshoba County, Mississippi)

         ix.   Nettie Doris Miller (born on 19 Jan 1918 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 15 Jul 1974 in Houston, Texas)

          x.   Rush Glenn Miller (born on 18 Jan 1920 Neshoba County, Mississippi)

         xi.   Charles Cooper Miller (born on 13 Nov 1922 Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 13 Mar 1992 in Little Rock, Arkansas)


Pennetta Agnes Clark Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

11. Pennetta Agnes Clark,11 daughter of Reuben Clark and Nancy Anne Dawes , was born on 14 Jul 1880 in Kemper County, Mississippi,11 died on 31 Mar 1961 in Henrietta, Texas, at age 80, and was buried in Sandtown Methodist Church Cemetary, Neshoba County, Mississippi. Other names for Pennetta were Nettie, and Mama Miller.

Noted events in her life were:

• Enumeration of Children: 1896 Enumeration of Children, 1896, Kemper County, Mississippi. 37 "Reubin Clark's children are listed in the 1896 Enumeriation of Children, Kemper County, Mississippi as follows:
Clark, Reubin
R. E. 19, m
Aggie 16, f
Archie 14, m
Stennis 12, m"
(1896 Kemper County, Mississippi, Enumeration of Children)

"The Aggie Clark must be Agnes Clark (Penetta Agnes Clark) because the age is correct. This is probably a mistake by the person transcribing the enumeration. The younger children are not listed because these lists were of "Teachable Children" and Sam would have been too young in 1896."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Loss of Children: Neshoba County, Mississippi. "Pennetta Agnes (Clark) Miller and John Henry Miller would lose 4 children at early ages and 3 children within two months. They would lose Thomas at 2 days old, Moses in May, 1918 at age 7, and Mary Sue at age 4 and Annie Ruth at age 2 in Jun, 1918. This was during the Spanish Flu era. It is interesting to note that Pennetta Agnes Clark's parents also lost 4 children at early ages."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Nettie Agnes Clark (Miller) 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Memories from Wendell H. Trest: Neshoba County, Mississippi. "My father has told me many stories of how he remembers his Grandmother Miller. She was a very hard worker and serious. One of his main memories was her working in the gardens all day. He said that the Miller house had a well near the corner of the porch that you had to lower the water bucket into. It had a flap at the bottom of the bucket that opened when lowered in the well and closed when you lifted the bucket back up. The outhouse was 30 - 50 yards from the house. Dad said that one of his memories of Grandma Miller was her hoeing the garden in a bonnet (which she always wore outside) with perspiration dripping off her nose. Papa Miller was in town earning money to live and she spent her days tending the gardens that supplied the vegetables on the table. They would can what they did not eat fresh and keep in the cupboard.

It is amazing today what she must have gone through losing 4 children at such an early age and losing 3 children so close together. There was a strength that kept the family together through such tragedy."
(Warren G. Trest)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Neshoba County, Mississippi, 1920, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 12 "The Millers are listed in the 1920 census as John H., age 37, and Agnes, age 38. Also listed are a daughter Ersell, age 16, son Sam, age 14, son Herbert, age 12, daughter Willie, age 10, and daughter Doris, age 1year and 11 months. John H. Miller's occupation is listed as Drygoods Salesman."
(Page 13-A)

(Note: 4 children had already passed away before the 1920 census. This is why there is such a gap between Willie and Doris.)

Pennetta married John Henry Miller on 24 Dec 1902 11.,36

12. Claudius Claborne Graham,5 son of Dewitt Clinton Graham and Francis Melvina Smith , was born on 1 Jan 1860 in Franklin County, Mississippi,38,39 died on 15 Jun 1903 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 43, and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi. Another name for Claudius was Claude.

Claudius Graham in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1870. 40 "Francis Melvina Smith Graham has married L.Ransom Hall by the time of the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O. The family is as follows:

Ransom Hall - age 34 - Farmer - born in Mississippi - Value of real estate $1400 - Value of personal estate $830
Elvira Hall (name misspelled) - age 36 - born in Mississippi
Adda Graham - age 16 - at school - all children born in Mississippi
Mary Graham - age 12
Claudius Graham - age 10
Dewitt Graham - age 6
Eustalia Hall - male - age 4
Ada Hall - age 1."
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O. - Page 38)

"Eustalia Hall must have died before 1880 since he does not show up in the 1880 Franklin County, Mississippi census. This is also the only census that gives Claude Graham's name as Claudius."
(Warren Graham Trest)

C.C> Graham in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. 41 "Francis Melvina Smith Graham has married L.R. Hall and has two children by him in the 1880 US Census. Adda is no longer living with them but the other 4 Graham children are still at home. The family is as follows:

L.R. Hall - age 44 - Farmer - Father born in North Carolina
F.M. Hall - wife - age 47 - born in Mississippi - Father born in South Carolina
Ada M. Hall - daughter - age 10 - all children born in Mississippi
R.R. Hall - son - age 7
M.D. Graham - Daughter in law - age 22
C.C. Graham - Son in law - age 19 - Farm Laborer
R.W. Graham - Son in law - age 16 - Farm Laborer
Ida Graham - Daughter in law - age 14."

Claude Graham and Family - 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The Claude Graham family is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin COunty, Mississippi, Beat 2 as follows:

Claude Graham - head of family - born Jan, 1860 - age 40 - all family born in MS. - Farmer
Clara - wife - born Mar, 1868 - age 32 - all family born in MS.
Claudia - daughter - born Jan, 1885 - age 15
Ned - son - born Feb, 1887 - age 13
Betty - daughter - born Dec, 1889 - age 10
Edith - daughter - born Dec, 1892 - age 7
Katie - daughter - born May, 1897 - age 3
David - son - born Sep, 1898 - age 1 (This should have been Dewitt)"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 2 - Page B? - sheet 24)

"This would be the only census that he would have shown up in after he was married. The 1890 census records were destroyed and he is still living with his mother and step father in 1880. He died before the 1910 census was taken."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Occupation: "In US Census Records, his occupation is listed as Farmer. He died when he was only 43 years old and his wife never remarried. She lived with her daughter, Kate, the rest of her life."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Claudius married Clara Dodd Bufkin 2,41,43 on 9 Jan 1882 in Franklin County, Mississippi.42

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Claudia Graham (born in Jan 1885)

6        ii.   Ned Bufkin Graham (born on 15 Feb 1887 Roxie, Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 20 Jul 1938 , buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Roxie, MS.)

        iii.   Betty Graham (born in Dec 1889)

         iv.   Edith Marie Graham (born on 25 Dec 1892 Franklin Co., MS - died on 12 Mar 1963 in Vicksburg, Mississippi)

          v.   Kate Graham (born in May 1897)

         vi.   Dewitt Clinton Graham (born on 15 Sep 1898 Franklin County, Mississippi)


Clara Bufkin Graham 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

13. Clara Dodd Bufkin,2,5,41,43 daughter of Reverend Solomon Bufkin and Elizabeth Carlisle , was born on 10 Mar 1868 in Franklin County, Mississippi,41,43,44 died on 17 Oct 1933 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 65,42 and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi.

Clara Bufkin in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 21 Jul 1870. "The Soloman Bufkin family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Meadville P.O., page 97 as follows. (The name is mispelled as Buffkin):

Soloman Buffkin - age 37 - Minister - value of real estate $1000, value of personal estate $582.
Elizabeth Buffkin - age (37 or 39) - keeping house
Kate S. - age 7
Clara - age 2

Everyone has Mississippi listed as place of birth."
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 97)
Clara Dodd Bufkin in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. "Elizabeth Bufkin, along with her daughter Clara, are found in the 1880 US Census, Franklin COunty, Hamburg Township. Solomon Bufkin has already passes away. They are listed as follows:

Elizabeth Bufkin - age - 49 - widow - keeping house - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Georgia
Clara D. Bufkin - age 12 - attending school - all family born in Mississippi."

• Residence: "Clara must have stayed in her own home after her husband died in 1903 until sometime before 1920 when she is shown living with her daughter, Kate, and her son in law, Clifford Herring. She is living with them in 1920 and 1930 US Census records. The assumption can be made that she was still staying with them until her death in 1933."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Claude Graham and Family - 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The Claude Graham family is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin COunty, Mississippi, Beat 2 as follows:

Claude Graham - head of family - born Jan, 1860 - age 40 - all family born in MS. - Farmer
Clara - wife - born Mar, 1868 - age 32 - all family born in MS.
Claudia - daughter - born Jan, 1885 - age 15
Ned - son - born Feb, 1887 - age 13
Betty - daughter - born Dec, 1889 - age 10
Edith - daughter - born Dec, 1892 - age 7
Katie - daughter - born May, 1897 - age 3
David - son - born Sep, 1898 - age 1 (This should have been Dewitt)"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 2 - Page B? - sheet 24)


Clara Graham in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1910. 19 "Clara Graham is shown in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Beat 2 with her children (her husband died in 1903). She is listed as follows:

Clara D. Graham - Head - widowed - age 42 - all family from Mississippi - Farmer
Ned B. Graham - son - age 22 - Lumber Manufacturer
Edith M. - daughter - age 18
Kate L. - daughter - age 13
Dewitt C. - son - age 11"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 17-A)
Clara Graham in 1920 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1920. 45 "Clara Graham is living with her daughter and son in law (Kate and Cliff Herring) in the 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville Township. Clara's husband had died in 1903. They are listed as follows:

Clifford Herring - age 27 - all family from Mississippi - Deputy Sheriff
Kate - wife - age 22 - all family from Mississippi
Clara - Mother in Law - age 52 - all family from Mississippi."
(1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Page 21-B)
Clara Graham in 1930 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1930. 46 "Clara D. Graham is shown as still living with Cliff Herring (her son in law) and Kate Graham Herring (her daughter) in the 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Roxie Township, Mississippi. The family is as follows:

Clifford H. Herring - age 37 - Head - all family from Mississippi - Autodealer
Kate L. - wife - age 32 - all family from Mississippi
Graham - son - age 11
Charles - son - age 6
Pete - son - age 2 years and 8 months
Clara - Mother in Law - age 62 - all family from Mississippi."
(1930 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Roxie, page 1-A"
Clara Graham in the Order of the Eastern Star 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Organizations: Eastern Star. 47 "A tribute to Clara Graham is found in the pamphlet from The Order of the Eastern Star (Masons), Roxie, Mississippi dted 1934. The tribute is as follows:

Mrs. Clara Graham

Born March 10, 1858: died October 17, 1933. Affiliated with Hannah Chapter, Meadville, Mississippi, June 6, 1924. Served as Esther 1926; Ruth 1926; Warder 1927; Esther 1928; Electa 1929. Admitted to Roxie Chapter, November 19, 1929. Served as Esther 1931; Chaplain 1932-1933.

A brighter Star has never shone,
A greater character was never known,
She lived the true principles that never die,
And has gone to her home beyond the sky."
(Order of the Easter Star)

Clara married Claudius Claborne Graham on 9 Jan 1882 in Franklin County, Mississippi.42
John Newman Collier 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

14. John Newman Collier,2,5 son of John Hardin Collier Jr. and Helen Edna Newman , was born on 2 Oct 1868 in Franklin County, Mississippi,2 died on 12 Dec 1933 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 65,2 and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi.2

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. "The John Newman Sr. family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi and is listed as follows:

John H. Collier - Age 73 - born in Mississippi, Widower, County Officer, father born in Virginia, mother born in Mississippi (this would be senior)

John Collier - Age 35 - born in Mississippi, Farmer, both parents born in Mississippi (this would be Jr.)
Helen N. Collier - age 32 - all family born in Mississippi
John N. Collier - son - age 11 - all children born in Mississippi
Willie P. Collier - son - age 11
Cora C. Collier - daughter - age 10
Mary L. Collier - daughter - age 9
Mattie W. Collier - daughter - age 8
Etta A. Collier - daughter - age 7
Sophia J. Collier - daughter - age 4
Sally J. Collier - daughter - age 3
John H. Collier - son - age 2 months."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, MIssissippi - District 1)
John Newman Collier in 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, District 49, page 5-A as follows:

(Page 5-A)
John Collier - born Oct, 1866 - age 33 - married 8 years - Farmer
Catherine L. - wife - born Mar, 1874 - age 26 - 4 children - all alive
Carrie - daughter - born Feb, 1893 - age 7

(Page 5-B)
Lula - daughter - born Dec, 1894 - age 5
Myrtis - daughter - born Feb, 1896 - age 4
John H. - son - born Mar, 1900 - age 2 months

Willie E. McMillan - boarder - white male - born Sep, 1877 - age 22 - Farm Laborer"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Page 5-A and B)

• Church Letter: 1906. 44 "24 March 1906, NEWMAN COLLIER asked for a letter from Union Baptist Church at Whitepalle, Ms. He was excused for unchristian conduct (DRUNKENNESS)."
(Barbara Celotto)

John Newman Collier family in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1910. 48 "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, District 61, Beat 1, page 20-A as follows:

John N. Collier - Head - age 40 - married 18 years - Farmer - all family from Mississippi
Clara L. - Wife - 6 children with all living - age 36
Carrie - daughter - age 17
Lula - daughter - age 15
Myrtis - daughter - age 13
John H. - son - age 10
Claude - son - age 2
Clara - daughter - age 5 months"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 20-A)
Newman Collier in 1920 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1920. 45 "The Newman Collier family is listed in the 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi (Roxie Township) as follows:

Newman Collier - age 51 - all family born in Mississippi - Farmer
Kattie - age 46 - all family born in Mississippi
Claud (misspelled) - son - age 12
Clara - daughter - age 10"
(1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Roxie Township - sheet 4-B)
Newman Collier in the 1930 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1930. 18 "John Newman Collier, his wife and daughter are visiting or living with Ned Graham and Carrie Edith Collier Graham in the 1930 US Census. The Ned Graham household is as follows:

Ned Graham -age 40 - Personal worth $1500 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi - Cafe Owner
Carrie - age 39 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi
Pauline - age 13
Claude - age 9
Roy - age 8
Fay - age 5
Nell - age 3 1/2
Joy (Joyce) - age 2 and 11 months
(Blank) - age (age 2 months) (This would have been Billie Jean)

Newman Collier - father in law - age 63 - all births in Mississippi
Katherine - mother in law - age 58 - all births in Mississippi
Clara - sister in law - age 20"
(1930 US Census, Franklin County, Roxie Village, District 1, Mississippi - page 3-A)

John Newman Collier and Catherine Lula Graves 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Death: 12th of December, 1933, Franklin Co., MS. 44 "John Newman Collier died at the dinner table of his daughter, Carrie Edith Collier Graham of a heart attack."
(Barbara Celotto)

"My Aunt Billie Jean remembers that he stood up at the table after dinner and dropped dead of a heart attack."
(Warren Trest)

John married Catherine Lula Graves 2 on 5 May 1892 in Franklin County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

7         i.   Carrie Edith Collier (born on 25 Feb 1893 - died on 5 Jul 1964 in Roxie, Mississippi)

         ii.   Lula Maude Collier (born on 13 Dec 1894 Franklin County, MS. - died on 20 Apr 1975 in Houma, La.)

        iii.   Myrtis Collier (born on 17 Feb 1897 Franklin County, MS. - died on 28 Jan 1931 in Batchelor, La.)

         iv.   John Hardin Collier (born on 6 Mar 1900 Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Claude Collier (born on 7 Oct 1907 Franklin County, MS. - died on 3 Jun 1972 in Adams County, MS.)

         vi.   Clara Collier (born on 8 Dec 1909 Franklin County, MS. - died on 14 Jul 1981 in Adams County, MS.)


Catherine Lula Graves Collier 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

15. Catherine Lula Graves,2,5 daughter of James F. Graves and Rhoda Currie Middleton , was born on 16 Mar 1874 in Franklin County, Mississippi,2 died on 10 Feb 1952 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 77,2 and was buried on 12 Feb 1952 in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi.2 Other names for Catherine were Kate 45, and Kattie.

Catherine Graves in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 6 Jul 1880. 49 "The James Graves family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, District 1 - Page 53 as follows:

James F. Graves - head - age 32 - farmer - all family born in Mississippi (everyone shows all family from Mississippi)
Rhoda - wife - age35 - keeping house
O.M. - son - age 12 - at school
S.A. - daughter - age 9 - at school
Catherine - daughter - age 7
Lizzie - daughter - age 5
Eliza - daughter - age 3
(page 54)
John Q. - son - age 1"
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - district 1 - page 53 and 54)

"Note: This would not agree with the birth date by Barbara Celotto. Catherine is listed as 7 which would have made her birth date about 1873, not 1875. In the 1900 US Census, she is listed as being born in Mar 1874, so I have changed her birth date from 1875 to 1874."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Catharine Collier in 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. 15 "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, District 49, page 5-A as follows:

(Page 5-A)
John Collier - born Oct, 1866 - age 33 - married 8 years - Farmer
Catherine L. - wife - born Mar, 1874 - age 26 - 4 children - all alive
Carrie - daughter - born Feb, 1893 - age 7

(Page 5-B)
Lula - daughter - born Dec, 1894 - age 5
Myrtis - daughter - born Feb, 1896 - age 4
John H. - son - born Mar, 1900 - age 2 months

Willie E. McMillan - boarder - white male - born Sep, 1877 - age 22 - Farm Laborer"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Page 5-A and B)
Catherine Lula Graves in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1910. "The John Newman Collier family is found in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, District 61, Beat 1, page 20-A as follows:

John N. Collier - Head - age 40 - married 18 years - Farmer - all family from Mississippi
Clara L. - Wife - 6 children with all living - age 36
Carrie - daughter - age 17
Lula - daughter - age 15
Myrtis - daughter - age 13
John H. - son - age 10
Claude - son - age 2
Clara - daughter - age 5 months"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 20-A)
Catherine Collier in 1920 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1920. "The Newman Collier family is listed in the 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi (Roxie Township) as follows:

Newman Collier - age 51 - all family born in Mississippi - Farmer
Kattie - age 46 - all family born in Mississippi
Claud (misspelled) - son - age 12
Clara - daughter - age 10"
(1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Roxie Township - sheet 4-B)
Catherine Collier in the 1930 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1930 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1930. "John Newman Collier, his wife and daughter are visiting or living with Ned Graham and Carrie Edith Collier Graham in the 1930 US Census. The Ned Graham household is as follows:

Ned Graham -age 40 - Personal worth $1500 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi - Cafe Owner
Carrie - age 39 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi
Pauline - age 13
Claude - age 9
Roy - age 8
Fay - age 5
Nell - age 3 1/2
Joy (Joyce) - age 2 and 11 months
(Blank) - age (age 2 months) (This would have been Billie Jean)

Newman Collier - father in law - age 63 - all births in Mississippi
Katherine - mother in law - age 58 - all births in Mississippi
Clara - sister in law - age 20"
(1930 US Census, Franklin County, Roxie Village, District 1, Mississippi - page 3-A)

Catherine Lula Graves Collier 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Catherine Lula Graves Collier: A picture of Catherine Lula Graves Collier (probably during the 30's or early 40's).
Catherine Lula Graves Collier and sons 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Kate and two of her sons: "This is a picture of Catherine Lula Graves Collier and two of her sons (from left to right) Claude Collier, Catherine Lula Graves Collier and John Hardin Collier."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Catherine Lula Graves Collier 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Memories from Barbara Celotto: 44 "KATE was born 16 March 1875 (census records say 1873). They are buried in Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Franklin County, Ms. with only slabs on the graves. They were separated for many years before his death. I do not know the reasons but TODDY HALFORD said that NEWMAN had a very bad temper."
(Barbara Celotto)


Death Certificate of Lula Graves 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cause of Death: "Her death certificate (witnessed by Carrie Graham) states the cause of death as Coronary Thrombosis.

Catherine married John Newman Collier 2 on 5 May 1892 in Franklin County, MS..2
picture

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Samuel Caper Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

16. Samuel Caper Trest, son of John Daniel Trest and Elizabeth Walters , was born on 1 Mar 1832 in Alabama,50 died on 19 Jun 1923 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 91,50 and was buried in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi.29

Modern Jones County 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Formation of Jones County, MS: Petition to form Jones County, Mississippi, 1822, Jones County, Mississippi. 51 "JONES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI 1822 PETITION Reference: Record Group 47 (Legislative Papers), box 17, Year 1822, Mississippi Dept. of Archives and History, Jackson, Mississippi.

To the honourable the General Assembly of the State of Mississippi to convene at the town of Jackson on the fourth Monday in December 1822. The Petitioners of the undersigned Citizens of Covington County respectfully sheweth that your petitioners labour under intolerable grievances: For that whereas, the said County of Covington is of the most inconvenient and unreasonable extent - comprehending within its extended boundaries an expanse of county amply sufficient for two constitutional counties. We believe that the area designated by the constitution is, generally, the most eligible extent for a county: - But that your petitioners should be necessitated to suffer the many inconveniences resulting from a residence in a county the enlarged boundaries of which include a tract of country of more than double that extent, is a burthen to which we cannot submit with silence. It is a duty we owe to ourselves to present our grievance before you. We sensibly feel these grievances. And a removal of them would be of unspeakable advantage to the county. All parts of the county most cordially concur with the measure. It is not the selfish request of a few interested individuals. It is the prayer of a county which is severely suffering innumerable disadvantages and hardships arising from the extensive dimensions of our County. We therefore pray your honourable body to remove our grievance by passing a law to divide our said county and form a new county of a part thereof. And we your Petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray.

Norvell ROBERTSON Jun. John HITE Angus McINNIS Norvell ROBERTSON Sen. Albert HITE William McCLELLAN William HERRINGTON Jun. Reuben PRICE (?) David SCARBOROUGH John TARBURTON Elbert WOOD Frederick CROSS Junr. Silas STEVENS Sen. Allin MURDOCK James TAYLOR Lewis PEARCE Sen. John MORRIS John FLAGG Lewis PEARCE Jun. Jas. TATE Francis SEARLE Joshua NEWTON Ewin SMITH Thomas PAGE Sen. George BAYLIS Calvin SUMNER A. STEWART George(?) P. SMITH Danil WINDHAM Thomas PAGE Junr. Joshua SMITH John SHOWS Henry PAGE Oliver M. SMITH Willis WINDHAM Willis PAGE John McCORMICK John RUSH Jacob PAGE Wm. McCORMICK Thomas Loveless MOTT William WEEK John LIGHTSEY Isaac HERRINGTON William COO-SEY John PARKER Adam SHOWS Peter COULTER Wm. JUDGE John SCRIVINER Allin HADIN Micajah HARGROVE Seaborn WADE Drury BURGE Absalom LOPER John SHOWS Sen. John L. REID Peter LOPER Henry WAID Hughey McNEERS Zachariah BLACKLEDGE Daniel SHOTS (marked out) Daniel McNEAL Jr. illegible name Francis WILLIAMSON John CARILEE illegible name Reuben WATTS William BONDS illegible name John B. LOWE Jesse LEE William PRINE Luke NORRIS Henry LUMPKINS Jesse SCRIVINER Stephen DAMPIER John HARVEY William COULTER Daniel YATES William MILES Evin HARRY Daniel McINNIS Senr. Joshua HERRING Daniel McINNIS Jun. Alexander McCLOUD Jesse HEDGEPETH Seaborn JUDD John GRAHAM Archibald GRAHAM
Number 89 END OF RECORD"


"LOCATION
Jones County is located in the southeastern part of the State and was established January 24, 1826, during the administration of Governor Holmes. It was named in honor of Commodore John Paul Jones, the founder of the American navy.

FORMATION
Jones County was formed from the counties of Covington and Wayne and its boundaries were declared to be "all that part of Covington county lying east of the center of range fourteen, and all that part of Wayne county lying west of range nine." Its northern boundary is formed by the Old Choctaw line established by the Treaty of Mt. Dexter, Nov. 16, 1805, which divides it from Jasper county, and its southern boundary is formed by the line between townships five and six, which divides it from Perry county."
(Jones County, Mississippi GenWeb)


Samuel Caper Trest in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "Samuel Trest is listed as a "farmer" and 18 years old in the 1850, Jones County, Mississippi census - and has his brother, Richard (Richard Crawson Trest) (age 16) living with him."
(Page 133).

"His sister, Rachael Dorcas Trest Walters is shown living next door with her 5 children. She was a widow by this time (she was 34 years old)."
(Page 133).

S.C. Trest in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 22 "Samuel Caper Trest is either visiting or living with William McGilvray during the 1860 US Census. He is married to Eleanor and has his first son, William John (11 months old) with him. The census has the following listing of the McGilvray household:
(House 229)
Wm McGilvray - Age 42 (Farmer)
Sarah McGilvray - Age 46
Angus McGilvray - Age 20
Joseph McGilvray - Age 18
Sarah McGilvray - Age 13
Mary McGilvray - Age 11
W. McGilvray - Age 7
Daniel Smith - (either age 11 or age 77 - can not make out the census) (Farmer)
Samuel C. Trest - Age 27 (Farmer)
Eleanor Trest (spelled Ellender) - Age 17
Wm. Trest - Age 11 months
William Eubanks - Age 27
Jacob Hutts - Age 28

It might be assumed that with the mixture of people at the McGilvray's home that there may have been a planting or harvesting going on with neighbors helping but this would be an assumption. They may have been living on his estate though, since his value of personal estate is listed as $18,910 (far more than most others in the county)."
(1860 US Census, Jones Coutny, Mississippi Page 34, Ellisville Post Office Area)

S.C. Trest in 1860 Slave Schedule 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Slave Schedule: 1860 Slave Schedule, 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 53 "S.C. Trest is shown as having 2 slaves in 1860. One female (12 years old) and one male (10 years old)."
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, Slave Scedule - Page 110)
Jones County in 1895 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Move to Ovett: after 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 "Samuel Caper Trest is shown living near his family in Northeast Jones County, Mississippi (near Sandersville) until he married Eleanor McGilvray. In the 1860 census, he is shown as living with his father in law (or visiting when the census was taken). Later records show that he lived in Ovett, Mississippi (near the county line with Perry, Mississippi). It can be assumed that he moved south to Ovett to be near the McGilvrays in Runnelstown. It might be assumed that he moved back to the Erata area in 1889 when he bought 40 acres of land."
(Warren Trest)

"Albert McLaurin remembers that his great-grandfather (Samuel Caper Trest) lived south and east of WIlliam John Trest's home (parallel to Trest Road outside Sandersville) on Hobson Trayler Road (going towards Rustin Community)."
(Warren Trest)
50 dollar pay sheet 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Military Service: 7th Battalion, Mississippi Infantry, 1862-1865. 54,55,56 "Samuel Caper Trest is listed as serving in the 7th Battalion, Company C, Mississippi Infantry during the Civil War. The 7th Battalion fought in the battle of Corinth, Mississippi and then went on to fight in Vicksburg, Mississippi. His records show that he enlisted as a Private and retired as a Private (not unusual in the Civil War)."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"7th Infantry Battalion was organized during the early spring of 1862 near Quitman, Mississippi. After participating in the conflict at Corinth the unit was assigned to Hebert's Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and was captured when Vicksburg fell. After the exchange only 15 officers and 116 men were present. The battalion then served in Mackall's and Sears' Brigade, was prominent throughout the Atlanta Campaign, endured Hood's winter operations in Tennessee, and aided in the defense of Mobile. It reported 65 casualties at Corinth, 50 during the siege of Vicksburg, 72 at Kenesaw Mountain , and 9 at the Chattahoochee River . Few were included in the surrender in May, 1865. The field officers were Lieutenant Colonels L. B. Pardue and James S. Terral, and Major Joel E. Welborn."
(Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System)

"Records show S. C. Trest being paid $50.00 to fight in the war for three years, mustering in at Quitman, Mississippi on May 12th, 1862.

He is shown on the muster roles of the 7th Battalion from May, 1862 through February, 1864. On July 5th, 1864, he is recorded as being captured at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia and became a prisoner of war. He was recieved at the Military Prison in Louisville, Kentucky on July 14th, 1864. He was transferred to Camp Douglas, Illinois (from Louisville, Ky.) on July 18th, 1864. He was sent to U.S. General Hospital in Point Lookout, Maryland for treatment. He took the Oath of Allegiance to be released at Point Lookout, Maryland on July 19th, 1865.
(7th Battalion Muster Roles)

On the Oath of Allegiance, Samuel Caper Trest is listed as 5' 9", Blue Eyes and Dark Hair. He was released and transferred to the General Hospital in Richmond, Virginia (with Consumption)."
(Civil War Muster Rolls)


Point Lookout Prison 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Point Lookout Prison Camp: 57 Point Lookout had terrible conditions for prisoners during the Civil War.

"Point Lookout, Maryland, located in Saint Mary's County, Maryland on the southern tip of the peninsula was deemed the largest and worst Northern POW camp. Point Lookout was constructed of fourteen foot high wooden walls. These walls surrounded an area of about 40 acres. A walkway surrounded the top of the walls where negro guards walked day and night. It is reported the guards were brutal in their treatment of prisoners. Prisoner, John R. King said; "Two days out of every three we were guarded by a gang of ignorant and cruelsome negroes. Please do not think that I dislike the negroes as a race. Many of them are my friends, but the negroes authority over the white people and the defenceless prisoners suffered at their hands. Numbers of scars were left on the frame work of the closets made by negroes firing at the prisoners. The negro guard was very insolent and delighted in tantalizing the prisoners, for some trifle affair, we were often accused of disobedience and they would say, "Look
out, white man, the bottom rail is on top now, so you had better be careful for my gun has been wanting to smoke at you all day!"

No barracks were ever built. The Confederate soldiers were given tents to sleep in until overcrowding became so bad, there were not even enough tents to go around.

Approximately 50,000 Confederate enlisted men were contained within the walls of Point Lookout Prison Camp during it's operation 1863-1865. Prison capacity was 10,000 but at any given time, there would be between 12,000 and 20,000 soldiers incarcerated there.

The extreme overcrowding, Maryland's freezing temperatures, shortages of firewood for heat, and living in tents took it's toll and many lives were lost due to exposure.

As the water supply became polluted and food rations ran low, prisoners died from disease and starvation. Food was in such short supply, the men were reported to hunt rats as a food source. A prisoner, Rev. J. B. Traywick said; "Our suffering from hunger was indescribable".

Estimates report that over 14,000 prisoners died while imprisoned at Point Lookout but the cemetery is known to hold 3,384 soldiers in a mass grave with no evidence to back up this massive figure. The Confederate soldiers' bodies have been moved twice and have found their final resting place in Point Lookout Cemetery. "
(CensusDiggins.com ,Civil War Prison Camps, Point Lookout Prison)


"A prison camp for Confederate prisoners of war was built at Point Lookout, Md., on the tip of the peninsula where the Potomac River joins Chesapeake Bay. In the two years during which the camp was in operation, August, 1863, to June, 1865, Point Lookout overflowed with inmates, surpassing its intended capacity of 10,000 to a population numbering between 12,500 and 20,000. In all, over 50,000 men, both military and civilian, were held prisoner there.

G.W. Jones, a private of Co. H, 24th Virginia Cavalry, described his ominous entrance into the prison amidst "a pile of coffins for dead rebels," hearing the lid close shut on his own soon thereafter when he learned that the system of prisoner exchanges had been suspended for the duration of the war. Jones described the camp as laid out into a series of streets and trenches, intended to aid in drainage, and surrounded by a fourteen foot parapet wall. Prisoners, who lived sixteen or more to a tent, were subjected to habitually short rations and limited fire wood in winter, and when the coffee ration was suspended for federal prisoners at Andersonville, the Point Lookout prisoner lost theirs as well.

The worst the prisoners suffered, however, may have been inflicted by the physical conditions. The flat topography, sandy soil, and an elevation barely above high tide led to poor drainage, and the area was subjected to every imaginable extreme of weather, from blazing heat to bone-chilling cold. Polluted water exacerbated the problems of inadequate food, clothing, fuel, housing, and medical care, and as a result, approximately 4,000 prisoners died there over 22 months. "

(William L. Clements Library
The University of Michigan
Schoff Civil War Collections)

"Point Lookout POW Camp (Camp Hoffman) was established after the Battle of Gettysburg to incarcerate Confederate prisoners. It was in operation from August 1863 through June 1865. Being only 5' above sea level, it was located on approx. 30 acres of leveled land at the southern tip of Maryland, in St. Mary's County, and surrounded by water on three sides by the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River. It was the largest Union prison camp for Confederates.

Before the war, Point Lookout was a fashionable resort hotel and a summer bathing place with over a hundred cottages where the elite spent their leisure time. In 1862, with erection of additional buildings, it became a military hospital for the care of union soldiers, an imprisonment for Maryland citizens who were Southern sympathizers, as well as a supply depot for the Army of the Potomac. In August 1863, the large building with outbuildings arranged in spoke fashion (Hammond Hospital), became the care center for wounded/sick Confederate prisoners as well as for union men.

During the two year span of operation, Point Lookout saw approx. 52,000 POWs pass through her gates. These were military and civilian, men, women, and children. It's also interesting to note that the youngest POW at Point Lookout was Baby Perkins. He was born there. His mother was captured at the Battle of Spotsylvania with her artillery unit.

Prison conditions were deplorable. Rations were below minimal, causing scurvy and malnutrition. Prisoners ate rats and raw fish. It's recorded that one hungry Rebel devoured a raw seagull that had been washed ashore. Soap skim and trash peelings were often eaten when found. Lice, disease, and chronic diarrhea often resulted in an infectious death. Prisoners were deprived of adequate clothing, and often had no shoes in winter or, only one blanket among sixteen or more housed in old, worn, torn, discarded union sibley tents. Even the Point's weather played havoc with the prisoners. Because of it's location, it's extremely cold with icy wind in the winter and a smoldering sun reflecting off the barren sand in summer was blinding. High water often flooded the tents in the camp area. The undrained marshes bred mosquitoes. Malaria, typhoid fever and smallpox was common. The brackish water supply was contaminated by unsanitary camp conditions. There was a deadline about 10' from the approx. 14' wooden parapet wall. Anyone caught crossing this line, even to peek through the fence, was shot. Prisoners were also randomly shot during the night as they slept, or if they called out from pain.

Mjr. Brady was the Provost Marshall and Mjr. Gen. Benjamin (Beast) Butler would review the prison camp. Many times he galloped through the crowd of men, hitting them as he sped by. The sixty gun Minnesota was within a short distance from the shore to guard the prisoners."
(PLPOW/PrisonHistory.html)


• General Information: Ancestry.com Message Board. 58 "Dear Don:

Angus B. Trest is the son of Samuel Capers Trest of Jones County, Mississippi. Angus B was born in 1862 and lived to be 104 years old. Samuel Capers was married to Eleander McGilvary in 1859. Samuel Capers was bron in Alabama in 1833. They had the following children: William John b. 1860; Angus B b. 1862; Sarah Elizabteh b. 1864 (my great grandmother); Joseph Alexander b. 1869; Colin Oliphant b. 1871; Samuel Albert, b. 1873; Richard/Richmond Felder b. 1875 and Norman Trest. Samuel Capers was in the 7th Battalion of the Mississippi Infantry, Company C. He was catpured three times. He was the son of John Trest of South Carolina. John was the son of John Trest who emigrated from Germany. He was a German sailor from the Hamburg district in Germany. He came to America in 1773. He married Rebecca Thorne and they settled in South Carolina. When their baby John was born and still a small child, the Inidans killed Rebecca. John was lost at sea and never heard from again. Little baby John was found by the McDonalds and they raised him. He marrieed Elizabeth Walters of Orangeburg, SC. They later moved to Alabama and then to Sandersville, MS, a Scotch settlement where the McDonalds had come come to live. Samuel Capers Trest was a school teacher at Ovett School in Jones County. After the Civil War, he was the first Sheriff in Jones County during Reconstruction. Angus, his son lived to be 104 years old. Angus married Nancy Walters in 1882. I do not know the children of Angus B. and Nancy Trest. This is something that you may find in ancestry.com or familytreemaker.com. I do hope this helps you. I have other information on Samuel Capers Trest which would be your grandfather if you would be interested. He is alos my great great grandfather.

Roy (Roy Pearson)"
(Ancestry.com Message Board)


Samuel Caper Trest as State Representative 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Farmer, Teacher, Sheriff and State Representative. 59,60 "Samuel Caper Trest was a representative to the Mississippi legislature in 1878. He was sheriff of Jones County for four terms. He rode on horseback to deliver the tax money to Jackson. Also, when there was no doctor in the vicinity where he lived with his family, he was one of the few men to pay a set salary per year to get a doctor to live there. His family was treated free of other fees."
(Letter from Elizabeth Eleanor Trest to Martha - Page 2)

"Samuel Caper Trest shows up in the History of Mississippi (page 508) as a State Representative in 1878."
(History of Mississippi)

"Samuel taught school west of Ovett; there met and married Eleanor McGilvray; lived there"
(Written History by Unknown)

"When the Civil War ended, Samuel was way up North. Battered, beaten, and ill, it took a long time for him to get home. He was assumed dead. Very much alive, he was elected the first Sheriff of Jones County after Reconstruction. His Granddaughter, Norma Gail Trest Baker, said some of his papers indicate he could serve more than one term around 1870."
(Lelia McGill)

"The fact that Samuel Caper Trest was a Sheriff is confirmed in the Jones County, Mississippi, Final Records of the Chancery Court records. From 1873 to 1877, Samuel Caper Trest is listed in the Court Records as Sheriff, serving, attending and serving suponeas in Jones County.

Items such as:

July Term of Court, 1873
Wesley Drane - Chancellor
Samuel Caper Trest - Sheriff
J.H. Bynum - Clerk of Court

appear throughout the Chancery Records from 1873 to 1877. The assumption can be made that Samuel Caper Trest was Sheriff of Jones County from 1873 - 1877 and then became a State Representative in 1878."
(Warren G. Trest)

Samuel C Trest in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1870, Jones County, Mississippi. 31 "The Samuel Caper Trest family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi (Ellisville PO area) as follows:

Samuel C. Trest - age 37 - Occupation Teacher - value of Real Estate - $80 - value of personal estate - $325
Elenor - age 25 - keeping house
William - age 10
Angus - age 8
Sarah - age 7
Joseph - age 2
Colon - age 3 months

They also have a white female, Josephine Creel - age 28 - without occupation and a William W Creel - age 2 - at Samuel's home."
(Page 3 - Township No. 6)
Samuel Caper Trest and Eleanor McGilvray 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Registered Marks and Brands: 28 Aug 1871. 61 "ABBR Registered Marks and Brands:
Samuel Trest
Bynam - Clerk

Cattle Ear Marks:
Swallowfork & Underbit in left ear. Underbit in right ear.
Cattle Brand:
Circle Bar. Horses, sheep, and hogs the same

Mark and Brand Records show it to be a vertical bar inside a circle."
Samuel Caper Trest in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1880, Jones County, Mississippi. 32 "S.C. Trest is listed at 47 years old and being born in Alabama. Both of his parents are listed from South Carolina. He is joined by his wife, Eleanor, Age 36. She is listed as being born in Mississippi and her parents are listed as being from North Carolina. They are joined by their children, son W.J. (age 20), son A.B. (age 18), daughter S.E. (age 16), son J.A. (age 11), son C.O. (age 9), son S.A. (age 7) and son R.F. (age 5)."
(1880 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 331-B, Ed 127)

"George Trest, black male, is listed as 37 years old and a "boarder". It can be assumed that George Trest was a slave that took the Trest name and stayed with the Trest family. George shows up as finally living next door and shows up in the 1910 census at 73 years old. His mother and father are listed as being born in Mississippi."

• Land: Land bought in Jones County, Mississippi, 29 Nov 1889. 62 "Samuel Caper Trest is shown as buying (Sale-Cash Entries) 40 acres on Novemeber 29, 1889 at the Augusta, Mississippi Land Office. The property was SWSE of St. Stephens, Township 9N, Range 10W, Section 22 in Jones County, Mississippi."
(Mississippi Land Records - Ancestry.com)

"Deed Record:

7-4-1855

Joel E. Welborn and Martha, his wife, to Samuel C. Trest for $60. The NW1/4 of NE1/4 and E1/2 of SW1/4 of section 17, township 9N Range 10W.

Attest: James M. Bates, J.P.

Signed J.E. Welborn and Martha Welborn."
(Page 133 - Records of Jones County, MS, Deed Books A&B, 1827-1856)

• Census: 1900, Jones County, Mississippi. 25 "Samuel Trest is listed in the 1900 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi. He is listed as 67 years old. His wife, Eleanor is 56 years old. They have the following children at home: Son Samuel, age 27, Son Richmond, age 24, Son Daniel, age 19, Son Norman "McG", age 17, and Son Ransom, age 13."
(Page 181-A, Beat 3)

"George W. Trest (Black) is living next door in a home of his own and is 62 years old."
Samuel C. Trest in 1910 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1910, Jones County, Mississippi. 33 "In the 1910 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi (Beat 3), Samuel Caper is listed living next to his son, Ricmond F., and is 78 years old. His wife, Eleanor, is 66 years old. They have the following children living with them: son, James Ransom (age 22), and son, Norman M. (age 26).

They also have George W. Trest, Mulatta servant, age 73, Katie WIggins, white servant, age 26 and Mary C. Wiggins, Servant's daughter (white), age 1 1/2 at their home.

Samuel Caper's house is followed by his son, Samuel A. Trest.

The Trest's are followed by James McGIll. (Son of Sarah Elizabeth Trest, daughter of Samuel Caper Trest, and her husband, James Archibald McGill)."
(Page 29B, Beat 3)
Samuel C. Trest in 1920 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1920, Jones County, Mississippi. 63 "Samuel C. Trest shows up in his last census at 87 years old. He is joined by his son, James Ransom (age 31) and a daughter (or sister) in law, T. Buchanen (age 44). and is a farmer by trade.

Eleanor has passed away by 1920"
(Page 18-B, Beat 3)
Death Certificate 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cause of Death: Death Certificate, 1923, Jones County, Mississippi. 64 "Samuel Caper Trest's cause of death on his Mississippi State Board of Helath Death Certificate is listed as "Old age and General Debility". It was witnessed by his son, WIlliam John Trest, who would pass away a few years later himself. Both of Samuel Caper Trest's parents are listed as being born in South Carolina and Samuel is listed as being born in Alabama. He is listed as widowed at the time of his death."
(Mississippi State Board of Health Death Certificate)
Samuel Caper Trest and Eleanor McGilvray 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cemetery: Lancaster cemetery, Jones County, Mississippi, 1923, Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. 29 "Samuel C. Trest 1-Mar-1832 to 19-Jun-1923 is buried with his wife, Eleanor McGilvray 5-Jun-1844 to 20-Jun-1918. in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi. The cemetary is located in Section 13 & 24, Township 6 North, Range 11 West."
(Joni Jackson, MSGenWeb Coordinator, USWebGen)

"His son and daughter in law (William John Trest and Flora Ferguson Trest are buried at the same cemetary."
(Lancaster Cemetary Records)
James R Trest in 1930 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Land: 1923, Jones County, Mississippi. 65,66 "Albert McLaurin states that James Ransom never married and died a bachelor. He said that Ransom died in Samuel Caper Trest's home (where he lived after Samuel Trest died).

Albert said that he knew Ransom because his brother, Hubert McLaurin, farmed Ransom's farm (the original Samuel Caper Trest land) when he became too old to farm it."
(Albert McLaurin)

"This fact is backed up by the 1930 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi census records where James R. Trest (age 43 and head of house) and Norman M. Trest (age 47) are still at the Samuel Caper homestead (between Richmond and Samuel A. Trest households (houses 107, 108 and 109). In 1930, Norman had not yet married Cora Mitchell and Albert McLaurin states that James Ransom never married."
(1930 US Census)

Samuel married Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray in 1859 in Jones County, Mississippi.21

Children from this marriage were:

8         i.   William John Trest (born on 12 Nov 1859 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 4 Apr 1929 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Angus Boyce Trest (born about 1862 Ovett, Jones County, Mississippi - died in 1965 in Lucedale, Mississippi)

        iii.   Sarah Elizabeth Trest (born about 1864 - died about 1931)

         iv.   Joseph Alexander Trest (born about 1869)

          v.   Colin Oliphant Trest (born about 1871 - died after 1930)

         vi.   Samuel Albert Trest (born on 13 Mar 1873 - died on 13 Mar 1942)

        vii.   Richmond Felder Trest (born on 22 Jul 1875 - died on 23 Jan 1952)

       viii.   Daniel Cayborn Trest (born on 10 Aug 1880 - died in Oct 1962)

         ix.   Norman McGilvray Trest (born on 1 Apr 1883 Jones County, Mississippi - died in Mar 1974 in Laurel, Jones County, Mississippi)

          x.   James Ransom Trest (born on 4 Apr 1887 - died after 1930)


Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray Trest 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

17. Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray, daughter of William Tyrus McGilvray and Sarah J. Smith , was born on 5 Jan 1844 in Mississippi,50 died on 20 Jun 1918 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 74, and was buried in Lancaster Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi.29 Another name for Eleanor was Jenny.

MacGillvray Tartan 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Heraldry: Scottish Tartan, Scotland. 67 "MacGillvray:
Crest Badge - A stag's head couped, proper, tyned or.
Motto - Dunmaglas
Gaelic Name - MacGhille-brath

This clan, one of the oldest branches of the Clan Chattan confederation, came originally from Morven and Lochaber, where they were one of the principal clans in the time of Somerled, recognized by the Norse as King of the Isles. They suffered severely, as did many others, during the conquest by Alexander II in the 13th century. This may have been why, according to a 16th century historian, Gillivray, the progenitor of the clan, vicGillivray, whose name means 'son of the lover of knowledge', chose to take the protection from the Farquhard Mackintosh, 5th of Mackintosh.

About 1500 the MacGilvrays settled at Dunmaglass in Strathairn, and in succeeding years added considerably to their possessions. THey became influential in that part of the country and took a prominent part in public affairs and local clan disputes. The Clan Chattan Bonds of 109 and 1664 were signed by three members of the clan.

The MacGillvrays were active in the Risings of 1715 and 1745, losing their chief and many others at Culloden. The chief's brother William survived the battle and, assisted by another brother, was able to increase the family estate. On the death of WIlliam's son there followed lawsuits over succession which eventually in 1858 passed to the Dalcrombie line. They soon sold Dunmaglass, to leave the clan landless in its own country by 1890."
(Collins Gem - Clans and Tartans - Published by HarperCollins - 1986)

McGillivray clan in Scotland 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• McGilvrays of Scotland: Home of the Clan McGilvrays, Scotland.

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "In the 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, William McGilvray's family is as follows (Note: The census taker in 1850 mispelled McGilvray as McGilberry):
(House 317)
William McGilvray - Farmer - age 31 - born in North Carolina
Sarah - age 36 - born in South Carolina
Angus - Age 10 - born in Mississippi
Joseph - age 8
Elender (Eleanor) - age 5
Sarah - age 3
Mary - age 7 months."
(Page 273)

• Marriage: 1859, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 "Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray was 15 years old when she married Samuel Caper Trest who was 27 years old. They stayed together for the next 59 years, raising 10 children."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Eleanor married Samuel Caper Trest in 1859 in Jones County, Mississippi.21
John Ferguson III 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

18. John Ferguson III,21 son of John Ferguson II and Flora Helen McGill , was born on 24 Feb 1820 in Jones County, Mississippi 21,52 and died on 3 May 1884 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 64.21

Noted events in his life were:

• Memories from Angus Furguson: 30 "My father was John Ferguson, born Feb. 24, 1820, one mile southeast of Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi, where he lived until he married. He died, May 3, 1884, and was buried in the family cemetery at the Ferguson old home, one mile southeast of Sandersville. This old cemetery is about one hundred yards east of where the old Ferguson home was built more than a century ago and stands today as a marker of the location of this old pioneer home."
(Angus Ferguson)
John Ferguson in the 1870 census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Farmer, 1870, Jones County, Mississippi. 31 "John Ferguson is listed as a farmer by trade in the 1850 and 1870 census"
John Ferguson in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "Flora is listed as head of household in the 1850 Jones County, Mississippi census, thus John Ferguson is assumed to have passed away prior to 1850. She is listed as 67 years old which does not agree with the date of birth by WIlliam Parks. If she was 67 in 1850, she would have been born in 1783 instead of 1788 listed by "Bill" Parks.

The Flora Ferguson family is listed as follows (all children are listed as being born in Mississippi):

Flora - age 67 - born in North Carolina
Elizabeth - age 37 - all children born in Mississippi
Mary - age 35
John - age 30 - Farmer
Catherine - age 28
Abigail - age 26
Sarah - age 22

The Fergusons and McGill's are living near each other. Archibald McGill is in house 297, Flora Ferguson is in house 299 and Angus Ferguson is in house 300"
(Pages 136 and 136B)
(1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)

• Marriage: Marriage of John Ferguson, 12 Mar 1857, Jones County, Mississippi. 30 "John Ferguson married Catherine Boyce on March 12, 1857 by the Rev. W.H. Singletary, a Presbyterian minister".
(Family, School, Church and Pioneer History written by Angus Grey Furgeson - Page 8)

John Ferguson in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 26 Oct 1860. 22 "John Ferguson and Robert Porter Boyce are listed in the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Ellisville Township, Mississippi as follows:

(house 400)
John Ferguson - age 40 - farmer - Value of Real Estate $3000 - Value of Personal Estate $1283 - born in Mississippi
Catherine - age 21 - born in Alabama
Angus - age 2 - male - born in Mississippi
Flora E. - age 1 - female - born in Mississippi

Robert P. Boyce - age 70 - mechanic - value of real estate $1000 - value of personal estate $50,500 - born in Delaware"
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 61)

• Residence: 30 "John Ferguson and Catherine Boyce lived about two miles east of the Ferguson old home during their entire married lives."
(Angus Ferguson)

• Military Service: 30 "My father served in the Civil War and was captured in the siege of Vicksburg. He came out of the service completely broken down in health and was never well any more."
(Family, School, Church and Pioneer History by Angus Grey Furgeson - Page 33)

"There were 7 John Fergusons who fought in the Civil War in Mississippi regiments. It would seem that he either fought in the 5th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, 24th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry or the 13 Regiment, Mississippi Infantry. These were the units I found from the Kemper or Clarke County areas. The other John Fergusons seem to have been recruited from Northern Counties. It is not provable at this time as to which unit he served in."
(Warren Trest)
John Ferguson in 1870 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1870, Jones County, Mississippi. 31 "John Ferguson is listed in the 1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi as follows:
John Ferguson - age 50
Catherine - age (35 or 32?)
Angus - age 12
Flora E. - age 10
Margaret - age 8
Mary - age 7
John - age 6
Sarah - age 5
Laura - age 2
Malcolm - age 5 months"
(1870 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)

John Ferguson in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Erata, Jones County, Mississippi, 1880. 68 "The John Ferguson household is listed as follows in the 1880 US Census, Erata, Jones County, Mississippi:

John Ferguson - age 60 - birthplace MS - Farmer - both parents born in NC.
Katharin - wife - age 40 - birthplace AL - Father born in DE - Mother born in NC
Angus - son - age 22 - All children are born in Mississippi
F.E. - dau - age 20
M.E. - dau - age 19
M.C. - dau - age 18
J.C. - son - age 16
S.A. - dau - age 15
Laura - dau - age 12
M.H. - son - age 11
Carry I. - dau - age 10
E.L. - dau - age 9
R.P.L. - son - age 3

It should be noted that many of the Fergusons live near each other in the 1880 census, along with the Carraways and Rushtons."
(1880 US Census - Page 330A)

"Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson would have been the F.E. - age 20."
(Warren Trest)

• Death: 30 "My father was born and reared at the old Ferguson home near where he lived and died. He was taken ill at the grave of his son, Calvin, at the old Ferguson cemetary and died in a few days. The attending physician, Dr. W.J. Bailey, attributed his death to grief. He was a soldier in the Civil War and came out broken down in health and never recovered."
(Angus Ferguson)

"Before he buried Calvin, he had also buried a daughter who died at an early age - age 3."
(Warren Trest)

John married Catherine Boyce 21 on 12 Mar 1857.30

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Angus Ferguson (born on 12 Feb 1858)

9        ii.   Flora Elizabeth McGill Ferguson (born on 10 Jan 1860 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 2 Aug 1936 in Louisville, Mississippi)

        iii.   Margaret E. Ferguson (born on 4 Apr 1861 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 20 Oct 1927)

         iv.   Mary A. Ferguson (born on 5 Aug 1862)

          v.   John Calvin S. Ferguson (born on 6 Dec 1863 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 27 Apr 1884)

         vi.   Sarah A. Ferguson (born on 10 Mar 1865 Jones County, Mississippi)

        vii.   Harriet Lenora Vernon Ferguson (born on 20 Apr 1866 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 16 Aug 1869 in Jones County, Mississippi)

       viii.   Laura Jane Ferguson (born on 22 Mar 1868 Jones County, Mississippi)

         ix.   Malcolm Hector Ferguson (born on 24 Oct 1869 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 19 Jan 1891)

          x.   Carrie Isabelle Ferguson (born on 17 Apr 1871 - died on 31 Oct 1935)

         xi.   Lou Ella Ferguson (born on 10 Dec 1872)

        xii.   Robert Palmer Ferguson (born on 20 Sep 1877)


19. Catherine Boyce,21 daughter of Robert Porter Boyce and Elizabeth Catherine McScrews , was born on 26 Apr 1838 in Alabama 21,66,69 and died on 23 May 1899 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 61.21

Catherine Boyce in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1850 Clarke County, Mississippi, 1850, Clarke County, Mississippi. 69 "The Robert Boyce family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi as follows:

Robert P. Boyce - Millwright - age 60 - born in Delaware
Elizabeth - age 45 - born in South Carolina
Elizabeth - age 18 - born in Florida (this is an assumption of data for birthplace - the census is hard to read).
Catherine (Katherine spelled in census) - age 12 - born in Alabama.

Note: This census does not agree with the Georgia birthplace from Bill Parks for Catherine Boyce."
(1850 US Census - Page 174B)

• Death of Children: 1 "There were at least 3 children who died at an early age.
John Calvin Ferguson - died at age 20
Harriet Ferguson - died at age 3
Malcolm - died age 21"
(Warren G. Trest)

Catherine married John Ferguson III 21 on 12 Mar 1857.30
Samuel Clark Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

20. Samuel Clark Miller,11 son of Moses M. Miller and Laura Saphronia Donald , was born on 30 Jan 1859 in Oak Grove, Winston County, Mississippi,11 died on 7 Jan 1897 in North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi, at age 37, and was buried in North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi. The cause of his death was struck by a log.

S.C. Miller in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1860, Winston County, Mississippi. 70 "In the 1860 US WInston County, Mississippi census, his father, Moses Miller is listed as 28 years old and a farmer by trade. His father is joined by his 22 year old mother, L.S. (Laura Saphronia), his 5 year old brother, W.D. (William David), his 3 year old brother, H.M. (Henry Moore) and himself, at age one year old, S.C. (Samuel Clark). "
(Page 721 - 1860 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi, 1880. 71 "Laura S. Miller is listed in the 1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi as follows:

Laura S. Miller - self - widow - white female - age 43 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in South Carolina
Henry M. Miller - son - white male - age 23 - born in Mississippi - farmer - father born in South Carolina - mother born in Mississippi
Samuel C. Miller - son - white male - age 21 - born in Mississippi - At School - father born in South Carolina - mother born in Mississippi

Delia Miller - Other - widow - Black female - age 70 - born in South Carolina - Servant - both parents born in South Carolina."
(1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi)

• Religion: Methodist, North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 11 "The Methodist Church to which the Miller family belonged most likely had it's origin in 1853 and was called Ebenezer Methodist Church."
(Margaret Miller White)

• School: 11 "The North Bend School was a one-teacher school located a few hundred yards north of the church. THe building was located on the land of Sam Miller. He did not donate the land; they simply built the school on his land. It was made of dressed planks and ceiled with beaded ceiling. It was approximately forty by seventy feet, with a long blackboard across one end and benches to sit upon. Before it was consolidated into Bond High School, it had become a two-teacher school."
(The Huguenot Millers)

• Organizations: Mason. 11 "Samuel Clark Miller was a Mason. He belonged to Coffadeliah Lodge, No. 371. After his death, Sally Miller recieved a certificate, dated August 1898, from the Lodge, stating that Sam C. Miller had raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason and was a faithful and worthy brother. It was signed by T.R. HArrison, W. MAster and R.G. Cooper."
(The Huguenot Millers)

• Cause of Death: 7 Jan 1897, North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 11 "On January 7, 1897, Sam Clark Miller was instantly killed in a freak accident. James Lamar (Kit) Miller, his youngest child was 10 months old when his father was killed, and, of course, heard the story many times. He offered these details:

"Tom Daniel had a sawmill, and Papa was hauling logs to the mill to have them sawed and dressed. He was working on the house at the time and did not have it completed. The wagon was going downhill, and there was a washout in the road. It was believed that the horses were running downhill. A log fell off the wagon, struck him, and killed him. The horses ran off, but they turned around and came back. THey were standing by the wagon when Papa was found. He was killed about one-half mile west of North Bend Church"
(The Huguenot Millers)

Samuel Clark Miller was only 37 years old when he died, leaving his wife and 8 children.

• Obituary: 11 "Following the death of Sam C. Miller, an anonymous friend the wrote the following tribute which bears no date nor signature:

We were shocked to recieve the intelligence of the unexpected death of our esteemed friend and worthy brother in Christ, Mr. S.C. Miller. Mr. Miller was a well known resident of Neshoba County and a prominent member of North Bend Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

His influence was everywhere felt by those with whom he was associated, and he will be sadly missed by all his friends and neighbors; but most of all by his family, consisting of a wife and eight children. Their children, we know from personal acquaintance, to be intelligent and promising.

How often have we seen Mr. Miller enter the church and Sunday School, followed by his children, whom he has early taught to follow Christ as their Chief Counselor in times of stress.

No cause which tended toward upbuilding of the morals of the community or aiding the Church of Christ went unsupported by Mr. Miller, and how consoling the thought that in heaven he is recieving his happy reward, known only to those who love and serve the Lord.

The unexpected death of Mr. Miller occured January 7, just in front of the school house where his children played thousands of times. While hauling logs to a swamill, he was thrown from the wagon and struck on the head by a log, causing his death. He did not have to endure a prolonged suffering, but was instantly and painlessly carried to that blest abode where we must all sooner or later assemble after having parted from our bodies of clay as God directs. So wisely, he has ordained that we know not the time or manner, but may we be found ready and watching.
- A Friend"
(It is believed that the letter above was written by a teacher at the nearby school)

Samuel married Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham 11 on 20 Jan 1881.

Children from this marriage were:

10        i.   John Henry Miller (born on 12 Jan 1882 Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi - died on 10 Oct 1948 in Philadelphia, Neshoba County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Laura Helen Miller ()

        iii.   Willie Ethel Miller ()

         iv.   Thomas Andrew Miller (born on 8 Aug 1887)

          v.   Linnie Maude Miller ()

         vi.   Velma Olive Miller ()

        vii.   Moses Clark Miller (born on 3 Oct 1893)

       viii.   James Lamar Miller (born on 11 Mar 1896)


Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

21. Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham,11 daughter of Thomas A. Cheatham and Talitha Jackson , was born on 5 Dec 1862 in Carroll Parish, Louisiana,11 died on 18 Feb 1935, at age 72, and was buried in North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi. Another name for Sarah was Sally.

Noted events in her life were:

• Widow: 1897. "Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham married Samuel Clark Miller when she was 18 years old and was widowed 15 years later when she was 33 years old with 8 children to raise on her own."
(Warren Trest)
Millers 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Death of Tabitha: 1897. 11 "Exactly one month after Salley Miller became a widow with eight children to rear, she also lost by death her beloved sister Mary Tabitha Miller. When James Lamar (Kit) Miller was asked how Laura and Sally Miller managed to rear these families alone, he replied that although relatives were helpful, it is more importantly their strong Christian faith. The two women had a name in common, and that name was "Valiant"."
(Margaret Miller White)

• General Memories: 11 "Many of us were blessed by the presence of our Grandmother, Sally Cheatham Miller, in our growing up years. She spent her latter years in the home of Lamar and Nannie Miller, but often visited her other children. She had been left an orphan when a small child and had been widowed at an early age, but she was still a cheerful person, intense and creative.

I remember Grandmother Miller as always being on a quest for beauty. She was always making something pretty. Her granddaughter, Ersell Miller Trest, remembers that, at one time, Grandmother had a millinery shop in an old store near her home, where she trimmed hats for the local ladies. She made thousands of yards of tatting, a delicate lace made with a shuttle, with which our clothes were often trimmed. She even made a tatting bedspread for one of her children. WHen her daughter Velma got married, Grandmother emboidered the silk for her wedding dress. She loved poems and collected them, along with bits of philosphy, which she kept in scrapbooks in her dresser drawers. These scrapbooks afforded me much enjoyment.

Grandmother Miller was a woman of great religious faith. She did not shout in church as Granny Miller was said to have done, but I can truely say from first-hand knowledge that Heaven came down when my grandmother prayed. She was not speaking words: she was communicating with the Almighty.

Sally Miller died February 18, 1935, at the home of James Lamar Miller and was interred in North Bend Cemetarty, Neshoba County."
(Margaret Miller White)

• Miller Home: 11 "I, Sarah Margaret Miller White, was born in 1918, in the house that Samuel Clark Miller was building at the time of his death, and I have vivid memories of the first four years of my life spent there. These memories center around my parents, my sister Claire, my grandmother, Sally Miller, and my uncles and aunts. I remember the hickory nut trees, which we called "The Grove", the garden, and the orchard. I also remember Wesley and his family, who were Choctow Indians that lived on the place."
(Margaret Miller White)

• Letters: 11 "Shortly before her death, Sally Miller wrote the following excerts from a letter to her children:

I want you to know what I want you to do. First, I want you to pledge yourselves to each other. Don't let anything come between your love for each other. Be true to God and the things that stand for Him. Love your fellowmen, for our attitude toward each other determines our love to God. Read your Bibles, and it will guide you aright. My prayer is that you will be good and love and stick to each other. Be good neighbors. Don't be looking for faults in people but remember that we are all human and liable to mistakes."
(Margaret Miller White)

Sarah married Samuel Clark Miller 11 on 20 Jan 1881.
Reuben Clark 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

22. Reuben Clark,11,72 son of Martin Clark and Ann , was born on 24 Apr 1847 in Kemper County, Mississippi,10,73,74 died on 21 Jan 1901, at age 53,10 and was buried in Methodist Cemetary, Noxapater, Mississippi.74 Another name for Reuben was Reubin Clarke.73

Noted events in his life were:

• Name: Clark or Clarke. "The Clark name is spelled at different times as both 'CLARK' and as 'CLARKE'."
Martin Clarke Family in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1850, Kemper County, Mississippi. 73 "The Martin Clark family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi as follows:
Martin "Clarke" - age 50 - Farmer - born in N.C.
Ann - age 45 - born in N.C.
Jane - age 15 - born in N.C.
Robert - age 13 - born in N.C.
Hiram - age 11 - born in Miss. (all other children are born in Miss.)
Harriet - age 9
John - age 7
Martin - age 5
Reubin - age 3
Nat - age 1"
(1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

• Military Service: Civil War Service Record, 1864, Kemper County, Mississippi. 75,76 " Reuben Clark served in Capt. Gamblin's Company, Mississippi State Troops, Mississippi Calavry. He mustered in as a Corporal and mustered out as a Private. Film -M232 roll 8"
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Reuben Clark - enlisted Mar 27, 1864 in Kemper, age 17, blue eyes, lite hair, fair complexion, 5 feet 8 inches, from Kemper, farmer."
(Gamblin's Roster - compiled by Dawn Driskall - Kemper County Webgen)


"This Company enlisted at Dawe's Store, Kemper County, on April 30, 1864. Its Captain was E. D. Gamblin.
First Lieutenant: A. C. Gamblin
Second Lieutenant: J. W. McCraw
Third Lieutenant: C. L. Smith

Enrolled, 88.

Gamblin's Cavalry Battalion was listed in Mabry's Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry, September 30, 1864. Apparently disbanded late in 1864. For those searching for ancestors who served with this unit the records are carried as Gamblin's Mississippi Cavalry Co. (State Troops).
The unit was still active in May 1865 when they were surrendered at Citronelle, Alabama."
(Kemper County Webgen Project)

• Occupation: Kemper County, Mississippi. 74 "Reuben Clark's occupation was a Farmer"
(Census Records and Rev. Glenn Miller, Sr.)

• Loss of Children: "Reuben and Nancy Ann Clark would lose 4 children at early ages. They lost one son at childbirth, Mary at age 5 years old, Sarah at age 1 year old and Edward when he was 26 years old. Their daughter, Penetta Agnes would also lose four children at early ages."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Rebuen Clark and Nancy Daws 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1880, Kemper County, Mississippi. 72 "In the 1880 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, Moscow township, the Clark family is listed as follows:

Reuben Clark - age 33 - born in Mississippi, farmer by trade. Both parents born in North Carolina
Nancy Clark - age 33 - born in Mississippi, keeping house. Both parents born in North Carolina.
Martin Clark - age 12 (all children are listed as being born in Mississippi)
Martha Clark - age 9
Wiley Clark - age 8
Robt. Clark - age 5
Edward Clark (relationship - other) age 4
John Clark (relationship - other) age 3
(Page 102A)

The Reuben Clark family is followed next door by the Ellis Daws (age 25) family. Ellis Daws lists both parents being born in North Carolina. It can be assumed that Ellis Daws is Nancy Ann Daws (Dawes) brother."
(1880 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

• 1896 Enumeration of Children: 1896. 37 "Reubin Clark's children are listed in the 1896 Enumeriation of Children, Kemper County, Mississippi as follows:
Clark, Reubin
R. E. 19, m
Aggie 16, f
Archie 14, m
Stennis 12, m"
(1896 Kemper County, Mississippi, Enumeration of Children)

"The Aggie Clark must be Agnes Clark (Penetta Agnes Clark) because the age is correct. This is probably a mistake by the person transcribing the enumeration. The younger children are not listed because these lists were of "Teachable Children" and Sam would have been too young in 1896."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• School: Moscow, Kemper County, Miss One Room School, Kemper County, Mississippi. 77 "The following newspaper article is not directly related to any family member. I wanted to include it as historical background of what schools were like in Kemper County. I came across this in my research and found it interesting."
(Warren Trest)

"Clippings from the "Kemper County Messenger", Mar 11, 1937
(no spelling or grammatical errors have been corrected)
"I do not know what man was put on earth for, but to me it seems sure he was put here to be successful" ...Robert Louis Stevenson.
On a train in from Hartford I met a fine looking young New York banker. I made the remark, "life is a game where you make nine sacrifice hits to one home run." He replied, "exactly."
And, I almost forgot. One Saturday I was riding into DeKalb and met a fine looking young buck on a good horse on the same errand as myself--our monthly pay. He was getting one hundred eighty dollars for his four month's work and I ask him how much he would save out of that and he replied as a matter of course, "one hundred eighty dollars."
He lived at home, would ride six miles to his school every morning and get there by seven and then ride home again about dark, for it was strictly against rules in those days to try to run a school after the sun went down, and often would help with the chores and work Saturdays to pay his father board, I forgot his name, too, a Clark, Overstreet, Stennis, Harbour, Gully, Adams or something or other. I never saw him again, but happen to know that he is a well-to-do farmer, lawyer, doctor or something like that (unless he happens to have been sent to the penitentiary or Congress) and also that he now had a bunch of fine boys and girls for grandchildren who honor their own names by paying heartfelt respect to "Grandpa".
"How so I know all that? Easy children. In this life the crop you sow as young folks is what you reap in later life, and don't let anyone lie to you about that either." The times have never changed the way seed sprout and grow and never will.
Well now, about Moscow and Thompson.
In the early days, the best teachers we had were nearly all Irish. Fifty years back I was riding with a big strapping prairie farmer who told me a a school in his boyhood. The fathers wanted their children to go get "eddication" (and their girls to know how to read and write, anyway) so they could "figger" as well as the store keepers and read the Bible as well as the preacher, and the boys wanted to get the "eddication" too, but they could not understand that they had to submit to any sort of discipline, except that their fathers handed out and when the teacher tride to keep order they would chunk him out the window and that was that. If father tried to thrash one of those young rough necks (no, he would not fight his own father) he would just leave home, go off a dozen miles or so, get work on a farm, buy a piece of land, marry the employers daughter, and bring home a grandchild or two to see the old man; and what could a father do.
There came along a double-jointed Irishman (in those days the best schools in the world were in Ireland. Even in my day one of the best superintendents New York ever had got his education in Northern Ireland) and when they found out he had an education he was asked to teach for them. When he found out what he would be up against, his old eye lighted up and he said, "Yes I will teach it."
He had a fine voice like a woman's and opened school as follows:
"Boys, they tell me you are a lively bunch and like to fight some. Now I love a lively boy and don't the least mind a little warm-up now and then and it generally takes about four good sized youngsters to make things real interesting for me, so any time now just don't be backward about coming forward. Here is your spelling lesson to start with, and the fellow who misses a single word gets a licking."
Well, he licked four of those big huskies before noon, but of course, the worst came up at home when father slyly joshed them about throwing the teacher out as usual, but one thing the fellows could not do was to be a quitter. Getting licked by the teacher might be humiliation, but being a quitter would be a disgrace. He would have to leave home.
Well after two schools the teacher refused to teach there longer in spite of the folks who wanted to make him a permanent feature of the landscape, but he gave an old-time "examination" in which they were put through all the paces to show what they could read, write, and do sums, etc., and then he parted with this advise, "Whoever gave you the notion these were bad boys? They are good boys. All they wanted to know was if there was a man around (and not such bad sense either, for our times or any other).
Well, in our history, Thompson was about the last of those old-fashioned Irish Teachers, and from what I know of him it must have suited folks in Moscow and the next morning half or three quarters of my school was absent. In that day, I hope it is much the same still, folks were intensely jealous of the reputation of their daughters and even the shadow of suspicion was to them a fearsome thing.
Again, those people were right. I am proud that they still gave me a warm friendship even in my loss.
Today, if I were instituting a school, I should demand an intense concentration in work that would make cigarettes and any disturbing emotions such as are very likely to be caused by the other sex, impossible.
Are you tired of this story of failures? Well, maybe you are tired of life too. However, I am not. I now had two hundred and started in for college -- the old A. & M. was my choice. I had had a lot of classical training and needed more science and mathematics. Besides I needed to know more in every way I knew it."
(Clippings from the "Kemper County Messenger", Mar 11, 1937)

Reuben married Nancy Anne Dawes on 4 Dec 1866.10

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Martin Luther Clark (born on 31 Jan 1868 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 15 Sep 1953)

         ii.   Mary Jane Clark (born on 22 Aug 1870 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 21 Jun 1945)

        iii.   Wiley Gray Clark (born on 12 Apr 1872 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 18 Feb 1952)

         iv.   Robert Ellis Clark (born on 22 Jan 1874 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 2 Jan 1929)

          v.   Edward Clark (born on 8 Sep 1875 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 11 Sep 1901)

         vi.   John Walton Clark (born on 8 Nov 1877 Kemper County, Mississippi)

11      vii.   Pennetta Agnes Clark (born on 14 Jul 1880 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 31 Mar 1961 in Henrietta, Texas)

       viii.   John Archibald Clark (born on 8 Jun 1882 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 15 Sep 1967 in Noxapater, Mississippi)

         ix.   Ruben Stennis Clark (born on 5 Apr 1884 Kemper County, Mississippi - died in Jun 1968 in Noxapater, Mississippi)

          x.   Mary Mitchell Clark (born on 7 Oct 1886 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 4 Apr 1891 in Kemper County, Mississippi)

         xi.   Sarah Catherine Clark (born on 29 Sep 1888 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 28 Jul 1889 in Kemper County, Mississippi)

        xii.   Infant Clark (born on 15 Dec 1890 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 15 Dec 1890 in Kemper County, Mississippi)

       xiii.   Sam Jones Clark (born on 15 Jan 1893 Kemper County, Mississippi - died in Oct 1975 in Chickasaw, Mississippi)


Nancy Anne Dawes Clark 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

23. Nancy Anne Dawes, daughter of Sire O. Dawes and Agnes Farmer , was born on 13 Nov 1846 in Kemper County, Mississippi,10 died on 24 Apr 1927 in Probably Winston County, Mississippi, at age 80,10 and was buried in Methodist Cemetary, Noxapater, Mississippi.74 Other names for Nancy were Nancy Ann Davis 11, and Nancy Ann Daws.

The Clark Family 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Name: Last Name. 1 "Some history had Nancy Ann Daws listed as a Davis. My grandmother. Lillian Ersell Miller. had written down that Nancy Ann Dawes was a Dawes, not Davis. My father called Glen Miller in 2003 and he stated that her maiden name (his grandmother) was a Dawes (or Daws) also. Census records also point to her maiden name being Dawes or Daws. In various records, the name is spelled both as 'DAWS' and 'DAWES'"
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Loss of Children: "Reuben and Nancy Ann Clark would lose 4 children at early ages. They lost one son at childbirth, Mary at age 5 years old, Sarah at age 1 year old and Edward when he was 26 years old. Their daughter, Penetta Agnes, would also lose 4 children at young ages."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Nancy A. Clark in Winston County 1910 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi (Noxapater), 1910, Winston County, Mississippi. 78 "Nancy Ann Clark is listed in the 1910 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi (Noxapater) as follows (house 184):

Nancy A. Clark - (Head) - age 67 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in North Carolina - Occupation as Farm Laborer
Sam J. Clark - age 17 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Mississippi - Occupation as Farmer

The next household is Marten L. Clark (house 185) as:
Martin L. - age 40
Sarah M. - age 30
Sadie A. - age 18 (or age 16)
Mary M. - age 11
Rubin H. - age 9
? - daughter - age 6
Mitchell - son - age 4
? - daughter - age 2."
(1910 US Census)

Nancy Ann Clark 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi, 1920, Winston County, Mississippi. 79 "In the 1920 US Winston County, Mississippi census, Nancy Ann Clark is living with Sam Jones Clark. She is listed as 73 years old and Sam Jones is listed as 28. Sam is listed as a laborer for Public Works. There are three Clark families that are living next door to each other. The first home is the Martin Luther Clark family, followed by Sam Jones Clark (with Nancy Ann Clark), and then the Robert Ellis Clark family."
(1920 US Census - Page 12-A)

Nancy married Reuben Clark 11 on 4 Dec 1866.10

24. Dewitt Clinton Graham,2,5,80,81,82,83 son of Archibald Graham and Jane Holloway , was born about 1828 in Louisana 84 and died in Nov 1865, about age 37.85

Noted events in his life were:

• Orphaned: 20,86 "Barbara Haigh states that Dewitt Clinton Graham was reared by Bartlett Ford after he was orphaned. (His father died in 1833 and his mother died in 1839 at ages of 38 and 29 years of age)."
(Warren Trest)

"This is backed up on page 98 of A History of Franklin County, Mississippi, to 1861 by John Willkiam Hadskey. "Dewitt Clinton Graham, the last elected representative from the county prior to the Civil War, was a socially prominent aristocrat of that day. Apparently his father, Archibald Graham, had died when Dewitt was quite young, and this young native of Hamburg community had been reared by his stepfather, Bartlett Ford. "
(William Hadskey)
 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• History of Franklin County, Mississippi: "Following LaSalle's trip down the Mississippi River, the Franklin County area was recognized as being populated by the Natchez Indians.

The French built their second settlement at Fort Rosalie (now Natchez) in 1716 and other settlements followed quickly. The growth of the area was slow. Notable land deals like the speculative Mississippi Company's deal led to the financial panic in 1720 known as the bursting of the Mississippi Bubble.

The Natchez Indians grew restless as French settlers began to take over their lands. They attacked Fort Rosalie in 1729 killing many settlers. Following this attack the French retaliated by virtually destroying almost all of the Natchez Indians.

With the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763 after the French and Indian War, France ceded its territory east of the Mississippi River except New Orleans. This Mississippi area which included present day Franklin County became a part of British West Florida and was known as the Natchez District. The northern boundary extended to the mouth of the Yazoo River. This area witnessed a large influx of Anglo-Americans from the Atlantic Seaboard Colonies.

During the American Revolution Spain seized the Natchez District and the remainder of British West Florida. When the American Revolution ended in 1783 Britain transferred the claim to the territory north of the 31 degree latitude to the United States. But, Spain refused to recognize the American claim to West Florida. It was not until 1795 that the Spanish agreed to the 31 degree north boundary. It was not until 1798 that the Spanish actually relinquished control of the Natchez District to the United States. In the meantime, the state of Georgia complicated matters by asserting a claim to the area. Georgia had actually sold land to three companies of eager speculators. Georgia passports were issued to settlers who would travel by land through the Creek Indian territory to the western Mississippi River settlements.

In 1798 the United States Congress created the Mississippi Territory which included all the land between Georgia and the Mississippi River which was located north of the 31 degree latitude and south of a line running due east of the mouth of the Yazoo River. In 1804 this territory was expanded to include the land northward to Tennessee. It 1812 the rest of West Florida was included.

On December 10, 1817 Mississippi was admitted as a state to the United States. The eastern part of the Mississippi Territory became the Alabama Territory.

Franklin County, Mississippi was formed from the eastern part of Jefferson County and parts of Amite, Wilkinson and Adams Counties on December 21, 1809. It was named for Benjamin Franklin, distinguished American patriot. Over the year numerous minor boundary changes create a nightmare for genealogists.

The city of Meadville was named for Cowles Meade, Virginia native, who was appointed Secretary of the Territory in 1805. He had also served as acting Governor and Speaker of the House. "
(Franklin County WebGen)

• Meadville: "Dewitt Graham is listed in the following article concerning the history of Meadville, Mississippi."

"Meadville was the political hotbed of Franklin County. Most of the leading political figures of the county lived in Meadville or in its environs. In 1860 it had telegraph service, three inns and taverns, two houses of private entertainment, a post office, cobblers, several school teachers, a group of lawyers, a number of mechanics, several blacksmiths, and a tailor lived there.

A gentleman passing through Meadville in 1841 describe it as "Being in a state of dilapidation and decline. The palsying hand of time had shaken it to pieces." Actually the whole county was suffering from the lingering depression that is usually styled "the panic of 1837." The traveler was undoubtedly sincere in his observation concerning the condition of Meadville. No one had enough money to buy a tavern license in the town that year, so he might have missed his mid-day "dram." It might have appeared dilapidated because the Whig Party had consistently led his Democratic Party during the past few years or because many people had left the county two jumps ahead of process servers to escape paying their debts and had left their homes vacant and fields unattended. The county did not have a sheriff because William K. Ratcliff, the man elected sheriff, could not get any person or group of persons as sureties for his bond, and the old jail had nearly fallen down.

Conditions in the entire state were bad. Various laws were passed restricting sheriffs who were busily selling debtors' property. The sheriff received half of the property at auction if there were no bidders and some sheriff's "forgot" to advertise the auctions. Early in 1841 a law was passed requiring the sheriff to post five notices, one being on the courthouse, advertising the auctions which could not be held without ten days' notice on personal property, or thirty days' notice on real estate. Later in the year a law was passed to ban the sheriff from receiving half of the property where there were no bidders.

About six months after the traveler came through Meadville, William Proby, Oscar J.A. Stuart and John Johnson put glasses in all the windows, repaired the broken benches and steps, made a new door for the east side of the courthouse, and made other needed repairs upon the building. About the same time, Patrick Burd, a former overseer for Robert Anderson, began to build a new jail, because in 1839, Edmund Tucker, the sheriff, had carried prisoners to the Adams County Jail due to the insufficiency of the county jail. The new jail was to be 30 feet long and 25 feet wide from out to out and two stones high, with two dungeons, one on the ground floor and the other on the second story. A sheriff's office was to be on the lower story and a debtor's room on the second story. The sheriff's office and the debtor's department each were to have a fireplace sealed to the building by iron or wooden timbers. Each story was to be nine feet in the clear and the windows of the upper and lower dungeons were to be lined with an iron plate three-eights of an inch in thickness and eleven inches wide, to extend six inches above and below. The windows were to be spiked well to the sheds and riveted through, with three bars in each window. The lower windows were to be bricked up half way from the bottom, half the thickness of the walls.
Later a rail fence with four gates was built around the public square. The posts were white oak and the fence extended 66 feet north.

In the years following the depression, life in Meadville returned to normal. Taverns and inns were again opened in the town. Before the panic the taverns were operated by Reddin Byrd; the jailor, N.R. McKay; John D. Warschow; and Lewis Hollinger, who were predominantly of old established families. After the depression taverns and inns were operated by persons who had in many cases recently arrived from abroad. Tavern keepers George Garvis and Henry N. McKenzie came from Great Britain. Ebenezer Eleeker, who ran a small store in Meadville, was a native of England. Jose Rodriquez, another merchant, came from Cuba. Lewis M. Hollinger, who had the largest tavern in town, and Hiram Mann and Jacob Stern, tavern keepers, were born in Germany.

Men of foreign ancestry comprised a large segment of the population of the town in 1860. Charles Brewerton, a local painter, was a native of England; Joseph Glick and Marcius Lilverburg, both tailors, were born in Germany; and Edward Moreau, a cobbler, was a recent immigrant from Russia. Thomas Ryan, a brick mason, hailed from the Emeral Isle, and Henry Hinelcamp, a mechanic, and Barnett Broadmitz, a clerk were both born in Europe. Sigmund Mann, who operated a general store in Meadville, were of Germanic origin, John and James Garvis, brothers of George Garvis, was originally from Great Britain.

In the various professions and crafts there were many native Americans some of whom were born in Franklin County. George W. Imes and Rufus R. Ford were engineers. Dewitt G. Graham practiced law and was a competent surveyor. Thomas M. Pickett was a carpenter. F.C. Huff, John F. Hall, William D. Buckles, and Alexander McDonally were mechanics. William K. Brown was a shoe maker.
Some of the doctors who resided in Meadville were John B. Holden, John J. Jones, James A. Lee, Orvin V. Shurtliff, and Jacob R. Sample. In addition to lawyer-surveyor D. C. Graham, other attorneys were David A. Herring, William S. Cassedy, and Judge Hiram Cassedy. John A. Sample was the town's sole artist.
John M. Flowers and Joseph B. Wilkinson operated houses of private entertainment in Meadville in 1860. Wilkinson also had a grocery store and was in charge of mail delivery. Some sources state that he became post master in Meadville, in May, 1858, upon the death of John P. Stewart, who had been post master prior to that time. Wilkinson had eight men working for him who distributed the mail throughout the county.

Several new buildings were built in the decade prior to 1860. The Masons were not satisfied with the old Masonic Lodge. In 1857 they bought two lots from William O. Weathersby and John P. Stewart, and Stewart and John A. Hunter contracted to build a new lodge hall. The old building was sold to Richard Haley by O.V. Shurtliff, one of the commissioners for the Masonic finance committee.
The various transactions in land in Meadville indicate that Seaborn E. Jones bought several lots in Meadville, and on this land he probably built his tavern. In this period other purchasers of Meadville land were David Laurie; J.P. Stewart, a lawyer; William Calvit; William S. Cassedy, a lawyer; Jesse W. Cobb, a tavern keeper; and Erwin, Cleary and John L. Bornmore.

Pickett Reynolds had begun what was to be the largest saloon in Meadville in 1860. This tavern was a two story structure about one hundred feet long and sixty feet wide. Reynolds planned to convert the lower story into a tavern and the upper story into small rooms for sleeping accommodations."
(www.franklincountyms.net)

• Occupation: Lawyer and State Representative, Franklin County, Mississippi. "Dewitt Clinton Graham is listed as a Lawyer and State Representative. By all accounts, one of his occupations should have been listed as a gambler."
(Warren Trest)
Dewitt Graham in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US, 1850, Franklin Co., MS. 84 "The Dewitt Graham family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

DeWitt C. Graham - age 22 - Lawyer - born in Louisiana
Francis M. - age 17 - born in Mississippi.

There is an Archibald B. Graham staying next door to Dewitt and is listed as 20 years old and a student. He is listed as being born in Louisiana also. These are the only Grahams living in Franklin County in 1850. A very good assumption can be made that Archibald is Dewitt Graham's younger brother."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 1)
Dewitt Graham in 1850 US Slave Schedule 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Slave Schedule: 1850 US Slave Schedule, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1850, Franklin Co., MS. 87 "Dewitt Graham has 9 slaves in the 1850 US Slave Schedule, Franklin County, Mississippi. They are listed as follows:
40 year old Male
30 year old female
11 year old female
9 year old female
Two 7 year old females
Two 4 year old females
1 year old female."
(1850 US Slave Schedule, Franklin County, Mississippi - Page 1)

DC Graham in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US, 1860, Franklin Co., MS. 88 "The Dewitt Graham family is listed on the 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Meadville Division, Mississippi as follows:

D.C. Graham - age 32 - Lawyer - Real Estate Value of $20,000 - Personal Estate Value of $25,000 - born in Louisiana
Malvinia - age 26 - born in Mississippi
Adda - age 6
Mary - age 2
Claiborne C - age 6 months"
(1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 238)
Dewitt Graham in 1860 US Slave Schedule 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Slave Schedule: 1860 US Census, Slave Schedule, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1860. 89 "D.C. Graham has 20 slaves in the 1860 Slave Schedule, Franklin County, Mississippi. They are listed as follows:
45 year old male
37 year old female
35 year old female
32 year old female
31 year old female
30 year old male
25 year old male
23 year old male
22 year old female
21 year old female
20 year old female
13 year old male
11 year old male
8 year old female
4 year old male
3 year old female
2 year old female
2 year old male
1 year old female
6 month old female."
(1860 Franklin County, Mississippi Slave Schedule - Page 2)
General John Bell Hood 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Military Service: Confederate Soldier - Civil War. 85,90 "Dewitt C. Graham served in the 7th Mississippi Infantry, CSA. He mustered in as a Sergeant and was ranked out as a Sergeant. He served in Company A, 7th Regiment Mississippi Infantry."

"Diane Hall states that Dewitt Graham was 4th Sergent in Company A, 7th Mississippi, Franklin Rifles."

"7th Infantry Regiment was organized at Corinth, Mississippi, in April, 1861 with men from Marion, Amite, Pike, Franklin, Lawrence, Yalobusha, Holmes, and Covington counties. It served on the Mississippi coast, saw action in Kentucky, then was assigned to Generals J.P. Anderson's, Tucker's, and Sharp's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. The 7th participated in many conflicts of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta , marched with Hood to Tennessee, and fought in North Carolina. It was mustered into Confederate service with 911 officers and men, and sustained 20 casualties at Munfordville , 113 at Murfreesboro, and 75 at Chickamauga . The unit was briefly consolidated with the 9th Mississippi Regiment in December, 1863 and totalled 468 men and 252 arms. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered with 74 men. The field officers were Colonels William H. Bishop, E.J. Goode, Hamilton Mayson, and A.G. Mills; Lieutenant Colonels R.S. Carter and Benjamin F. Johns; and Major Henry Pope."
(Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System)

"Dunbar Roland's history of the unit is as follows:

Company A -- Franklin Rifles (raised in Franklin County, MS)
Company B -- Bogue Chitto Guards (raised in Pike County, MS)
Company C -- Amite Rifles (raised in Amite County, MS)
Company D -- Jeff Davis Sharpshooters (raised in Marion County, MS)
Company E -- Franklin Beauregards (raised in Franklin County, MS)
Company F -- Marion’s Men (raised in Marion County, MS)
Company G -- Goode Rifles (raised in Lawrence County, MS)
Company H -- Dahlgren Rifles (raised in Pike County, MS)
Company I -- Covington Rifles, aka Covington Rangers (raised in Covington County, MS)
Company K -- Quitman Rifles (raised in Franklin County, MS)
Colonels -- Enos J. Goode, Hamilton Mayson, William H. Bishop, killed at Franklin. Lieutenant-Colonels -- Hamilton Mayson, R. S. Garter, A. G. Mills, Benjamin F. Johns. Majors -- R. S. Carter, Benjamin F. Johns, Henry Pope.

Aggregate original enrollment, 911 officers and men. Original rolls on file.

This regiment was organized as the Seventh Regiment, Third Brigade, Army of Mississippi, Gen. C. G. Dahlgren commanding brigade, headquarters at Shieldsboro. It was intended by Governor Pettus to be one of three regiments for coast defense. The regiment was organized September 25, 1861, and in December was stationed at Bay St. Louis. Started to Tennessee February 26, and was at Jackson, Tenn., March 3, 1862. Being recalled to Corinth, it was assigned in the organization of the army under Albert Sidney Johnston to the "High Pressure" Brigade of Gen. J. R. Chalmers. Under the command of Lieut.-Col. Hamilton Mayson, the regiment participated in the battle of Shiloh. The Tenth, Ninth and Seventh made the first charge through the Federal camp in their front on the morning of April 6, and were gallantly engaged throughout that day and the next. Mayson was honorably mentioned as conspicuous in the thickest of the fight.

During the siege of Corinth Lieut.-Col. A. G. Mills commanded the outpost on the Monterey road, with 200 men from the Seventh and other regiments of the brigade. A Federal force advanced on May 28 and took position in a swamp from which they could not be driven until Mills was reinforced by an Alabama brigade under Col. Joseph Wheeler, when battle was given May 29, resulting in dislodging the enemy. In his report Wheeler mentioned the gallantry of Colonel Mills and Private Kerns, both wounded.

With Chalmers' Brigade the regiment, Col. W. H. Bishop commanding, participated in the Kentucky campaign of 1862. After passing through Glasgow they occupied Cave City, on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and thence moved to attack the Federal garrison of 4,000 troops at Munfordville, strongly entrenched. In this battle, September 14, the Seventh, Ninth and Twenty-ninth took position to support the battery on a knob in front of the bastion fort, and thence were advanced in two columns to closer positions, the Seventh supporting the Ninth and Twenty-ninth. After the Tenth made its assault the other three regiments moved against the works, the Seventh on the right, and seemed to have prospects of success, when the opening of fire from a Confederate battery in their rear, unknown to them, disconcerted the attack. Colonel Bishop reported that he had 141 men in the battle and lost 4 killed, 15 wounded, 1 missing. In the second battle, September 16, the Seventh supported the skirmish line in the light attack, after which General Wilder surrendered. The brigade was at Danville and Harrodsburg October 8, day of battle of Perryville, skirmished at Lawrenceburg on the retreat, crossed Cumberland Gap October 20, reached Knoxville on the 31st, and in November advanced from Chattanooga to Murfreesboro.

At the battle of Murfreesboro Chalmers' Brigade was stationed at the right of Polk's Corps, the right of the brigade resting on Stone's River. Rosecrans established his line near them, placing Palmer's Division (Hazen's, Cruft's and Grose's Brigades) from the river along the Round Forest. The lines were separated by an open field, and Chalmers' men were exposed to artillery fire. It was wet and cold, but to avoid observation they refrained from building fires. Throwing up a slight earthwork for protection, they lay there forty-eight hours, waiting for the battle. It began with the attack by Hardee's Corps at dawn, December 31. Chalmers' Brigade was the pivot on which Polk's Corps swung into action, and was not ordered to attack until 11 o'clock. Surprise had aided the other brigades in their triumphant advance, but Palmer's Brigades were fully prepared when Chalmers' went in. There was no lack of spirit in the charge of the Mississippians, but the storm of lead and iron that met them at the burnt house struck down General Chalmers and shattered the line of gray. The regiments became separated, but soon reformed and under the brigade command of Colonel White fought gallantly through the remainder of the battle, which raged about the Round Forest for three days. In his report of the battle General Bragg said, "We succeeded in driving the enemy from every position except the strong one held by his extreme left flank, resting on Stone's River and covered by a concentration of artillery of superior range and caliber which seemed to bid us defiance." All of Withers' Division except Walthall's Brigade, all of Breckenridge's Division except Hanson's Brigade, and Donelson's Brigade of Cheatham's Division, were in this fight on the left, about 12,000 men, and their killed and wounded numbered 4,000. The casualties of the Seventh Regiment were 12 killed, including Capt. R. D. McDowell and Lieuts. H. J. M. Harrigill and G. W. Jones, 97 wounded and 4 missing.

The names selected by the various companies for the Roll of Honor were: John A. Higginbotham, A (k) ; H. H. Price, B; Richard R. Chaddick, C; Jeptha Creel, D; Sergt. George Stewart, E; B. Drummond, F; M. B. Stringer, G; A. Z. Coker, H; P. W. Rogers, I; Sergt. A. E. Ford, K.

They fell back to Shelbyville and Tullahoma in January and remained in that line until July, 1863, when they crossed the Tennessee River, marched over Lookout Mountain and went in camp near Chattanooga. July 13 to August 23, at the Tennessee River near Bridgeport, on picket duty; withdrawn as Rosecrans advanced.

The regiment, with Hindman's Division of Bragg's army, retreated from Chattanooga, as Rosecrans made the flank movement, into Georgia, and the Mississippi Brigade was encamped at Lee & Gordon's mill until they marched, September 10, to give battle to one of the Federal columns coming through the mountains at Cooper's and Stevens' gaps. Through a failure of co-operation only a skirmish resulted, on the 11th, and the men, many of them barefooted, all on short rations, hungry, thirsty and worn by night marches, moved back to Lafayette, whence they reached the field of battle with Rosecrans' united army, near Lee & Gordon's mill, on the night of September 19th, and next day went into the fight under the command of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. They attacked near the Glenn house, and gained that strong position. Colonel Bishop reported: "In obedience to orders, passing through General Deas' line, I attacked the enemy in my front, drove them from their position, capturing three pieces of artillery, and pursued them nearly a mile. In this charge I lost 2 men killed and about 10 officers and men wounded, among the latter Color Sergeant W. J. Nunnery." Of this victory of his division and others over the Federal divisions of Sheridan and Jeff C. Davis, General Hindman wrote: "Anderson's fearless Mississippians, carrying the breastworks in their front, moved up rapidly on Manigault's left. Without halting these two brigades then drove the enemy across the Crawfish Spring road and up the broken spurs of Missionary Ridge to its first elevation, 100 yards west. Hiding behind this, the enemy opened a tremendous fire of musketry and cannon upon our line as it advanced, and at the same time enfiladed it from an eminence in a field on the right; but without faltering he was charged, driven from his strong position and pursued upwards of three quarters of a mile, when he ceased resisting and disappeared northward." Hindman's Division captured 17 cannon and over 1,000 prisoners. Sheridan reported that his battle was fought under the most disadvantageous circumstances and that he lost 96 officers, among them Gen. W. H. Lytle, and 1,421 men. After 1 o'clock the same day the Mississippi Brigade joined in the assaults upon Granger's line near the Vidito house, and were three times repulsed, despite their most heroic efforts, with heavy loss. In the third assault, after repelling a Federal charge, the Seventh advanced with Kelly's Brigade of Buckner's Corps. Among the killed were Capts. J. M. Brister and G. A. Robertson, "brave and gallant soldiers and attentive and efficient officers." (Bishop). Mat Stringer, of Company G, Color Corporal, who succeeded Nunnery as color bearer, was mentioned for "cool intrepidity and gallantry." The flag staff was shot in two near the crest of the ridge. Lieut. W. J. Proby of A, and Lieut. John D. Cooper of G, were given honorable mention. The casualties were 10 killed, 64 wounded, 1 missing.

Major Riedt, commanding Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania, reported capture of 15 sharpshooters of this regiment, in front of Missionary Ridge, November 24, 1863. November 25 they participated in the battle of Missionary Ridge, and joined in the retreat to Dalton, where they went into winter quarters. The Ninth Regiment was then also put under command of the field officers of the Seventh.

At the opening of the campaign of 1864, the brigade, under General Tucker, participated in the engagement at Rocky Face Ridge, May 8, and at Resaca, May 14-15, was held in reserve, supporting Walthall's brigade. General Tucker was severely wounded and the brigade suffered considerably from artillery fire. Colonel Sharp, of the Forty-fourth, was promoted to Brigadier-General. The brigade served under General Hood in the fighting along the lines of New Hope church and Kenesaw Mountain in May and June. Gen. S. D. Lee took command of the corps July 27, Hood having been promoted to command of the army, and was directed to push the Federal advance back from the Lickskillet road west of Atlanta. Sharp's Brigade, which had been moved from the east to the west side of the city the day before, marched out three miles and attacked, twice, but the Federal line was too strongly established for the force available against it. Gen. Patton Anderson resumed command of the division, which went to work intrenching westward of the city, and was engaged in this work and constant skirmishing with the Federal line for a month. August 30 they marched to Jonesboro and went into battle there against Sherman, attacking with great gallantry and perseverance a strongly posted line of the enemy. (See Forty-fourth Regiment.) Col. William H. Bishop commanded the regiment through this campaign, and Lieut.-Col. Benjamin F. Johns was detached in command of the Ninth.

In General Hood's October, 1864, campaign on the Atlanta and Chattanooga Railroad, Lee's Corps invested Resaca but did not assault, and held Snake Creek Gap against Sherman until the remainder of the army had moved toward Gadsden, Ala. Sharp's Brigade crossed the Tennessee late on October 30 and "encountered the enemy on the Florence and Huntsville road about dark. A spirited affair took place, in which the enemy were defeated." (Lee). Sharp's Brigade, with Brantley's, Deas' and Manigault's, constituted the division of Gen. Edward Johnson, in S. D. Lee's Corps. They moved to Columbia, and when the Federal force there fell back across the river and took a strong position, Johnson's Division was detached with the other two corps of the army to cross the river and move in the direction of Spring Hill. The Federal force fell back to the intrenched line on the Harpeth River at Franklin, where they were attacked November 30 by Cheatham's and Stewart's Corps and Forrest's cavalry. Lee sent Johnson's Division in as reinforcements, "but owing to the darkness and want of information as to the locality his attack was not felt by the enemy until about one hour after dark. This division moved against the enemy's breastworks under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry, gallantly driving the enemy from portions of his line. The brigades of Sharp and Brantley (Mississippians) and of Deas (Alabamians), particularly distinguished themselves. Their dead were mostly in the trenches and on the works of the enemy, where they nobly fell in a desperate hand-to-hand conflict. Sharp captured three stand of colors. These brigades never faltered in this terrible night struggle." (Lee's report, January 30, 1865). The casualties of Sharp's Brigade were 30 killed, 81 wounded, 9 missing. Col. W. H. Bishop, commanding the Seventh and Ninth, was among the killed. Lieut.-Col. Johns, Major Henry Pope and Capt. J. N. Atkinson were wounded. Total casualties, 2 killed, 10 wounded, in Companies A, C, F, H, and I.

General Thomas' army then fell back to Nashville, which was invested by General Hood, December 2-16. December 15 Thomas assumed the offensive and Lee sent Johnson's Division to the assistance of Stewart's Corps. Sharp's Brigade was placed on the extreme left extended in the night by Bates' Division. In the battle next day the line of Bates' Division was broken by Garrard's Federal Division, which reported the capture of 20 guns and about 850 prisoners, including General Johnson. In a few moments the whole Confederate line was in retreat toward Franklin. At Brentwood General Lee took command of the rear guard, and during the retreat next day he was severely wounded in the foot. The army crossed the Tennessee River December 26, and fell back to the prairies of Mississippi, Lee making his headquarters at Columbus, Hood at Tupelo.

The brigade was furloughed until February 12, 186S. Under orders for the Carolinas 274 were assembled at Meridian February 14, and started east on the 18th. They were detained some time at Montgomery on account of the Mobile campaign, but were ordered to Augusta, March 4, and thence to North Carolina. April 3, the aggregate present was 420 in the brigade. Organization of the army near Smithfield, N. C., March 31, 1865, Seventh and Ninth Regiments consolidated under the command of Lieut .-Col. B. F. Johns.

April 9 Sharp's Brigade -- the Seventh, Ninth, Tenth, Forty-first and Forty-fourth Regiments and Ninth Battalion -- consolidated as the Ninth Mississippi Regiment, Col. William C. Richards, commanding. Brig.-Gen. Sharp's Brigade included this regiment, also the Eighth Mississippi Battalion, representing the consolidation of Lowrey's Brigade, and the Twenty-fourth Alabama and Nineteenth South Carolina, the consolidation of Manigault's Brigade. This consolidated brigade was part of the division of Gen. D. H. Hill, in S. D. Lee's Corps. The army was surrendered April 26, and paroled at Greensboro, N.C. But some of this regiment did not go east, and were included in the surrender of General Taylor, May 4, 1865."
(from Dunbar Rowland’s "Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898")

"From the muster rolls was found the following:

NON COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
1St SGT. James M. Lowe
2nd SGT. Jacob R. Sample
3rd SGT. George Imes
4th SGT. Dewitt Clinton Graham
5th SGT. Thomas Samuel Cotton
1st Corp. Hardy G.H. Magee
2nd Corp. John Everly Holden
3rd Corp. John A. Higginbotham
4th Corp. Elias Green"
(PoBoys Civil War)

• Military Service: "According to William Hadskey, Dewitt Clinton Graham did not muster due to being a State Representative and went into the 23rd Calvery instead."

"The Men Of Company A:

Captain William J. Proby not -elected; reenlisted and killed at Atlanta; served as Lieutenant Colonel and Provost Marshal of Franklin County in 1862.
1st Lt. William M. Porter — resigned as Captain due to month’s illness; Co. I, 14th Confederate Cavalry
2nd Lt. Pinckney Cotesworth Herrington - not re-elected; became Lt. Col. of Cavalry
3rd Lt. Adolphus Brown — resigned Dec. 1861; enlisted Co. B 14th Confederate Cavalry
1st Sergeant James M Lowe — not mustered; joined Darden’s Artillery school teacher.
2nd Sergeant Jacob R Sample — surrendered in North Carolina; a physician
3rd Sergeant George lmes — promoted to 1st Lt. transferred to Co. K; born in Va.
4th Sergeant Dewitt Clinton Graham — did not muster; State Representative; joined 23rd Cavalry
5th Sergeant Thomas Samuel Cotton — became captain; disabled from wounds at Atlanta
1st Corp. Hardy G. H. Magee — wounded at Murfreesboro and captured at Missionary Ridge
2nd Corp. John Everly Holden not re-elected was 2nd Lt.; later served in Youngblood’s Signal; was a physician and later a judge; had his servants Ale and Blackman with him
3rd Corp. John A. Higginbotham — wounded at Shiloh; killed at Murfreesboro, Medal of Honor
4th Corp. Elias Green — did not muster; transferred to Co. E 4th Louisiana"

• Memories from William Hadskey: 20 "The following is from the book, A History of Franklin County, Mississippi, to 1861 by John William Hadskey. It was his thesis for a MS degree.

p.65 "Gambling was a vice of which many of the people were guilty. Joseph B.Wilkinson,....Dewitt C.Graham,...and many others were hauled into court for gambling."
p.69 "The membership roll for this society [The Franklin County Agricultural Society] was impressive. Some of the most influential people in the county were members: ... Attorney Dewitt C.Graham...."
p.89 "Twenty-three lawyers practiced in Meadville between 1853 and 1860, and ten of those lived in the county. They were ..."Dewitt C.Graham...."
p.76 "Dewitt G.Graham practised law and was a competent surveyor."
p.98 "Dewitt Clinton Graham, the last elected representative from the county prior to the Civil War, was a socially prominent aristocrat of that day. Apparently his father, Archibald Graham, had died when Dewitt was quite young, and this young native of Hamburg community had been reared by his stepfather, Bartlett Ford. Archibald Graham, a United States surveyor, left his son a nice estate, and the young man inherited more land from his mother, the former Mary Jane Holloway, and from his stepfather. One of his kinsmen taught him the art of surveying and the fundamentals of engineering [321]. Dewitt was also well versed in law and was a close friend of John P.Stewart, one of the political leaders of the county. From the time of his birth in 1828 his family expected him to follow their aristocratic fashion. He learned well and from all accounts this tall, handsome young man was one of the most aristocratic snobs in the county. After he married Melvina Smith in 1859, he would not let Ransom Hall, a white day laborer who was working for him, eat at his table. Other supposedly inferior white people were also denied that privilege [322].

"When Graham began to practice law, he moved to Meadville. He was recognized as one of the most brilliant lawyers in the county and was noted as a mathematician. His knowledge of mathematics availed him naught in his gambling exploits; he lost nearly all his inheritance at cards although on some occasions he won as much as $5000. in a single night [323]. He was a familiar figure in circuit court, pleading for himself or some friends on a gaming charge [324].To better his political ambitions he secured the post of deputy probate clerk and served on election committees as clerk and occasionally as commissioner. He also served as a school commissioner and as a commissioner of the Homochito River Company [325].

"Graham supported for district attorney Luther M.Lee, a Meadville attorney and secretary of the county Democratic executive committee, in the convention which was held at Fayette, and in the ensuing political race his choice was defeated by a Know-Nothing [326]. He also supported Judge Cassedy fopr the congressional nomination at the district convention in Brookhaven but failed to get him nominated. Graham could afford to be magnanimous for he had been selected by acclamation to represent the county legislature in the county Democratic convention which had been held on May 2, 1859. Probably there, at the apex of his life, graham had majestically arisen and assured the assembled crowd that "if a Black Republican should b e elected in 1860, a convention of the people should be called.' That rabid group of secessiontionists knew what Graham meant [327]."
Sources: 321-Memoirs of Mississippi, Vol I, 753-4.
322-Interview with Mrs.Anna Graham, Hamburg, Miss, January 1, 1952.
323-Idem
324-Franklin Co.Circuit Court Records, 1860.
325-Franklin Co. Records of the Board of Police, Nov.20,1849; Dec 2,1850; June 12, Sept 13, 1852; March 12,1855; Nov 7,1859.
326-Fayette Watch Tower, April 30,1859, to Oct 18, 1859, passim.
327-Ibid., May 13,1859; Sept 13, 1859."
(William Hadskey)

"It is interesting to note that the Ransom Hall that he would not let eat at his table, married his wife and reared his children after his death."
(Warren Graham Trest)
1st Flag of the 7th Miss Infantry 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Death: 1866-1867. 85 "Francis Smith Graham married Leonidus Ransom Hall in August, 1867. Diane Hall states that Leonidus Hall married Dewitt's widow and raised his children. She believes that before the war, Leonidus Hall was Dewitt's overseer.

Francis being married to L. Hall with the Graham children is backed up by the 1880 Franklin County, Mississippi census."

"It is also of note that Leonidus Hall was a private in Company A, Franklin Rifles when Dewitt Graham was the 4th Sergent of the same unit.

The following is the original roster of the 7th, Company A:
NON COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
1St SGT. James M. Lowe
2nd SGT. Jacob R. Sample
3rd SGT. George Imes
4th SGT. Dewitt Clinton Graham
5th SGT. Thomas Samuel Cotton
1st Corp. Hardy G.H. Magee
2nd Corp. John Everly Holden
3rd Corp. John A. Higginbotham
4th Corp. Elias Green

PRIVATES
Eugene E. Adams (WIA at Atlanta)
George M. Adams
David Leroy Aldridge
Manfield L. Aldridge
John E. Allred
Charles Arnold
Ira Amasa Austin
Charles W. Beam
Soloman J. Beck
James P. Bennett
Jesse C. Bennett
Micajah P. Bennett
James M. Bovard
Charles Brewerton
Barnett Broadnitz
William K. Brown
William Prater / Prather Buckles
Joseph S. Buie
William E. Buie
Blanchard D. Butler
Thomas Byrd
Thomas Jefferson Byrd
Winston W. E. Byrd
George W. Cain
Hardy H. Cain
William T. Calert Jr.
Bryant M. Caraway
William B. Carraway
William S. Cassidy
Jasper N. Chambers
John Chambers
Henry M. Cloy
Richard M. Cloy
Zachariah Reeves Cloy
Joseph Robert Cotton
William Van Cotton
Walter Courtney
Zachariah Monroe Coward
Jacob J. Cox
Octairous H. Cox
George McD Crosby
William M. Crosby
Francis E. Cruise
Samuel Cruise
Thomas S. Cruise
Isaac J. Davis
John L. P. Dixon
Thomas Alexander Ducker
Thomas Ephraim Dixon
Jesse T. Evans
John K. Ford
Rufus R. Ford
William H. Freeman (Died in 1935)
Charles H. Gammill (Artificer)
Thomas Wesley Gammill
Wade H. Golden / Gaulden
John M. Gill
Joseph Glack
Jefferson L. Godbold
Benjamin F. Grant
Edward O. Grigsby
John F. Gunter
John F. Hall
Leonardis Ransom Hall
Samuel D. Harris"

(Warren Trest)

Dewitt married Francis Melvina Smith 2,81,82,91,92 on 23 May 1850 in Franklin County, Mississippi 80.,83

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Adda J. Graham (born in 1856 Franklin County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Mary Beatrice Graham (born on 10 Feb 1858 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 5 Feb 1950 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

12      iii.   Claudius Claborne Graham (born on 1 Jan 1860 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 15 Jun 1903 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         iv.   Dewitt Clinton Graham (born on 11 Oct 1863 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 16 Apr 1926 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

          v.   Ida Graham (born on 15 Mar 1865)


25. Francis Melvina Smith,2,5,81,82,91,92 daughter of William B. Smith and Francis Scott , was born on 17 Mar 1833 in Mississippi 38,39,93 and died after 1910 in Mississippi 48.,85

Noted events in her life were:

• Remarriage: "Francis Melvina Smith married Dewitt Graham at an early age. She is already married in the 1850 census at age 17 to Dewitt. She must have been married at 16 or 17 years old.

After Dewitt Clinton Graham died in 1865, Francis Melvina Smith Graham married Leonidus Ransom Hall, a caretaker for Dewitt Graham. Ransom Hall reared Dewitt's children. L.R. Hall served in the same company (as a Private) during the Civil War that Dewitt Graham was a Sergent in.

It is interesting to note that this is the same L.R. Hall that Dewitt Graham would not let eat at the same table according to WIlliam Hadskey's book, A History of Franklin County, Mississippi, to 1861.

"From the time of his birth in 1828 his family expected him to follow their aristocratic fashion. He learned well and from all accounts this tall, handsome young man was one of the most aristocratic snobs in the county. After he married Melvina Smith in 1859, he would not let Ransom Hall, a white day laborer who was working for him, eat at his table. Other supposedly inferior white people were also denied that privilege [322]."

"Francis Melvina Smith remained married to L. Ransom Hall until his death between 1900 and 1910."
(Warren Graham Trest)



"
(Warren Graham Trest)
Francis Hall in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1870. 40 "Francis Melvina Smith Graham has married L.Ransom Hall by the time of the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O. The family is as follows:

Ransom Hall - age 34 - Farmer - born in Mississippi - Value of real estate $1400 - Value of personal estate $830
Elvira Hall (name misspelled) - age 36 - born in Mississippi
Adda Graham - age 16 - at school - all children born in Mississippi
Mary Graham - age 12
Claudius Graham - age 10
Dewitt Graham - age 6
Eustalia Hall - male - age 4
Ada Hall - age 1."
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O. - Page 38)

"Eustalia Hall must have died before 1880 since he does not show up in the 1880 Franklin County, Mississippi census."
(Warren Graham Trest)
F.M. (Graham) Hall in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. 41 "Francis Melvina Smith Graham has married L.R. Hall and has two children by him in the 1880 US Census. Adda is no longer living with them but the other 4 Graham children are still at home. The family is as follows:

L.R. Hall - age 44 - Farmer - Father born in North Carolina
F.M. Hall - wife - age 47 - born in Mississippi - Father born in South Carolina
Ada M. Hall - daughter - age 10 - all children born in Mississippi
R.R. Hall - son - age 7
M.D. Graham - Daughter in law - age 22
C.C. Graham - Son in law - age 19 - Farm Laborer
R.W. Graham - Son in law - age 16 - Farm Laborer
Ida Graham - Daughter in law - age 14."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Hamburg - page 36C)
Ransom and Francis Hall in 1900 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Jun 1900. 15 "Francis Melvina Smith (Graham) Hall is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Beat 1, Hamburg District, Mississippi as follows:

L. Ransom Hall - Head - born Nov 1835 - age 64 - married 32 years - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Tennessee - Farmer - Owned his land, free from mortgage.
Francis M. - Wife - born Mar 1833 - age 67 - bore 10 children with 7 still living - born in Mississippi, Father born in South Carolina, Mother born in Mississippi.

Both could read and write."
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - Beat 1 - Page 19)
Francis Hall in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1910. 48 "Francis Melvina (Graham) Hall is listed in the 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Beat 2, Antioch District, Mississippi as follows:

Melvina Hall - white - age 77 - widowed - 6 out of 7 children living - born in Mississippi.
Frank Cade - black male - lodger - age 15 - born in Mississippi
H?ll Cade - black male - lodger - age 11 - born in Mississippi
(both boys are listed as Farm Laborers)

It can be assumed that the Cade boys were working the farm for Francis."
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Francis married Dewitt Clinton Graham 2,81,82,83 on 23 May 1850 in Franklin County, Mississippi 80.,83

Francis next married Leonidas Ransom Hall on 8 Aug 1867 81.,82 Leonidas was born in 1836 in Mississippi 38,39 and died on 27 Feb 1910 in Mississippi, at age 74.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Eustatia Hall (born in 1867 Mississippi)

         ii.   Ada M. Hall (born on 23 Sep 1868 Franklin County, Mississippi)

        iii.   Robert Ransom Hall (born on 25 Feb 1873 Franklin County, Mississippi - , died in Y)


26. Reverend Solomon Bufkin,5 son of Benjamin Franklin Bufkin and Celia Ann Lewis , was born on 21 Apr 1832 in Copiah County, Mississippi,94 died on 20 Dec 1877 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 45,94 and was buried in Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery, Barlow, Copiah County, MS..94

Benjamin Bufkin in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi, 1840. "Benjamin Bufkin is listed in the 1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - 1 male under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age (This should have been Soloman Graham since he would have been about 8 years old at the time of the census).
2 males between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 20 and 30 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age

1 female under 5 years of age
1 female between 5 and 10 years of age
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi)
Soloman Bufkin in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi, 1850. 95 "The Benjamin Bufkin family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - age 56 - Blacksmith - born in South Carolina
Celia Bufkin - age 55 - born in North Carolina
Soloman - 18 years of age - farmer - born in Mississippi
Erbane - age 14
Celia A. - age 12"
(1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi)

• Occupation: home missonary. 94 "Soloman Bufkin was a home-missionary for 16 years in Southwest Mississippi."
(Ben Bunting)

• Occupation: Pastor at Antioch Baptist Church, 1852. "Listed below are the pastors who have served Antioch Baptist Church and God's work in Western Copiah County:
1827 William Mullens
1852 A. K. Lumm
1856 Solomon Bufkin"

• Antioch Baptist Church Records: 1856. "The good work still goes on at this Church. They have licensed brother Solomon Buffkins to preach."

• Antioch Baptist Church Records: 1857. "We have peace and love in our midst. We have regular preaching by Bro. A.R. Lum. Bro. Buffkin preaches for us once a month, and regular Prayer Meetings twice a week."

• Antioch Baptist Church Records: 1859. "We are still enjoying the visitation of the Holy Spirit in our midst. The great work of the Lord is still going on. We have regular preach- ing twice a month -2nd and 4th Sabbath - by Brother S. Buffkin, whose labors seem to be blessed - have regular prayer meetings once a week, besides a regular Sunday school."

Soloman Bufkin in 1870 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 21 Jul 1870. 40 "The Soloman Bufkin family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Meadville P.O., page 97 as follows. (The name is mispelled as Buffkin):

Soloman Buffkin - age 37 - Minister - value of real estate $1000, value of personal estate $582.
Elizabeth Buffkin - age (37 or 39) - keeping house
Kate S. - age 7
Clara - age 2

Everyone has Mississippi listed as place of birth."
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - page 97)

• Obituary: "ELDER SOLOMON BUFKIN
April 21, 1832 December 20, 1877

As we glean the historical records we have at hand, we find Solomon Bufkin, son of Benjamin and Celia Ann Lewis Bufkin was ordained and licensed to the ministry in Antioch Baptist Church in the spring of 1854.

The following report was taken from the archives of the Mississippi Baptist Association of 1878 and we feel is worthy of printing in this book. "Report of Committee on Obituaries" your committee on obituaries would beg leave to submit the following as their report.

Elder Solomon Bufkin

A gloom has been thrown over our association by the death of our much esteemed Brother Solomon Bufkin. Soon after the last meeting of our association, death began to throw his dark shadows across his mind, and he saw and remarked to a Brother that he was not long for this world; and accordingly began setting his house in order for his departure. He realized more of it than his friends and even his bosom companion, who tried to dispel the shadows of death that then hung like a pall over him; but all the friends and physicians could do did not check the cruel hand of death. He is dead, noy, not dead, but sleepeth. He is gone to that bright world of sainted spirits to which he pointed his fellow men. He was born April 21, 1832 and died December 20, 1877; making him forty-six years old.

In the year 1851, on April 24th, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Carlisle, as his companion and partner in life. That union gave him eight children, all of whom are buried except two. Thus you see that the most of his family had preceded him to the spirit land. He professed conversion sometimes before he united with the church, and would not only engage in prayers, but would exhort his brethren. He established the altar of his family soon after his conversion, thus showing that the Lord has set him apart for a great work. In the spring of 1854, he united with the Antioch Baptist Church, in Copiah County, Mississippi where he was born and raised by pious parents, and in the same year, the church being so well satisfied that the Lord had chosen him as a herald of the Cross, he was licensed and ordained to the work of the Gospel minister, and we are happy to say that he ended with joy to himself and all who knew him. His labors in the ministry for sixteen years are full of zeal and self-denial - he was instant in season and out of the first part of his ministry was given churches and hard labor in the field, and God blessed him not only in his churches, but in toiling in the field. He was not supported as he should have been, and feeling that he must provide for his own family, was driven to the farm. He was away from his home and family for nearly two-thirds of his time: having to travel from twenty to thirty miles to reach all his churches except of one at home, having to encounter all the danger of crossing the Homochitto River, as well as other large creeks, and at one of these crossing on one occasion, lost a valuable horse and came near losing his own life, but God saved him amid summer's heat and winter's cold, when duty said go, he never shrank.

As to matter of his preaching, it was more practical than doctrinal. Always exhibiting that zeal and earnestness that made his preaching powerful, his manner was of that character as to rivet the audience to those holy and blessed truths that were drawn from hard study of the scriptures. His education was limited and he made himself what he was by hard study. His social qualifications were good.

There was that cheerfulness about him that made all around him happy, and this life was with him on his dying bed.

He was one of the sweet singers of Israel, his voice was strong and clear and well adapted to singing. It was one of his engagements of worship, as well as the social circle that he loved so dearly; and for this many would come to hear him preach.

Brother Bufkin was truly a working missionary Baptist. He has done more to arouse and keep a missionary spirit in this association than any other man. He has traveled miles and made speeches and preached sermons to get the churches to do something for missions, especially in the bounds of this ssociation. But, brethren; he is dead. Nay, he lives - he lives in the affections of his churches. Oh! His own churches have almost paralyzed by his loss; feeling that his place cannot be filled; and almost everywhere we see the work of his hands. These praise him and he cannot die while he is in the hearts of so many. Years may roll away and like Curtis, Felder, Cooper and others, he will still live. But while we feel his loss, there are none to feel like his beloved wife and children. That step and voice is no longer heard in his home to cheer it, but what is their and our loss, we trust in this eternal gain; therefore resolved, that we tender his bereaved family our warmest sympathies.

Pale and cold we see thee lying
Near God's temple once so dear,
And the mourner's bitter sighing,
Feels unheeded on thine ear.
All thy love and zeal to lead us,
Where immortal fountains flow,
And on living bread to feed us,
In our fond remembrance glow.
May the Conquering faith that cheered thee,
When they foot the Jordan pressed,
Guide our spirit while we leave thee,
In the tomb that Jesus blessed.
W.H. Gunby

This brother died early in December last. He was an active and zealous member of the Ebenezer Church, and died in he forty-sixth year of his age. Though cut off suddenly - dying even in the home of another - yet he was thoroughly prepared for his change. The church and community will even find it hard to fill the void created by his decease, but his companion, children, and friends, are assured that their loss was his eternal gain.

"Dying in the Lord he rests from his labors: his works do follow him"

Solomon married Elizabeth Carlisle .

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Kate Scott Bufkin (born on 20 Mar 1863 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 19 Jan 1919)

13       ii.   Clara Dodd Bufkin (born on 10 Mar 1868 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 17 Oct 1933 in Franklin County, Mississippi)


27. Elizabeth Carlisle,5 daughter of James Carlisle and Mary E. Bishop , was born about 1831 in Mississippi 41,43 and died after 1880.40

Elizabeth Bufkin in 1880 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1880 US Census, Hamburg, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. 49 "Elizabeth Bufkin, along with her daughter Clara, are found in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Hamburg Township. Solomon Bufkin has already passes away. They are listed as follows:

Elizabeth Bufkin - age - 49 - widow - keeping house - born in Mississippi - both parents born in Georgia
Clara D. Bufkin - age 12 - attending school - all family born in Mississippi."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Elizabeth married Reverend Solomon Bufkin .

28. John Hardin Collier Jr.,2,5 son of John Hardin Collier Sr. and Cora Catherine Truly , was born about Jan 1846 in Jefferson County, Mississippi,2 died after Feb 1925 in Franklin County, Mississippi,2 and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi.

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 30 Jul 1850. 96 "John H. Collier Sr. is living in Jefferson County, Mississippi in the 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 9 Township, page 2 and is listed as follows:

J.H. Collier - age 42 - Planter - born in Mississippi
Cora Collier - age 27 - all family born in Mississippi
Sarah A. Collier - age 7
J.H. Jr - age 4"
(1850 US Census, Jefferson County, MIssissippi)

• Military Service: "There are 3 John Colliers (with no middle initial) that fought in the Civil War out of Mississippi. It is not known if any of these records are John Hardin Collier.

1 Collier, John Confederate Infantry 1st Regiment, Mississippi Infantry (State Troops) (King's)

2 Collier, John Confederate Infantry 6th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry

3 Collier, John Confederate Infantry 26th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry"


John Hardin Collier in the 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 3 Aug 1870. 40 "John Hardin Collier Sr. and Jr. are living together in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville Post Office, page 169 and are as follows:

J.H. Collier Sr. - age 60 - born in Mississippi - value of real estate - $1,000 - Farmer
J.H. Collier Jr. - age 23 - born in Mississippi - Farm Laborer"
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. 43 "The John Newman Sr. family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi and is listed as follows:

John H. Collier - Age 73 - born in Mississippi, Widower, County Officer, father born in Virginia, mother born in Mississippi

John Collier - Age 35 - born in Mississippi, Farmer, both parents born in Mississippi
Helen N. Collier - age 32 - all family born in Mississippi
John N. Collier - son - age 11 - all children born in Mississippi
Willie P. Collier - son - age 11
Cora C. Collier - daughter - age 10
Mary L. Collier - daughter - age 9
Mattie W. Collier - daughter - age 8
Etta A. Collier - daughter - age 7
Sophia J. Collier - daughter - age 4
Sally J. Collier - daughter - age 3
John H. Collier - son - age 2 months."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, MIssissippi - District 1)
J.H. Collier in 1920 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 20 Jan 1920. 45 "John Hardin Collier is living with his daughter, Sally and grandchildren in the 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Roxie Township, page 11-A. The family is listed as follows, preceeded by F.M. Collier (who must have been Frank Marshall Collier):

House 229
F.M. Collier - head - married (so his wife must not have been home when the census was taken) - white male - age 37 - Farmer
Marshall - son - age 6

House 230
J.H. Collier - head (so his daughter was with him) - age 74 - widowed
Sally M. (married name was Martin) - age 38 (hard to read) - widowed
(hard to read - possibly Sam or Samie) Martin - son - age 10
Eugene - son - age 12
Tami - daughter - age 15"
(1920 US Census, Franklin County, MIssissippi)

John married Helen Edna Newman 2 on 13 Nov 1867 in Franklin County, Mississippi.2

Children from this marriage were:

14        i.   John Newman Collier (born on 2 Oct 1868 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 12 Dec 1933 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Willie P. Collier (born about 1869 - died after 1880 in Buried: Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, No Marker)

        iii.   Cora Cordelia Collier (born about Apr 1871 Franklin County, MS. - died on 8 Aug 1943 in Buried: Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, No Marker)

         iv.   Mary Lou Collier (born about Feb 1872 Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Mattie W. Collier (born on 7 Jun 1874 Franklin County, MS. - died on 11 Mar 1907 in Buried: Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Franklin County MS.)

         vi.   Etta A. Collier (born about 1876 Franklin County, MS. - , died in Dequincy, La.)

        vii.   Sophia J. Collier (born on 12 Apr 1879 Franklin County, MS. - died on 24 Jul 1967 in Franklin County, MS.)

       viii.   Sally A. Collier (born on 10 Apr 1880 Franklin County, MS. - died on 29 Apr 1964)

         ix.   John H. Collier (born about May 1880 - , died in Found Only In 1880 Census)

          x.   Frank Marshall Collier (born on 15 Apr 1881 Franklin County, MS. - died between 1930-1936 in Franklin County, MS.)

         xi.   Edna Lee Collier (born on 22 Apr 1882 Franklin County, MS. - died on 18 May 1949 in Winnsboro, Franklin Parish, La.)

        xii.   Helen Collier (born on 28 Feb 1888 Franklin County, MS. - died on 24 Feb 1908 in Buried: Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery)


29. Helen Edna Newman,2,5 daughter of Robert James Newman and Martha Edna McMillan , was born between 1847-1848 in Mississippi,2 died after 1900 in Mississippi,2,49 and was buried in Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Franklin County, Mississippi.

Helen married John Hardin Collier Jr. 2 on 13 Nov 1867 in Franklin County, Mississippi.2

30. James F. Graves,2,5 son of Osborne Bartlett Graves and Eliza Jane Corban , was born on 20 Jan 1847 in Franklin County, Mississippi 2 and died on 17 Mar 1927 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 80.2 Other names for James were James Francis, and James Franklin.

James F. Graves in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 16 Sep 1850. "The Osborne Graves family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

(house 184)
Osborne B. Graves - age 23 - farmer - value of real estate $600 - all family born in Mississippi
Eliza J. - age 18
James F. - age 5
Sarah E. - age 1
Mary A. - age 7 months

Osborne's brother and sister are also living with him in 1850"
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
James Graves in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 11 Aug 1860. 88 "The John Aldridge family is listed in the 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 22 as follows (Osborne Bartlett Graves Sr. has died and Eliza Corban has remarried to John Aldridge by 1860):

John Aldridge - age 41 - male - farmer - value of real estate $12, 500 - value of personal estate $300 - born in Mississippi (everone is listed as birthplace of Mississippi)
Eliza - age 29 - female - domestic - can not read or write
James - age 13 - male (This is James F. Graves)
Sarah - age 12 - female - attended school in the last year
Mary - age 10 - female - attended school in the last year
William - age 9 - male
Bartlett - age 7 male
Colombus - age 2 - male
Elizabeth - age 1 - female.

It should be noted that all the children listed from James down to Bartlett were born between Eliza Corban and Osborne Graves. The last two children were between Eliza Corban and John Aldridge."
(1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

• Military Service: 54 "There is a James F. Graves that served in the 19 Mississippi Infantry, Company H., that mustered in and out as a private. It is not known at this time if this is the same James F. Graves.

History of the 19th Mississipi Infantry:

CONFEDERATE MISSISSIPPI TROOPS

19th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Oxford, Mississippi, in May, 1861, and soon moved to Virginia. The men were raised in the counties of Warren, Jefferson, Greene, Panola, Marshall, and was assigned to General Wilcox's, Featherston's, Posey's, and Harris' Brigade. It fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor , then served in the Petersburg trenches south of the James River and in the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment lost 15 killed and 85 wounded of the 501 engaged at Williamsburg, had 58 killed, 264 wounded, and 3 missing at Gaines' Mill and Frayser's Farm, and had 6 killed and 52 wounded in the Maryland Campaign. Its casualties were 6 killed and 40 wounded at Chancellorsville and seven percent of the 372 at Gettysburg were disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 8 officers and 129 men. The field officers were Colonels Thomas J. Hardin, Nathaniel H. Harris, Lucius Q.C. Lamar, Christopher H. Mott, John Mullins, Richard W. Phipps, and Ward G. Vaughan; Lieutenant Colonel James H. Duncan; and Majors Ben. Allston, Robert A. Dean, Thomas R. Reading, and Abner Smead."
(Civil War Soldier and Sailor System)

James F. Graves in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 9 Aug 1870. "The James Graves family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O., page 183 as follows:

J.F. Graves - age 24 - Farm laborer - born in Mississippi - can not read or write
R. Graves - age 24 - keeping house - born in Mississippi
O.M. Graves - male - age 3 (This would be Osborne Monroe Graves - oldest child)

(I would have to wonder about the birth date of Sicily Anna Graves since she does not show up in the 1870 census)"
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
James F. Graves in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 6 Jul 1880. 49 "The James Graves family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, District 1 - Page 53 as follows:

James F. Graves - head - age 32 - farmer - all family born in Mississippi (everyone shows all family from Mississippi)
Rhoda - wife - age35 - keeping house
O.M. - son - age 12 - at school
S.A. - daughter - age 9 - at school
Catherine - daughter - age 7
Lizzie - daughter - age 5
Eliza - daughter - age 3
(page 54)
John Q. - son - age 1"

(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - district 1 - page 53 and 54)
James Graves in 1900 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 14 Jun 1900. 15 "The James Graves family is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, page 10 as follows:

James F. Graves - born Jan 1844 - age 56 - farmer (all family members born in Mississippi) - married 36 years
Rhoda - born Feb 1840 - age 60 - 9 children with 8 living
John Q. - son - born Jan 1879 - age 21 - farm laborer
Stella - daughter - born Mar 1881 - age19
Lillian(d) - daughter - born Feb 1882 - age 18
Vernon - Grandson - born Jan 1892 - age 7
Thomas - Grandson - born Feb 1895 - age 5"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

• Memories from Barbara Celotto: 5 "Joe Graves (son of James Graves and his second wife Ella) said there was a big split in the family when Jim (James F. Graves) married Ella Corban (his second wife).

He feels bitter toward Osborne Monroe Graves and John Quincy Graves (his stepbrothers) because he said they did not help him and his Mother after his Father died.

After Jim's death Mazie and Sally (daughters from James' second marriage) went to Vicksburg and stayed with Sicily for a while.

He also said Jim was a very mean man.

Billie Lea said that Mary Ella and Joe (children from second marriage) went to live with John Quincy Graves and Queen Victoria for a short time but the women did not get along and they left."
(Barbara Celotto)

James F. Graves in 1910 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 21 Apr 1910. 19 "The James F. Graves family is listed in the 1810 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, Page 6-A as follows:

(Note: Rhoda Middleton Graves has died since the 1900 US Census and James Graves has remarried Ella Corbin)

James F. Graves - age 67 - farmer - married 3 years - everyone born in Mississippi
Ella - wife - age 36 - 1 child - living
Jimmy May - daughter - age 3 months
Martha Corban - stepmother - age 55
Julia Corban - sister in law - (can not make out age)
Lindsey - brother in law - age 10"
(1910 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
J.F. Graves in 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 19 Jan 1920. 45 "The James F. Graves family is listed in the 1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Roxie township, page 10B as follows:

J.F. Graves - head - age 75 - all family members and relatives born in Mississippi - Farmer
Ella - wife - age 47
Jimmie May - daughter - age 10
Sallie - daughter - age 8
Joe V. - son - age 5
(Corban? - hard to read) Howard - brother in law - age 44
(Roberson Annie? - hard to read) - sister in law - age 36
Birtie May - daughter - age 9
Annie - daughter - age 7"
(1920 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

James married Rhoda Currie Middleton 2 on 1 Feb 1866 in Franklin County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Osborne Monroe Graves (born on 12 Jan 1868 Franklin County, MS. - died on 24 Dec 1951 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Sicily Anna Graves (born on 31 May 1869 Franklin County, MS. - died on 14 Dec 1952 in Meridian, Lauderdale County, MS.)

15      iii.   Catherine Lula Graves (born on 16 Mar 1874 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 10 Feb 1952 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         iv.   Lizzie Graves (born in Apr 1876 Franklin County, MS. - died before 1910 in Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Eliza Jane Graves (born on 16 Jan 1877 Franklin County, MS. - died on 11 Feb 1967 in Franklin County, MS.)

         vi.   John Quincy Graves (born on 13 Jan 1880 Franklin County, MS. - died on 8 May 1944 in Jackson, MS.)

        vii.   Stella Graves (born on 15 Jan 1881 Franklin County, MS. - died on 17 Jun 1968 in Beaumont, TX.)

       viii.   Lillian Graves (born on 31 Aug 1886 - died on 24 Jul 1962)

James next married Mary Ella Corban ,2 daughter of Joseph Elisha Corban and Martha Alice Whittington , on 9 May 1907 in Franklin County, MS..2 Mary was born on 4 Aug 1875 2 and died on 10 Apr 1967, at age 91.2

Marriage Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(Volume 1 Page 480)

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(7 August 1870) Alt. birth date.

She is buried in Providence Cemetery, Franklin County, Ms.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Jimmie Mazie Graves (born on 2 Mar 1910 Franklin County, MS. - died in Jul 1984)

         ii.   Sally Graves (born on 19 Nov 1912 Franklin County, MS. - died about 1968)

        iii.   Joe Graves (born on 30 Apr 1914 Franklin County, MS.)


31. Rhoda Currie Middleton,2,5 daughter of Levi Evans Middleton and Jane Farrar Currie , was born on 20 Sep 1842 in Franklin County, Mississippi 2,84 and died on 20 Mar 1907 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 64.2 Another name for Rhoda was Rhodie.

Rhoda Middleton in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1850. "The Levi Middleton family is listed in the 1850 US Census, 16 Oct, 1850, household 355 as follows:

Levi E. Middleton - male - age 45 - farmer - born in Mississippi
Jane - female - age 39 - born in Mississippi
Martha J. - age 14 - born in Mississippi
Elizabeth - age 13 - born in Mississippi
Levi - male - age 10 - born in Mississippi
Rhoda - female - age 8 - born in Mississippi
Sophronia - female - age 3 - born in Mississippi

Malcolm Currie (hard to read) - age 70 - male - born in Scotland
Martha (?) Currie (hard to read) - female - age 21
Monroe Currie - male - school teacher - age 21 - personal worth $200 - born in Mississippi."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Rhoda Graves in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1870. "The James Graves family is listed in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville P.O., page 183 as follows:

J.F. Graves - age 24 - Farm laborer - born in Mississippi - can not read or write
R. Graves - age 24 - keeping house - born in Mississippi
O.M. Graves - male - age 3 (This would be Osborne Monroe Graves - oldest child)

(I would have to wonder about the birth date of Sicily Anna Graves since she does not show up in the 1870 census)"
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Rhoda Graves in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. "The James Graves family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, District 1 - Page 53 as follows:

James F. Graves - head - age 32 - farmer - all family born in Mississippi (everyone shows all family from Mississippi)
Rhoda - wife - age35 - keeping house
O.M. - son - age 12 - at school
S.A. - daughter - age 9 - at school
Catherine - daughter - age 7
Lizzie - daughter - age 5
Eliza - daughter - age 3
(page 54)
John Q. - son - age 1"

(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi - district 1 - page 53 and 54)
Rhoda Graves in 1900 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1900. "The James Graves family is listed in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 1, page 10 as follows:

James F. Graves - born Jan 1844 - age 56 - farmer (all family members born in Mississippi) - married 36 years
Rhoda - born Feb 1840 - age 60 - 9 children with 8 living
John Q. - son - born Jan 1879 - age 21 - farm laborer
Stella - daughter - born Mar 1881 - age19
Lillian(d) - daughter - born Feb 1882 - age 18
Vernon - Grandson - born Jan 1892 - age 7
Thomas - Grandson - born Feb 1895 - age 5"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Rhoda married James F. Graves 2 on 1 Feb 1866 in Franklin County, MS..2
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32. John Daniel Trest,21 son of John Trest and Rebecca Thorne , was born in 1772 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina 21 and died in 1842 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 70.21

Noted events in his life were:

• Military: 1812. "There is a John Trust that is listed as a private in Juhan's Battalion, South Carolina Militia in the War of 1812. It is not provable if this is John Trest or not."
(Warren Trest)
John Daniel Trest in 1820 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Orangeburg County, South Carolina, 1820, Orangeburg County, South Carolina. 97 "John Daniel Trest shows up in the 1820 US Census Records in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. He is listed between 26 and 45 years old. He has one male under 10 years old (this would be Edmond Edward). He also has his wife listed between 26 and 45 years old and 2 female children under 10 years old (these would have been Rachel Dorcas and Dicey).

Slaves: John Daniel has 2 male slaves between 14 and 26 years of age in the 1820 Census."
(1820 US Census, Orangeburg County, South Carolina)


John Daniel Trest in 1830 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Orangeburg County, South Carolina, 1830, Orangeburg County, South Carolina. 98 "John Daniel Trest shows up in the 1830 US Census Records in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. He is listed between 40 and 50 years old. He has one male between 15 and 20 years old (this would be Edmond Edward). He has one son between 5 and 10 years old (this would be John Daniel). He also has 2 sons under 5 years of age (these would be Peter and William).

His wife is listed between 30 and 40 years old. They have one daughter between 10 and 15 years old (this would be Rachel Dorcas). They have two female children under 10 years old (these would have been Dicy and Mary). They also have one daughter under 5 years old. The last child is not found in any other record. I do not know the name of the last daughter nor what happened to her.

Slaves: John Daniel has 1 male slave under 10 years old, 4 female slaves under 10 years old, 1 female slave between 10 and 25 years old and 1 female slave between 25 and 36 years old in the 1820 Census."
(1820 US Census, Orangeburg County, South Carolina)

• Migration: Migration from South Carolina to Mississippi, 1832-1833, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 "John Daniel Trest migrated from South Carolina to Mississippi from 1832 to 1834. In the 1850 Census, Samuel Caper Trest (born 1832) is listed as being born in South Carolina and his younger brother Richard Crawson Trest (born 1834) is listed as being born in Mississippi. Note: Later census records will show Samuel Caper Trest as being born in Alabama - in route to Mississippi). There is no Trest that shows up in the 1830 Census in Mississippi, but they do show up in Orangeburg County, S.C. census records in 1820 & 1830. John Daniel Trest and family are listed for the first time in Jones County, Mississippi in the 1840 census records."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Parents of Samuel Caper Trest were shown in latter census records as being born in South Carolina, so it is an assumption that they were born in Orangeburg County."

"John Trest shows up in the 1833 Jones County, Mississippi tax rolls, so the assumption can be made that he moved to Jones County between 1832 and 1833."
(Warren Trest)

• Tax Schedule: 1833 Tax Roll, Jones County, Mississippi, 1833. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 1833 Tax Rolls, Jones County, Mississippi as follows:

John Trest - 5 slaves - tax $3.12 1/2."
(Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls)

• Tax Schedule: 1834 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Schedule, 1834. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 1834 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Schedule as follows:

John Trest - $74 at interest; 6 slaves; Tax $3.93 1/2."
(1834 Jones County, MS Tax Rolls)

• Tax Schedule: 1836 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls, 1836. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 183 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls as follows:

John Trest - 5 slaves; Tax $3.12 1/2."
(1836 Jones County, MS Tax Rolls)

• Census: 1837 State Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1837. 100 "John Trest is listed in the 1837 State Census as follows:

John Trest
1 male over 45 years of age
5 males under 18 years of age

1 female over 16 years of age
3 females under 16 years of age

Slaves: 1 male and 6 females

Total Whites- 10

50 acres under cultivation and 2 bales of cotten in 1836."
(1837 State Census)

• Tax Schedule: 1837 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Roll, 1837. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 1837 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Roll as follows:

John Trest - $70 at interest; 7 slaves; Tax $4.54 1/2."
(1837 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls)

• Tax Schedule: 1838 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Roll, 1838. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 1838 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Roll as follows:

John Trest - $112 at interest, 7 slaves, Tax $4.61 1/2."
(1838 Jones County, MS., Tax Rolls)

• Occupation: Farmer. 1 "In every census that John Daniel is listed in, his occupation is that of Farmer or Agriculture."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Tax Schedule: 1839 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls, 1839. 99 "John Trest is listed in the 1839 Jones County, Mississippi Tax Rolls as follows:

John Trest - 7 slaves - Tax $4.37 1/2."
(1839 Jones County, MS. Tax Rolls)
John Trest in 1840 Jones County Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1840, Jones County, Mississippi. 101 "John Daniel Trest shows up in the 1840 US Census Records in Jones County, Mississippi (his first census in Mississippi). He is listed as between 60 and 70 years old. (Edmond Edward Trest has already married and moved out. He is listed in the 1840 census living in Jones County, Mississippi along with hisfamily). John Daniel has two males between 10 and 15 years old (these would be John Daniel III and Peter N.). He has three sons between 5 and 10 years old (these would be William Byrd, Samuel Caper and Richard Crawson).

His wife is listed between 40 and 50 years old. (Their oldest daughter, Rachel Dorcas has already married and is listed with her husband, next door to John Daniel, in Jones County, Mississippi). John Daniel has a daughter between 20 and 30 years old (this would be Dicy) and a daughter between 15 and 20 years old (this would be Mary). The daughter that shows up in the 1820 census as being under 5 years old does not show up in the 1830 census, so it is assumed that there was a girl, "unknown" born before 1820 and died before 1830.
(Page 307)

It should be noted that upon arriving in Jones County, both Edmond Edward Trest and Rachel Dorcas Trest married children of Herrin Walters (prior to the 1840 census). Two other Trest children, Mary and Peter, would also marry Herrin's children in the future.

Two other children, John and William, would marry Rushton girls.

John Trest lives next door to James Walters (married to his daughter Rachel) who is followed by Edward Trest (married to James Walters' sister). They have three houses in a row in 1840. In 1850, Samuel Caper and Richard are shown living next door to Rachel (John has passed away at this time), so Samuel must be living in the original homestead in 1850."
(Warren Graham Trest and Census Records)

• Land: 1841, Jones County, Mississippi. 24,62 "Deed found in Dead Records of Jones County:

4-11-1837 Wayne County, Mississippi. Arthur Herrington and Milley, his wife to John Trest land in Jones County for $93.75 section 17, township 9, range 10W containing 79 and 94/100 acres at $1.00 per acre.

Witness: Mallichai McLain

Signed: Arthur Herrington and Milley Herrington."
(Page 261 of Deed Book - Records of Jones County, Mississippi Deed Book A,B 1827-1856 - Compiled by Ben and Jean Strickland)

"There are records of a John Trest buying 240 acres of land on 5-Jan-1841. This appears to be the Trest properties that the children settled on in latter years."
(Warren Trest)

Jones County in 1895 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Sandersville, Mississippi: Sandersville, Jones County, Mississippi. 1 "Sandersville is the final place of the John Trest family and is in the North East section of Jones County, Mississippi."
(Warren Trest)

John married Elizabeth Walters in 1812 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Edmond Edward Trest (born on 11 Sep 1812 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died on 9 Feb 1891 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Rachel Dorcas Trest (born in 1816 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died after 1880 in Jones County, Mississippi)

        iii.   Dicey B. Trest (born on 18 Sep 1821 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died on 30 Jun 1891 in Mississippi)

         iv.   Mary B. Trest (born in 1822 Orangeburg County, South Carolina)

          v.   John Daniel Trest (born in 1825 Orangeburg County, South Carolina)

         vi.   Peter Nathaniel Trest (born on 14 Aug 1827 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died on 28 Sep 1918 in Covington County, Alabama)

        vii.   William Byrd Trest (born before 1830 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died between 1873-1880)

       viii.   Trest (born before 1830 - died before 1840)

16       ix.   Samuel Caper Trest (born on 1 Mar 1832 Alabama - died on 19 Jun 1923 in Jones County, Mississippi)

          x.   Richard Crawson Trest (born in 1834 Jones County, Mississippi)


33. Elizabeth Walters, daughter of Zadrack James Walters and Unknown , was born in 1792 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina and died in 1863 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 71. Other names for Elizabeth were Elizabeth Waters, and Elizabeth Watters.

Elizabeth Trest in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "Elizabeth shows up living in Jones County, Mississippi with Peter and William (her children) in the 1850 Jones County Census. She is listed as 56 years old. Peter is listed as 23 years old and William is listed as 20 years old. Both William and Peter are listed as "Farmers" by occupation."
(Page 134-B)

"Slaves: In the 1850 Slave Schedule, Elizabeth Trest has 14 slaves. She has slaves listed as follows:
Female 56 years old
Female 35 years old
Male 33 years old
Female 30 years old
Female 25 years old
Female 23 years old
Female 20 years old
Male 12 years old
Male 7 years old
Male 4 years old
Male 2 years old
Male 1 year old
2 Males 6 months old"
(Page 3 of Jones County Slave Schedule, Sep. 12, 1850)

• Land: Land Purchase, 1 Nov 1859, Jones County, Mississippi. "Elizabeth is shown as buying (Sale-Cash Entries) 39.12 acres on Novemeber 1, 1859. The property was SWSE of St. Stephens, Township 9N, Range 10W, Section 8 in Jones County, Mississippi."

Elizabeth Trest in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi. 22 "Elizabeth Trest appears in the 1860 census as follows:

(She is living next door to William B. Trest) The family is as follows:

House 360:
William B. Trest - age 28 - born in S.C.
Nancy - age 31- born in Alabama
W.B. - 9 months

House 361:
Elizabeth Trest - age 72 - total of real estate $3000 - total of personal estate $3500 - born in S.C. - can not read or write
J.D. - age 33 - values of $2000 and $2000 - born in S.C.
R.C. - age 24 - values of $1100 and $2300 - born in Mississippi
James R. - age 13 - born in Mississippi (It is unknown who this James R. Trest is. He would have been born after John Daniel Trest died and before S.C. Trest's son was born. Is there a missing Trest here? Is this James (Trest) Walters?)"
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)

Elizabeth married John Daniel Trest 21 in 1812 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina.

34. William Tyrus McGilvray,52,102 son of Alexander McGilvray and Mary Elizabeth McLeod , was born about 1819 in Moore County, North Carolina 22,61,103 and died after 1860 in Jones County, Mississippi.22

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "In the 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, William McGilvray's family is as follows (Note: The census taker in 1850 mispelled McGilvray as McGilberry):
(House 317)
William McGilvray - Farmer - age 31 - born in North Carolina
Sarah - age 36 - born in South Carolina
Angus - Age 10 - born in Mississippi
Joseph - age 8
Elender (Eleanor) - age 5
Sarah - age 3
Mary - age 7 months."
(Page 273)
William McGilvray 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Slave Schedule: 1850 Jones County, Mississippi Slave Schedule, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. "William McGilvray (spelt by the census taker as William McGilberry) owned the following slaves in the 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi Slave Schedule:

1 female - age 49
1 female - age 21
1 male - age 18
1 male - age 6
1 male - age 4
and 1 female - age 1"
(Page 7)
1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 22 "The McGilvray household in the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi is as follows:

(House 229)
Wm McGilvray - Age 42 (Farmer) - Born in North Carolina
Sarah McGilvray - Age 46 - Born in South Carolina
Angus McGilvray - Age 20 - All Children born in Mississippi
Joseph McGilvray - Age 18
Sarah McGilvray - Age 13
Mary McGilvray - Age 11
W. McGilvray - Age 7
Daniel Smith - (either age 11 or age 77 - can not make out the census) (Farmer)
Samuel C. Trest - Age 27 (Farmer)
Eleanor Trest (spelled Ellender) - Age 17
Wm. Trest - Age 11 months
William Eubanks - Age 27
Jacob Hutts - Age 28

It might be assumed that with the mixture of people at the McGilvray's home that there may have been a planting or harvesting going on with neighbors helping but this would be an assumption. They may have been living on his estate though, since his value of personal estate is listed as $18,910 (far more than most others in the county). Samuel Caper Trest has married Eleanor McGilvray and is at the McGilvray home during the census. They have already had William - age 11 months."
(1860 US Census, Jones Coutny, Mississippi Page 34, Ellisville Post Office Area)

• Slave Schedule: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi Slave Schedule, 1860, Jones County, Mississippi. 53 "In the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, William McGilvray is listed with the following slaves:

1 female - age 70
1 female - age 28
1 male - age 10
1 female - age 7
1 male - age 2
and 1 female - age 5 months old.

William McGilvray is followed in the Census (Slave Schedule) by Daniel Smith and then Samuel Caper Trest (his son-in-law)."
(Page 3)

• Military Service: 1,75 "William McGilvray was 44 years old when the Civil War started. I have not been able to trace him to the Civil War but he had his eldest two sons, Angus and Joseph, who fought in the Mississippi Cavalry in the Civil War.

Angus McGilvray fought with the 4th Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry
Joseph McGilvray fought with Stockdale's Brigrade, Mississippi Cavalry."
(Warren Graham Trest)

William married Sarah J. Smith 22.,103

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Angus McGilvray (born about 1840)

         ii.   Joseph McGilvray (born about 1842)

17      iii.   Eleanor Elizabeth McGilvray (born on 5 Jan 1844 Mississippi - died on 20 Jun 1918 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         iv.   Sarah McGilvray (born about 1847)

          v.   Mary Elizabeth McGilvray (born about 1850)

         vi.   William McGilvray (born about 1853)


35. Sarah J. Smith,22,103 daughter of Daniel Smith and Eleanor Murphy , was born about 1814 in South Carolina 22,61 and died after 1860 in Jones County, Mississippi.22

Sarah married William Tyrus McGilvray 52.,102

36. John Ferguson II,21 son of Malcolm James Ferguson and Mary Margaret McDonald , was born on 3 May 1776 in Richmond County, North Carolina,30 died on 3 Jan 1835 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 58,30 and was buried in Old Ferguson Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi.

John Ferguson in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1810 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1810, Richmond County, North Carolina. 104 "John Ferguson is listed as living 2 homes down from Angus McGill in the 1810 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina as follows:
John Ferguson:
1 male under 10 years old, 1 male 26 to 44 years old (John Ferguson would have been 34 years old), 2 females under 10 years old and 2 females between 26 and 44 years old."
(1810 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina - Page 110)

"It must be noted that this does not agree with birth dates given by Angus Ferguson in his book. According to his dates, there was only one child born in 1810. The only other John Ferguson in 1810 Richmond County, North Carolina is over 45 years old at the time of the census. It states that as the John Ferguson family traveled through the Creek Nation in 1811, that he had three children (see Passport section for John Ferguson). Therefore, I feel that he had three children born before 1811 and that Angus Ferguson must have been mistaken on dates."
(Warren Trest)

• History of Richmond County, North Carolina: "As I have researched geneology back, it is interesting to note that between 1800 and 1820 all of my family ancestors that were in Richmond County, North Carolina at the same time. There were the Fergusons, McGills, Fairleys and the Grahams. Each would become part of my family tree at some time in the future."
(Warren Graham Trest)

History of Richmond County, North Carolina:

"Present-day Richmond County was first settled by Native Americans living along the Pee Dee River. Richmond was part of Anson County, which was formed in 1750 from Bladen County. The General Assembly formed Richmond County from Anson in October 1779. The citizens cited the hardship in crossing the Pee Dee River to go to the courthouse in Anson County, as their reason for wanting a separate county with the dividing line of the Pee Dee River.

Richmond County was named for Charles Lennox, the third Duke of Richmond, who criticized the policy of the British toward the American colonies. The county seat was known as Richmond Courthouse. Scotland County was formed from Richmond in 1899.

The first court in the new county was held in December 1779 at the old Presbyterian Meeting House in the Zion Community. About 1783, after raising money from taxes to pay for buying land and laying out a town, a new courthouse was built in what is today downtown Rockingham. In 1784 the name of the town was changed to Rockingham in honor of Charles Watson-Wentworth, second Marquis of Rockingham, and supporter of American independence.
Dockery Meeting House (which was the forerunner of Cartledge Creek Baptist Church) was chartered in 1774, Mt. Pleasant Methodist in 1780, First Methodist Church of Rockingham in 1786, Concord Methodist Church in 1787, and Zion Methodist Church in 1829. There was a Presbyterian Meeting House in Rockingham around 1788.

The County grew slowly as many families moved down from Maryland, Virginia, and up from South Carolina. The Dockery Brick house, built in 1830, and the Leak-Wall House, built in 1854, are both still standing. The County began to grow more as the economy diversified from agriculture to cotton mills. The Richmond Mill was chartered in 1833 and was the seventh cotton mill chartered in North Carolina. It operated until 1865 when it was burned by Sherman's troops. It was rebuilt in 1869 and renamed Great Falls Mill. It burned again in 1972, and the ruins are still standing. Other cotton mills sprang up in the county."
(Richmondnc.com)

• Memories from Angus Furguson: 30 "My grandfather Fergsuon was born in 1776, the first child born to his parents after they came to this country. He and grandmother were both born and reared in Richmond County, North Carolina. They moved to Wayne County, Mississippi in 1811, where they remained for awhile and, as I understand, had some part in the organization of the old Philadelphus Presbyterian Church. WHile they were there my Uncle Malcolm Ferguson was born in an Indian Fort near Winchester, Wayne County, Miss. After a short stay there they moved northwestward to Jones County, Miss. and built a home and opened a farm just west of Boguehoma Creek, one mile south of the present site of Sandersville. Here they lived and reared a large family and having finished a great life work for Jones County, passed on to the Great Beyond. With their burial, the old Ferguson cemetery was started. My grandfather, John Fergson, was born, May 3, 176 and died Jan. 3, 1835. Grandmother, Flora Ferguson, also a native of Richmond County, North Carolina, was born, Oct. 8, 1779, and died, May 25, 1857. She rests in the old Ferguson cemetery. I understand that great grandfather Ferguson and the others came over from Scotland in 1771 or 1772."
(Angus Ferguson)

• Migration: Jones County, Mississippi, Jones County, Mississippi. 30,105,106 "Helene Stein states that John Ferguson was the first white man to settle in Jones County, Mississippi."
(Helene Stein)

"Daniel McDonald made his way to Mississippi and "reported back to North Carolina that thousands of acres of virgin timber lands in Southeast Mississippi were for sale by the government for 10 cents an acre." Also, "that the Choctow Indians were frreindly, the region abounded in wild game, fish, honey and nuts and berries and the climate was mild enough for cattle, sheep and hogs to remain throughout the year on open range affording abundent substenance".

The Fergusons were part of the old McDonald Highlanders in Scotland.

"John Ferguson decided to join the numerous caravans moving westward from North Carolina when Chief Tecumseh was attempting to lead all of the southern tribes in an all-out effort to exterminate the whites. Hundreds of ox-drawn covered wagons took the great caravan route via Savannah, Georgia and St. Stephens, Alabama to the US Land Office in Augusta, Mississippi in quest of sites with larger acreage."

"John Ferguson settled in 1811 on the west side of the Chickasawhay River. In the summer of 1812, he moved up the river to Yellow Creek, thence to the US Post Road (Savannah to Natchez) at Eucutta, and west across Big Bogue Homa swamp. He called his home place Good Hope."

The site was within what is now the corporate limits of Sandersville, Mississippi.

"It was about 1819, that he built a split-log house for worship by the US Post Road on the south side of his tract...Good Hope Presbyterian Church was organized, which soon became a religious and educational center of note, known as Good Hope Camp Ground. First a large arbor was built in front of the church, mainly for social purposes. This was later covered with boards and made into a large assembly hall. The split log church was also used as a kitchen. Cabins were built all around as well as a corral on the south side. A new plank church house of architectural symmetry with a balcony for the slaves, who were full and equal members, was erected on a five acre parcel in the southwest corner of the forty. Services and school were held the last week of every month but August, which was camp meeting month. People came from near and far and many weddings were solemnized".

"John Ferguson and Flora McGill were married in 1806. Eleven children were born to this union. Final survivors were Flora and five daughters who never married. Their home was a split log house with two rooms, hallway between and log kitchen about 100 feet from the dwelling. Later two plank rooms were added on the back so that each of the four surviving old maids had their own room, This became known far and wide as the home of the Ferguson Spinsters"

(Jones County Newspaper article based on a "subscribed and sworn" statement from Lee Bonner to the notary public, Nina M. Daly)

• Passport: Issued by Georgia Governor, 24 Jan 1811, Georgia. 107 "Page 23 - Thursday, 24th January 1811
On Application

ORDERED

That the passports be prepared for the following to travel through the Creek Nation of Indians, to wit, One for Mr. John Ferguson with his wife, his sister and thre children from Richmond County, North Carolina."
(Passports issued by Governors of Georgia 1810 - 1820 - page 77)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1830, Jones County, Mississippi. 1,108 "The John Ferguson family is listed in the 1830 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi as follows:

Page 15, Line 72

Ferguson, John
1 male between 10 and 15 years of age (this would have been John Ferguson III)
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age (this would have been Angus)
1 male between 20 and 30 years of age (this would have been Malcolm)
1 male between 50 and 60 years of age (this would have been John Ferguson II)
(John Ferguson would have been 54 years old)
1 female under 5 (this would have been Sarah)
2 females between 5 and 10 years of age (these would be Abigail and Catherine)
2 females between 10 and 15 years of age (these would be Flora and Mary)
1 female between 15 and 20 years of age (this would be Elizabeth)
2 females between 20 and 30 years of age (these would be Margaret and I will make the assumption that Annie - listed by Angus - is the other female, since he gave no birth or date records).
1 female between 50 and 60 years of age (this would be Flora Helen McGill - age 51)."
(1830 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)
(Warren Trest)


• Funeral: John Ferguson Burial, 1835, Jones County, Mississippi. 106 "Nearby to his home was Good Hope Cemetery in which John Ferguson was the first to be buried. It is now popularly known as the Old Maids Graveyard"
(Jones County Newspaper Article)

John married Flora Helen McGill 21 in 1806.21

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Margaret Ferguson (born on 10 Nov 1809)

         ii.   Annie Ferguson ()

        iii.   Malcolm Ferguson (born on 3 May 1811 Indian Fort, Winchester, Wayne County, Mississippi - died on 3 Mar 1899)

         iv.   Elizabeth Ferguson (born on 10 Jul 1813 Mississippi - died on 10 Jul 1901)

          v.   Mary Ferguson (born on 13 Nov 1816 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 19 Dec 1892 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         vi.   Angus Ferguson (born prob 1816 - 1817)

        vii.   Flora Ferguson (born in 1818 Jones County, Mississippi - died in 1903 in Jones County, Mississippi)

18     viii.   John Ferguson III (born on 24 Feb 1820 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 3 May 1884 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         ix.   Catherine Ferguson (born on 2 Mar 1822 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 29 Nov 1888 in Jones County, Mississippi)

          x.   Abigail Ferguson (born on 6 Oct 1824 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 19 Sep 1904 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         xi.   Sarah Ferguson (born on 25 Nov 1828 Jones County, Mississippi - died on 18 Jun 1900 in Jones County, Mississippi)


37. Flora Helen McGill,21 daughter of Angus McGill and Anne Fairley , was born on 8 Oct 1779 in Richmond County, North Carolina,21,30 died on 25 May 1857 in Jones County, Mississippi, at age 77,21,30 and was buried in Old Ferguson Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi.

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1790, Richmond County, North Carolina. 109 "Angus McGill is listed in the 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina with 2 free white males of 16 years and older, 2 free white males under 16 years old and 5 free white females."
(1790 US Census)

Flora Helen McGill would have been one of the 5 free white females since she should have been around 2 years old at the time of the census.

McGills in the 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1800, Richmond County, North Carolina. 110 "Angus McGill is listed in the 1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina as having 2 males under 10 years old, 2 males between 16 and 25 years old, 1 male over 45 years old, 2 females under 10 years old, 2 females between 10 and 15 years old, 1 female between 16 and 25 years old and 1 female 26 to 44 years old.

He is also listed as having 3 slaves.

Flora McGill would have been one of the two females between 10 and 15 years old (she was 12 at the time)."
(1800 US Census)

Angus McGill in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1810 US Census, 1810, Richmond County, North Carolina. 104 "There is tape running through the name of Angus McGIll in the 1810 US Census but it appears to be that he is listed as having 4 males under 10 years old, 1 male 10 to 15 years old, 1 male 26 to 44 years old and 1 male 45 and older.

The females are listed as 1 female under 10 years old, 1 female 10 to 15 years old, 3 females 16 to 25 years old and 1 female between 26 and 44 years old.

They also have 1 other free person at home and 2 slaves."
(1810 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina)

Flora Ferguson in the 1840 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1840, Jones County, Mississippi. 1,101 "In the 1840 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi the Flora Ferguson family is listed as follows (John Ferguson had passed away by this time):
Flora Ferguson Family: 1 male between 20 and 30 years old, 1 female between 15 and 20 years old, 4 females between 20 and 30 years old, 1 female between 30 and 40 years old and 2 females between 50 and 60 years old."
(1840 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 307)

"It surprised me when I saw the 307 page of the US Census, Jones County, Mississippi that on one page there were the Linders, McGills, Fergusons, Walters and Trests living on the same page. Half of that page within the census were or would become related thorughout the years. Flora Ferguson is listed 13 homes from John Trest whose grandchildren, William John Trest and Flora Elizabeth McGill Fergsuon, would later marry in 1882."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Flora Ferguson in 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 52 "Flora is listed as head of household in the 1850 Jones County, Mississippi census, thus John Ferguson is assumed to have passed away prior to 1850.

The Flora Ferguson family is listed as follows (all children are listed as being born in Mississippi):

Flora - age 67 - born in North Carolina
Elizabeth - age 37 - all children born in Mississippi
Mary - age 35
John - age 30 - Farmer
Catherine - age 28
Abigail - age 26
Sarah - age 22


The next house is Angus Ferguson:
Angus - age 45
Dicey - age 33
Flora - age 12
John - age 11
Nancy - age 9
Dicey - age 7
Angus - age 6
Andrew - age 2

The next houee is John Daniel Trest.

The Fergusons, Trests and McGill's are living near each other. Archibald McGill is in house 297, Flora Ferguson is in house 299 and Angus Ferguson is in house 300. The assumption is being made that Archibald McGill is Flora McGill's brother.The next house, 301, is John Daniel Trest and family (Samuel Caper's brother)."
(Pages 136 and 136B)
(1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi)
Archibald McGill in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Family: Family of Flora McGill Ferguson, 1840 & 1850, Jones County, Mississippi. 1,52,101 "The Archibald McGill family is shown living near the Flora (McGill) Ferguson family in Jones County, Missippi in the 1840 and 1850 US Census, It is the assumption that the McGill family moved with the Fergsuon family into Jones County, Mississippi together."
(Warren G. Trest)

Flora married John Ferguson II 21 in 1806.21

38. Robert Porter Boyce,21 son of Robert Nicholas Boyce and Elizabeth Porter , was born in 1798 in Delaware,21 died in Mar 1873 in Wayne County, Mississippi, at age 75,21 and was buried in State Line, Mississippi.30

Robert Porter Boyce in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi, 1850, Clarke County, Mississippi. 69 "The Robert Boyce family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi as follows:

Robert P. Boyce - Millwright - age 60 - born in Delaware
Elizabeth - age 45 - born in South Carolina
Elizabeth - age 18 - born in Florida (this is an assumption of data for birthplace - the census is hard to read).
Catherine (Katherine spelled in census) - age 12 - born in Alabama.

Note: This census does not agree with the Georgia birthplace from Bill Parks."
(1850 US Census - Page 174B)

Robert Porter Boyce Occupation 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Mill right, 1850, Clarke County, Mississippi. 69 "Robert Porter Boyce is listed in the 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi as a Millright."
(1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi)
Robert Porter Boyce in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 26 Oct 1860. 22 "John Ferguson and Robert Porter Boyce are listed in the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Ellisville Township, Mississippi as follows:

(house 400)
John Ferguson - age 40 - farmer - Value of Real Estate $3000 - Value of Personal Estate $1283 - born in Mississippi
Catherine - age 21 - born in Alabama
Angus - age 2 - male - born in Mississippi
Flora E. - age 1 - female - born in Mississippi

Robert P. Boyce - age 70 - mechanic - value of real estate $1000 - value of personal estate $50,500 - born in Delaware"
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 61)

• Organizations: Mason. 30 "Grandfather Boyce was a loyal Mason and devoted member of the Baptist Church. He was honored and respected by all who knew him."
(Angus Ferguson)

• Death: 1873, State Line, Mississippi. 30 "Angus Ferguson remembers:

My grandparents on mother's side were Robert P. Boyce and Elizabeth McScrews Boyce. Grandmother first married a Nelson and they had two children, George Washington and Nancy. Mr. Nelson died after which she and grandfather married and had three children; Elizabeth who married a Shoemake; Mary, who married a Holley; and Catherine, the youngest, who married my father, John Ferguson. Grandmother died when I was a small child and grandfather married a Miss Hails in Clark County, Mississippi. They had two children, Lenora and Hampton.

Grandfather Boyce's family came from Ireland to Illinois, as I understand. Grandfather and grandmother came to Mississippi, where they lived and died. She was buried in the Old Ferguson cemetery and he at State Line, Mississippi. I do not remember grandmother, but I loved Grandfather devotedly. He visited our home often during his lifetime. He was a cabinet workman and millwright and had moved to State Line to build his last mill. His second wife was partially insane at the time. When he had the mill near completion and operating, he became ill and died at the age of eighty years, or more. At this time, his wife was found sitting on the spillway down at the mill, which was built on a little creek near State Line, perfectly insane and had to be sent to the asylum, where she soon passed on. This was in February or March of 1873. I carried mother and sister Ella, a tiny baby, in an ox cart from where we lived on Boguehoma near Sandersville to Shubuta, twenty-one miles, where they took the train to State Line. They remained there until grandfather was buried and grandmother sent to the asylum."
(Angus Ferguson in Family, School, Church and Pioneer History)

Robert married Elizabeth Catherine McScrews .21

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Elizabeth Boyce (born about 1832 Florida)

         ii.   Mary Boyce ()

19      iii.   Catherine Boyce (born on 26 Apr 1838 Alabama - died on 23 May 1899 in Jones County, Mississippi)

Robert next married Hails .112

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Lenora Boyce (born in Mississippi)

         ii.   Hampton Boyce (born in Mississippi)


39. Elizabeth Catherine McScrews 21 was born about 1805 in South Carolina 69 and was buried in Old Ferguson Cemetary, Jones County, Mississippi.111

Elizabeth married Nelson .30

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   George Washington Nelson ()

         ii.   Nancy Nelson ()

Elizabeth next married Robert Porter Boyce .21
Robert Porter Boyce in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi, 1850, Clarke County, Mississippi. 69 "The Robert Boyce family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi as follows:

Robert P. Boyce - Millwright - age 60 - born in Delaware
Elizabeth - age 45 - born in South Carolina
Elizabeth - age 18 - born in Florida (this is an assumption of data for birthplace - the census is hard to read).
Catherine (Katherine spelled in census) - age 12 - born in Alabama.

Note: This census does not agree with the Georgia birthplace from Bill Parks."
(1850 US Census - Page 174B)

Robert Porter Boyce Occupation 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Occupation: Mill right, 1850, Clarke County, Mississippi. 69 "Robert Porter Boyce is listed in the 1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi as a Millright."
(1850 US Census, Clarke County, Mississippi)
Robert Porter Boyce in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi, 26 Oct 1860. 22 "John Ferguson and Robert Porter Boyce are listed in the 1860 US Census, Jones County, Ellisville Township, Mississippi as follows:

(house 400)
John Ferguson - age 40 - farmer - Value of Real Estate $3000 - Value of Personal Estate $1283 - born in Mississippi
Catherine - age 21 - born in Alabama
Angus - age 2 - male - born in Mississippi
Flora E. - age 1 - female - born in Mississippi

Robert P. Boyce - age 70 - mechanic - value of real estate $1000 - value of personal estate $50,500 - born in Delaware"
(1860 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi - page 61)

• Organizations: Mason. 30 "Grandfather Boyce was a loyal Mason and devoted member of the Baptist Church. He was honored and respected by all who knew him."
(Angus Ferguson)

• Death: 1873, State Line, Mississippi. 30 "Angus Ferguson remembers:

My grandparents on mother's side were Robert P. Boyce and Elizabeth McScrews Boyce. Grandmother first married a Nelson and they had two children, George Washington and Nancy. Mr. Nelson died after which she and grandfather married and had three children; Elizabeth who married a Shoemake; Mary, who married a Holley; and Catherine, the youngest, who married my father, John Ferguson. Grandmother died when I was a small child and grandfather married a Miss Hails in Clark County, Mississippi. They had two children, Lenora and Hampton.

Grandfather Boyce's family came from Ireland to Illinois, as I understand. Grandfather and grandmother came to Mississippi, where they lived and died. She was buried in the Old Ferguson cemetery and he at State Line, Mississippi. I do not remember grandmother, but I loved Grandfather devotedly. He visited our home often during his lifetime. He was a cabinet workman and millwright and had moved to State Line to build his last mill. His second wife was partially insane at the time. When he had the mill near completion and operating, he became ill and died at the age of eighty years, or more. At this time, his wife was found sitting on the spillway down at the mill, which was built on a little creek near State Line, perfectly insane and had to be sent to the asylum, where she soon passed on. This was in February or March of 1873. I carried mother and sister Ella, a tiny baby, in an ox cart from where we lived on Boguehoma near Sandersville to Shubuta, twenty-one miles, where they took the train to State Line. They remained there until grandfather was buried and grandmother sent to the asylum."
(Angus Ferguson in Family, School, Church and Pioneer History)

40. Moses M. Miller,11 son of William Miller and Millsbury Robertson , was born in 1832 in Williamsburg County, South Carolina 11 and died on 22 Jul 1864 in Atlanta, Georgia, at age 32.11 The cause of his death was shot from his horse in the Civil War.

Noted events in his life were:

• Millers Come to Winston County: 11 "In January, 1845, John M. Barrineau led a migration of several families and their slaves from South Carolina to Winston County, Mississippi. He brought with him his wife, Millsbury Robertson Miller Barrineau; their two children, Angelina Barrineau, age 6, and Edward Barrineau, age 4; and her two children, Moses M. Miller, age 13, and Mary Elizabeth Miller, age 11 (her son and daughter of her deceased first husband, William Miller of Williamsburg County, South Carolina)."
(Margaret Miller White)
Moses Miller in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850, Winston County, Mississippi. 113 "Moses Miller is living with the Barrineau family in the 1850 US, Winston County, Mississippi census. He is listed as a student and 18 years old. He is staying with John M. Barrineau, age 27, Millsbury (his true mother), age 38, Angelina, age 11, Edward, age 9, and an Elijah Ford, age 22."
(1850 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi)

• Marriage: 1854, Neshoba County, Mississippi. 11 "There is little doubt but that Moses M. Miller was visiting his cousin, Samuel Thomas Durant, and his wife, Sarah Lowery Durant, when he met Laura Donald. Moses' mother, Millie Barrineau, had died, and his sister, Mary Elizabeth Miller, had married. Moses would have been somewhat at loose ends. He had grown up with Thomas DUrant, and the Durants lived within three to four miles of the David Donald family. It is easy to imagine that he saw the young Laura at church and that each was mutually attracted to each other. At any rate, it must have been a genuine love affair. James L. Davis, her great-grandson, remembered that when he was a small boy, Laura Miller, then an elderly woman, still talked a great deal about her husband, Moses M. Miller. Laura Miller lived as a widow for fifty five years, ever faithful to the memory of her husband."
(Margaret Miller White)

Moses Miller was 22 years old and Laura was 16 at the time of their marriage.
Moses Miller Family in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi, 1860, Winston County, Mississippi. 70,114 "In the 1860 census, Moses Miller is listed as 28 years old and a farmer by trade. He is joined by his 22 year old wife, L.S. (Laura Saphronia), his 5 year old son, W.D. (William David), his 3 year old son, H.M. (Henry Moore) and his 1 year old son, S.C. (Samuel Clark). Moses Miller lists his place of birth as South Carolina and Laura's place of birth as Mississippi."
(Page 721)

"In the 1860 Slave Schedule, Moses Miller is listed as having one female slave, age 40."
(Page 424)
(1860 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi)

"This was the last census that Moses M. Miller would have been listed in. He was killed in the Civil War on 22, July, 1864."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Military Service: Civil War (Southern), 1861-1864. 1,11,75 "A company known as the Bogue Chitto Rangers was organized at New Hope Baptist CHurch in the North Bend Community. The church was located a short distance from North Bend Methodist Church and had been built in 1849. The company was made up of men and boys of the entire area, including some from southern Winston County, as was Moses Miller."
(Margaret Miller White)

Company B. Bogue Chitto Rangers of Neshoba County (5th Regiment, 4th Brigade) was mustered into State Service at Philadelphia, Mississippi, on August 5, 1861. Moses Miller mustered in as a Sergeant.

What was thought to be a short campaign, many thought the war would be over in a matter of weeks, would turn into a long war for Moses Miller. He would be killed just 8 months prior to the unit's surrender.

"5th Infantry Regiment, organized in the spring of 1861, contained men from Pike, Amite, Lauderdale, Winston, Noxubee, and Kemper counties. After serving in Florida it took an active part in the fight at Shiloh under General Chambers. Later it was assigned to J.K. Jacksons's, Gist's and Lowry's brigade, Army of Tennessee. The 5th was involved in the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, endured Hood's winter campaign in Tennessee, and fought in North Carolina. It lost 47% of the 170 engaged at Murfreesboro and 33% of the 225 at Chickamauga. In December, 1863, the unit totaled 395 men and 283 arms. At the battle of Atlanta there were 11 killed, 44 wounded and 11 missing. Only a remnant remained to surrender on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Col. John R. Dickins, Albert E. Fant, and John Weir; Lt. Col. Samuel F.M. Faucett, John Herring, A.T. Stennis, and W.L. Sykes; and Maj. James R. Moore."
(Civil War Soldiers and Sailors)

"Moses M. Miller would have seen all of the battles up to Atlanta and would have been one of the 11 killed. Moses rose from Seargent to Captain. He was elected to Captain on May 8, 1862, after the battle of Shiloh, and assumed the rank on July 29, 1862. Moses Miller was commanding Company B of the 5th Mississippi in the massacre at Peachtree Creek in Atlanta, when he was killed. He would have mustered in the service when he was about 29 years old and died when he was about 32 years old."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Letters: Letter from Moses to Laura Miller, 1863. 11 "Bridgeport, Alabama
December 2, 1863

Dear Laura,
I now proceed to answer your very kind letter which I have not recieved but hope to recieve soon. THis leaves me well and all the rest of the biys except Jesse Glass. He is unwell and has been ever since the Battle. He has gone out in the country to see if his health will not improve. I have nothing of importance to write you at this time. Times are very still here now. We have some good weather nowadays. I am in hopes you have gotten salt before this and killed your meat. I wish I was there to get some of the backbones and spare ribs, but there is no use to grieve about things that a man cannot help, so I will bear it and say "curse the Yankees", for they are the cause of it.
I expect to live fine for the next two or three days, for I have just gotten a chicken, some butter, eggs, and a piece of shoat! So, we will have good eating at our house. Come over if you can, conveniently. Our old Colonel is back. He has been at home ever since I have been in the regiment until a few days ago. Col. Sykes was wounded in the Battle and is now at home but will be back in about fifteen days and the he and old Dickens will start up the old....."
(Letter from Moses Miller to Laura Miller)
(The rest of the letter did not survive)

The battle to which Moses Miller referred to in the letter was the Battle of Missionary Ridge.

• Atlanta Campaign: 1864, Atlanta, Georgia. 11,115 "Captain Moses M. Miller was killed in the afternoon of an extremely hot day on July 22, 1864, in the second assault at Peachtree Creek."
(Margaret Miller White)

Moses Miller was 32 years old when he died in the Civil War.

"Johnston was relieved of command of the army, and Hood, in his place, ordered the assault along Peachtree Creek , July 20, in which Walker's Division was on the front line. Next followed the yet more bloody assault of July 22, in which Walker was killed. Walker's Division was then broken up. The Fifth and Eighth Mississippi were already transferred to Lowrey's Brigade, Cleburne's Division. Under the command of Lieut.-Col. John B. Herring, the regiment took part with Lowrey's Brigade in the Atlanta battle of July 22, when the casualties were: Company A, Capt. L. B. Fowler commanding, 4 wounded; Company B, Capt. M. M. Miller commanding, killed, Captain Miller, wounded, 4; Company C, Captain S. W. Mosby commanding, killed, Lieut. W. A. Ford and Sergt. S. S. Dennis, wounded 5, missing, Lieut. J. T. Hobgood; Company D, Lieut. W. A. Ford commanding, killed 1, wounded, Lieuts.. Ford and .W.W. Blain and 10 men; Company E, Lieut. L. L. Anderson commanding, killed 5, wounded 7; Company F, Capt. F. M. Woodward commanding, 4 wounded; Company G, Capt. D. B. Lattimore lost a leg, 1 other wounded; Company H, Capt. J. S. Featherston and 2 others wounded severely; Company I, Lieut. J. T. Hobgood commanding, 5 wounded; Company K, Capt. W. J. H. McBeath and 4 others wounded, Sergt. W. W. Phillips killed, 4 missing Total: killed, 9; wounded, 51 ; missing, 11. The Fifth served in the trenches around Atlanta and at East Point until August 30, when they marched to Jonesboro."
(From Dunbar Rowland’s "Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898" )



"Following the sad news of the death of Moses Miller, Laura Miller recieved from the Confederate government a box containing some of his personal belongings. These included his nadgun and holster, a billet, and an identification tag. The inscription on the tag reads: Co. I, 35, Miss. Vol. Inf., C.S.A.

"Kit" Miller remembers that Laura also had a fragment of a New Testament that was in the pocket of her husband when he was shot.

Mae Miller Mann, grandaughter of Moses Miller of Osceola, Indiana, stated that the Bible was in the possesion of her father, Henry Moore Miller, when the family moved to McAlester, Oklahoma in the early 1900's. The Bible was destroyed when their home burned. The story that was told to Mae was that a comrade of Moses Miller, also at the battle of Peachtree Creek, had seen Moses Miller shot from his horse and that he had retrieved the tattered Bible through which the bullet had passed."
(Margaret Miller White)

Moses married Laura Saphronia Donald 11 in 1854 in Neshoba County, Mississippi.11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   William David Miller (born on 19 Dec 1854 - died on 14 Sep 1928)

         ii.   Henry Moore Miller (born in 1856 - died in 1917 in McAlister, Oklahoma)

20      iii.   Samuel Clark Miller (born on 30 Jan 1859 Oak Grove, Winston County, Mississippi - died on 7 Jan 1897 in North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi)

         iv.   John L. Miller (born in 1860 - died between 1878-1880)

          v.   Catherine Miller (born in 1862 - died before 1870)


Laura Saphronia Donald Miller 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

41. Laura Saphronia Donald,11 daughter of David Donald and Tabitha Hickman , was born about 1838 in Mississippi 70 and died on 13 Jun 1919, about age 81.11 Other names for Laura were Granny Laura, and Granny Miller.

Moses Miller Family in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1860 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi, 1860, Winston County, Mississippi. 70 "In the 1860 census, Moses Miller is listed as 28 years old and a farmer by trade. He is joined by his 22 year old wife, L.S. (Laura Saphronia), his 5 year old son, W.D. (William David), his 3 year old son, H.M. (Henry Moore) and his 1 year old son, S.C. (Samuel Clark). Moses Miller lists his place of birth as South Carolina and Laura's place of birth as Mississippi."
(Page 721)

"In the 1860 Slave Schedule, Moses Miller is listed as having one female slave, age 40."
(Page 424)

• Widow: 1864. 11 After the death of her huband, Moses M. Miller:

"Laura Donald Miller was now, at age 26, a widow with four small children, ranging in age from four to nine. She became acquainted with grief early in her life. In 1862, she had suffered the death of her brother, David Donald Jr., killed at the Battle of Shiloh. In the same year (1864) that her husband, Captain Moses M. Miller, was killed at the Battle of Peachtree Creek, she suffered another sorrow in the death of her father, David Donald Sr. These experiences early in her life served to develop within her a wisdom and spiritual maturity which usually comes to others much later, if at all."
(Margaret Miller White)

Laura was married at sixteen and a widow (with 4 children) at twenty-six. She would never remarry and passed away when she was 82 years old. She survived all but one of her children."

• Census: 1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi, 1880. 71 "Laura S. Miller is listed in the 1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi as follows:

Laura S. Miller - self - widow - white female - age 43 - born in Mississippi - both parents born in South Carolina
Henry M. Miller - son - white male - age 23 - born in Mississippi - farmer - father born in South Carolina - mother born in Mississippi
Samuel C. Miller - son - white male - age 21 - born in Mississippi - At School - father born in South Carolina - mother born in Mississippi

Delia Miller - Other - widow - Black female - age 70 - born in South Carolina - Servant - both parents born in South Carolina."
(1880 US Census, Winston County, Mississippi)

• Cemetery: Noxapater, Mississippi. 11 "Laura Saphronia Donald Miller was buried in the WIlliam David Miller family plot in Mt. Carmal Cemetary, located across the street from the Baptist Church in Noxapater, Mississippi.

She had survived her husband, brother, a daughter and three sons, and when she died, only had one surviving son, William David Miller."

• Obituary: 1919, Winston County, Mississippi. 11,116 "Mrs. Laura Miller, one of the oldest citizens of our town, died at the home of her son, Mr. W.D. Miller, and granddaughter, Mrs. J.L. Davis, on Thursday night of last week, June 13, 1919. Her remains were carried to Noxapater, her old home, for burial. Mrs. Miller was in her 82nd year, and had been a sufferer for many years, but in a most beautiful Christian manner, she bore her pain. She was a good Christian woman, and had many warm friends throughout the country. We extend our condolence to the bereaved ones."
(Winston County Journal Newspaper Article - June 20, 1919)

Laura married Moses M. Miller 11 in 1854 in Neshoba County, Mississippi.11

42. Thomas A. Cheatham .11

Thomas married Talitha Jackson .

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Mary Tabitha Cheatham (born on 5 Jun 1853 Carroll Parish, Louisiana - died in 1897)

         ii.   Sebron Andrew Cheatham (born in 1854 Carroll Parish, Louisiana)

        iii.   John Lane Cheatham (born in 1856 Carroll Parish, Louisiana)

         iv.   Thomas Moseley Cheatham (born in 1860 Carroll Parish, Louisiana - died in 1948 , buried in Sandtown Methodist Church Cemetary, Neshoba County, Mississippi)

21        v.   Sarah Elizabeth Cheatham (born on 5 Dec 1862 Carroll Parish, Louisiana - died on 18 Feb 1935 , buried in North Bend Community, Neshoba County, Mississippi)

         vi.   Dr. John lane Cheatham ()


43. Talitha Jackson .

Talitha married Thomas A. Cheatham .11

44. Martin Clark,117 son of Daniel Clark and Peggy , was born about 1800 in North Carolina 73 and died after 1850 in Probably Kemper County, Mississippi.73 Another name for Martin was Martin Clarke.73

Martin Clark in 1830 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1830 US Census, Anson County, North Carolina, 1830. 118 "The Martin Clark family is listed in the 1830 US Census, Anson County, North Carolina as follows:

Martin Clark
2 free white males between 20 and 30 years of age

1 free white female under 5 years of age
1 free white female between 15 and 20 years of age

1 male slave under 10 years of age
1 male slave between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female slave between 36 and 55 years of age

1 free colored male between 10 and 24 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Anson County, North Carolina)
1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Migration: North Carolina to Mississippi, Between 1837-1839, Kemper County, Mississippi. 73 "Martin Clark and his wife, Ann, must have moved from North Carolina to Mississippi between 1837 and 1839. In the 1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, his son Robert (born about 1837) was born in North Carolina and his next son, Hiram, was born in Mississippi (born about 1839)."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Daniel and Martin Clarke in 1840 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1840, Kemper County, Mississippi. 119 "Martin "Clarke" is listed in the 1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi (two homes down from his father, Daniel, and his family is as follows:
2 males under 5 years old and 1 male between 30 to 40 years old. (Martin would have been near 40 years old at the time).
1 female between 5 and 10 years old, 1 female between 10 and 15 years old and 1 female between 20 and 30 years old. Ann must have misquoted her age, since she should have been about 35 years old at the time of the census."
(1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

Slaves:
"In the 1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, Martin Clarke is shown as having 1 male slave under 10 years old and 1 female slave between 24 and 35 years old."

"It can be assumed that the two younger males would have been Robert and Hiram and that the two younger females would have been Ann and Jane."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Martin Clarke Family in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1850, Kemper County, Mississippi. 73 "Martin Clark is listed in the 1850 US Census, Jones County, Mississippi as follows:
Martin "Clarke" - age 50 - Farmer - born in N.C.
Ann - age 45 - born in N.C.
Jane - age 15 - born in N.C.
Robert - age 13 - born in N.C.
Hiram - age 11 - born in Miss. (all other children are born in Miss.)
Harriet - age 9
John - age 7
Martin - age 5
Reubin - age 3
Nat - age 1"
(1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

"The Martin Clarke family is preceeded by his father's family, Daniel Clark. Daniel Clark is living in house 872 and Martin Clarke is in house 873"
(Warren Graham Trest)

Martin married Ann 73.,117

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Ann Clark (born about 1824 North Carolina - died about 1875)

         ii.   Jane Clark (born about 1835 North Carolina)

        iii.   Robert H. Clark (born about 1837 North Carolina - died on 25 Jun 1862)

         iv.   Hiram Clark (born about 1839 Mississippi)

          v.   Harriet Clark (born about 1841 Mississippi)

         vi.   John Clark (born about 1843 Mississippi)

        vii.   Martin Clark (born about 1845 Mississippi)

22     viii.   Reuben Clark (born on 24 Apr 1847 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 21 Jan 1901 , buried in Methodist Cemetary, Noxapater, Mississippi)

         ix.   Nat Clark (born on 6 Sep 1849 Mississippi - died in 1887 , buried in Kemper County, Mississippi)


45. Ann 73,117 was born about 1805 in North Carolina 73 and died after 1850 in Probably Kemper County, Mississippi.73

Ann married Martin Clark .117

46. Sire O. Dawes,117 son of Ephraim Dawes and Suzanna , was born on 28 Aug 1818 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina,79,120,121 died on 29 Aug 1894 in Kemper County, Mississippi, at age 76,72,121 and was buried in Daws Family Cemetery, Kemper County, Mississippi.117 Other names for Sire were Sira Outley, Sire Outley, and Syer Outley Daws.

Ephraim Dawes in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1820. 122 "Ephraim Daws (Dawes) is listed in the 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Ephraim Daws

3 free white males under ten years of age (Sire O. Dawes should have been about 2 years old during this census)
2 free white males between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male above 45 years of age

1 free white female under 10 years of age
2 free white females between 16 and 26 years of age
1 free white female above 45 years of age

4 persons engaged in agriculture."
(1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

• Land: according to Kemper County Land Patents. There are 3 Land Patents for S.O. Dawes in Kemper County, Mississippi:

Sira Outley Daws
12-01-1849
33383
MS1500_.179

Sira O. Daws
10-01-1859
37835
MS1580_.198

Siar O. Daws
5-01-1860
40525
MS1640_.086"
(Land Patents for Kemper County, Mississippi)

• Military Service: 76,120 "Enlisted Apr 30, 1864, Served Apr 30 - Jun 9 1864, 47 yrs old , blue eyes, dark hair, dark complexion, 5 feet 10 inches, from Richmond County, NC, farmer."

"This Company enlisted at Dawe's Store, Kemper County, on April 30, 1864. Its Captain was E. D. Gamblin.
First Lieutenant: A. C. Gamblin
Second Lieutenant: J. W. McCraw
Third Lieutenant: C. L. Smith

Enrolled, 88.

Gamblin's Cavalry Battalion was listed in Mabry's Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry, September 30, 1864. Apparently disbanded late in 1864. For those searching for ancestors who served with this unit the records are carried as Gamblin's Mississippi Cavalry Co. (State Troops). The unit was still active in May 1865 when they were surrendered at Citronelle, Alabama."
(Kemper County Webgen Project)

• Occupation: Merchant, 1880. "In the 1880 US Census, his occupation is listed as Merchant."

• Census: 1880 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1880, Kemper County, Mississippi. 1,72 "Sire O. Daws is listed in the 1880 Kemper County, Mississippi as follows:

Sire O. Daws - age 61 - Merchant - born in S.C. (this may have been in N.C.) and father born in North Carolina. There is no listing for his mother's birthplace.
Agnes Daws - age 57 - born in North Carolina and both parents born in North Carolina.

James U. George - other - age 21 - born in Tennessee - clerk in store
Callie Wright - other - age 15 - born in Mississippi - keeping house
(Page 128C)

S.O. Daws is followed by Issac Daws (2 homes down). Issac is listed with both parents being born in N.C. and he is listed at age 27 and being born in Mississippi. I will make the assumption that Issac is the son of S.O. Daws.

Since SIre O. Daws is listed as a merchant, the assumption can be made that it was at his store that Gamblin's Cavalry Battalion mustered into the Civil War military service. Kemper County Webgen stated that Gamblin's Battalion enlisted at Dawe's Store, Kemper County, on April 30, 1864."
(1880 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, District 4 - Warren Trest)

Sire married Agnes Farmer .117

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   John W. Dawes (born about 1839)

         ii.   Martin Luther Dawes (born about 1840)

        iii.   David Thomas Dawes (born about 1844)

23       iv.   Nancy Anne Dawes (born on 13 Nov 1846 Kemper County, Mississippi - died on 24 Apr 1927 in Probably Winston County, Mississippi)

          v.   S.O. Dawes (born in Dec 1848)

         vi.   Issac Richbeau Dawes (born on 23 Sep 1852 Mississippi)

        vii.   Margaret Dawes (born about 1854)

       viii.   Ellis Dawes (born about 1855)

         ix.   Mary Catherine Dawes (born on 17 Jan 1856)


47. Agnes Farmer,117 daughter of Issac Farmer and Mary Williams , was born about 1823 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina 72,79 and died about 1904 in Kemper County, Mississippi, about age 81 72.,121

Agnes married Sire O. Dawes .

48. Archibald Graham,42 son of Duncan Baxter Graham and Elizabeth Graham , was born about 1795 in Richmond County, North Carolina 42 and died about 1833 in Mississippi, about age 38.42

Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: United States Surveyor, Louisiana and Mississippi. 20 William Hadskey states in his book, A History of Franklin County, Mississippi, to 1861:

"Dewitt Clinton Graham, the last elected representative from the county prior to the Civil War, was a socially prominent aristocrat of that day. Apparently his father, Archibald Graham, had died when Dewitt was quite young, and this young native of Hamburg community had been reared by his stepfather, Bartlett Ford. Archibald Graham, a United States surveyor, left his son a nice estate, and the young man inherited more land from his mother, the former Mary Jane Holloway, and from his stepfather. One of his kinsmen taught him the art of surveying and the fundamentals of engineering [321]. "

"The fact that his occupation was as a surveyer and that he left a large estate to his son was backed up by the Chief Geneologist for the Clan Graham."
(Warren Trest)

Archibald married Jane Holloway .123

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Duncan Patrick Henry Graham (born about 1827)

24       ii.   Dewitt Clinton Graham (born about 1828 Louisana - died in Nov 1865)

        iii.   Archibald Graham (born about 1830 Louisana)


49. Jane Holloway 123 was born about 1810 in Richmond County, North Carolina 123 and died about 1838 in Mississippi, about age 28.42

Jane married Archibald Graham .42

50. William B. Smith,5 son of George Smith and Mary , was born on 5 Nov 1786 in South Carolina 38,39.,93

William married Francis Scott on 5 Sep 1816 in Franklin County, Mississippi.93

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Joseph George Smith (born on 15 Feb 1818)

         ii.   James Maxwell Smith (born on 13 Apr 1819)

        iii.   Margaret Rebecca Smith (born on 17 Aug 1820)

         iv.   Mary Elizabeth Smith (born on 28 Jun 1822)

          v.   Jane Elvira Smith (born on 12 Jan 1824)

         vi.   William Gabriel Smith (born on 5 Feb 1825)

        vii.   Anna Elmira Smith (born on 13 Jul 1826)

       viii.   George Columbus Smith (born on 7 Jul 1831)

25       ix.   Francis Melvina Smith (born on 17 Mar 1833 Mississippi - died after 1910 in Mississippi)


51. Francis Scott 5 was born on 29 Apr 1794 in Mississippi 38,39,93 and died on 19 Aug 1844, at age 50.93

Francis married William B. Smith on 5 Sep 1816 in Franklin County, Mississippi.93

52. Benjamin Franklin Bufkin,94 son of Josiah Bufkin and Unknown , was born on 27 Sep 1794 in Georgetown District, Prince George Parish, South Carolina,94 died in 1853 in Copiah County, Mississippi, at age 59,94 and was buried in Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery, Barlow, Copiah County, MS..94

Noted events in his life were:

• Migration: "Benjamin Franklin Bufkin must have migrated from South Carolina to Mississippi between 1818 and 1820 with his father. Census records have Albert Bufkin being born in South Carolina in 1818 and Harmon Floyd Bufkin being born in Mississippi in 1822. Census records have him in Perry County in 1820, so the assumption can be made that the Bufkins came from North Carolina between 1818 and 1820."
(Warren Trest)

• Occupation: Blacksmith, Copiah County, Mississippi. 95 "In the 1850 US Census, Benjamin Franklin Bufkin is listed as a Blacksmith by trade."
John and Benjamin Bufkin in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1820. 124 "The Benjamin Bufkin and John Bufkin families (who the assumption can be made is his brother) are listed on the same page of the 1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - 2 free white males under 5 years of age (this would have been Albert and ? maybe Harmon), 1 free white male between 16 and 26 year of age (Benjamin Bufkin would have been near 26 years of age), 1 free white female between 6 and 26 years of age (Celia would have been about 25 years of age).

1 Person engaged in Agriculture

John Bufkin (The assumption can be made that this is Benjamin's brother):
2 free white males under 5 years of age, 1 free white male between 16 and 26 years of age, 1 free white female between 16 and 26 years of age.

2 Persons engaged in Agriculture."
(1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi)

• History of Centerpoint Community: "Centerpoint - Located near Bayou Pierre, at the forks of Union Church and Barlow roads, was settled early in Copiah's history by the Hall, Bufkin, Holliday, Wade, Miller and Brown families. By the early 1900's it was a progressive country village, boasting a cotton-gin, several stores, a church, a blacksmith shop, and a school."
(Mississippi GenWeb Project)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi, 1830, Copiah County, Mississippi. 125 "The Benjamin Bufkin Family is listed in the 1830 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - 2 males under 5 years of age
2 males between 5 and 10 years of age
1 male 10 to 15 years of age
1 male between 30 and 40 years of age

1 female between 20 and 30 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi)
Benjamin Bufkin in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi, 1840. 126 "Benjamin Bufkin is listed in the 1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - 1 male under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
2 males between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 20 and 30 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age

1 female under 5 years of age
1 female between 5 and 10 years of age
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi)
Benjamin Bufkin in 1850 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi, 1850. 95 "The Benjamin Bufkin family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi as follows:

Benjamin Bufkin - age 56 - Blacksmith - born in South Carolina
Celia Bufkin - age 55 - born in North Carolina
Soloman - 18 years of age - farmer - born in Mississippi
Erbane - age 14
Celia A. - age 12"
(1850 US Census, Copiah County, Mississippi)
Benjamin Bufkin and Celia Ann Lewis Tombstone 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Cemetery: "The following is partial listing of the Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery in Copiah County, Mississippi. B.F. Bufkin and many, many of the Bufkins can be found. Transcribed by Susan BARLOW Holmes from a survey made on July 27, 1997 by an unknown person:


Ref.
Name
Date of Birth
Date of Death
Notes

1.
Hugh O. Holland, Sr.
Jun 09, 1906
Apr 20, 1980
2.
James M. Conn
Jan 09, 1840
Jul 22, 1902
James Madison Conn, born Aug 09, 1840 & died Jul 26, 1902 - might be the same?
3.
Annie Mae Stapp Barlow
Apr 05, 1908
Feb 14, 1927
w/o Anthony Wayne Barlow
4.
Lucien B. Barlow
(Lucien Boneparte)
1882
1963
Born Nov 17, 1882 s/o John Quincy Barlow & Rhoda Jane Robertson h/o Arcola Roberts
5.
Jeffrey Hurley Hodges
Oct 09, 1947
Apr 16, 1979
6.
Lee Roy Owens - infant
Apr 25, 1922
no date
s/o Albert Owen & Clara Inez Davis
7.
Albert F. Owens
Jun 29, 1924
Oct 09, 1924
s/o Albert Owen & Clara Inez Davis
8.
Baby Davis - infant
Jul 10, 1942
no date
9.
Baby Davis - infant
May 24, 1943
no date
10.
Amanda R. Green
75 yrs - 6 mo.
Aug 20, 1889
11.
Peter Hedrick
1844
1917
12.
Bettye H. Bufkin
Aug 25, 1890
Dec 18, 1983
13.
Francis L. Bishop
Apr 21, 1918
May 12, 1973
14.
Audrey C. Bishop
Oct 28, 1921
no date
15.
Margaret J. Bishop
Sep 08, 1920
Oct 16, 1942
16.
Essie V. Bishop
1886
1940
17.
F. M. Bishop
1882
1934
18.
Amanda W. Bishop
Jul 01, 1851
Mar 16, 1922
w/o Albert Gallatin Bishop
19.
Albert G. Bishop
Jan 26, 1849
Mar 28, 1919
h/o Amanda Missouri Williams
20.
Annie Lee Bishop, R.N.
Nov 24, 1894
Feb 08, 1985
21.
Elma Bishop
Apr 16, 1900
Jan 08, 1901
21A
Infant Son Conn
Jul 02, 1915
Jul 03, 1915
s/o Ira Frank Conn & Mary Elizabeth "Bettie" Bishop
22.
Mary Epsie Conn
Nov 26, 1910
Sep 13, 1911
d/o Ira Frank Conn & Mary Elizabeth Bishop
23.
A.D. Conn (Albert David)
1894
1933
s/o Ira Frank Conn & Mary Elizabeth Bishop Mar 25, 1894 - Feb 18, 1933
24.
Bettie Bishop Conn
Mar 17, 1875
Aug 27, 1937
w/o Ira Frank Bishop d/o Albert Gallatin Bishop & Amanda Missouri Williams
25.
Ira Conn
Apr 18, 1870
Apr 16. 1957
h/o Bettie Bishop s/o John Floyd Conn, Sr. & Minerva Frances Douglass
26.
Ola May Conn
1895
1966
d/o Ira Frank Conn & Mary Elizabeth Bishop
27.
Bobby Conn (Robert Henry)
Nov 24, 1901
Oct 16, 1968
s/o Ira Frank Conn & Mary Elizabeth Bishop h/o Gertrude Wade
28.
Zula Sine
Aug 23, 1888
Mar 10, 1980
29.
Cula L. Noyes
Oct 05, 1916
Aug 01, 1990
30.
Infant son of J. F. & Epsie B. Conn
no date
no date
s/o John Floyd Conn, Jr. & Cora Epsie Bishop
31.
Infant son of J. F. & Sally Conn
no date
no date
s/o John Floyd Conn, Jr. and Sally Augusta Wade
32.
Sallie Wade Conn
Dec 13, 1881
Oct 01, 1912
d/o James A. Wade & Maggie Tucker 1rst w/o John Floyd Conn, Jr.
33.
John Floyd Conn, Jr.
Mar 13, 1883
May 15, 1971
s/o John Floyd Conn, Sr. & Minerva Frances Douglass h/o 1. Sallie Augusta Wade & 2. Cora Epsie Bishop
34.
Epsie Bishop Conn
Mar 12, 1890
Nov 17, 1964
2nd w/o John Floyd Conn, Jr.
35.
Ray Bishop Conn
Jun 30, 1916
Jan 21, 1967
s/o John Floyd Conn, Jr. & Cora Epsie Bishop h/o Dorothy Barnett
36.
William E. Hennington
(William Ernest)
May 18, 1894
Jun 12, 1898
s/o Frank A. Hennington & Rubye Conn
37.
F.A. Hennington
(Frank)
Aug 27, 1868
Nov 22, 1900
1rst h/o Rubye Conn
38.
Ruby Conn
Hennington Davis
1872
1969
d/o John Floyd Conn, Sr. & Minerva Frances Douglass 1rst w/o Frank A. Hennington 2nd w/o Plummer Lee Davis Nov 05, 1872 - Dec 03, 1969
39.
Plummer L. Davis
1873
1946
2nd h/o of Rubye Conn
40.
Owen Howell Davis
Apr 26, 1902
Mar 26, 1976
s/o Plummer Davis & Rubye Conn h/o Betty Bishop
41.
Betty Bishop Davis
Dec 19, 1902
Nov 23, 1980
w/o Owen H. Davis
42.
John M. Beasley
Jul 20, 1864
Dec 20, 1929
43.
Mollie F. Beasley
Apr 27, 1864
Nov 03, 1914
44.
Ellen F. Hennington
May 12, 1837
Feb 15, 1905
45.
Sarah Frances Allen
Apr 18, 1845
Jun 24, 1914
d/o Harmon Floyd Bufkin & Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Barlow w/o John B. Allen
46.
John B. Allen
Feb 15, 1888
Oct 03, 1908
s/o John B. Allen & Sarah Frances Bufkin
47.
J. B. Allen
Jul 22, 1841
Jul 09, 1900
s/o William Tarpley Allen & Sarah Ann Fore h/o Sarah Frances Bufkin
48.
J. Turner Allen
Mar 02, 1873
Jan 24, 1888
s/o John B. Allen & Sarah Frances Bufkin
49.
Florence Allen
Oct 29, 1878
Aug 20, 1885
d/o John B. Allen & Sarah Frances Bufkin
50.
William T. Allen
Oct 13, 1814
Sep 30, 1897
h/o of Sarah Ann Fore
51.
Sarah A. Allen
Dec 21, 1818
Oct 31, 1881
w/o William Tarpley Allen
52.
Margaret Douglas
Feb 24, 1834
Oct 02, 1904
53.
Marshall M. Hennington
(Marshall Morgan)
1868
1915
s/o John Hennington & Ellen Taylor h/o Clara May Conn
Aug 03, 1868 - Oct 27, 1916
54.
Clara C. Hennington
1875
1969
d/o John Floyd Conn, Sr. & Minerva Frances Douglass w/o Marshall M. Hennington Jun 23, 1875 - Jul 28, 1969
55.
Oscar H. Hennington
(Oscar Harold)
1894
1944
s/o Marshall M. Hennington & Clara May Conn h/o Louise ______ Jan 28, 1894 – May 1944
56.
Harrison Hennington
(Henry Harrison)
1905
1945
s/o Marshall M. Hennington & Clara May Conn h/o Miriam Dodds Jan 02, 1904 - Nov 13, 1945
57.
Katie M. Hennington
Katie M. McGinnis
Jun 01, 1901
Jan 24, 1996
d/o James Witherspoon McGinnis & Lee Anna Johnson w/o Marshall Frank Hennington
58.
M. F. Hennington
(Marshall Frank)
Sep 21, 1896
Jan 16, 1984
s/o Marshall M. Hennington & Clara May Conn h/o Katie M. McGinnis
59.
Lydia Conn
Sep 29, 1821
Jun 07, 1892
d/o Henry "Buck" Barlow & Charity Millsaps w/o Henry Ward Conn
60.
H.W. Conn
(Henry Ward)
Jul 20, 1808
Jan 28, 1876
s/o Richard & Margaret Conn h/o Lydia Barlow
61.
Uriah M. Conn
Uriah Millsaps "Bud"
1856
1918
s/o Henry Ward Conn & Lydia Barlow Jul 19, 1856 - Aug 14, 1918 h/o Mary Holiday Douglass
62.
Mary M. Conn
1856
1934
w/o Uriah Millsaps Conn Jun 22, 1856 - Dec 07, 1934 what is the M. for?/ should be "H"
63.
Martha Conn
May 22, 1854
Feb 28, 1899
w/o Matthew Tinsley " Mat" Conn d/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Maryanne Singletary
64.
Romulus Conn
1874
1914
s/o Matthew Tinsley Conn & Martha Bufkin h/o Lettie Scott Jul 1873 - Feb 14, 1914
65.
Minerva F. Conn
(Minerva Frances)
Oct 20, 1852
Oct 20, 1896
w/o John Floyd Conn, Sr. d/o James M. Douglass & Martha Bufkin
66.
J. F. Conn
(John Floyd, Sr.)
Apr 12, 1844
Aug 24, 1912
s/o Henry Ward Conn & Lydia Barlow h/o 1. Minerva Frances Douglass h.o 2. Melissa Pickett
67.
Hobson Carey Bishop, Jr.
Mar 20, 1932
Apr 06, 1980
68.
Dora Mae Bishop
Feb 01, 1905
Nov 08, 1976
69.
Hobson C. Bishop, Sr.
Apr 07, 1900
Nov 04, 1979
70.
Andrew J. George
Mar 14, 1895
May 03, 1968
71.
Infant of
M/M I.E. Scurlock
no date
no date
s/o Isiah Elois Scurlock & Mary Elizabeth George br/o Avo Dell Scurlock
72.
Louise Helen George
Mar 25, 1861
May 31, 1906
73.
Samuel George
age 62
Jan 01, 1960
74.
Wiley C. George
Jun 08, 1884
Sep 08, 1966
75.
George Johnson
Oct 26, 1889
May 28, 1945
76.
illegible
77.
Shambry Conn
Jul 04, 1893
Nov 10, 1925
s/o Matthew Tinsley Conn & Martha Bufkin
78.
Jose Sims West
Mar 12, 1858
Jul 18, 1858
79.
Martin A. West
26 y-1 m-3 d
Jan 11, 1855
80.
William Leroy West
Aug 02, 1830
Feb 07, 1852
81.
Nancy Taylor West
1803
1838
82.
Sarah Elizabeth Allen
no date
no date
I think this may be: d/o William Tarpley Allen & Sarah Ann Fore Oct 02, 1848 - Sep 27, 1858
83.
Albert G. Bishop
Jan 31, 1888
Jan 15, 1978
s/o Albert Gallatin Bishop & Amanda Missouri Williams
84.
Susie B. Bishop
Dec 21, 1891
Apr 04, 1974
85.
Annie Bess Bishop
Dec 10, 1916
Aug 24, 1917
86.
Jarrett H. Noland
no date
no date
h/o Lizzie Bufkin
87.
Lizzie Bufkin Noland
no date
no date
w/o Jarrett H. Noland d/o Wm. David Bufkin & Susan P. Carlisle 1863 - Jan 06, 1899
88.
Susan P. Bufkin
Sep 15, 1823
Mar 25, 1886
w/o William David Bufkin d/o James Carlisle & Mary Bishop
89.
David Bufkin
Apr 08, 1827
May 18, 1880
h/o Susan P. Carlisle s/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Celia Ann Lewis
90.
Beatrice A. Conn
Apr 06, 1913
Jul 09, 1988
91.
Lula F. Womack
(Lula Frances)
Sep 08, 1881
Jul 06, 1883
d/o William Washington Womack & Charity Bufkin
92.
Harmon B. Womack
(Harmon Bufkin)
Jan 01, 1879
Jul 13, 1881
s/o William Washington Womack & Charity Bufkin
93.
Howell M. Robinson
Sept 19, 1895
Jul 23, 1961
94.
George David Bufkin
Nov 08, 1887
Nov 25, 1944
s/o Ulley Dudley & Maggie Eudora Bufkin
h/o Betty Hynum
95.
Ulley Dudley Bufkin
Feb 20, 1866
Mar 09, 1944
s/o William David Bufkin & Susan P. Carlisle h/o Maggie Eudora ____
96.
Maggie Eudora Bufkin
Apr 01, 1867
Jan 10, 1941
w/o Ulley Dudley Bufkin
97.
Hugh Benjamin
Robertson
Aug 23, 1869
Feb 09, 1906
98.
Emerline Ryan
May 04, 1840
Aug 04, 1910
w/o Daniel B. Ryan maiden name: Pitts
99.
Daniel B. Ryan
Jan 15, 1838
Aug 14, 1879
h/o Emerline Pitts
100.
F. P. Ryan
Oct 18, 1869
Aug 28, 1883
ch/o Daniel Ryan & Emerline Pitts
101.
G. Macom Bufkin
(George Macon)
Apr 30, 1862
Oct 17, 1886
s/o Harmon Floyd Bufkin & Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Barlow
102.
John J. Bufkin (Jay)
Sep 28, 1858
Sep 13, 1886
s/o Harmon Floyd Bufkin & Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Barlow
h/o Mary J. Weeks
103.
Elizabeth Ann Bufkin (Betsy)
Oct 14, 1824
Feb 02, 1900
w/o Harmon Floyd Bufkin
d/o Henry "Buck" Barlow & Charity Millsaps
104.
Harmon F. Bufkin
(Harmon Floyd)
Jul 28, 1822
Aug 16, 1900
h/o Elizabeth Ann Barlow
s/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Celia Ann Lewis
105.
M.C. Ryan Bufkin
(Matilda Carolyn Ryan)
Oct 09, 1859
Jun 26, 1890
d/o Daniel Ryan & Emerline Pitts w/o William Webster Bufkin
106.
H. F. Bufkin
(Harmon Floyd, Jr.)
May 07, 1854
May 14, 1918
h/o Fannie Golden Bondurant
s/o Harmon Floyd Bufkin & Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" Barlow
107.
Harmon Luther Bufkin
Jan 13, 1901
Jan 21, 1901
s/o Harmon F. Bufkin, Jr. & Fannie Golden Bondurant
108.
Nelwyn L. Palmertree
Oct 04, 1935
July 19, 1936
109.
Mittie Bufkin
1885
1925
110.
Ira Frank Hennington
Feb 02, 1897
Jan 26, 1987
s/o Frank A. Hennington & Rubye Conn
h/o Lola May Newman
111.
Lola May Hennington
Jun 25, 1895
Dec 27, 1985
d/o Silas Shadrick Newman & Julia Anna Weathersby
w/o Ira Frank Hennington
112.
Calvin Clyde Newman
Sep 11, 1888
Nov 28, 1968
maybe Lola's brother
113.
S. S. Newman
(Silas Shadrick)
1856
1927
h/o Julia Ann Weathersby
114.
Julia A. Newman
1861
1936
maiden name: Weathersby
w/o Silas Shadrick Newman
115.
Laura Bufkin
Dec 25, 1862
May 13, 1931
d/o Laura Whitehead
w/o Benjamin Louis Bufkin
116.
Benjamin L. Bufkin
(Benjamin Louis)
Mar 12, 1852
Mar 29, 1933
h/o Laura Whitehead
s/o William David Bufkin & Susan P. Carlisle
117.
Cecilia Compton
Mar 19, 1971
Nov 05, 1971
118.
David Conn
Dec 27, 1921
Jan 22, 1989
s/o David Conn & Frances Ellen George
119.
Kenneth Dale Conn
Dec 06, 1954
Sep 21, 1980
120.
Percy Conn
Aug 01, 1908
Apr 12, 1968
s/o David Conn & Frances Ellen George
h/o Hazel Albritton
121.
Pauline C. Jordan
June 27, 1913
Feb 21, 1985
122.
Daisy Bishop
(Daisy Belmont)
1881
1965
w/o David Hinds Bishop
d/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran Mar 14, 1881- Dec 27, 1965
123.
David H. Bishop
(David Hinds)
1877
1942
h/o Daisy Belmont Bufkin
124.
Maydee Bufkin
1908
1926
d/o William David & Fannie Bufkin
125.
Fannie Bufkin
1888
1928
w/o William David Bufkin
maiden name unknown
126.
W. D. Bufkin
(William David)
1876
1931
s/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran
h/o Fannie Mar 1876 - Nov 1931
127.
Elwin W. Bufkin
(Elwin Watson)
Jan 22, 1917
May 20, 1985
s/o William David & Fannie Bufkin
128.
Boone Bufkin
(Daniel Boone "Boony")
Dec 08, 1891
Dec 17, 1969
h/o Lutie Scott
s/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran
129.
Thomas U. Bufkin
(Thomas Urbin "Tommy")
1885
1959
s/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran
h/o Gertrude Bishop
130.
Gertrude Bishop Bufkin
1892
1978
w/o Thomas Urbin Bufkin
131.
Homer Barlow
Nov 27, 1896
Feb 07, 1963
s/o John Quincy Barlow & Rhoda Ann Robertson
h/o Hattie Lynn Bufkin
132.
Hattie Barlow
Aug 04, 1896
Aug 09, 1982
w/o of Homer Barlow
d/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran
133.
William Carey Bufkin
Apr 03, 1855
Aug 27, 1923
h/o Annie Eliza Cochran
s/o William David Bufkin & Susan P. Carlisle
134.
William Bishop Bufkin
no date
June 09, 1945
s/o Thomas Urbin Bufkin & Gertrude Bishop born Apr 12, 1919
135.
Annie Eliza Bufkin
Aug 06, 1856
Mar 27, 1931
w/o William Carey Bufkin
d/o William Cochran & Catherine Norwood
136.
David E. Bufkin
May 29, 1946
June 05, 1946
137.
Inez Bufkin
Jan 05, 1912
Feb 27, 1912
138.
David Bishop
Aug 27, 1913
Sep 05, 1919
s/o David Hinds Bishop & Daisy Belmont Bufkin
139.
James Earl Davis
Feb 15, 1927
no date
140.
Betty Ann Thompson
no date
March 1933
141.
Hugh H. Barlow
(Hugh Harmon)
Dec 08, 1873
Apr 24, 1966
s/o William Jasper Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
h/o 1. L.V. Deere
h/o 2. Emma Parker
h/o 3. Lou Ella Cronk
142.
Green Barlow ("Pud")
1912
1976
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
h/o Margie Gill Nov 15, 1912 - Aug 07, 1976
143.
Earl Barlow
Sep 06, 1909
Jan 08, 1911
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
144.
Mary Elizabeth Barlow
Dec 07, 1928
no date
d/o Hugh Quintus Barlow & F. L. Bland
w/o Jasper Daniel Barlow
145.
Jasper Daniel Barlow
Feb 25, 1908
Mar 08, 1988
s/o William Jasper Barlow & Catherine Louisa Wright
h/o Mary Elizabeth Barlow
146.
Henry B. Bufkin
(Henry Rufus)
Jan 04, 1847
Jan 14, 1914
s/o of Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
147.
A.G. Norwood
(Augusta G.)
Nov 25, 1868
Oct 30, 1936
h/o Holly Emaline Bordurant Bufkin
148.
Holly E. Norwood
(Holly Emaline)
1868
1956
d/o Francis Marion Bufkin & Martha Bondurant
w/o Augusta G. Norwood
149.
Gus P. Norwood
1868
1936
150.
Urben Bufkin
Jun 22, 1863
Jul 08, 1908
s/o Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
h/o Frances Marion Goza
151.
Charity Bufkin ("Sweet")
Sep 15, 1858
Dec 21, 1903
d/o Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
152.
Emma M. Goza
Dec 12, 1848
Sep 07, 1887
153.
James J. "Jimmy" Barlow
Oct 29, 1950
Aug 28, 1967
s/o Jasper Daniel Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Barlow
154.
Jasper Daniel Barlow, Jr.
Aug 24, 1949
Aug 24, 1949
s/o Jasper Daniel Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Barlow
155.
William Jasper Barlow
Oct 06, 1828
Dec 30, 1910
s/o Henry "Buck" Barlow & Charity Millsaps
h/o 1. Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
h/o 2. Catherine Louisa Wright
156.
M. Elizabeth Barlow
(Mary Elizabeth)
1834
1893
w/o William Jasper Barlow
d/o James M. Stanfil & Martha A. Douglass
157
Dolly Barlow
(Minerva L. "Dolly")
Nov 03, 1880
May 19, 1939
s/o William Jasper Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
158.
John Newton Barlow
("Tucker")
Nov 26, 1858
Jul 09, 1924
s/o William Jasper Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
h/o Alice Clorinda Goodson
159.
Alice Goodson Barlow
Feb 08, 1866
Sep 09, 1933
d/o William Goodson & Louisa Cook
w/o John Newton Barlow
160.
Otho Columbus Beall
Jul 19, 1857
Nov 26, 1931
h/o Celia Bufkin
161.
Celia Bufkin Beall
(Celia Ann)
Jul 05, 1856
Mar 31, 1892
w/o Otho Columbus Beall
d/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Maryanne Singletary
162.
Emma Robertson Beall
May 22, 1858
Jun 03, 1931
163.
Harmon L. Bufkin
(Harmon Louis)
no date
1890
s/o Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
Oct 02, 1849 - Aug 02, 1890
164.
Frank M. Bufkin
(Francis Marion)
Mar 1841
Sep 1890
s/o Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
h/o Martha Bondurant
165.
Amanthus Jones Bufkin
Jun 1846
Mar 1890
s/o Albert Bufkin & Emaline Barlow
166.
Celia St. Clair Bufkin
Jan 06, 1873
Nov 10, 1884
167.
Emma Goza
4y-9m-12d
Nov 05, 1879
168.
Bettie Goza
1m-2d
Aug 31, 1873
169.
Albert Bufkin
Feb 22, 1818
May 27, 1880
s/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Celia Ann Lewis
h/o Emeline Barlow
170.
Emeline Barlow
1823
1871
w/o Albert Bufkin
d/o Henry "Buck" Barlow & Charity Millsaps
Jan 28, 1823 - Dec 18, 1871
171.
B. F. Bufkin ("Dock")
(Benjamin Franklin)
Sep 25, 1829
Oct 28, 1904
h/o Maryanne Singletary
s/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Celia Ann Lewis
172.
Francis Bufkin
1852
1922
173.
Infant son of B.L. & Laura Bufkin
Feb 05, 1893
Feb 26, 1893
s/o Benjamin Louis Bufkin & Laura Whitehead
174.
W. J. Thompson
Jan 18, 1874
Nov 23, 1900
h/o Kate Bufkin
175.
Henry C. Bufkin
Oct 11, 1864
Aug 01, 1869
176.
Benjamin Bufkin
(Benjamin Franklin)
1794
1853
born Sept 27, 1794 - s/o Josiah Bufkin
h/o Celia Lewis
177
Celia Ann Lewis Bufkin
1795
1864
w/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin
d/o Benjamin Lewis & Celia Martin
178.
Isabell Price
Sep 07, 1882
Feb 06, 1883
d/o Josiah Bufkin - birth year should be 1802
w/o Charles Randolph Price
179.
Rachel Carlisle Price
Nov 17, 1826
Jan 07, 1896
w/o G. Thomas Carslise
d/o Charles Randolph Price & Isabella Bufkin
180
Milton H. Price
(Milton Harrison)
Nov 19, 1839
Jul 28, 1867
s/o Charles Randolph Price & Isabella Bufkin
181.
Charles R. Price (Jr.)
Apr 22, 1833
Jun 17, 1867
s/o Charles Randolph Price & Isabella Bufkin
182.
Hardy H. Price
Aug 22, 1836
Feb 16, 1859
s/o Charles Randolph Price & Isabella Bufkin
183.
Joseph Hester
Sep 15, 1860
Oct 12, 1868
184.
Charles Randolph Hester
Apr 18, 1862
Oct 02. 1873
s/o Ephraim Hester & Mary Ann Price
185.
Ephraim Hester
Aug 15, 1813
Feb 04, 1875
186.
Young Robertson
Feb 07, 1825
Jan 07, 1891
h/o Mary Jane McIntosh
187
Mary Jane Robertson
Aug 22, 1828
Nov 24, 1910
w/o Young Robertson
188.
Grace Barlow Cranfield
(Grace Agnes)
1841
1929
d/o Henry "Buck" Barlow & Miranda Hayman
w/o Jared Hoyt Cranfield
Mar 23, 1843 - Jan 10, 1929
189.
Eugene Barlow
(Albert Eugene)
Apr 26, 1899
Jan 13, 1969
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
h/o Avo Dell Scurlock
190.
Avo S. Barlow
(Avo Dell Scurlock)
Dec 21, 1901
Mar 20, 1971
d/o Isiah Elois Scurlock & Mary Elizabeth George
w/o Albert Eugene Barlow
191.
Lilly Holloway Newman
June 14, 1909
w/o 1. Leslie Lee Williams
w/o 2. Will Sebe Newman
192.
Will Sebe Newman
Jan 03, 1889
May 18, 1967
h/o Lilly Holloway Williams
193.
W. D. Thompson
(William David)
Oct 26, 1902
Dec 15, 1960
h/o of Annie Bishop
194.
Annie Bishop Thompson
Jul 21, 1901
Jul 06, 1983
w/o William David Thompson
195
Vernon Thompson
Sep 21, 1914
Jul 16, 1969
196.
Alma L. Thompson
Aug 13, 1881
Jan 20. 1965
197.
Albert S. Thompson
Aug 15, 1871
Jan 07, 1926
198.
Baby Bufkin
Jun 16, 1930
199.
Baby Grace Bufkin
June 16, 1930
Sep 25. 1930
200.
W. D. Thompson
June 06, 1844
Jan 30, 1914
201.
Harmon Floyd Douglass
Aug 16, 1877
Sep 20, 1963
s/o Timothy Alfred Douglass & Mary Elizabeth Bufkin
h/o Allah Bufkin
202.
Allah Bufkin Douglass
Jul 26, 1877
Oct 22, 1946
d/o Benjamin Franklin Bufkin & Mary Frances Cochran
w/o Harmon Floyd Douglass
203.
Pearl Douglass
(Floyd Pearl)
Oct 16, 1921
Nov 07, 1928
h/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
204.
Earl Douglass
(Robert Earl)
Oct 16, 1921
May 09, 1922
s/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
205.
Fannie Golden Douglass
Feb 13, 1918
Dec 24, 1919
d/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
206.
Neva Douglass
Aug 14, 1909
May 09, 1918
d/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
207.
Nollie Kate Douglass
Nov 11, 1911
Aug 14, 1912
d/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
208.
Infant Timothy Douglass
March 16, 1906
s/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
209.
William Ashley Barlow
("Bill")
Nov 17, 1862
Oct 07, 1924
h/o Lou Ella Robinson
s/o William Jasper Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
210.
Ella Robinson Barlow
(Lou Ella)
Nov 18, 1871
Nov 16, 1932
w/o William Ashley Barlow
Hugh George Robinson & Celia Ann Bufkin
211.
Quintus Reese Barlow
Oct 30, 1937
Jul 17, 1943
s/o Hugh Quintus Barlow & F.L. Bland
212.
H. Quintus Barlow
(Hugh Quintus)
Jul 25, 1897
Jan 24, 1970
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
h/o F. L. Bland
213.
F. L. Barlow
Oct 05, 1910
Aug 22, 1983
d/o Joseph Bland & Susie Martin
w/o Hugh Quintus Barlow
214.
Stella Barlow
Jan 06, 1897
May 22, 1977
d/o Jesse Sumter Parker & Lateen Ashley
w/o Julian "Dude" Barlow
215.
Julian Barlow
("Dude")
Feb 04, 1907
Sep 20, 1965
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
h/o Stella Parker
216.
Nelson Barlow
Apr 08, 1940
Feb 16, 1941
possible child of Julian Barlow & Stella Parker
217.
Emma S. Barlow
May 19, 1935
Jul 11, 1935
possible child of Julian Barlow & Stella Parker
218.
Holly Barlow
(Holly Goff)
Jan 28, 1905
Oct 27, 1972
h/o Maude Kenney
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
219.
Bennie Barlow
(Bennie Davis)
Jun 03, 1921
Jan 08, 1938
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
220.
Emma P. Barlow
Feb 24, 1877
Sep 03, 1933
2nd w/o Hugh Harmon Barlow
d/o Benjamin F. Parker & Malinda Oglesby
221.
James Lafayette Bufkin
Apr 20, 1859
May 25, 1945
s/o William David Bufkin & Susan P. Carlisle
h/o Sarah Frances Barlow
222
Frances Barlow Bufkin
(Sarah Frances Barlow)
Jul 10, 1856
Dec 25, 1933
w/o James Lafayette Bufkin
d/o William Jasper Barlow & Mary Elizabeth Stanfil
223
Allah Virginia Barlow
May 07, 1938
Nov 01, 1944
d/o Paul Wesley Barlow & Alyne Douglass
224
Alene D. Barlow
Oct 18, 1916
Apr 20. 1973
w/o Paul Wesley Barlow
d/o Harmon Floyd Douglass & Allah Bufkin
225.
Paul W. Barlow, Sr.
Feb 16, 1903
May 17, 1978
s/o Hugh Harmon Barlow & Emma Parker
h/o Alene Douglass
226.
Catherine Wright
Barlow - Cammack
1863
1958
2nd w/o William Jasper Barlow
2nd w/o John Edward Cammack
d/o Elijah Kendall Wright & Mary G. Cranfield
born Dec 09, 1863
227.
Jim Douglass Barlow
Sep 27, 1939
Aug 09, 1940
s/o James Jasper Barlow & Iva Kelly Douglass
228.
Alma D. Phillips Conn
Apr 16, 1906
no date
w/o Francis Lee Conn
229.
Francis Lee Conn
March 16, 1906
Dec 28, 1934
s/o David Conn & Frances Ellen George
h/o Alma D. Phillips
230.
Joe Randall Conn
Mar 09, 1959
Dec 20, 1959
231.
Donald Hartley
Aug 04, 1934
Nov 15, 1985
232.
James D. Hartley
(James Daniel)
1899
1942
h/o Dorothy Conn
died February 18, 1942
233.
Lucille H. Bufkin
(Lucille Bernita Hartley)
Nov 06, 1906
Aug 31, 1962
d/o Tucker Hartley & Sarah Wilson
w/o Frank Mullen Bufkin
234.
Frank M. Bufkin
(Frank Mullen)
Jan 14, 1894
Oct 02, 1974
s/o William Carey Bufkin & Annie Eliza Cochran
h/o Lucille Bernita Hartley
235.
Sarah Ann Hartley
July 10, 1873
Nov 24, 1945
w/o Tucker Hartley
maiden name: Wilson
236.
Tuck D. Hartley
1870
1941
h/o Sarah Ann Wilson
237.
Bessie Conn
no date
Apr 05, 1930
w/o Matthew Tinsley Conn, III
maiden name: Gibson
237B.
Matthew Conn
(Matthew Tinsley, III)
no date
Mar 25, 1929
h/o Bessie Gibson
s/o Matthew Tinsley " Mat" Conn & Martha Bufkin
238.
Herman Conn
Jan 03, 1911
Oct 15, 1986
s/o David Conn & Frances Ellen George
239.
David Conn
Sep 26, 1879
Feb 08, 1944
s/o Matthew Tinsley " Mat" Conn & Martha Bufkin
h/o Frances Ellen George
240.
Frances George Conn
(Frances Ellen)
Mar 15, 1888
Feb 14, 1969
d/o Mack George & Helen Louise Richardson
w/o David Conn
241.
Infant Son
Mar 06, 1914
Mar 07, 1914
Conn?
242
Walter Conn
Jun 11, 1912
Jun 10, 1917
s/o Thomas Luther Conn & Cora Mae Smith
243.
Hubert Bishop
1/24?
Dec 29, 1994
244
Ida Hollingsworth George
no dates
no dates
245
___ Morgan
no dates
no dates
246.
Sally Epsie Conn
Feb 11, 1915
May 28, 1992
w/o Carl Brent
d/o John Floyd Conn, Jr. & Cora Epsie Bishop
247.
Virgil Sisto Coronado
Aug 29, 1917
Nov 20, 1993
248.
Catherine Bishop Coronado
Aug 21, 1918
no date
249.
Ayres Baron Bishop
Oct 30, 1910
no date
250.
Carrie Newman
June 29, 1904
Jan 17, 1992"

Benjamin married Celia Ann Lewis 94.,127

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Albert S. Bufkin (born on 22 Feb 1818 Georgetown District, Prince George Parish, South Carolina - died on 27 May 1880 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Harmon Floyd Bufkin (born on 28 Jul 1822 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 16 Aug 1900 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

        iii.   William David Bufkin (born on 8 Apr 1827 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 18 May 1880 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

         iv.   Benjamin Franklin Bufkin (born on 20 Sep 1829 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 28 Oct 1904 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

26        v.   Reverend Solomon Bufkin (born on 21 Apr 1832 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 20 Dec 1877 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         vi.   Margaret Bufkin (born on 24 Feb 1834 Copiah County, Mississippi - died on 2 Oct 1904 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

        vii.   Urben Bufkin (born about 1836 Copiah County, Mississippi - died in 1863 in Battle of Port Gibson, Mississippi)

       viii.   Celia Ann Bufkin (born in 1838 Copiah County, Mississippi)


53. Celia Ann Lewis,94,127 daughter of Benjamin Lewis and Celia Martin , was born in 1795 in North Carolina,94 died in 1864 in Copiah County, Mississippi, at age 69,94 and was buried in Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery, Barlow, Copiah County, MS..94

Celia married Benjamin Franklin Bufkin .94

54. James Carlisle 94 was born in Georgia and died about 1844 in Monticello, Lawrence County, Mississippi.

James Carlisile in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi, 1820. 128 "James Carlilse is shown living next door to possibly his father in law in the 1820 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi. The families are listed as follows:

William Bishop

1 male under 10 years of age
1 male between 10 and 16 years of age
1 male 45 years or older (William Bishop)

3 females under 10 years of age
1 female 45 years or older.

James Carlisle (next home)

2 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 45 years of age (James Carlisle)

1 female between 26 and 45 years of age."
(1820 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi)
James Carlisle in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi, 1840. 129 "James Carlisle is listed in the 1840 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi as follows:

1 male under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
2 males between 10 and 15 years of age
1 between 20 and 30 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age (James)

1 female under 5 years of age
1 female between 5 and 10 years of age
1 female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 female between 15 and 20 years of age
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age.

He is listed as having the following slaves:
1 male between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 24 and 34 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Lawrence County, Mississippi)

James married Mary E. Bishop .94

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Susan P. Carlisle (born on 15 Sep 1823 - died on 25 Mar 1886 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

27       ii.   Elizabeth Carlisle (born about 1831 Mississippi - died after 1880)

        iii.   Newton Carlisle (born about 1837)


55. Mary E. Bishop,94 daughter of WIlliam Bucner Bishop and Sarah Ann Runnels , was born on 22 Feb 1799 in Georgia and died after 1840 in Lawrence County, Mississippi.

Mary married James Carlisle .94

56. John Hardin Collier Sr.,2,5 son of Isaac H. Collier Jr. and Sarah Truly , was born about 1807 in Jefferson County, Mississippi,2 died on 4 Jul 1890 in Franklin County, Mississippi, about age 83,2 and was buried in Old Union Baptist Chruch, Franklin County, Mississippi.

Noted events in his life were:

• Slave Transfer: 11 Dec 1816, Jefferson Co, Mississippi. "I Found a Deed in Jefferson County, Ms. on 11 December 1816 where Sarah Collier Gave Her Sons, James J. and John H. Collier, Slaves. Witness by James B. Truly. After that there are records where the sons were wards of James B. Truly and or Richard Harrison until the Late 1820's. There Is a Marriage License for Mrs. Sarah Collier and Eli K. Ross on 17 December 1817 in Jefferson County, Ms., They were married by Lawrence Scarbourgh. From this I assume that Isaac had died and Sarah's brother and brother-in-law had custody of the boys. James Was Circuit Clerk in Jefferson County."
(Barbara Celotto)

"It is interesting to note that if John H. Collier was a ward of James B. Truly, he would later marry a daughter of James Truly."
(Warren Graham Trest)

John H. Collier in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 1840. 130 "John Hardin Collier is found in the 1840 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi along with his brother and Mrs. M. Truly (living next door to each other) and they are listed as follows:

Mrs. M. Truly (This may have been Martha Truly, Cora Catherine Truly's mother). She has 2 males under 5 years old, 1 male between 5 and 10 years of age, 1 male between 10 and 15 years of age and 1 male between 40 and 50 years of age. 1 female between 5 and 10 years of age and 1 female between 30 and 40 years of age.

The next house is:
James J. Collier (John Hardin Collier's brother) - 2 males between 5 and 10 years of age, 1 male between 30 and 40 years of age, 1 female under 5 and 1 female between 20 and 30 years of age.

The next house is:
John H. Collier - 2 males between 20 and 30 years of age and 1 female between 15 and 20 years of age.

John Hardin Collier should have been about 33 years old, so his age listed may not have been correct. Cora Collier would have been 17 years old, so she would have been the female between 15 and 20 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi)
JH Collier in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 30 Jul 1850. 96 "John H. Collier is living in Jefferson County, Mississippi in the 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 9 Township, page 2 and is listed as follows:

J.H. Collier - age 42 - Planter - born in Mississippi
Cora Collier - age 27 - all family born in Mississippi
Sarah A. Collier - age 7
J.H. Jr - age 4"
(1850 US Census, Jefferson County, MIssissippi)

"The Martha Smith that is buried in Jefferson County, Mississippi and listed as the oldest daughter must have died prior to 1850 since she is not listed in the census. She was not listed in the 1840 census either, so it is unknown when she was born or died. It must have been before 1840 or between 1840 and 1843 (since Sarah was born in 1843)."
(Warren Trest)
John Hardin Collier in 1870 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 3 Aug 1870. 40 "John Hardin Collier Sr. and Jr. are living together in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Meadville Post Office, page 169 and are as follows:

J.H. Collier Sr. - age 60 - born in Mississippi - value of real estate - $1,000 - Farmer
J.H. Collier Jr. - age 23 - born in Mississippi - Farm Laborer"
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

"Senior and Junior are still living together in 1880 (according to census records). John Hardin Collier Junior will have married and had 9 children by then."
(Warren Trest)

"In 1870, his wife, Cora Truly is not listed, so the assumption is she had died prior to 1870."

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1880. 43 "The John Newman Sr. family is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi and is listed as follows:

John H. Collier - Age 73 - born in Mississippi, County Officer, father born in Virginia, mother born in Mississippi - widowed

John Collier - Age 35 - born in Mississippi, Farmer, both parents born in Mississippi
Helen N. Collier - age 32 - all family born in Mississippi
John N. Collier - son - age 11 - all children born in Mississippi
Willie P. Collier - son - age 11
Cora C. Collier - daughter - age 10
Mary L. Collier - daughter - age 9
Mattie W. Collier - daughter - age 8
Etta A. Collier - daughter - age 7
Sophia J. Collier - daughter - age 4
Sally J. Collier - daughter - age 3
John H. Collier - son - age 2 months."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, MIssissippi - District 1)

• Occupation: "According to census records, John Hardin Collier Sr. is listed as a Farmer and as a County Officer."

• Obituary: 5 " The following was found in The Fayette Chronicle of Jefferson County, Mississippi:

John H. Collier Died in Franklin County July 4, 1890 Age 85 Years, 5 Months, an Honored Citzen of Franklin County."
(Fayette Chronicle Newspaper)

John married Cora Catherine Truly 2 on 5 Jan 1837 in Jefferson County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Martha Smith Collier (, died in 14 Sep 1848)

         ii.   Sarah A. Collier (born about 1843 Jefferson County, MS. - died on 15 Mar 1937)

28      iii.   John Hardin Collier Jr. (born about Jan 1846 Jefferson County, Mississippi - died after Feb 1925 in Franklin County, Mississippi)


57. Cora Catherine Truly,2,5 daughter of James Benett Truly and Martha Smith , was born about 1823 in Jefferson County, Mississippi 2 and died before 1870.40

Noted events in her life were:

• Will: "In the will of her mother, Martha Smith Truly, dated 5, November, 1855, Cora Truly Collier was given $20 and her daughter, Sarah Collier, was given the female slave, Bet."

Cora married John Hardin Collier Sr. 2 on 5 Jan 1837 in Jefferson County, MS..2

58. Robert James Newman,2,5 son of Solomon Newman and Mary Ann Lowery , was born on 1 Jan 1819 in Amite County, Mississippi,2 died on 2 Nov 1882 in Mississippi, at age 63,2 and was buried in Probably Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.

Robert married Martha Edna McMillan 2 on 22 Dec 1841 in Franklin County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Oscar Solomon Newman (born about 1843 - died on 8 Apr 1914 in Wood County, TX.)

         ii.   Sarah Josephine Newman (born on 28 Jul 1844 - died on 28 Aug 1844 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Eudora Stellaphine Newman (born on 25 Dec 1846 - died on 28 Mar 1847 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

29       iv.   Helen Edna Newman (born between 1847-1848 Mississippi - died after 1900 in Mississippi)

          v.   Robert Douglas Newman (born about 1850 Jefferson County, MS.)

         vi.   Newman (born on 29 Mar 1854 - died on 3 Apr 1854 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

        vii.   Mastin Mcmillan Newman (born on 29 Feb 1856 Franklin County, MS. - died on 7 Dec 1928 in Franklin Parish, La.)


59. Martha Edna McMillan,2,5 daughter of Daniel McMillan and Sarah Foster , was born about 1823 in Probably Franklin County, Mississpi 2 and died about 1859 in Franklin County, Mississippi, about age 36.2

Martha married Robert James Newman 2 on 22 Dec 1841 in Franklin County, MS..2

60. Osborne Bartlett Graves,2,5 son of William Graves and Sarah Ford , was born about 1827 in Franklin County, MS. 2 and died after 17 Mar 1852 in Franklin County, MS..2 Another name for Osborne was Aub.

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: 44 "AUB was born ca. 1827, probably in Franklin County, Ms. and died there after 17 March 1852, when he was bondsman for the marriage of AMELIA C. CORBAN and SAMUEL WHARTON, and before 13 September 1852. His estate papers are in Probate Book B, page 128, Franklin County, Ms. He married ELIZA JANE CORBAN on 12 February 1846 in Franklin County, Ms. (book 3 page 22). Thomas H. Corban, bondsman and married by C. C. Campbell. ELIZA JANE and AMELIA were half sisters."
(Barbara Celotto)

William Graves in 1830 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1830. 131 "The William Graves family is listed in the 1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 154 as follows:

William Graves
2 males under 5 years of age (Osborne should have been one of the children under 5 years of age)
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age (William would have been near 50 years of age)

1 female between 5 and 10 years of age (this person is unkown since Sarah should have not been born yet)
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age

Their slaves are as follows:

1 male under 10 years of age
3 males between 10 and 24 years of age
2 males between 24 and 36 years of age

4 females under 10 years of age
4 females between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 24 and 26 years of age
2 females between 36 and 55 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
William Graves in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1840. 132 "The William Graves family is listed in the 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

William Graves - 1 free white male under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
1 male between 10 and 15 years of age (Osborne Bartlett Graves should have been about 13 years of age, so this should be him in 1840)
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 10 and 30 years of age
1 male between 50 and 60 years of age

1 free white female under 5 years of age
1 female between 40 and 50 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Osborne Graves in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 16 Sep 1850. 84 "The Osborne Graves family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

(house 184)
Osborne B. Graves - age 23 - farmer - value of real estate $600 - all family born in Mississippi
Eliza J. - age 18
James F. - age 5
Sarah E. - age 1
Mary A. - age 7 months

Sarah C. Graves - age 14 (this would have been his sister)
John Q. A. Graves - age 11 (this would have been his brother)

The assumption can be made that he has his younger sister and brother living with him that his father has passed away before 1850."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)


Osborne married Eliza Jane Corban 2 on 12 Feb 1846 in Franklin County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

30        i.   James F. Graves (born on 20 Jan 1847 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 17 Mar 1927 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Sarah Elizabeth Graves (born on 3 Aug 1848 Franklin County, MS. - died on 17 May 1935 in Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Mary Adeline Graves (born on 12 Oct 1849 Franklin County, MS. - died on 18 Feb 1940 in Hineston, Rapides Parish, La; Buried In Fellowship Cem.)

         iv.   William T. Graves (born in Mar 1852 Franklin County, MS. - died in 1928 in Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Osborne Bartlett Graves (born on 3 Aug 1853 Franklin County, MS. - died on 15 Jul 1934 in Franklin County, MS.)


61. Eliza Jane Corban,2,5 daughter of Elisha Corban and Mary Ann Kinnison , was born on 15 Nov 1830 in Franklin County, MS. 2 and died after 1900 in Franklin County, MS..2

Elisha Corban in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1840. 132 "The Elisha Corban family is listed in the 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Elisha Corban (speeled Corbin)
2 males under 5 years of age
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 30 and 40 years of age

2 females under 5 years of age
3 females between 5 and 10 years of age (Eliza Jane should have been one of these females)
1 female between 20 and 30 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Eliza J. Graves in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1850. 84 "The Osborne Graves family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

(house 184)
Osborne B. Graves - age 23 - farmer - value of real estate $600 - all family born in Mississippi
Eliza J. - age 18
James F. - age 5
Sarah e. - age 1
Mary A. - age 7 months

Sarah C. Graves - age 14 (this would have been his sister)
John Q. A. Graves - age 11 (this would have been his brother)

The assumption can be made that he has his younger sister and brother living with him that his father has passed away before 1850."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Eliza Corban Graves Aldridge in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 11 Aug 1860. 88 "The John Aldridge family is listed in the 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 22 as follows (Osborne Bartlett Graves Sr. has died and Eliza Corban has remarried to John Aldridge by 1860):

John Aldridge - age 41 - male - farmer - value of real estate $12, 500 - value of personal estate $300 - born in Mississippi (everone is listed as birthplace of Mississippi)
Eliza - age 29 - female - domestic - can not read or write
James - age 13 - male
Sarah - age 12 - female - attended school in the last year
Mary - age 10 - female - attended school in the last year
William - age 9 - male
Bartlett - age 7 male
Colombus - age 2 - male
Elizabeth - age 1 - female

It should be noted that from James to Bartlett, these are children between Eliza Coban and Osborne Graves. The last two children were between her and John Aldridge."
(1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Eliza Corban Graves Aldridge in 1870 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1870. 40 "Eliza Jane (Graves) Aldridge is found in the John Aldridge family in the 1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 166 as follows:

(Note: The penmanship of the census taker is hard to read, so some of the letters in the names may not be correct)

J. Aldridge - age 51 - white male - everyone born in Mississippi - Farmer
E.J. Aldridge - age 40 - white female (This is Eliza Jane Corban Graves Aldridge)
E. Mathews - age 3 - black female - keeping house (I feel this age is wrong)
J.C.W. Aldridge - age 12 - white male - farm laborer
C.E.A. Aldridge - age 10 - white female
J.S. Aldridge - age 8 - white female
D.R. Aldridge - age 6 - white male
N.N. Aldridge - age 4 - white male
E.J. Aldridge - age 2 - white female
N.R. Aldridge - age 1 month - white female
W.T. Graves - age 19 - white male - Farm Laborer"
(1870 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Eliza Corban Graves Aldridge in 1880 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 14 Jun 1880. 41 "Eliza Jane Corban Graves Aldridge is listed in the John Aldridge family in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Hamburg, page 20 as follows:

John Aldridge - white male - age 62 - born in MS. - farmer - father born in MD - mother born in GA.
E.J. Aldridge - wife - white female - age 49 - born in MS. - keeping house - both parents born in MS.
Ida C. Aldridge - daughter - white female - age 17 - all born in MS.
David C. Aldridge - son - white male - age 16 - farm laborer - all born in MS.
Albert N. Aldridge - son - white male - age 14 - farm laborer - all born in MS.
E.J. Aldridge - daughter - white female - age 12 - attending school - all born in MS.
Nancy R. Aldridge - daughter - white female - age 10 - attending school - all born in MS.
John F. Aldridge - son - white male - age 4 - all born in MS.

J.W. Powers - brother in law - white male - age 76 - born in VA. - farmer - both parents born in VA.
Sarah Powers - sister - white female - age 68 - born in MS. - father born in MD. - mother born in GA."
(1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Eliza Graves Aldridge in 1900 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 13 Jun 1900. 15 "Eliza Jane Corban (Graves) Aldridge is living with her son Covington in the 1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Beat 2, sheet No 80-A as follows:

Covington Aldridge - born June 1863 - age 36 - married 16 years - all born in MS.
Mary - wife - born Dec. 1865 - age 34 - 6 children - all alive
(? undecernable) - son - born Dec 1885 - age 14
Pearl - daughter - born Jan 1888 - age 12
Kirby - son - born Aug 1891 - age 8
Della - daughter - born Jan 1894 - age 6
Homer - son - born Aug 1895 - ge 4
Covington - son - born Sept 1899 - age 8 months

Eliza - mother - born Nov 1830 - age 69 - widowed - can read and write

Sarah Powers - aunt - born May 1812 - age 88 - widowed
Elizabeth Anders - mother in law - born May 1824 - age 76 - widowed"
(1900 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Eliza married Osborne Bartlett Graves 2 on 12 Feb 1846 in Franklin County, MS..2

Eliza next married John H. Aldridge ,2 son of Thomas Aldridge and Catherine King , on 24 Nov 1853 in Franklin County, MS..2 John was born between 1816-1819 in Mississippi.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(1860 Census Page 22 Family 158, Age 41---eliza Can't Read or Write--1870 Census Age 51--1880--dew. 189-191-age 72-farmer-born Ms.
Jospeh Aldridge Bondsman, Married by Asa J. Guice

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Columbia (Columbus) Aldridge (born about 1857 Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Elizabeth Jane Aldridge (born on 27 May 1858 Franklin County, MS. - died on 21 Jul 1956 in Buried: Old Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Ida C. Aldridge (born about 1862 Franklin County, MS.)

         iv.   David Covington King Aldridge (born on 28 May 1863 Franklin County, MS. - died on 14 Aug 1939 in Buried: Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Albert Newton Aldridge (born in Apr 1866 Franklin County, MS.)

         vi.   Eliza Jane Aldridge (born about 1867 Franklin County, MS. - died between 1949-1950 in Jackson, MS.)

        vii.   Nancy Rosa Aldridge (born about 1869 Franklin County, MS.)

       viii.   John L. Aldridge (born on 18 Feb 1876 Franklin County, MS. - died on 27 Jul 1914 in Buried In Mt. Carmel Cemetery)


62. Levi Evans Middleton,2,5 son of Stephen Middleton and Dicey , was born in 1808 in Mississippi 2 and died in Jan 1862 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 54.2

Levi Middleton in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 16 Oct 1850. 84 "The Levi Middleton family is listed in the 1850 US Census, 16 Oct, 1850, household 355 as follows:

Levi E. Middleton - male - age 45 - farmer - born in Mississippi
Jane - female - age 39 - born in Mississippi
Martha J. - age 14 - born in Mississippi
Elizabeth - age 13 - born in Mississippi
Levi - male - age 10 - born in Mississippi
Rhoda - female - age 8 - born in Mississippi
Sophronia - female - age 3 - born in Mississippi

Malcolm Currie (hard to read) - age 70 - male - born in Scotland
Martha (?) Currie (hard to read) - female - age 21
Monroe Currie - male - school teacher - age 21 - personal worth $200 - born in Mississippi."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Levi Middleton in 1860 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1 Oct 1860. 88 "The Levi Middleton family is listed in the 1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, Friendship P.O., page 80 as follows:

L. C. (?) Middleton - age 52 - married within the year - Farmer - value of real estate $1000 - value of personal estate $1500 - born in Mississippi
Jane - age 18 - married within the year - born in Mississippi
Levi - age 20 - farm labor - personal estate value - $175 - born in Mississippi
Monroe - age 9 - born in Mississippi"
(1860 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Levi married Jane Farrar Currie 2 on 9 Mar 1829 in Jefferson County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Martha Jane Middleton (born on 5 Jun 1837 Franklin County, MS. - died on 28 Sep 1902)

         ii.   Elizabeth Middleton (born about 1837)

        iii.   Levi Middleton (born about 1840)

31       iv.   Rhoda Currie Middleton (born on 20 Sep 1842 Franklin County, Mississippi - died on 20 Mar 1907 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

          v.   Sophronia Middleton (born about 1847)

         vi.   Monroe Middleton (born about 1851)

Levi next married Francis Jane Freeman 2 on 7 Apr 1860 in Franklin County, MS..2


63. Jane Farrar Currie,2,5 daughter of Malcolm Currie and Rhoda Farrar , was born on 22 Jun 1810 in Jefferson County, Mississippi,2 died on 24 Jul 1859 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 49,2 and was buried in Old Wrights Cemetery, Franklin County, Mississippi.5

Jane Middleton in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi. "The Levi Middleton family is listed in the 1850 US Census, 16 Oct, 1850, household 355 as follows:

Levi E. Middleton - male - age 45 - farmer - born in Mississippi
Jane - female - age 39 - born in Mississippi
Martha J. - age 14 - born in Mississippi
Elizabeth - age 13 - born in Mississippi
Levi - male - age 10 - born in Mississippi
Rhoda - female - age 8 - born in Mississippi
Sophronia - female - age 3 - born in Mississippi

Malcolm Currie (hard to read) - age 70 - male - born in Scotland
Martha (?) Currie (hard to read) - female - age 21
Monroe Currie - male - school teacher - age 21 - personal worth $200 - born in Mississippi."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

Jane married Levi Evans Middleton 2 on 9 Mar 1829 in Jefferson County, MS..2
picture

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64. John Trest was born in Hamburg, Germany and died after 1773 in Lost at Sea. The cause of his death was lost at Sea. Other names for John were Johann Treist, and Johann Trest.

Noted events in his life were:

• Death: Death, After 1773. 133 "It is reported that "Big John" or Johann Trest (or Triest) arrived in Charleston, South Carolina from Hamburg, Germany and married Rebecca Thorne in 1771 in Orangeburge County, South Carolina. Their son, John Trest, was born in 1772 in Orangeburg. They were attacked by Indians in 1773 and Rebecca was killed in the attack. John was taken prisoner and the Trest baby was found and raised by a family named MacDonald. John later escaped from the Indians and was reported as lost at sea. This is from oral family history at the Trest Reunion in Jones County, Mississippi and has not been proved in any way.

On census records 1850 and on, the child John Daniel Trest is listed as being born in South Carolina, so it appears that John and Rebecca were in South Carolina at the time of John's birth."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Our history indicates John Trest or Triest arrived in Charleston, SC about 1774 from Hamburg, Germany. Supposedly there was an Indian masacre and one son John was rescued by the McDonald family in the late 1700's. This was in the Carolina area. The family imigrated to Miss with the Fergusons in the 1840's."
(Mike and Judy Trest)

"Johann Trest was a German Sailor who came from the district of Hamburg, Germany to these shores of North America in 1773. He married Rebecca Thorne
and they settled in South Carolina.

When their baby John was born, still a small child, Indians attacked and
killed Rebecca, captured big Johann and carried him away. A family named McDonald found the small child John and reared him.

Records in Orangeburg County, South Carolina: The Indians did not kill Johann or John, he escaped. He was listed as a Ships Captain and was lost at sea.

John Trest grew up and married Elizabeth Waters of Orangeburg, South Carolina but they later moved to Alabama. After several years they settled in a Scotch Settlement called Sandersville, Jones County, MS."
(Roy Pearson)

• History of Orangeburg County, North Carolina: "The first sixty years of history in the Province of South Carolina shows that colonists either settled on the coast or in the immediate vicinity. To induce settlers to the undeveloped "backcountry", a wilderness inhabited by only a few white traders and Indians, eleven townships were formed to be called The King's Bounty Land.

Each township containing 20,000 acres, encircled by a strip of land six miles wide to be held for future exapansion. One decision that was to leave a deep impress upon the character of the South Carolina people was that which extended these land rights to Protestants of Europe. This meant that would have a heritage from the German and Swiss nationalities.

The plan of Jean Pierre Purry of the firm Purry et Compagnie in Neuchatel to found a colony in Carolinia and a list of it's German- speaking settlers is detailed in the South Carolina Historical Magazine (October 1991). A steady migration from Switzerland to other Carolina townships also began, the Swiss for economic reasons and the German refugees from religious persecution. This migration was encouraged by extravagant accounts of the land in America. While other nationalities also settled in the townships, it was the Swiss and Germans that composed the greater number of these first settlers.

The following list of immigrant ships that will indicate the strength of the migration of German-speaking families into Caroilina during this period.
1732 Purry's first party.
1732 (Dec 2) 50 Palatines expected.
1733 (July) 25 Salzburgers for Purrysburg.
1734 (November) 260 Swiss for Purrysburg.
1735 (July) 250 German Switzers.
1735 (July) 200 German Palatines.
1735 (July) 250 German-Swiss
1736 (October) A Great Number (170) of German Swiss People.
1737 (February) Above 200 Switzers out of the canton of Tockenburgh ncluding Rev. Hans Ulrich Giessendanner and his nephew Rev. John Giessendanner , the first pastors of Orangeburgh.
1744 Captain Ham's ship, which brought over some Swiss from Bern.
1744 (December) Capt. Brown's ship with 100 Palatines.

It was during the fourth decade of the eighteenth century, that German-Swiss emigration reached it's peak. A Bernese offical of the time coined for it the fitting expression "Rabies Carolinae."

• General Information: 58 "Dear Don:

Angus B. Trest is the son of Samuel Capers Trest of Jones County, Mississippi. Angus B was born in 1862 and lived to be 104 years old. Samuel Capers was married to Eleander McGilvary in 1859. Samuel Capers was bron in Alabama in 1833. They had the following children: William John b. 1860; Angus B b. 1862; Sarah Elizabteh b. 1864 (my great grandmother); Joseph Alexander b. 1869; Colin Oliphant b. 1871; Samuel Albert, b. 1873; Richard/Richmond Felder b. 1875 and Norman Trest. Samuel Capers was in the 7th Battalion of the Mississippi Infantry, Company C. He was catpured three times. He was the son of John Trest of South Carolina. John was the son of John Trest who emigrated from Germany. He was a German sailor from the Hamburg district in Germany. He came to America in 1773. He married Rebecca Thorne and they settled in South Carolina. When their baby John was born and still a small child, the Inidans killed Rebecca. John was lost at sea and never heard from again. Little baby John was found by the McDonalds and they raised him. He marrieed Elizabeth Walters of Orangeburg, SC. They later moved to Alabama and then to Sandersville, MS, a Scotch settlement where the McDonalds had come come to live. Samuel Capers Trest was a school teacher at Ovett School in Jones County. After the Civil War, he was the first Sheriff in Jones County during Reconstruction. Angus, his son lived to be 104 years old. Angus married Nancy Walters in 1882. I do not know the children of Angus B. and Nancy Trest. This is something that you may find in ancestry.com or familytreemaker.com. I do hope this helps you. I have other information on Samuel Capers Trest which would be your grandfather if you would be interested. He is alos my great great grandfather.

Roy (Roy Pearson)"
(Ancestry.com Message Board)

John married Rebecca Thorne in 1771 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina.

Children from this marriage were:

32        i.   John Daniel Trest (born in 1772 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died in 1842 in Jones County, Mississippi)


65. Rebecca Thorne was born in England and died in 1773 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. The cause of her death was killed by Indians.

Noted events in her life were:

• Death: Death of Rebecca Thorne, 1773, Orangeburg County, South Carolina. 133 "It is reported that "Big John" or Johann Trest (or Triest) arrived in Charleston, South Carolina from Hamburg, Germany and married Rebecca Thorne in 1771 in Orangeburge County, South Carolina. Their son, John Trest, was born in 1772 in Orangeburg. They were attacked by Indians in 1773 and Rebecca was killed in the attack. John was taken prisoner and the Trest baby was found and raised by a family named MacDonald. John later escaped from the Indians and was reported as lost at sea. This is from oral family history at the Trest Reunion in Jones County, Mississippi and has not been proved in any way.

On census records 1850 and on, the child John Daniel Trest is listed as being born in South Carolina, so it appears that John and Rebecca were in South Carolina at the time of John's birth."
(Warren Graham Trest)

"Our history indicates John Trest or Triest arrived in Charleston, SC about 1774 from Hamburg, Germany. Supposedly there was an Indian masacre and one son John was rescued by the McDonald family in the late 1700's. This was in the Carolina area. The family imigrated to Miss with the Fergusons in the 1840's."
(Mike and Judy Trest)

"Johann Trest was a German Sailor who came from the district of Hamburg, Germany to these shores of North America in 1773. He married Rebecca Thorne
and they settled in South Carolina.

When their baby John was born, still a small child, Indians attacked and
killed Rebecca, captured big Johann and carried him away. A family named McDonald found the small child John and reared him.

Records in Orangeburg County, South Carolina: The Indians did not kill Johann or John, he escaped. He was listed as a Ships Captain and was lost at sea.

John Trest grew up and married Elizabeth Waters of Orangeburg, South Carolina but they later moved to Alabama. After several years they settled in a Scotch Settlement called Sandersville, Jones County, MS."
(Roy Pearson)

Rebecca married John Trest in 1771 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina.

66. Zadrack James Walters 21 died after 1800. Another name for Zadrack was Zadrack Waters.

Zadrack Walters in 1800 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1800 US Census, Orange County, North Carolina, 1800, Orange County, South Carolina. 134 "Zadrack Walters is listed in the 1800 Orange, South Carolina census as having one male under 10 years old, 1 male 10 through 15 and 1 male 26 through 44. He also has one female under 10 years old, 1 female 10 through 15 and 1 female between 26 and 44 years old. They show up living between "indecernable" River, Beaver Creek and 4 holes.

The female child between 10 and 15 would have been Sarah Elizabeth Walters if she was born between 1794 and 1795."

Zadrack married Unknown .

Children from this marriage were:

33        i.   Elizabeth Walters (born in 1792 Orangeburg County, South Carolina - died in 1863 in Jones County, Mississippi)


67. Unknown died after 1800.

Unknown married Zadrack James Walters .21

68. Alexander McGilvray,103 son of John McGilvray and Sarah Buchannon , was born about 1788 in Isle of Skye, Scotland 102,103,135,136 and died about 1871 in Runnelstown, Perry County, Mississippi, about age 83.103

Noted events in his life were:

• Migration: North Carolina to Mississippi, 1820-1830. 1 "The Alexander McGilvray family must have migrated from North Carolina after 1820 and before 1830. They do not show up in the 1820 Mississippi census but do show up in 1830.

Daniel and John, ALexander's sons, both show up in the 1850 Census as being born in North Carolina."
(Warren Trest)
Perry County Courthouse and Jail 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• History of Perry County, MS: "In December, 1809 Wayne County, Mississippi Territory was formed from Choctaw Indian lands obtained through The Treaty of Mount Dexter in 1805. On December 9, 1811 Greene County was created out of Wayne county. Perry County was established February 3, 1820, and originally formed the western part of the large county of Greene primarily because the settlers didn't want to cross the river to get to the Courthouse!

History tells us that as more and more people arrived, they began to settle along the creeks and rivers in western Greene county. The pioneers once again began to complain about having to cross the river to conduct business at the courthouse. Thus, the movement began to create a separate county with a courthouse above the Leaf River instead of below. (Greene County's Courthouse was built on Leaf river at Boise (French for wood) Bluff which was the highest point on the river in Greene County and relatively safe from Indian attacks. Boise Bluff is located between Atkinson and Courthouse Creeks about 3/4 miler upriver from present day Highway 98 Bridge at McLain.)

This movement was led by the Gains family who owned 1,300 acres on both sides of the creek bearing their name (Gaines Creek). George S. Gains was the government's Indian factor (agent) at St. Stephens and knew most of the territorial officials personally. Gaines used his influence with those officials to get the federal land office moved from the Jackson County Courthouse to Augusta, the largest settlement in western Greene county. The people no longer had to travel to St. Stephens on the Tombigbee river to record their land deeds.

By 1819 the Augusta land office was in operation and a new county was ready to be formed, on February 3, 1820, Perry County was born and named for War of 1812 Naval Hero, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry who died in 1819. Once Perry County was formed, the Greene County Courthouse on the western edge of Greene County and this led to its relocation to Leakesville, which was closer to the center of the county, around 1826.

Its civil officers during the first year of its existence were: Jacob H. MORRIS, Chief Justice of the Quorum and John JENKINS, John GREEN, Jacob CARTER, Craven P. MOFFITT, Associate Justices; Alex. McKENZIE, Eli MOFFITT, Benjamin H.G. HARFIELD, William HUDSON, John MOFFIT, Seth GRANBERRY, Lewis W. John McDONALD, Assessor and Collector; Geo. HARRISON, Ranger; Joel LEWIS, Surveyor; John BARLOW, Constable; Wm. TISDALE, Coroner, J.J.H. MORRIS, Notary PUBLIC, Martin CHADWICK, Sheriff. Some of the other county officers, 1821-1827, were Griffin HOLLOMON, J.J.H. MORRIS, John F. MAPP, Abner CARTER, Judges of Probate; Lewis RHODES, Sheriff; Anthony PITTS, Adam ULMER, Jonathan TAYLOR, Geo. B. DAMERON, Sterling BRINSON, John DEACE, Daniel MILEY, James SIMMONS, Sherod BYRD, Isham H. CLAYTON, James OVERSTREET, Uriah MILLSAPP, Justices of the Peace; Hugh McDONALD, Treasurer; Farr PROCTOR, Go. HARRISON, Lewis RHODES, Assessors and Collectors.

Perry County was settled by a large number of hardy pioneers along its many waterways, and is located in the southeastern part of the State, in the long-leaf pine belt, and is bounded on the north by Jones and Wayne counties, on the east by Greene County, on the south by Harrison county and on the west by Lamar and Pearl River Counties, and has an area of twenty-six townships, or 936 square miles. The Leaf River was a main mode of transportation during the early years, being utilized by the many loggers of the County to transport the logs to the Mississippi Gulf Coast area. Many of the early settlers were Farmers, both food and livestock. The principal streams are the Leaf River, which flows through the center of the county from the northwest to the southeast with its numerous tributaries and Black Creek and its tributaries in the southern part. The prevailing timber is the long leaf pine, but on the rivers and creeks, oaks, hickory, poplar, magnolia, gums, cypress, etc., are found.

Its population has always been small in proportion to its acres. Within recent years its valuable timber resources have been partially exploited and it has taken on a new and permanent growth; from a total of 6,456 inhabitants in 1890, increased to 14,682 in 1900, a rate of increase considerably in excess of one hundred per cent.

The county seat, until 1906 was the old town of Augusta, near the center of the county on the east bank of the Leaf River. Old August remains a small village today.

New Augusta, two miles south of Old Augusta, on the Mobile, Jackson & Kansas City R.R., was made the county seat of Perry County. Hattiesburg which was formerly in the northwestern part of the county, and up until the early 1900s was one of the two county seats of Perry County, is a flourishing city which is now the "capital" of Forrest County."
(Sources: Richard Roman, Birth of Perry County, The Richton Dispatch Vol 91 No. 18.; Rowland, Dunbar, LL.D, editor. MISSISSIPPI; COMPRISING SKETCHES OF COUNTIES, TOWNS, EVENTS, INSTITUTIONS, AND PERSONS, ARRANGED IN CYCLOPEDIC FORM , v. 2. c1907, Southern Historical Pub. Association, Atlanta.)

Runnelstown and Ovett, Mississippi 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Runnelstown, Mississippi: Runnelstown, Perry County, Mississippi. 1 "Runnelstown is just across the Perry County border from Jones County, Mississippi. Samuel Caper Trest is reported to have lived in Ovett, Mississippi which is just on the other side of the county line. Sandersville, where most of his family lived is in the North East section of Jones County."
(Warren Trest)
Alexander McGilvray in 1830 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1830, Perry County, Mississippi. 137 "The Alexander McGilvray family (spelled McGilberry) is listed as follows:

1 male under 5 years of age
2 males between 5 and 10 years of age
2 males between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age

1 female between 15 and 20 years of age
1 female between 40 and 50 years of age.

They are shown in 1830 without slaves.

William McGilvray would have been one of the children (males) between 10 and 15 years of age in the 1830 Census. Given the accuracy of census in 1830, he may have been one of the males between 5 and 10 years old."
(Warren Trest, 1830 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi)

"It is interesting to note that Josiah Bufkin and Alexander McGilvray were in Perry County (near Runnelstown) at the same time between 1820 and 1830. Since the census record is only 9 pages (in 1820), they must have known each other in Church, in town or at Farming events. Their children would spread to Jones County (to the North) and Franklin County (to the West). The McGilvrays would marry into the Trest family (Eleanor to Samuel Caper) and the Bufkins would marry into the Grahams (Clara Dodd Bufkin to Claudius Claiborn Graham). 5 generations (on both sides) after Alexander McGilvray and Josiah Bufkin, Wendell Trest would marry Neddie Graham bringing these two lines together."
(Warren Graham Trest)
Alexander McGilvray in 1850 cesus 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1850, Perry County, Mississippi. 135 "The Alexander McGilvray family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi as follows:

(Starting at the house next door with his son, Daniel):
Daniel McGilvray (the census taker spells all the names as McGilbry) - age 35 - farmer - born in N.C.
Catherine - age 23 - born in Miss.
Angus - age 5
Fl? - (daughter) - age 3
Catherine - age 1
(House 73)

Alexander McGilvray - age 60 - Farmer - born in Scotland
Mary - age 56 - born in Scotland
Neil - age 20 - farmer - born in Miss.
(House 74)

John McGilvray - age 35 - farmer - born in N.C.
Sarah - age 25 - born in Miss.
Elizabeth - age 8 - born in Miss.
William - age 5
John - age 4
Hugh - age 3
Malcolm - age 1
(House 75)"
(Page 376A)



Alexander McGilvray in 1860 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1860 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1860, Perry County, Mississippi. 136 "In the 1860 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, Alexander McGilvray is living with his eldest son, Daniel McGilvray. He is listed as having $600 of real estate and $2000 of personal estate.

The Daniel McGilvray family is listed as follows (The family name is misspelled as McGilbury)

Daniel McGilvray (McGilbury) - age 35 - farmer - born in N.C. - $1000 real estate value and $6000 personal value
Catherine - age 32 - born in Mississippi
Angus - age 15 - all children born in Mississippi
Florance (?) - age 13
Catherine - age 11
Mary Jane - age 9
William - age 6
Alexander - age 4
Duncan - age 2
Margaret - age 4 months
Alexander - age 70 - farmer - born in Scotland.

His wife is not listed in the 1860 census, so the assumption can be made that Mary Elizabeth passed away prior to 1860."
(1860 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi)

 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1870 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1870, Perry County, Mississippi. 138 "Alexander McGilvray is sataying with the David McGilvray family in the 1870 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi. I do not show a David McGilvray as a son, so it is not known who David McGIlvray (born about 1820) is. The family is as follows (name misspelled as McGillberry):

David McGilvray - age 50 - farmer - born in South Carolina
Phebie - age 48 - born in Mississippi
William - age 16
Alexander - age 14
Duncan - age 12
Alex - age 85 - born in Scotland
Clair - age 13"
(1870 US Census, Perry County, page 12)
McGilvray Cemetery 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• McGilvray Cemetery: Perry County, Mississippi. 139 "The McGilvray Cemetery is located in Perry County, Mississippi, Ovett SE.

The coordinates are 31 deg 20 min 29 sec North latitude
89 deg 04 min 44 sec West longitude."
(USGS National Mapping Information)

Alexander married Mary Elizabeth McLeod 103 about 1812.102

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Daniel Angus McGilvray (born on 1 Jan 1814 North Carolina - died on 4 Aug 1895 in Perry County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Christian McGilvray (born on 15 Mar 1815 North Carolina - died on 28 Jun 1892 in Leon County, Texas)

        iii.   John Angus McGilvray (born about 1815-1817 North Carolina)

34       iv.   William Tyrus McGilvray (born about 1819 Moore County, North Carolina - died after 1860 in Jones County, Mississippi)

          v.   Duncan McGilvray ()

         vi.   Harmon McGilvray ()


69. Mary Elizabeth McLeod,103 daughter of Murdoch McLeod and Christian McSwain , was born about 1794 in Isle of Skye, Scotland 102,103,135 and died before 1860 in Runnelstown, Perry County, Mississippi.103 Another name for Mary was Polly McLeod.103

Dunvegan Castle 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Heraldry: 140 "The fascinating origins of the clan can be traced to Leod, who was born about 1200, the son of Olaf the Black, King of Man and the Isles. Leod married the daughter and heiress of MacRaild about the year 1220. Through his son, Tormod, came the MacLeods of Harris, Dunvegan and Glenelg, and through his second son, Torquil, came the MacLeods of Lewis.

Throughout the centuries MacLeods have been known for their devotion to their chief, the tenacity with which they have maintained the ancient Dunvegan castle, their appreciation of music and Gaelic lore, their outstanding record in the professions, and their loyalty to one another."

The Castle of McLeaod - Dunvegan Castle

"Originally a rock fortress founded about eight and a half centuries ago, Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye in Invernesshire, Scotland, has grown and changed over the years until today it is a beautiful and historic castle - the oldest continuously inhabited stronghold in the British Isles, the home of the Chief and the symbolic clan home to MacLeods around the world. Among its many treasures are the Fairy Flag, the Dunvegan Cup, Rory Mor's Drinking Horn, art works, as well as its magnificent views of Loch Dunvegan and the landscaped grounds."
(www.clan-macleod.com)

Mary married Alexander McGilvray 103 about 1812.102

70. Daniel Smith 103 was born about 1771 in South Carolina 103 and died after 1850 in Mississippi.

Daniel married Eleanor Murphy .103

Children from this marriage were:

35        i.   Sarah J. Smith (born about 1814 South Carolina - died after 1860 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Daniel Smith (born about 1818)

        iii.   William Joseph Smith (born on 22 Jul 1822)

         iv.   George Perrigan Smith (born about 1827)


71. Eleanor Murphy 103 was born about 1775 in South Carolina.103

Eleanor married Daniel Smith .103

72. Malcolm James Ferguson,21,30 son of John Ferguson I and Catherine Crawford , was born about 1750 in Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland 21.,30

Noted events in his life were:

• Migration: Migration from Nova Scotia to North Carolina to Mississippi. 106 "First Settler in Jones County

Sandersville - Who were the first settlers in Jones County? An answer that would probably go unchallenged is traced back to Scotland. It is set forth in a 1957 historical document by the late Lee Bonner, "subscribed and sworn to" in Laurel before Nina M. Daly, notary public.

"The Ferguson, McGill and Smith clans," Bonner recorded, "were branches of the greatest Scot clan, the McDonald Highlanders."

The story notes that "in the period of the American Revolution, some Scots seeking a better climate than Nova Scotia (New Scotland) immigrated to North Carolina. Among them were Malcolm and Mary McDonald Ferguson, parents of John, Margaret and Mary; Angus and Annie Fairley McGill, parents of Archibald, Flora and Nancy; John Hector Smith and wife (maiden name not avaolable), parents of John Campbell, Isabelle and Daniel. The children named all migrated to Mississippi."
(Jones County Newspaper Article - page 4)

Malcolm married Mary Margaret McDonald 21.,30

Children from this marriage were:

36        i.   John Ferguson II (born on 3 May 1776 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 3 Jan 1835 in Jones County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Catherine Ferguson (born on 8 Oct 1779 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 25 May 1857 in Jones County, Mississippi)


73. Mary Margaret McDonald 21,30 was born in Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland.21

Mary married Malcolm James Ferguson 21.,30

74. Angus McGill,21,141 son of Archibald McGill and Elizabeth Walker , was born in 1758 in Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland 21,141 and died in 1820 in North Carolina, at age 62 21,141.,142

Noted events in his life were:

• Military Service: American Revolution, North Carolina. 141 "Angus McGill served as a Private in the Revolutionary War on the Patriot side according to D.A.R. Records. He served in North Carolina. The records show that no pension was given to him or his wives (listed as Anne Fairley and Polly Fletcher)."
(D.A.R. Records)

• Occupation: Weaver, Richmond County, North Carolina. 30 "They were all farmers except my great grandfather McGill, who was a weaver by trade."
(Angus Furguson)

• Tax Schedule: 1779 Richmond County, North Carolina Tax Schedule, 1779, Richmond County, North Carolina. 57 "Angus McGill is listed in the 1779 Tax Schedule, Richmond County, North Carolina as having 550 acres of land. His brother, Allen, (assumption) is listed as having 400 acres."
(1779 Tax Schedule)
Angus McGill in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1790, Richmond County, North Carolina. 109 "Angus McGill is listed in the 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina with 2 free white males of 16 years and older, 2 free white males under 16 years old and 5 free white females."
(1790 US Census - Page 177)

He is followed in the census by an Allen McGill (The assumption is that this is his brother).

"The Allen McGill family is listed as 1 male 16 years and older, 1 male under 16 and 4 females."
(1790 US Census - Page 177)
Angus McGill in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1800, Richmond County, North Carolina. 110 "Angus McGill is listed in the 1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina as having 2 males under 10 years old, 2 males between 16 and 25 years old, 1 male over 45 years old, 2 females under 10 years old, 2 females between 10 and 15 years old, 1 female between 16 and 25 years old and 1 female 26 to 44 years old.

He is also listed as having 3 slaves."
(1800 US Census)
Angus McGill in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1810 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1810, Richmond County, North Carolina. 104 "There is tape running through the name of Angus McGIll in the 1810 US Census but it appears to be that he is listed as having 4 males under 10 years old, 1 male 10 to 15 years old, 1 male 26 to 44 years old and 1 male 45 and older. (Angus would have been close to 52 years old and th 45 years or older male).

The females are listed as 1 female under 10 years old, 1 female 10 to 15 years old, 3 females 16 to 25 years old and 1 female between 26 and 44 years old. (this would have been the second wife of Angus - Polly Fletcher) . All of the children listed (except for the elder son) were children of Angus and his second wife, Polly.

They also have 1 other free person at home and 2 slaves."
(1810 US Census and Warren Trest)

Angus married Anne Fairley 21.,141

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Archibald McGill (born about 1779)

37       ii.   Flora Helen McGill (born on 8 Oct 1779 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 25 May 1857 in Jones County, Mississippi)

        iii.   Nancy McGill (born between 1785-1794)

         iv.   McGill (born between 1785-1794)

          v.   McGill (born between 1785-1794)

Angus next married Polly Fletcher .141

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   McGill (born between 1800-1810)

         ii.   McGill (born between 1800-1810)

        iii.   McGill (born between 1800-1810)

         iv.   McGill (born between 1800-1810)

          v.   McGill (born between 1800-1795)

         vi.   McGill (born between 1800-1810)


75. Anne Fairley,21,141,144 daughter of John Fairley and Lady Margaret Stuart , was born 1765 or 1764 in Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland 21,142 and died before 1795 in North Carolina.143 Another name for Anne was Annie Fairley.21

Noted events in her life were:

• History: 144 "A decendency chart for John Fairley was submitted to the LDS Family
History Center's Ancestral File by Ralph S. Swank, 4 South Wagner
Avenue, Stockton, California 95205. Submission AF83-048267. Film
1394214.

The following information was abstracted from the LDS records:

Born 1717
Died 4 JUL 1798
Buried Drowning Creek Cemetery
Married Margaret Stewart, born 1719, buried 20 AUG 1781
The will of a John Fairley is found in Richmond County, NC, RECORD of
WILLS, Book 1, 1799-1830, page 110. This will was dated 26 AUG 1795 and
proved in MAR 1806 by Alexander Fairley.

Sons: Archibald
Alexander
Robert
John (Jr.)
Daughters: Ann (deceased, wife of Angus McGillis)
Mary

The will was signed "John Farley" and was witnessed by Alexander Fairley,
John McKoy, and Patrick McEachin. John Fairley, Jr., was appointed
executor. The entire estate was left to son, John Fairley, Jr., with a
token of two shillings to each other child or their representative.
Alexander Fairley states in his DEC 1827 will that he bought cows from
the John Fairley estate.

A 1785 tax list in Richmond County listed John Fairley with four in his
household, Archibald Fairley with six in his household, and Alexander
Fairley, over 21, not married. John Fairley, Sr., and Archibald Fairley,
thus, appear to be brothers.

An 1806 tax list in Richmond County named John, Sr., John (Miller),
Archibald, Alexander, Peter, and Angus Fairley."
(Ralph Swank)

Anne married Angus McGill 21.,141

76. Robert Nicholas Boyce,21 son of Robert Scott Boyce and Unknown , was born about 1780 in Ireland.21

Robert married Elizabeth Porter .21

Children from this marriage were:

38        i.   Robert Porter Boyce (born in 1798 Delaware - died in Mar 1873 in Wayne County, Mississippi)


77. Elizabeth Porter .21

Elizabeth married Robert Nicholas Boyce .21

80. William Miller,11 son of Moses Miller Jr. and Mary Bennett , was born about 1792 11 and died in 1836, about age 44.11

William married Millsbury Robertson .

Children from this marriage were:

40        i.   Moses M. Miller (born in 1832 Williamsburg County, South Carolina - died on 22 Jul 1864 in Atlanta, Georgia)

         ii.   Mary Elizabeth Miller (born in 1834 - died after 1900)


81. Millsbury Robertson . Another name for Millsbury was Millie.

Millsbury married William Miller .11

Millsbury next married John M. Barrineau on 7 Jun 1838.11 John was born in 1818 and died in 1886, at age 68.


82. David Donald .11

David married Tabitha Hickman .11

Children from this marriage were:

41        i.   Laura Saphronia Donald (born about 1838 Mississippi - died on 13 Jun 1919)

         ii.   David Donald (died in 1862 in Shiloh, Tennessee)


83. Tabitha Hickman .11

Tabitha married David Donald .11

88. Daniel Clark 73,117 was born about 1779 in North Carolina 73 and died after 1850 in Kemper County, Mississippi.73 Another name for Daniel was Daniel Clarke.73

Daniel and Martin Clarke in 1840 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1840, Kemper County, Mississippi. 119 "Daniel "Clarke" is shown in the 1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi (two houses away from his son, Martin) and is listed as follows:
1 male beween 15 and 20 years old, 3 males between 20 and 30 years old and 1 male between 50 and 60 years old. Daniel should have been around 51 years old at the time of the census.

1 female between 10 and 15 years old, 2 females between 15 and 20 years old and 1 female between 40 and 50 years old."
(1840 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

"Slaves:
Daniel is shown in the 1840 Census as having the following slaves:
1 male under 5 years old and 2 males between 10 and 24 years old. 2 females under 10 years old, 2 females between 10 and 24 years old and 1 female between 24 and 35 years old."
Daniel Clarke in 1850 Kemper County Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi, 1850, Kemper County, Mississippi. 73 "Daniel Clark (spelled Clarke) is shown in the 1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi as follows:

Daniel Clark - age 71 - Farmer - Born in N.C.
Peggy - (age 61 or 66) - born in N.C. (all children born in N.C.)
Daniel Clarke Jr. - age 30 - Laborer
Malinda - age 24
Mary - age 22"
(1850 US Census, Kemper County, Mississippi)

"Peggy may have been the second wife of Daniel Clark. Martin would have been born when she was 12 years old (according to her age in the 1850 Census). There is a 16 year span between Martin and Hugh. Daniel may have had Martin from his first wife and then married Peggy who gave birth to the other childrn. This is strictly an assumption."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Daniel married Peggy .117

Children from this marriage were:

44        i.   Martin Clark (born about 1800 North Carolina - died after 1850 in Probably Kemper County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Hugh Clark (born on 8 Jun 1816 North Carolina)

        iii.   Daniel Clark (born about 1820 North Carolina)

         iv.   William Clark (born about 1821 North Carolina - died on 27 Sep 1862 in Saltillo, Mississippi)

          v.   Malinda Clark (born about 1826 North Carolina)

         vi.   Mary Clark (born about 1828 North Carolina)


89. Peggy 117 was born about 1788 in North Carolina 73 and died after 1850 in Kemper County, Mississippi.

Peggy married Daniel Clark 73.,117

92. Ephraim Dawes 117 was born about 1770 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina 121 and died after 1850 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.121 Another name for Ephraim was Ephraim Daws.

Noted events in his life were:

• History: History of Edgecombe County, North Carolina. "Edgecombe was formed in 1732 from Bertie County by proclamation of the Governor, and county government apparently was established not long afterwards since some of the county records date back to this period. The assembly, however, did not confirm its creation until 1741. Granville (1746), Halifax (1758), and Nash (1777) were formed from Edgecombe. Parts of Edgecombe, Johnston, Nash, and Wayne were taken in 1855 to form Wilson.

Edgecombe County was named for Richard Edgecome, who became Baron Edgecombe, an English nobleman. It is located in the eastern part of North Carolina, surrounded by Halifax, Martin, Nash, Pitt, and Wilson counties. Tarboro was established in 1760 and replaced Edgecombe Court House as the county seat in 1764. "

• General Information: "Ephraim is located in Edgecombe County, NC in the 1800, 1810,1820, 1830, 1840, and 1850 censuses. He first bought land in EdgecombeCounty on 13 DEC 1796 from Abraham Pippen, 165 acres for 82 pounds. Witnesses were John Van Pelt and John Griffis."
(Frank Dawes Gedcom)

Ephraim Daws in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1810 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1810. 145 "Ephraim Daws is listed in the 1810 US Census, Edgecombe Count, North Carolina as follows:

Ephraim Daws
3 free white males under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 26 and 44 years of age

1 free white female under 10 years of age
1 free white female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white female between 26 and 44 years of age."
(1810 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

Ephraim Daws in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1820. 122 "Ephraim Daws (Dawes) is listed in the 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Ephraim Daws

3 free white males under ten years of age (Sire O. Dawes should have been about 2 years old during this census)
2 free white males between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male above 45 years of age

1 free white female under 10 years of age
2 free white females between 16 and 26 years of age
1 free white female above 45 years of age

4 persons engaged in agriculture."
(1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

Ephraim married Suzanna 117 about 1790 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.146

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Benjamin Dawes (died before 1847)

         ii.   Patsy Dawes (born about 1795 - died before 1850)

        iii.   Sarah Dawes (born about 1800)

         iv.   Ephraim Dawes Jr. (born in 1800 - died before 1850)

          v.   John Dawes (born in 1801 - died on 10 May 1891)

         vi.   Polly Dawes (born in 1805)

        vii.   Nathan Dawes (born in 1807 - died after 1870)

       viii.   Catherine Dawes (born in 1811 - died before 1865)

         ix.   Martin Dawes (died before 1850)

46        x.   Sire O. Dawes (born on 28 Aug 1818 Edgecombe County, North Carolina - died on 29 Aug 1894 in Kemper County, Mississippi)


93. Suzanna 117 was born in Edgecombe County, North Carolina and died about 1871 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.121 Another name for Suzanna was Suzannah.

Suzanna married Ephraim Dawes 117 about 1790 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.146

94. Issac Farmer,117 son of Asael Barnes Farmer and Charlotte Coppage , was born about 1800 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina.

Issac Farmer in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1820. 122 "The Issac Farmer family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Issac Farmer
1 free white male under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 26 years of age

1 free white female between 16 and 26 years of age
1 free white female 45 years of age or older

Slaves:
2 male slaves under 14 years of age
2 male slaves between 14 and 26 years of age
2 female slaves under 14 years of age
1 female slave between 14 and 26 years of age
1 female slave between 26 and 45 years of age."
(1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

Issac married Mary Williams .

Children from this marriage were:

47        i.   Agnes Farmer (born about 1823 Edgecombe County, North Carolina - died about 1904 in Kemper County, Mississippi)


95. Mary Williams was born in North Carolina. Another name for Mary was Polly.117

Mary married Issac Farmer .117

96. Duncan Baxter Graham,42 son of Archibald Graham and Mary Baxter , was born about 1767 in Inverary, Argyll, Scotland 42 and died on 8 Aug 1846 in Telfair County, Georgia, about age 79.42

Noted events in his life were:

• Migration: From North Carolina to Georgia. 1 "Duncan Graham must have migrated from North Carolina to Georgia between 1810 and 1820. Duncan shows up in the 1810 census in Richmond County, North Carolina and in 1820 in Telfair County, Georgia."
(Warren Trest)
Duncan and Archibald Graham in 1800 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1800. 110 "The Archibald Graham family must have migrated to Richmond County, North Carolian between 1790 and 1800. They do not show up in the 1790 census in Richmond County but do show up in the 1800 Richmond County census. The Grahams in Richmond County, North Carolina in 1800 are as follows (all living near each other - 2 pages of the census records)

John Graham - 2 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (John should have been around 30 years old)
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

Archibald Graham (the father) - 1 male between 16 and 25 years of age
2 males between 16 and 44 years of age
1 male over 45 years of age (Archibald should have been about 65 years old)
2 females between 16 and 25 years of age and 1 female over 45 years of age. (This would not agree with the birthdate of Mary Baxter - she would have only been 41 yeas old).

Duncan Graham - 3 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (Duncan should have been about 35 years old)
2 females under 10 years of age and 1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

"Dugal" Graham - 1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (Dougald should have been about 36 years of age)
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 16 and 25 years of age

Mary Graham - 2 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 10 and 15 years of age
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age (Mary should have been about 25 or 26 years of age)

John had 2 slaves
Archibald had 5 slaves
Duncan had 2 slaves
Dougald had 2 slaves."

Duncan Graham in the 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia, 1820. 147 "The Duncan Graham family shows up in the 1820 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia as follows:

Duncan Graham

3 males between between 10 and 16 years of age
1 male between 18 and 26 years of age
1 male 45 years of age or older

1 female under 10 years of age
2 females between 10 and 16 years of age
2 females between 16 and 26 years of age
1 female between 26 and 45 years of age.

(There are 4 foreigners not naturalized)

They are listed with the following slaves:
4 males under 14 years of age
2 males that are 45 years or older
1 female between 14 and 26 years of age."
(1820 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia)
Duncan Graham in the 1830 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia, 1830. 148 "The Duncan Graham family shows up in the 1830 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia as follows:

Duncan Graham
2 males between 20 and 30 years of age
1 male between 30 and 40 years of age
1 male between 60 and 70 years of age (Duncan should have been about 63 years old at the time).
1 female under 5 years of age
1 female between 15 and 20 years of age
1 female between 40 and 50 years of age (Elizabeth Graham should have been about 40 years old at the time)

Slaves:

They have the following slaves listed:

1 male under 10 years of age
2 males between 10 and 24 years of age
1 male between 24 and 36 years of age
1 female between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 36 and 55 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Telfair County, Georgia)

Duncan married Elizabeth Graham about 1790 in Richmond County, North Carolina.

Children from this marriage were:

48        i.   Archibald Graham (born about 1795 Richmond County, North Carolina - died about 1833 in Mississippi)

         ii.   William Graham (born before 1800 Richmond County, North Carolina - died before 1852)

        iii.   Daniel Graham (born about 1804 Richmond County, North Carolina - died in Apr 1870 in Coffee County, Georgia)

         iv.   Duncan B. Graham (born about 1804 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 13 Apr 1872 in Telfair, Coffee County, Georgia)

          v.   Alexander Graham (born about 1805 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 18 Nov 1853 in Telfair County, Georgia)

         vi.   John Graham (born about 1805 Richmond County, North Carolina - died in Jan 1850 in Holmesville, Appling County, Georgia)

        vii.   Isabella Graham (born about 1809 Richmond County, North Carolina - died after 1880 in Telfair County, Georgia)

       viii.   Flora Graham (born on 27 Jul 1809 Richmond County, North Carolina - died on 4 Jul 1874 in Monroe County, Alabama)

         ix.   Jane Graham (born about 1810 Richmond County, North Carolina - died after 1852)

          x.   Katherine Graham (born after 1810 Richmond County, North Carolina - died after 1850)


97. Elizabeth Graham, daughter of John Graham and Elizabeth Smylie , was born in Scotland and died in 1818.

Elizabeth married Duncan Baxter Graham 42 about 1790 in Richmond County, North Carolina.

100. George Smith 93 was born in St. Bartholomew, Charleston District, South Carolina 93 and died on 5 Oct 1815.93

George married Mary 93 on 24 Jun 1784.93

Children from this marriage were:

50        i.   William B. Smith (born on 5 Nov 1786 South Carolina)


101. Mary .93

Mary married George Smith 93 on 24 Jun 1784.93

104. Josiah Bufkin,94 son of Benjamin Bufkin and Unknown , was born about 1766 in South Carolina 94 and died about 1830 in Perry County, Mississippi, about age 64.94

Josiah Bufkin in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Prince George Parish, South Carolina, 1790. 149 "Benjamin Bufkin and Josiah Bufkin are found in the 1790 US Census is Prince George Parish, South Carolina. The family names are spelled by the census taker as BUFKING. The families are listed as follows:

Benjamin Bufking - 2 free white males 16 years or older
1 free white male under 16 years old
6 free white females.

Josiah Bufking - 1 free white male 16 years or older
1 free white male under 16 years old
2 free white females.

The son of Josiah Bufkin must have been an older brother to Benjamin Franklin Bufkin, since he was not supposedly born until 1794."
(1790 US Census, Prince George Parish, South Carolina)
Josiah Bufkin in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Kingston County, South Carolina, 1800. 150 "There are 3 Bufkin families living near each other in the 1800 US Census, Franklin County, South Carolina. The name is spelled by the census taker as BUFKING. The families are as follows:

Josiah Bufking - 3 males under 10
3 males 10 to 15 years of age
1 male 26 to 44 years of age. (JOsiah should have been about 34 years old in 1800)
1 female between 10 and 15 years old
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

Benjamin Bufking - 1 male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 16 and 25 years of age
1 male 45 years or older
3 females between 10 and 15 years of age
1 female between 16 and 25 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age

John Bufking (this is assumed to be a brother to Josiah)
1 male under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age
1 female under 10 years of age
1 female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age."
(1800 US Census, Kingston County, South Carolina)

• Migration: 1818-1820. "Josiah Bufkin must have migrated from South Carolina to Mississippi between 1818 and 1820 with his children. Census records have Albert Bufkin (Son of Benjamin Franklin Bufkin) being born in South Carolina in 1818 and Harmon Floyd Bufkin being born in Mississippi in 1822. Census records have Josiah Bufkin in Perry County in 1820, so the assumption can be made that the Bufkins came from North Carolina between 1818 and 1820."
(Warren Trest)

• First Settlers of Perry County, Mississippi: "The First Families of Perry County" was graciously provided by Sherry Herrington from an article that appears in the Richton Dispatch Dated 10/3/96. This article was authored by Richard Roman who has published several books on Perry County Residents. Mr. Roman is a member of the South MS Genealogical Society.

The following is a list of people in 1820 who were the first families to make up Perry County:

BALL, BANKSTON, BARFIELD, BARLOW, BOLTON, BOSWORTH, BOUNDS (4), BOWIE, BOYD, BRINSON, BUFKIN (4), BYRD (5), CARROLL, CARTER (4), CHADWICK (3), CLARK, COLEMAN, COOPER, CORLEY (5), COURTNEY, COWART (4), COX, CREEL (2), CRUTHIRDS, DAVIS (4), DEARMAN, DICKEY (2), DICKSON, DRAUGHN, DUKE, DUNN, DUPRIEST (2), EASTERLING (2), ELLIOT, ELLZY, FARR, FATHEREE (2), FILLINGAME, FREEMAN (2). GAINES, GARRAWAY (2), FORD, GAVIN, GIBSON, GRANBERRY (2), GRANTHAM (3), GREEN (2), HARPER (2), HARTFIELD (2), HARVISON (2), HEIDELBERG, HERRINGTON (4), HICKMAN, HINTON (3), HOLLIMAN, HUDSON, HYATT, JACOBS, JENNINGS, JONES (2), JOURDAN, KELLY, LAIRD, LANDRUM (2), LEE, LEWIS (2), LINDER, LOPER (4), LOT, MECALLUM, McCARDLE, McDONALD (2), McKENZIE (2), McSWAIN, MALONE, MATCHETT (2), MATHAIS, MATTHEWS (2), MEGAHA, MILWEY, MILSAPS (2), MIMS, MOFFITT (3), MOLEY, MORRIS, MYERS, MYRICK (3), NEWELL (5), NIELY (3), O'NEAL (3), PARKER (3), PEARCE (2), PETTUS, PRICE, PROCTOR, RAGLIN, RASHER, RATCLIFF, REAVES, REESE, REYNOLDS, RIGDON, TOCHON, ROSE, ROSS, ROWLAND, RUNNELS (2), SANFORD, SAPP, SIMMONS (2), SMITH (5), STEELE, STEWART (2), STRAHN, STUCKY, SUMMERLIN (2), SUMRALL, TAYLOR (2), THOMAS (3), THOMPSON, TISDALE, TOUCHSTONE (2), TUCKER (2), ULMER, UPCHURCH, WALL, WALTERS (4), WARREN, WELDY, WHATLEY, WHEELER, WHEAT (2), WILLIAMS (3), WINDHAM (2). "
(Perry County, Mississippi GenWeb)

Josiah Bufkin in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi, 1820. 124 "The Josiah Bufkin family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi as follows:

Josiah Bufkin - 1 free white male between 26 and 45 years of age, 1 free white male 45 years and upwards, 1 free white female under 10 years of age, 1 free white female betwen 10 and 16 years of age and 1 free white female between 26 and 45 years of age.

1 person is engaged in Commerce."
(1820 US Census, Perry County, Mississippi)

"It is interesting to note that Josiah Bufkin and Alexander McGilvray were in Perry County (near Runnelstown) at the same time between 1820 and 1830. Since the census record is only 9 pages (in 1820), they must have known each other in Church, in town or at Farming events. Their children would spread to Jones County (to the North) and Franklin County (to the West). The McGilvrays would marry into the Trest family (Eleanor to Samuel Caper) and the Bufkins would marry into the Grahams (Clara Dodd Bufkin to Claudius Claiborn Graham). 5 generations (on both sides) after Alexander McGilvray and Josiah Bufkin, Wendell Trest would marry Neddie Graham bringing these two lines together."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Josiah married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

52        i.   Benjamin Franklin Bufkin (born on 27 Sep 1794 Georgetown District, Prince George Parish, South Carolina - died in 1853 in Copiah County, Mississippi)

         ii.   John Bufkin ()


106. Benjamin Lewis .94

Noted events in his life were:

• Benjamin Lewis in North Carolina: "There are 2 Benjamin Lewis's listed in the 1790 US Census in North Carolina. One is in Dobbs County and one lived in Mecklinburg County. Celia Lewis was born in 1795 and lists her birthplace as N.C. in later census records.

There are Martins living in both counties also, so it is not known at this time, which of these two Benjamin Lewis's are correct."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Benjamin married Celia Martin .94

Children from this marriage were:

53        i.   Celia Ann Lewis (born in 1795 North Carolina - died in 1864 in Copiah County, Mississippi)


107. Celia Martin .94

Celia married Benjamin Lewis .94

110. WIlliam Bucner Bishop .

WIlliam married Sarah Ann Runnels .

Children from this marriage were:

55        i.   Mary E. Bishop (born on 22 Feb 1799 Georgia - died after 1840 in Lawrence County, Mississippi)


111. Sarah Ann Runnels .

Sarah married WIlliam Bucner Bishop .

112. Isaac H. Collier Jr.,2,5 son of Isaac H. Collier Sr. and Frances Seawell , was born in Virginia 2 and died before Dec 1816 in Jefferson County, Mississippi.

Noted events in his life were:

• History of Jefferson County, Mississippi: "Following LaSalle's trip down the Mississippi River, the Jefferson County area was recognized as being populated by the Natchez Indians. This can be proved by the existing Emerald Mound burial site which is located several miles off the Natchez Trace in present day Jefferson County.

The French built their second settlement at Fort Rosalie (now Natchez) in 1716 and other settlements followed quickly. The growth of the area was slow. Notable land deals like the speculative Mississippi Company's deal led to the financial panic in 1720 known as the bursting of the Mississippi Bubble.
The Natchez Indians grew restless as French settlers began to take over their lands. They attacked Fort Rosalie in 1729 killing many settlers. Following this attack the French retaliated by virtually destroying almost all of the Natchez Indians.

With the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763 after the French and Indian War, France ceded its territory east of the Mississippi River except New Orleans. This Mississippi area which included present day Jefferson County became a part of British West Florida and was known as the Natchez District. The northern boundary extended to the mouth of the Yazoo River. This area witnessed a large influx of Anglo-Americans from the Atlantic Seaboard Colonies.

During the American Revolution Spain seized the Natchez District and the remainder of British West Florida. When the American Revolution ended in 1783 Britain transferred the claim to the territory north of the 31 degree latitude to the United States. But, Spain refused to recognize the American claim to West Florida. It was not until 1795 that the Spanish agreed to the 31 degree north boundary. It was not until 1798 that the Spanish actually relinquished control of the Natchez District to the United States. In the meantime, the state of Georgia complicated matters by asserting a claim to the area. Georgia had actually sold land to three companies of eager speculators. Georgia passports were issued to settlers who would travel by land through the Creek Indian territory to the western Mississippi River settlements.

In 1798 the United States Congress created the Mississippi Territory which included all the land between Georgia and the Mississippi River which was located north of the 31 degree latitude and south of a line running due east of the mouth of the Yazoo River. In 1804 this territory was expanded to include the land northward to Tennessee. It 1812 the rest of West Florida was included.
On December 10, 1817 Mississippi was admitted as a state to the United States. The eastern part of the Mississippi Territory became the Alabama Territory."

From the Pee Dee River Valley to Cole's Creek and Curtis Landing
The pioneers to the new "Natchez Country" would leave the Pee Dee River area of SC/NC and travel about 200 miles using pack-horses to the Holston RIver in northeastern Tennessee. They traveled via the South Carolina State Road (North) on the Warriors Path. They continued on the Catawba Trail to the Wilderness Road Fort near Kingsport, Tennessee. (Some of the present day towns and cities they would pass through were: Cheraws, SC; Wadesboro, NC; New Salem, NC; Lenoir, NC; Blowing Rock, NC; Boone, NC; Hampton, TN; Johnson City, TN; and Kingsport, TN. The automobile driving distance today would be over 250 miles.)


At the Wilderness Road Fort they secured/built flat boats. The flat boats were sturdy with one end enclosed for protection from the elements. The flat boat had to be designed to allow for the women, children, food, bedding and household items. They had to transport a milk cow, chickens, horses, hunting dogs and farm implements. Once aboard the flat boats they followed the Holston River to the Tennessee River which they entered near Knoxville, TN. (They traveled near present day towns of Surgoinsville, TN; Chalk Level, TN: Cherokee Lake; Buffalo Springs, TN; and Mascot, TN).

Indian attacks were a frequent occurrence. The pioneers always had to be prepared. The women often steered the boats while the men fought the Indians. Following the Tennessee River they reached the Ohio River near Paducah, KY. (On this leg they traveled near present day towns of Dayton, TN; Chattanooga, TN; Scottsboro, AL; Guntersville, AL; Decatur, AL; Florence, AL; Savannah, TN; Perryville, TN; Sycamore Landing, TN; Eva, TN; Aurora, KY; and Lake City, KY) From Paducah the flat boats floated down the Ohio River where they entered the Mississippi near Cairo, IL. (This is near present day Metropolis, IL; and about 30 miles south of Cape Girardeau, MO)

At Cairo, IL the flat boats embarked on the "mercy" of the mighty Mississippi River for the rest of the journey to the "Natchez Country." (They traveled near present day towns like Hayti, MO; Cathursville, MO; Heloise, TN; Osceloa, AR; Memphis, TN; Helena, AR; Rosedale, MS; Greenville, MS; Lake Providence, LA; and Vicksburg, MS) South of Rodney one group of pioneers steered the flat boats into Boyd's Creek (now Cole's Creek) for the 15 mile trip to Curtis Landing on the South Fork of Cole's Creek. Other pioneers continued on to Natchez or Wilkinson County steering their flat boats up St. Catherine's Creek, the Homochitto River or Buffalo River.

These pioneers had made a trip of approximately 1400 miles by flat boat on water. The total miles traveled by horse-pack and flat boat would be about 1650-1700 miles.

Upon arrival it was necessary to fell trees and build log houses quickly. Fields needed to be cleared and cultivated. The survival for the first year was dependent on the family's ability to fish and hunt. Squirrel, deer, ducks, and wild turkey were the family's fresh meat.

One of the pioneer families who had a British land grant in Jefferson County included James Cole who arrived October, 1772 with the paperwork finalized in 1776. Richard Curtis who arrived in 1780."
(Jefferson County Genweb Project)

• Slave Transfer: "1800-22 October 1800-pickering (Jefferson) County, Ms., Book A1, Page 161, Isaac H. Collier Sell to Henry Green a Slave, Isaac Age 22 for $600.00. Isaac States That He Is If of the State of Tennessee. Proven in Open Court 14 July 1802.

1801 (A)-12 May 1801 (A)-pickering (Jefferson) County, Ms., Book B2, Page 4. Isaac Collier Sells to Cato West Slaves, for $1800.00, Three Negro Women Slave with Each a Child, to Wit, Ester and Child Called Plato, Thamer and Child Name Jenny, Nan and Child Name Nelorn. He States That He Is Late of the State of Tennessee. Proven in Open Court 12 July 1802.

1801 (A)-28 September 1801 (A)-pickering (Jefferson) County, Ms., Book A1, Page 161, Isaac Collier, Sr. of Pickering County, Territory of Mississippi Sells Isaac H. Collier Jr. a Negro Girl Named Nelly Age 13 (C)-witness Benjamin Collier. Registered 18 January 1802.

1812 (B)-pickering (Jefferson) County, Ms., Book B1, Page 507, I. H. Collier et Al J A. Chamberlin B/s.

1816-11 December 1816, Book C1, Page 329, Jefferson County, Ms. Sarah Collier to Collier & Collier (James J. and John H.), Slaves, Tanner about 25 Years Old, Cora, 3 Years Old and Mary Ann, 2 Years Old. Witness J. B. Truly"
(Barabara Celotto)
Issac Collier in 1790 Tax Schedule 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Tax Schedule: 1790 Sussex County, Virginia Tax Schedule. "Issac Collier is listed in the 1790 Tax Schedule, Sussex County, Virginia as having 1 white above 16 years of age."

Isaac married Sarah Truly .2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   James J. Collier (born on 27 Jul 1806 Jefferson County, MS. - died on 16 Oct 1857 in Jefferson County, MS. Buried: Fayette Cemetery)

56       ii.   John Hardin Collier Sr. (born about 1807 Jefferson County, Mississippi - died on 4 Jul 1890 in Franklin County, Mississippi)


113. Sarah Truly,2,5 daughter of Unknown and Elizabeth Holt , was born in Jefferson County, MS. 2 and died on 25 Dec 1817.2

Noted events in her life were:

• Slave Transfer: 11 Dec 1816, Jefferson County, Mississippi. 5 "I Found a Deed in Jefferson County, Ms. on 11 December 1816 Where Sarah Collier Gave Her Sons, James J. and John H. Collier, Slaves. Witness by James B. Truly. After That There Are Records Where the Sons Were Wards of James B. Truly and or Richard Harrison until the Late 1820's. There Is a Marriage License for Mrs. Sarah Collier and Eli K. Ross on 17 December 1817 in Jefferson County, Ms., They Were Married by Lawrence Scarbourgh. From this I Assume That Isaac Had Died and Sarah's Brother and Brother-in-law Had Custody of the Boys. James Was Circuit Clerk in Jefferson County."
(Barbara Celotto)

Sarah married Isaac H. Collier Jr. .2

Sarah next married Eli Kershaw Ross 2 on 17 Dec 1816 in Jefferson County, MS..2


114. James Benett Truly 2,5 was born on 14 Dec 1793 in Jefferson County, Mississippi,151 died before 1840 in Fayette, Jefferson County, Mississippi,151 and was buried in David Darden Cemetery, Jefferson County, Mississippi.151

James B. Truly in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi, 1820. 152 "James B. Truly shows up in the 1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi (borders Jefferson County) as is listed as follows:

James B. Truly
2 males under 10 years old
1 male between 16 and 26 years of age (J.B. Truly should have been about 27 years old)

1 female between 16 and 26 years of age. (Martha Smith Truly should have been about 22 years of age)."
(1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi)

• Truly Tavern: Jefferson County, Mississippi. "The following was found in a History of Buell / Truly Tavern in Jefferson County, MIssissippi:

Some tragic, as well as humorous, things happened in and near the old Tavern.
Directly across the street was the first brick store, on its porch a duel was fought, one participant using a dirk and the other a sword cane.

James B. Truly, a dandified fellow, who had a way with the women was exhibiting his skill at doing a jig before an admiring crowd. Rather picturesque, no doubt, in his knee breeches, swallow-tail coat, colonial buckles, etc., he was cutting the pigeon wing when a nephew was suddenly inspired to play a prank upon his dandified uncle. He ran up to him and whispered "Uncle, your trousers are split and are falling off!", whereupon the gallant James grasped the trousers and rushed off up the stairs to find that it was all a joke. He quickly caught up his old trusty rifle, used in the Battle of New Orleans and chased the luckless nephew for some time!"

• Slave Court Record: 16 Sep 1826. "James B. Truly served as a juror on a Slave Court Proceeding in 1826:
Page 62

Special County. Ct. 16th Sept. 1826

At a Special Court for Jefferson County summoned by the sheriff agreeably to the Statute in such case made and provided for the trial of slaves this 16th day of September 1826 - Present the Honorable J. R. Holmes presiding Justice & John L. Irwin Esquire associate Justice.
Charles H. Jordan Esq.. Sheriff
Isaac Pipes Clerk of the County Court

Ordered that the court adjourn to the house of John Buell Esquire.
The State of Miss. vs. Tom a Negro man slave the property of Agnes Irvine
The Sheriff returned a list of Jurors summoned in this case – Ordered by the court that C. Jefferson Esquire be appointed to prosecute in behalf of the State in this case, and that P. T. Williams on the part of the accused.

The prisoner charged with an assault and battery on the body of Agnes Irvine with intent to kill and murder this the said Agnes Irvine. The prisoner placed at the bar by the sheriff arraigned and on arraignment pleads not guilty and issue by consent. Ordered by the court that a Jury be empanelled and sworn, as the law directs, in this case, whereupon there came a Jury to wit –
Joseph Parmilee
Peter C. Goosey
John Buell
James B. Truly
Alex. Bolls
John Pickins
Elisha Trader
Samuel Scott
John Clawson
David F. Standlee
Andrew Bolls
John Montgomery
who being empanelled and sworn to will and truly try the issue aforesaid upon their oaths do say

Page 63 – continued
Ordered that the court be adjourned for one hour. Court met pursuant to adjournment.

Ordered that the court adjourn till Monday morning nine o’clock.
Monday September 18, 1816, Court met pursuant to adjournment.

The State vs. Tom a Negro man slave

The Jury empanelled in this case on Saturday last returned to the court now here the following verdict to wit “we of the Jury find the prisoner at the bar guilty in manner and force as charged – And on motion & on reasons filed by his attorney aforesaid for a new trial, it is ordered, considered and adjudged that a new trial be granted to be holden (held) at the next regular Term of the county court on the first Monday in October next – And that a new Jury be awarded to be summoned by the Sheriff as the law directs, and that the prisoner be remanded to Jaol (Jail).
Ordered that the account of the Sheriff against the county amounting to fifteen dollars be allowed.

Ordered that the sum of six dollars be allowed Isaac Pipes – clerk for his per dieum, in attending on this court two days.

Ordered that the court adjourn sine dine.

Signed J. Remson Holmes"

• Slave Court Record: Sep 1827, Jefferson County, Mississippi. "James B. Truly was a juror in a Slave Court proceeding in Sept, 1827:
The State of Miss. vs. Isaac a slave the property of Edward Broughton
The prisoner placed in the Barr and ordered by the court that Cicero Jefferson Esq. be appointed to prosecute in behalf of the State, & also ordered that L. L. Cartwright Esq. be appointed to defend said slave.

The prisoner charged with arson in having on the night of the first day of September 1827 burned the Barn house of James Watson, Jr. in the county of Jefferson State of Mississippi.

The prisoner arraigned and pleads not Guilty, therefore ordered by the court that Jury be empanelled and sworn in this case whereupon there came a jury to wit –

1. Daniel Perry, Jr.
2. Joshua H. Rawlings
3. Neal Torry
4. Raford(?) West
5. Isaac McClutchie
6. Robert Brooks
7. Young Hill
8. James B. Truly
9. Anthony Hamberlin
10. Moses Odam
11. Philip Dixon
12. John W. Slater

who upon their oaths do say we of the Jury find the prisoner at the barr not Guilty.

Ordered that the court adjourn for one hour. Court met pursuant to adjournment."

James B. Truly in 1830 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 1830. 153 "James B. Truly is listed in the 1830 US Census (page 32A) as follows:

James B. Truly
2 males under 5 years of age
2 males between 10 and 15 years of age
3 males between 30 and 40 years of age

1 female under 5 years of age
1 female between 5 and 10 years of age
1 female between 15 and 20 years of age
1 female between 20 and 30 years of age
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age

THey have the following slaves:
1 male under 10 years of age
3 males between 20 and 36 years of age
1 female under 10 years of age
1 female between 20 and 36 years of age
1 female between 36 and 45 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi)

James married Martha Smith .2

Children from this marriage were:

57        i.   Cora Catherine Truly (born about 1823 Jefferson County, Mississippi - died before 1870)

         ii.   Henkle I. Truly ()

        iii.   Philip H. Truly ()

         iv.   Sarah Truly ()

          v.   Hardin Truly (died before 1855)


115. Martha Smith,2,5 daughter of Francis Smith and Unknown , was born on 17 Mar 1798 in Mississippi 151 and died on 27 Oct 1855 in Fayette, Jefferson County, Mississippi, at age 57.151 Another name for Martha was Martha Patsey Smith.

Noted events in her life were:

• Truly Tavern: Buell Tavern (Later known as Truly Tavern)

A modern apartment house remodeled from the Old Buell Tavern, but over the same foundation and with two rooms upstairs as originally built is located on Highway 61 (Main Street) in the Town of Fayette, Jefferson County. The large lower rooms of the old tavern have been partitioned off into smaller rooms making two apartments. In Township 9 Range 1 East this house is located. The Township line divides the town.

In 1825 land was bought from Henry Platner by Jefferson County in Township 9, Range 1 East and Township 9, Range 2 East upon which to erect public buildings and establish a county seat. The old County Seat at Greenville was not satisfactory because it was not centrally located and to travel to the County Seat in those days, from remote parts of the county, was a good day’s journey. Hence, the present site was decided upon. Thirty-eight acres were purchased for the sum of Five Hundred Forty dollars ($540.00).

When the Commissioners purchased thirty-eight acres of land from Henry Platner to build a Court House and other public buildings, the Town of Fayette came into existence in 1825.

Lots were sold at auction and John Buell bought lot no.1 in square no. 4, upon which to erect a tavern. Later the entire square was purchased by Buell.
As were the usual taverns, this one consisted of a parlor and small back room on one side and a long dining room running the length of the other two, on the other side. Back of this room was a cistern from which cool, refreshing water was served to the guests. The kitchen, store room, etc., were located back of the main building, not a part of it but connected by a shed. The large dining room served as a banquet hall and dance hall. Cottages, four in number, with four rooms each were built on the square and assigned to the guests. The two rooms upstairs were presumably used by the family. A large stable was back of the tavern and a lot in which the teams were kept. The teams were fed and watered by the tavern keeper.

In 1837, Peter Rucker acting as Trustee for Mrs. Martha Truly, (for women at this time were not permitted to own land) bought the tavern from Richard Harrison. Since then, the place has been referred to as the Truly Tavern. This is the oldest residence in Fayette.

Some tragic, as well as humorous, things happened in and near the old Tavern.
Directly across the street was the first brick store, on its porch a duel was fought, one participant using a dirk and the other a sword cane.
James B. Truly, a dandified fellow, who had a way with the women was exhibiting his skill at doing a jig before an admiring crowd. Rather picturesque, no doubt, in his knee breeches, swallow-tail coat, colonial buckles, etc., he was cutting the pigeon wing when a nephew was suddenly inspired to play a prank upon his dandified uncle. He ran up to him and whispered “Uncle, your trousers are split and are falling off!”, whereupon the gallant James grasped the trousers and rushed off up the stairs to find that it was all a joke. He quickly caught up his old trusty rifle, used in the Battle of New Orleans and chased the luckless nephew for some time!

Tavern rates were regulated by the County Court at and before the time John Buell opened the Tavern in Fayette. From the County Court minutes for 1820 we read:

“Ordered that the following Tavern rates be established in and for the County of Jefferson to wit –
Champagne wine per bottle or quart $2.50
Madeira $2.00
Port $1.50
Claret $1.00
Sherry Teneriff Malaga, etc $1.00
Rum per quart $ .75
Cognac Brandy per quart $1.50
Peach $ .50
Whiskey $ .50
Apple Brandy $ .50
Breakfast $ .37 ½
Dinner $ .50
Supper $ .37 ½
Lodging per night $ .12 ½
Horse per day 24 hours $ .75
night only $ .50
feed $ .25
Toddy per qt. cognac brandy $ .50
rum $ .37 ½
whiskey $ .25
And in same proportions for smaller quantities
“Ordered that a Tavern License issue to John Buell agreeably to his permit and Bond.”
“Ordered that John Buell be recommended as a suitable person for a Justice of the Peace for the Town of Fayette."

John H. Collier in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 1840. "John Hardin Collier is found in the 1840 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi along with his brother and Mrs. M. Truly (living next door to each other) and they are listed as follows:

Mrs. M. Truly (This may have been Martha Truly, Cora Catherine Truly's mother). She has 2 males under 5 years old, 1 male between 5 and 10 years of age, 1 male between 10 and 15 years of age and 1 male between 40 and 50 years of age. 1 female between 5 and 10 years of age and 1 female between 30 and 40 years of age. (The assumption can be made that James Truly had died prior to 1840).

The next house is:
James J. Collier (John Hardin Collier's brother) - 2 males between 5 and 10 years of age, 1 male between 30 and 40 years of age, 1 female under 5 and 1 female between 20 and 30 years of age.

The next house is:
John H. Collier - 2 males between 20 and 30 years of age and 1 female between 15 and 20 years of age.

John Hardin Collier should have been about 33 years old, so his age listed may not have been correct. Cora Collier would have been 17 years old, so she would have been the female between 15 and 20 years of age."

Martha Truly in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi, 1850. 96 "Martha Truly is listed in the 1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi as follows:

Martha Truly - age 52 - female - value of real estate $1500 - born in Mississippi
P.H. Truly - age 24 - male - all children born in Mississippi
H.S. Truly - age 33 - male
D.B. Truly - age 30 - male
Richard H. Truly - age 17 - male
jane (or Janie)? B. Truly - age 8 - female
S.M. Truly - age 22 - female

L.Holt - age 42 - black male
(1850 US Census, Jefferson County, Mississippi - Page 99B)

• Will: 5 Nov 1855, Jefferson Co, Mississippi. "Jefferson County Ms.
Number 54
Dated this 5th Day of November 1855
A. K. Ford Clerk
Recorded Book F
Pages 413 and 414

The Last Will and Testament of Martha Truly of Jefferson County in the State of Mississippi.

I, Martha Truly Considering the Uncertainty of Human Life and Being Now of Sound Mind and Disposing Memory, Do Make, Publish Ordain and Declare this My Last Will and Testament, Hereby Revoking and Annulling All Other Wills by Me Hereto Before Made.

Item First; it Is My Will and Desire That My Executors Herein after Named, Shall Keep My Slaves, Stock, Furniture, Farming Utensils on My Plantation in Said County of Jefferson to Be Employed and Used to the Best Advantage in Raising Crops and That the Sum of Two Thousand Dollars Now at Interest in the Hands of Dr. B. F. Fox Daniel Smith and Mrs. Adeline Dangerfield, Remain at Interest until All My Debts Are Paid and That the Interest Be Collected When Due and Applied with the Proceeds of the Crop on Said Plantation, to the Payment of My Debts.

Item Second; I Will and Direct That after the Payment of My Debts, the Said Sum of Two Thousand Dollars at Interest in the Hands of Dr. B. F. Fox, Daniel Smith and Mrs. Adeline Daingerfield, Be Collected, and Equally Divided among My Children, Henkle I. Truly, D. Bradford Truly, Philip H. Truly, Sarah A. Fox, and John H. Collier
Item Third; after the Payment of All My Debts as Aforesaid, I Will and Direct That All the Horses, Mules, Oxen, Stock of Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, , Corn , Fodder, Wagons, Ploughs, and All the Farming Utensils, Household, Kitchen Furniture, Except the Bedding and Bed Clothes Be Sold on Such Terms and Credits as My Executers May Deem Best and the Proceeds of Thereof to Be Equally Divided Among, Henkle I. Truly, D. Bradford Truly, Philip H. Truly, Sarah A. Fox, and Richard H. Truly.

Item Fourth; I Will and Direct unto My Two Sons, Henkle I. Truly and Philip H. Truly My Plantation in Said County of Jefferson , Known as and Called "Wantmore", Containing Three Hundred and Twenty Acres More or Less, to Them as Tenants in Common with the Privileges and Appintinancet Hereunto Belong .

Item Fifth; I Give and Devise to My Son Henkle I. Trulymy Negro Slaves, Samson and Lilly.

Item Sixth; I Give and Devise to My Son H. Bradford Truly My Negro Man Slave Rodman.

Item Seventh; I Give and Devise to My Son Philip H. Truly My Negro Woman Slave Cynthia and Her Child Emma.

Item Eight; I Give and Devise to My Daughter Sarah A. Fox My Negro Girl Slave Hannah.

Item Ninth; I Give and Devise to My Son Richard H. Truly My Negro Woman Slave Cinda and Her Four Children, Levi, Wesley, Daniel and Caleb.

Item Tenth; I Give and Devise to My Granddaughter Sarah H. Collier, My Negro Girl Slave Bet and Her Increase.

Item Eleventh; to My Daughter Cora Collier, I Give and Bequeath the Sum of Twenty Dollars, to Be Paid Whenever She Applies for the Same to My Executors.

Item Twelfth; I Give and Bequeath to My Son Richard H. Truly the Sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars out of the Sum of Two Thousand Dollars Which I Loaned Him, the Remaining Five Hundred Dollars Appropriated by Him to the Creation of a Tombstone or Monument over My Grave, and an Enclosment Around the Same.

Item Thirteenth; I Give Ot My Son Henkel I. Truly My Spectacles.

Item Fourteenth; to My Daughter Sarah A. Fox I Give My Own Portrait, and the Picture of My Little Son.

Item Fifteenth; to My Son D. Bradford Truly I Give the Portrait of His Father.

Item Sixteenth; to My Granddaughter Sarah H. Collier I Give a Small Gold Locket Containing a Miniature Likeness of My Deceased Son Hardin Truly. Also a Set of Table Silver Spoons, with the Letters "M.t." Engraved on Them and Also All My Little Articles.

Item Seventeenth; to My Daughter Sarah A. Fox I Give One Set of Table Silver Spoons, and a Set of Silver Tea Spoons with the Letters "M. T." Engraved on Them.

Item Eighteenth; in the Vent of the Death of Either of My Children Without Issue, I Will and Direct That the Share or Portion Devised to Such Deceased Child, Shall Revert to My Estate and Be Equally Divided among the Remaining Except Cora Collier. And I Further Will and Desire That If Any Children or Others Interested in My Estate Have Any Regard for My Emory, and Any Respect for My Last Wishes, They Will Not Attempt to Set Aside this Will, but Be Satisfied with the Disposition I Have Made of My Little Property.

Item nineteenth; I Hereby Constitute and Appoint My Sons Henkle I Truly and Richard H. Truly Executors of this My Last Will and Testament and Desire That the Court Will Not Require Them to Give Security for the Performance of Their Duties as Such.

In Witness Whereof I the Said Martha Truly Have Hereunto Subscribed My Name, and Affixed My Seal, in Fayette in Said County of Jefferson this the 12th Day of October A. D. 1855
Her Signature'
Signed Sealed Published and Declared by the above Named Martha Truly to Be Her Last Will and Testament on this 12th October 1855 in the Presence of Us Who Have Hereunto Subscribed Our Names as Witnesses in the Presence and at the Request of the Testator and in the Presence of Each Other.
Signed Jas. B. Wigginton
G. A. Guilmont"
(Submitted by Barbara Coletto)

• Relationship with her daughter: "Martha Smith must have been upset with her daughter, Cora Smith Collier, since she only gave her $20 and stated in her will:

Item Eighteenth; in the Vent of the Death of Either of My Children Without Issue, I Will and Direct That the Share or Portion Devised to Such Deceased Child, Shall Revert to My Estate and Be Equally Divided among the Remaining Except Cora Collier. "
(Warren Trest)

Martha married James Benett Truly .2

116. Solomon Newman,2,5 son of Jonathan Newman and Margaret , was born on 5 Sep 1788 in South Carolina 2 and died on 7 May 1837 in Franklin County, MS., at age 48.2

Solomon married Mary Ann Lowery 2 on 9 Sep 1809 in Amite County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Margaret Jane Newman (born on 1 Aug 1810 - died on 17 Nov 1851 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Elizabeth C. Newman (born about 1811 - died on 16 Nov 1851 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Susanna Newman (born on 21 Feb 1813 - died on 10 Aug 1828 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

         iv.   John Mccullum Newman (born in 1816)

          v.   Jonathan Purvis Newman (born on 6 Aug 1817 - died on 16 Oct 1887 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

58       vi.   Robert James Newman (born on 1 Jan 1819 Amite County, Mississippi - died on 2 Nov 1882 in Mississippi)

        vii.   Samuel Maxwell Newman (born on 30 Sep 1820 - died on 10 Apr 1864 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

       viii.   Joseph A. Newman (born on 18 Apr 1822 - died on 5 Sep 1835 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

         ix.   Mary C. Newman (born on 29 Jul 1824 - died on 15 Aug 1828 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

          x.   Sophronia R. Newman (born on 17 Apr 1827 - died on 10 Jul 1833 in Buried: Newman Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

         xi.   Martha Newman ()

        xii.   Dr. William Riley Newman (born on 2 Mar 1831 Eddiceton, Franklin, MS - died on 30 Apr 1897 in Union Church, Jefferson, MS)


117. Mary Ann Lowery,2,5 daughter of Robert Lowery and Penelope , was born on 21 Apr 1786 in South Carolina 2 and died on 14 Aug 1868 in Franklin County, MS., at age 82.2

Mary married Solomon Newman 2 on 9 Sep 1809 in Amite County, MS..2

118. Daniel McMillan 2,5,154 was born in Jul 1788 in Chesterfield District, South Carolina 2,155 and died on 13 Jan 1840 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 51.2

Daniel married Sarah Foster 2 on 29 Jun 1810 in Adams County, MS..2

Marriage Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

Mississippi
Adams County

Foster, Sally married Mcmillan, Daniel on 27 Jun 1810 in Adams County, Mississippi

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Caroline A. Mcmillan (born about 1814)

         ii.   Mastin (Martin) A Mcmillan (born about 1820 Mississippi - died on 13 Dec 1855 in Buried: Mcmillan Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Thomas L. Mcmillan (died on 3 May 1852 in Buried: Mcmillan Cemetery, Franklin County, MS.)

59       iv.   Martha Edna McMillan (born about 1823 Probably Franklin County, Mississpi - died about 1859 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

          v.   John C. Mcmillan (born about 1832 Mississippi)


119. Sarah Foster,2,5 daughter of Thomas Foster and Sarah Smith , was born on 1 Feb 1789 in Natchez District, Adams County, Mississippi 2 and died on 10 Apr 1852 in Franklin County, Mississippi, at age 63.2 Another name for Sarah was Sally.155

Sarah married Daniel McMillan 2,154 on 29 Jun 1810 in Adams County, MS..2

120. William Graves,2,5 son of Unknown and Unknown , was born about 1780 in South Carolina 2 and died before 11 Mar 1849 in Franklin County, MS..2

William Graves in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1820. 156 "The William Graves family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 45 as follows:

William Graves
1 male under 10 years of age
1 male betwen 26 and 45 years of age (William Graves would have been about 40 years old)

1 female between 16 and 26 years of age. (I will assume that this is his wife and put her birth year between 1804 and 1814).

He has the following slaves:

5 male slaves under 14 years of age
2 male slaves between 26 and 45 years of age
3 female slaves under 14 years of age
2 female slaves between 26 and 45 years of age."
(1820 US Census, Franklin COunty, Mississippi)
William Graves in 1830 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1830. 131 "The William Graves family is listed in the 1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, page 154 as follows:

William Graves
2 males under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
1 male between 40 and 50 years of age (William would have been near 50 years of age)

1 female between 5 and 10 years of age (this person is unkown since Sarah should have not been born yet)
1 female between 30 and 40 years of age

Their slaves are as follows:

1 male under 10 years of age
3 males between 10 and 24 years of age
2 males between 24 and 36 years of age

4 females under 10 years of age
4 females between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 24 and 26 years of age
2 females between 36 and 55 years of age."
(1830 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

William Graves in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1840. 132 "The William Graves family is listed in the 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

William Graves - 1 free white male under 5 years of age
1 male between 5 and 10 years of age
1 male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 10 and 30 years of age
1 male between 50 and 60 years of age

1 free white female under 5 years of age
1 female between 40 and 50 years of age."
(1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

William married Sarah Ford .2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   William J. Graves (died before Apr 1849 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Thomas F. Graves (born between 1820-1825 Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Franklin P. Graves ()

60       iv.   Osborne Bartlett Graves (born about 1827 Franklin County, MS. - died after 17 Mar 1852 in Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Sarah Caroline Graves (born about 1836 Mississippi - died after 1880 in Mississippi)

         vi.   John Quincy Adams Graves Sr. (born on 19 Feb 1839 Franklin County, MS. - died after 1900 in Franklin County, MS.)


121. Sarah Ford,2,5 daughter of Thomas Ford and Elizabeth , was born between 1804-1814 and died before Jul 1847.2

Sarah married William Graves .2

122. Elisha Corban,2,5 son of Stephen Corban and Rachel Hill , was born on 6 Apr 1805 in Corbandale, Montgomery County, TN. 2 and died in 1884 in Franklin County, MS., at age 79.2

Stephen Corban in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1820. 156 "The Stephen Corban family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Stephen Corban

1 free white male under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 10 and 16 years of age (Elisha Corban should have been about 15 years old at the time of the census)
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 26 years of age
1 free white male between 26 and 45 years of age (Stephen Corban should have been about 40 years old at the time of the census)

1 free white female under 16 years of age
1 free white female between 26 and 45 years of age (Rachel should have been about 34 years old at the time of the census)

3 persons engaged in Agriculture."
(1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Elisha Corban in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1840. 132 "The Elisha Corban family is listed in the 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Elisha Corban (spelled Corbin)
2 males under 5 years of age
1 male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 male between 30 and 40 years of age

2 females under 5 years of age
3 females between 5 and 10 years of age
1 female between 20 and 30 years of age.

Note: Mary Kinnison should have died by 1840 and Elisha has remarried Evilena Farr before 1840. The three females between 5 and 10 years of age should have been his children with Mary Kinnison. It is not known at this time who the male between 15 and 20 years of age is."
(1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Elisha Corban in 1850 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississppi, 3 Oct 1850. 84 "The Elisha Corban family is listed in the 1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, house 289 as follows:

Elisha Corban - age 45 - Farmer - value of real estate $3500 - born in Tennessee - can not read or write
Eveline D. - age (36?) - female - born in Mississippi (all other family born in Mississippi)
Sarah A. - age 18 - female
Robert - age 14 - male
Amelia - age 13 - female
John B. - age 12 - male
Mary E. - age 10 - female
Lucinda - age 9 - female
David - age 8 - male
(Ciero?) - age age 7 - male
Francis - age 5 - female
(Rohna?) - age 3 - female
Joseph - age 1 - male
James - age 4 moths - male."
(1850 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

• Census: 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Missippi, 1880. 49 "Elisha Corban is listed in the 1880 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Elisha CORBAN Self (Married) M (sex) Male W (age) 75 (born) TN (occupation) Farmer (father born in) TN (mother born in) TN
Louisa CORBAN Dau S Female W 15 MS Keeping House MS MS
Jane A. CORBAN Wife M Female W 45 MS Keeping House MS MS
Rebecca CORBAN Dau S Female W 13 MS MS MS
Lydia CORBAN Dau S Female W 11 MS MS MS
Alice CORBAN Dau S Female W 9 MS MS MS
Josephine CORBAN Dau S Female W 7 MS MS MS
Wade WHITTINGTON Other Male W 20 MS Farm Laborer MS MS
Victoria WHITTINGTON Other Female W 18 MS Farm Laborer MS MS"
(1880 US Census, Franklin COunty, Mississippi)

Elisha married Mary Ann Kinnison 2 about 1828 2.,157

Children from this marriage were:

61        i.   Eliza Jane Corban (born on 15 Nov 1830 Franklin County, MS. - died after 1900 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Sarah Ann Corban (born about 1832 Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Susan C. Corban (born on 31 Aug 1833 Franklin County, MS. - died on 9 May 1914 in Cleveland, MS)

Elisha next married Evelina Theodocia Farr ,2 daughter of Robert Farr and Mary Ann Kinnison , on 20 May 1835 in Adams County, MS.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Robert Farr Corban (born on 24 Feb 1836 Franklin County, MS - died on 7 Jun 1909 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Amelia Clarenda Corban (born about 1837 Franklin County, MS. - , died in Texas)

        iii.   John Burnes Corban (born on 10 Jan 1838 Franklin County, MS. - , died in Franklin County, MS.)

         iv.   Mary Ella Corban (born about 1840 Franklin County, MS.)

          v.   Lucinda J. Corban (born about 1841)

         vi.   David Washington Corban (born on 25 Mar 1842 Franklin County, MS. - died on 23 May 1917 in Franklin County, MS.)

        vii.   Stephen Cicero Corban (born on 10 Mar 1844 Franklin County, MS. - died on 14 Sep 1931 in Biloxi, MS.)

       viii.   Francis Corban (born about 1845 Franklin County, MS.)

         ix.   Roena E. Corban (born about 1847 Franklin County, MS.)

          x.   Joseph Elisha Corban (born about 1849 Franklin County, MS. - died on 9 Aug 1905 in Franklin County, MS.)

         xi.   James Monroe Corban (born on 5 Feb 1850 Franklin County, MS. - died on 20 Nov 1922 in Sharkey Co., MS.)

Elisha next married Susan M. Aldridge 2 on 24 Jul 1854 in Franklin County, MS..2

Elisha next married Catherine Jerome 2 on 3 Feb 1858.2

Elisha next married Julia Ann O'steen ,2 daughter of Gabriel O'steen and Tabitha , on 24 Dec 1861 in Franklin County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Louisia A.(Lou) Corban (born on 5 Sep 1862 Franklin County, MS. - died on 27 Feb 1953 in Amite County, MS.)

         ii.   Rebecca Corban (born about 1865)

        iii.   Lydia S. Corban (born about 1868)

         iv.   Alice O. Corban (born on 11 Apr 1871 Franklin County, MS. - died on 24 Jan 1936 in Amite County, MS.)

          v.   Sarah Josephine Corban (born about 1873)


123. Mary Ann Kinnison,2,5 daughter of John A. Kinnison and Susannah Guice , was born on 3 Mar 1815 in Mississippi 2 and died before 1835.2

Mary married Elisha Corban 2 about 1828 2.,157

124. Stephen Middleton 2.,5

Stephen married Dicey .2

Children from this marriage were:

62        i.   Levi Evans Middleton (born in 1808 Mississippi - died in Jan 1862 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Stephen Nicholas Middleton (born in 1809 South Carolina)


125. Dicey 2.,5

Dicey married Stephen Middleton .2

126. Malcolm Currie,2,5 son of Edward Currie and Elizabeth , was born on 12 Feb 1780 2 and died on 14 Aug 1868 in Mississippi, at age 88.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

DIED: 14 August 1863, Adams County, Ms. (J S.)

(1850 11 October, Franklin County, Ms. census, call 355/355, household of LEVI E. MIDDLETON , MALCOLM CURRIE, age 70 born Scotland.

<1860 census in house with Stephen N. MIDDLETON age 80 born United States


Malcolm Currie Head of House in Jefferson County in 1820

Orphans Court Jefferson County, Ms. 1830-1838 1831?
Currie-91
Alexander Currie -M Currie-martha-edward-isaac-rhoda-monroe-malcolm Currie 127, 371, 449, 467, 526=papers Not Found

*** All Data from History of Jersey Settlers)

1820 Jefferson County, Ms. Census//1 Male 16/18: 2 Males 16/26, 1 Male 26/45, 1 Female 10-16//1 Female 16/26/, 1 Female 26 (F)-45, 1 Female over 45

Malcolm married Rhoda Farrar 2 on 30 Jun 1808 in Adams County, MS..2

Children from this marriage were:

63        i.   Jane Farrar Currie (born on 22 Jun 1810 Jefferson County, Mississippi - died on 24 Jul 1859 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Alexander Currie ()

        iii.   Martha Currie (born about 1823 Franklin County, MS.)

         iv.   Edward Currie ()

          v.   Isaac Currie ()

         vi.   Eliza (Elizabeth) Currie ()


127. Rhoda Farrar,2,5 daughter of Alexander Farrar and Jane Davis , was born on 26 Apr 1791 in MS. 2 and died on 5 Dec 1831, at age 40.2

Rhoda married Malcolm Currie 2 on 30 Jun 1808 in Adams County, MS..2
picture

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136. John McGilvray 103 was born in 1760 102 and died in 1835, at age 75.102

Noted events in his life were:

• Heraldry: 158 "The MacGillivrays were a principal clan even before King Somerled drove the Norsemen from the western Isles. The Clann Mhic Gillebrath were dispersed after Alexander II subdued Argyll in 1222."
(Scotclan.com)

• Immigration: Scotland to America, 1803-1804. 102 "John and Sarah McGilvray, Alexander and Mary McGilvray, Murdock and Christian Mcleod & Daniel and Eleanor Smith all emigrated to America on the same ship ca 1803/1804. On the Isle of Skye, Sarah's surname was probably spelled the traditional way as Buchannon."
(Joyce McGilvray)

John married Sarah Buchannon 102,103 in 1788.102

Children from this marriage were:

68        i.   Alexander McGilvray (born about 1788 Isle of Skye, Scotland - died about 1871 in Runnelstown, Perry County, Mississippi)


137. Sarah Buchannon 102,103 was born in Isle of Skye, Scotland.102

Crest of the Buchanan 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Heraldry: 158 "Gaelic Name: Cononach
Motto: Clarior hinc honos (Hence the brighter honour)
Badge: Bilberry
Lands: Loch Lomond From Both-Charain (Canon's Seat)
Origin of Name: The Buchanan name has been grounded in the lands surrounding the shores of Loch Lomond since 1225, when a grant by the Earls of Lennox to Sir Absalon of Buchanan, referred to in contemporaneous sources as 'clericus meus' i.e. he was a clergyman."
(scotclan.com)
Buchanan Tartan 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Heraldry: Tartan of the Buchanan. "This is an example of the Tartan of the Buchanan clan."
(Warren G. Trest)

Sarah married John McGilvray 103 in 1788.102

138. Murdoch McLeod 103 was born in 1748 in Scotland.159

Noted events in his life were:

• Immigration: Scots in the Carolinas, 1802, North Carolina. 159 " McLeod, Murdoch:
Born in 1748. Emigrated to America in 1802. Settled in Richmond County, NC, with his wife and three children."
(DIrectory of Scots in the Carolinas 1680-1830, By David Dobson)

Murdoch married Christian McSwain .103

Children from this marriage were:

69        i.   Mary Elizabeth McLeod (born about 1794 Isle of Skye, Scotland - died before 1860 in Runnelstown, Perry County, Mississippi)


139. Christian McSwain .103 Another name for Christian was Christian McSwan.102

Christian married Murdoch McLeod .103

144. John Ferguson I,30 son of Robert Ferguson and Amelia Murray , was born in Scotland.30

John married Catherine Crawford .30

Children from this marriage were:

72        i.   Malcolm James Ferguson (born about 1750 Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland)


145. Catherine Crawford .30

Catherine married John Ferguson I .30

148. Archibald McGill,30 son of Allen McGill and MacCormick . Another name for Archibald was Archie McGill.

Archibald married Elizabeth Walker .21

Children from this marriage were:

74        i.   Angus McGill (born in 1758 Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland - died in 1820 in North Carolina)

         ii.   Allen McGill ()


149. Elizabeth Walker .21

Elizabeth married Archibald McGill .30

150. John Fairley,21 son of John Fairley and Watson , was born about 1717 in Argyleshire, Scotland,142,143 died on 4 Jul 1798 in Richmond County, North Carolina, about age 81,143 and was buried in Old Centre Presbyterian.

Noted events in his life were:

• County History: Richmond County, North Carolina. 160 "The difficulty of having to cross the Pee Dee River to get to Anson's county seat spurred the North Carolina Assembly to create Richmond county from Anson in 1779. The new county was named in honor of Charles Lennox, the Duke of Richmond and friend of the American colonies. He petitioned the House of Lords to grant the colonies their independence. The county seat was first known as Richmond Court House but was changed in 1784 to Rockingham. In February 1899, Scotland County was formed from part of Richmond County.

Richmond County is located in the south central section of the State and is bounded by (clockwise starting on the west side) Anson, Stanly, Montgomery, Moore, Hoke, Scotland Counties and the State of South Carolina. In SC, Richmond touches two counties: Marlboro and part of Chesterfield. Before the border between North and South Carolina was settled, a few folks who lived in the old Cheraw District (SC) were technically in what would become modern Richmond County."
(North Carolina WebGen Project)


John Fairley in 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina, 1790, Richmond County, North Carolina. 109 "There is a John Fairley that is listed in the 1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina. He is listed as having 2 males above 16 years old and 1 female above 16 years old. He is listed on the same page as John Ferguson and Angus McGill."
(1790 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina - Page 177)

• Will: Will of John Fairley, 1795, Richmond County, North Carolina. 161 "The will of John Fairley is found in Richmond County, NC, Records of Wills, Book 1, 1799-1830, page 110.
The will was dated 26 Aug 1795 and proved in Mar 1806 by Archibald Fairley.
Sons:
Archibald
Alexander
John (Jr.)
Daughters:
Ann (deceased, wife of Angus McGillis)
Mary

The will was signed "John Farley" and was witnessed by Alexander Fairley, John McKoy and Patrick McEachin. John Fairley, Jr., was appointed executor. The entire estate was left to son, John Fairley, Jr., with a token of two shillings to each other child or their representative."

"The will of Alexander Fairley, dated Dec 1827, states that he bought cows from the John Fairley estate."
(Rex McLaurin)

John married Lady Margaret Stuart 21 about 1747.143

Children from this marriage were:

75        i.   Anne Fairley (born 1765 or 1764 Granoch, Cantyre, Scotland - died before 1795 in North Carolina)

         ii.   Archibald Fairley ()

        iii.   Alexander Fairley ()

         iv.   Robert Fairley ()

          v.   John Fairley Jr. ()

         vi.   Mary Fairley ()


151. Lady Margaret Stuart 21 was born in 1719 in Argyleshire, Scotland 143,162 and died on 20 Aug 1781 in Richmond County, North Carolina, at age 62 143.,162 Another name for Margaret was Margaret Stewart.

Margaret married John Fairley 21 about 1747.143

152. Robert Scott Boyce,21 son of Nicholas Boyce and Lady Henrietta Scott , was born about 1756.21

Robert married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

76        i.   Robert Nicholas Boyce (born about 1780 Ireland)


160. Moses Miller Jr.,11 son of Moses Miller Sr. and Ann Jeffords , was born in 1752 in Berkeley County, South Carolina 11 and died on 25 Sep 1822, at age 70.11

Moses Miller Jr. in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Gerogetown County, South Carolina, 1790. "Moses Miller Jr. is listed in the 1790 US Census, Georgetown County, Prince George Parish, South Carolina as follows:

Moses Miller Junr.
1 free white male over 16 years of age
3 free white males under 16 years of age
3 free white females

14 slaves."
(1790 US Census, Georgetown County, South Carolina).
Moses Miller in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1810 US Census, Georgetown County, South Carolina, 1810. "There are 2 Moses Millers in the 1810 South Carolina census records. The assumption can be made by children and children age that our Moses Miller is the one in Georgetown County, S.C. He is listed as follows:

Moses Miller:

1 free white male between 16 and 25 years of age.
1 free white male between 16 and 44 years of age.
1 free white male above 45 years of age

1 free white female between 16 and 25 years of age.

2 slaves.

The other Moses Miller is in Williamsburg County, S.C. and is listed as follows:

1 free white male under 10 years of age.
1 free white male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white male between 26 and 44 years of age.

2 free white females under 10 years of age.
1 free white female between 10 and 15 years of age.
1 free white female between 26 and 44 years of age.

31 slaves.

Again, according to the ages of the children, I will assume that the Moses Miller in Georgetown County, S.C. is my ancestor."
(1810 US Census, South Carolian and Warren Graham Trest)

Moses married Mary Bennett .11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Ann Miller (born in 1789 Williamsburg County, South Carolina - died in 1837 in Williamsburg County, South Carolina)

         ii.   Stephen Miller (born in 1790 - died in 1836)

80      iii.   William Miller (born about 1792 - died in 1836)

Moses next married Unknown 11 about 1782.11 Unknown died between 1785-1788.11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Moses Miller (born in Georgetown District, South Carolina - , died in Winyah, South Carolina)

         ii.   Samuel Miller (born in 1783 Gerogetown District, South Carolina - died in 1827)


161. Mary Bennett .11

Mary married Moses Miller Jr. .11

188. Asael Barnes Farmer,163 son of Issac Farmer and Christian Barnes , was born about 1778 163 and died after 1820.122 Another name for Asael was Asial Farmer.

Issac Farmer in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1790. 164 "Issac Farmer is listed in the 1790 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Isaac Farmer
1 free white male under 16 years of age (Asael Barnes Farmer should have been the male under 16 years of age. He would have been about 12 years old).
4 free white males over 16 years of age

6 free white females

3 slaves."

Asael Farmer in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1800. 165 "Asael Farmer is listed in the 1800 US Census, Edgecombe County North Carolina as follows:

Asael Farmer
1 free white male under 10 years of age (Issac ?)
1 free white male between 26 and 44 years of age

1 free white female under 10 years of age (Augustine? - If so, her date of birth is incorrect)
1 free white female between 26 and 44 years of age

3 slaves."
(1800 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)


Asael Farmer in 1810 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1810 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1810. 166 "Asael Farmer is listed in the 1810 US Census, Edgecombe County North Carolina as follows:

Asael Farmer
3 free white male under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 26 and 44 years of age

1 free white female under 10 years of age
1 free white female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white female between 26 and 44 years of age

6 slaves.

It should be noted that Asael Farmer is listed on the same page as many Barnes and Coppages, so these families must have had close ties in Edgecombe County, North Carolina."
(1810 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)
Asael Farmer in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1820. 122 The Asael Farmer family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Caolina as follows:

Asael Farmer:

4 free white males under 10 years od age
1 free white male between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male 45 years of age and upwards

2 free white females under 10 years of age
1 free white female between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white female between 26 and 45 years of age

9 persons engaged in agriculture

Slaves:

2 males under 14 years of age
3 males between 14 and 26 years of age
2 males between 26 and 45 years of age

3 females under 14 years of age
2 females between 14 and 26 years of age
1 female betwen 26 and 45 years of age."
(1820 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

Asael married Charlotte Coppage .163

Children from this marriage were:

94        i.   Issac Farmer (born about 1800 Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

         ii.   Augustine Farmer (born about 1803)

        iii.   Elizabeth Farmer (born about 1807)

         iv.   John Farmer (born about 1809)

          v.   Wilmont Farmer ()

         vi.   Josiah Farmer (born about 1820)

        vii.   William Farmer (born about 1823)


189. Charlotte Coppage .163

Charlotte married Asael Barnes Farmer .163

192. Archibald Graham,42 son of Daniel Graham and Jennet Williamson , was born about 1735 in Iverary, Argyleshire, Scotland,42 died about 1810 in Richmond County, North Carolina, about age 75,42 and was buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, North Carolina.42

Archibald and Duncan Graham in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Migration: Migration to Richmond, County, North Carolina, Bef 1800. 110 "The Archibald Graham family must have migrated to Richmond County, North Carolina between 1790 and 1800. They do not show up in the 1790 census in Richmond County but do show up in the 1800 Richmond County census.


Archibald and Duncan Graham in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800, Richmond County, North Carolina. 110 "The Grahams in Richmond County, North Carolina in 1800 are as follows (all living near each other - 2 pages of the census records)

John Graham - 2 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (John should have been around 30 years old)
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

Archibald Graham (the father) - 1 male between 16 and 25 years of age
2 males between 16 and 44 years of age
1 male over 45 years of age (Archibald should have been about 65 years old)
2 females between 16 and 25 years of age and 1 female over 45 years of age. (This would not agree with the birthdate of Mary Baxter - she would have only been 41 yeas old).

Duncan Graham - 3 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (Duncan should have been about 35 years old)
2 females under 10 years of age and 1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

"Dugal" Graham - 1 male between 26 and 44 years of age (Dougald should have been about 36 years of age)
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 16 and 25 years of age

Mary Graham - 2 males under 10 years of age
1 male between 10 and 15 years of age
2 females under 10 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age (Mary should have been about 25 or 26 years of age)

John had 2 slaves
Archibald had 5 slaves
Duncan had 2 slaves
Dougald had 2 slaves."
(1800 US Census, Richmond County, North Carolina)

Archibald married Mary Baxter 42,123 about 1759 in Iverary, Argyleshire, Scotland.42

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   John Graham (born about 1760 Argyleshire, Scotland - died about 1835 in Richmond County, North Carolina)

         ii.   Daniel Graham (born about 1762 Argyleshire, Scotland - died about 1801 in Richmond County, North Carolina)

        iii.   Dougald Baxter Graham (born about 1764 Argyleshire, Scotland - died on 30 Sep 1835 in Autauga County, Alabama)

         iv.   Euphemia Graham (born on 25 Dec 1766 Inveraray, Argyllshire, Scotland - died on 27 Jul 1848 in Autauga County, Alabama)

96        v.   Duncan Baxter Graham (born about 1767 Inverary, Argyll, Scotland - died on 8 Aug 1846 in Telfair County, Georgia)

         vi.   Alexander Graham (born on 25 Dec 1769 Cumberland County, North Carolina - died on 15 Nov 1832 in Telfair County, Georgia)

        vii.   Mary Flora Graham (born about 1775 Richmond County, North Carolina)

       viii.   Isabel Graham (born about 1778 Richmond County, North Carolina - died after 1829)

         ix.   Archibald Graham (born about 1782 Richmond County, North Carolina - died before 1836 in Gadsden County, Florida)


193. Mary Baxter 42,123 was born about 1740 in Iverary, Argyleshire, Scotland,42 died after 1800 in Richmond County, North Carolina,42 and was buried in Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, North Carolina.42

Mary married Archibald Graham 42 about 1759 in Iverary, Argyleshire, Scotland.42

194. John Graham was born in Paisley, Renfreshire, Scotland and died in 1776 in Cumberland County, North Carolina.

Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: Schoolteacher. "He was educated at Twinork and came to America, arriving in 1756. He was suppose to be very intelligent. He was granted 200 acres on Stewarts Creek in Cumberland County, N.C. (now Hamett County). He is suppose to have built the first shoolhouse in Hamett County, N.C. in 1756 and had a passion for teaching. In 1757, he moved to the head of the Rockfish Creek near Aberdeen and then to Longstreet. He moved to the area where the Pee Dee and Cane Creek Roads meet."
(Clan Graham Geneology)

John married Elizabeth Smylie about 1740 in Argyleshire, Scotland.

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Major Archibald Graham ()

97       ii.   Elizabeth Graham (born in Scotland - died in 1818)


195. Elizabeth Smylie .

Elizabeth married John Graham about 1740 in Argyleshire, Scotland.

208. Benjamin Bufkin 94 died after 1800 in Horry County, South Carolina 94.,149

Benjamin and Josiah Bufkin in 1790 Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Prince Gerorge Parish, South Carolina, 1790. 149 "Benjamin Bufkin and Josiah Bufkin are found in the 1790 US Census is Prince George Parish, South Carolina. The family names are spelled by the census taker as BUFKING. The families are listed as follows:

Benjamin Bufking - 2 free white males 16 years or older
1 free white male under 16 years old
6 free white females.

Josiah Bufking - 1 free white male 16 years or older
1 free white male under 16 years old
2 free white females."
(1790 US Census, Prince George Parish, South Carolina)
Benjamin Bunfkin in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 Kingston County, South Carolina, 1800. 150 "There are 3 Bufkin families living near each other in the 1800 US Census, Kingston County, South Carolina. The name is spelled by the census taker as BUFKING. The families are as follows:

Josiah Bufking - 3 males under 10
3 males 10 to 15 years of age
1 male 26 to 44 years of age. (Josiah should have been about 34 years old in 1800)
1 female between 10 and 15 years old
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age.

Benjamin Bufking - 1 male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 male between 16 and 25 years of age
1 male 45 years or older (This would have been Josiah's father)
3 females between 10 and 15 years of age
1 female between 16 and 25 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age

John Bufking (this is assumed to be a brother to Josiah)
1 male under 10 years of age
1 male between 26 and 44 years of age
1 female under 10 years of age
1 female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 female between 26 and 44 years of age."
(1800 US Census, Kingston County, South Carolina)

• History of Horry County, South Carolina: "Horry County was named for Revolutionary War hero Peter Horry (1743-1815). The county was originally a part of Georgetown District, and at one time it was called Kingston. It became a separate county in 1801, with the county seat at Conway.

This area of the state was isolated for many years by numerous rivers and swamps, and the inhabitants sometimes referred to themselves as the "Independent Republic of Horry." Lumber and naval stores were the primary industries during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, with tobacco farming being introduced later. In the twentieth century tourism has come to dominate the coastal section of the county centered around Myrtle Beach."

• Cemetery: "According to the Horry County Genweb, there is a Buffkin Cemetery and is located on Highway 33, just before reaching the NC state line."

• Bufkin Family History: "The book, "Antioch Baptist Church, 175 Years, 1824-1999" tells the story:
"Family tradition tells that 3 brothers of Norwegian descent, set out from South Carolina in the early nine-teenth century to explore and find new country in which to claim a homestead in the vast wilderness of the "Great Southwest". The spelling of these brothers names at that time was Buffking or Buffkin. Later we find that some letters were dropped and is now spelled Bufkin.

One brother stopped in the area of Jasper Co, another went back to West Virginia, and the third brother settled in what is now the Antioch Community of Copiah Co Mississippi."
(Bufkins of Mississippi History)

"The three brothers must have been Josiah, John and Francis"
(Warren Graham Trest)

Benjamin married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

104       i.   Josiah Bufkin (born about 1766 South Carolina - died about 1830 in Perry County, Mississippi)

         ii.   John Bufkin (born before 1774)

        iii.   Francis Bufkin (born before 1785)


224. Isaac H. Collier Sr.,2,5 son of Isaac Collier and Ann Vines , was born about 1740 in Brunswick County, VA. 2 and died before 1803 in Adams County, MS..2

Noted events in his life were:

• Land: "They moved from Brunswick County, Va. to Bute County, NC to an area which later became Warren County, NC on 23 Feb. 1775 where they bought two tracts of land from Thomas Bell. (Deed book 5, apge 250 Warren County, NC) They sold one of those tracts on 8 Nov. 1777 to Lewis Hill (Deed book 6, page 216) and the other tract to Hugh Hays on 3 Aug. 1785 )Deed book 9, page 172) On 21 Sept. 1785, Isaac Colier bought 300 acres in Franklin County, NC from Christopher Strothers where they lived until 1793. We find him next in records in Natchez District, Adams County, Ms. where his will was probated in 1803. 8 children."

Submitter(s):
W. HAROLD COLLIER Microfilm:
615 RAY ANDRA Submission: AF96-114701
DE SOTO TX
USA 75115

Isaac married Frances Seawell .2

Children from this marriage were:

112       i.   Isaac H. Collier Jr. (born in Virginia - died before Dec 1816 in Jefferson County, Mississippi)


225. Frances Seawell 2,5 was born in 1744 in Poto Bello, Brunswick, Virginia 2.,167

Frances married Isaac H. Collier Sr. .2

227. Elizabeth Holt 2.,5

Elizabeth married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

113       i.   Sarah Truly (born in Jefferson County, MS. - died on 25 Dec 1817)


230. Francis Smith .151

Francis married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

115       i.   Martha Smith (born on 17 Mar 1798 Mississippi - died on 27 Oct 1855 in Fayette, Jefferson County, Mississippi)


232. Jonathan Newman 2,5 died in 1823 in Amite County, MS..2

Jonathan married Margaret .2

Children from this marriage were:

116       i.   Solomon Newman (born on 5 Sep 1788 South Carolina - died on 7 May 1837 in Franklin County, MS.)


233. Margaret 2.,5

Margaret married Jonathan Newman .2

234. Robert Lowery 2,5 was born in 1752 in South Carolina 2 and died in 1813 in Amite County, MS., at age 61.2

Robert married Penelope .2

Children from this marriage were:

117       i.   Mary Ann Lowery (born on 21 Apr 1786 South Carolina - died on 14 Aug 1868 in Franklin County, MS.)


235. Penelope 2.,5

Penelope married Robert Lowery .2

238. Thomas Foster,2,5 son of William James Foster and Mary Smith , was born on 19 Sep 1762 in Fairfax County, Virginia 2,168 and died on 30 Sep 1829 in Adams County, Mississippi, at age 67 2.,169

Noted events in his life were:

• Tobacco Records: Spanish Tobacco Records of Mississippi, 1790. "In the following report, Thomas Foster is shown in 1790 as planting 8,000 pounds of Tobacco."

"This report contains translations of materials from the Spanish Archives now in the Bancroft Library at Berkley, all concerned with Spain in the MS Valley, 1765-1794.

A letter from Carlos de Grand Pre, Natchez, March 2, 1790, to Governor Don Estavan Miro, enclosed statement of tobacco produced by growers of Natchez, according to the settlers own statements, in 1790. The name of each planter is listed with number of pounds of tobacco reported.The spelling of names is often SPANISH or a PHONETIC spelling of the same.

FOSTER, JOHN - 2,000
FOSTER, JAMES - 5,000
FOSTER, WILLIAM - 6,000
FOSTER, THOMAS - 8,000"

• Census: 1792 Spanish Census, 1792. "Thomas Foster is shown in the 1792 Spanish Census as living in the District of Santa Catalina."
(1792 Spanish Census of Mississippi Teritory)

Thomas Foster in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi, 1820. 170 "Thomas Foster is listed in the 1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi as follows:

1 free white male between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male between 18 and 26 years of age
1 free white male 45 years of age or older

1 free white female between 10 and 16 years of age
1 free white female between 16 and 26 years of age
2 free white females 45 years of age or older

2 people engaged in agriculture.

He has he following slaves:

19 males under 14 years of age
9 males between 14 and 26 years of age
16 males between 26 and 45 years of age
2 males 45 years of age or older

18 females under 14 years of age
10 females between 14 and 26 years of age
11 females between 26 and 45 years of age
2 females 45 years of age or older."
(1820 US Census, Adams County, Mississippi)

• Tombstone: "Thomas Foster is buried in what is known as the Foster-Speed cemetery (since the only two tombstones are of him and his daughter Cassandra Foster Speed.

The remains of the family burial ground of Thomas Foster of the "Fosters Mound" Foster's. He was the owner of Ibrahima or Prince as he was called here.
Mrs. Jeff Lambdin told Mrs. L.R. McGehee many years ago that other monuments had been removed for use as door steps etc. Mrs. Lambdin's father had torn down the old Foster house and built the present dwelling which is now the home of Mr. & Mrs. Dalton Brown. The monuments are on the grounds of the Brown's home.

Adjacent to the steam plant on Steam Plant Road. Between Fosters Mound Road and Pine Ridge Road.

Sec. 12, T7N, R3W.
Reported by Mrs L. R. McGehee, Route 6, Box 223, Natchez, Mississippi.

THOMAS FOSTER, who was born on the 19th day of September 1762. He lived in the discharge of all the duties of social order and exemplified through life the character of the doer of god and was removed from the bosom of his family to that of his God on the last day of September, 1829.

CASSANDRA SPEED, late consort of John Speed and daughter of Thomas Foster native of Adams Co. Mississippi who departed this life on the 21st March 1831 in the 44th year of her age and is now gone to enjoy in Heaven an eternity of increasing Blessings and Glory."
(Nathezbelle.org)

Thomas married Sarah Smith .2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Cassandra Foster (born about 1787 - died on 21 Mar 1831)

119      ii.   Sarah Foster (born on 1 Feb 1789 Natchez District, Adams County, Mississippi - died on 10 Apr 1852 in Franklin County, Mississippi)

        iii.   Ellen Foster ()

         iv.   Levi Foster ()

          v.   Nancy Foster ()

         vi.   Francis Ann Foster ()

        vii.   Elizabeth Foster ()

       viii.   Thomas Foster ()

         ix.   Barbara Foster ()

          x.   James Foster ()

         xi.   Caroline Foster ()

        xii.   Issac H. Foster ()


239. Sarah Smith,2,5 daughter of Zachariah Smith and Frances Prestwood , was born on 22 Jun 1768 2 and died in 1837 in Adams County, Mississippi, at age 69.2

Sarah married Thomas Foster .2

242. Thomas Ford 2,5 was born before 1775 2 and died before 8 Nov 1827.2

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: "14 July 1789---THOMAS FORD indebted to JUAN GIRAULT for $47.00, binding self and estate. THOMAS (X) FORD. (McBee's Court Records, page 143, book D, page 68)

30 March 1798--Land grant to 640 acres on Homochitto River by occupancy. Entered 1 September 1806, certificate number 25, volume 4, page 26. Land next to SAMUEL RATCLIFFE.(from "LAND CLAIMS IN THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY" page 803)

3 March 1803---Franklin County, Ms. Original entry book, United States to THOMAS FORD, all land in section 42, township 7, range 2.

27 August 1804-Witness to sale of land by ALEXANDER MACGRAW to WILLIAM KINNISON. The other witness was SAMUEL BOYD. (McBee's Court Records, page 378, land claims page 102-103-clain number 314)

4 March 1804---Claim by SAM BOYD for land on Morgan's Fork. The land adjoining WM. KINNISON and THOMAS FORD. (McBee's Court Records page 516, unrecorded land claims).

24 March 1804--Claim by THOMAS HILL. This land claimed 1st by THOMAS MORGAN and transferred to THOMAS FORD who transferred it to THOMAS HILL. (McBee's Court Records, page 538, unrecorded land claims, Claim #1066)"
(Barbara Celotto)

Thomas married Elizabeth .2

Children from this marriage were:

121       i.   Sarah Ford (born between 1804-1814 - died before Jul 1847)

         ii.   John S. Ford ()

        iii.   Thomas J. Ford ()

         iv.   Abjah Ford ()

          v.   Philip Ford ()

         vi.   Elizabeth A. Ford ()

        vii.   Burshably Ford ()

       viii.   Samuel Ford ()

         ix.   Stephen M. Ford ()

          x.   Mary Ford ()


243. Elizabeth 2,5 died before 14 Dec 1848 in Franklin County, MS..2

Noted events in her life were:

• General Information: "ELIZABETH WIDOW OF THOMAS FORD ESTATE NOVEMBER 1848 ALSO SHOW STEPHEN M FORD HEIR OF ELIZABETH FORD 20 JULY 1848
SHE WAS IN 1840 CENSUS 60-70-YEARS OLD."
(Barbara Celotto)

Elizabeth married Thomas Ford .2

244. Stephen Corban,2,5 son of William Corban and Mary (Corban) , was born in 1780 in Halifax County, North Carolina 2 and died on 14 Oct 1851 in Franklin County, MS., at age 71.2

Stephen Corban in 1820 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in his life were:

• Census: 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1820. 156 "The Stephen Corban family is listed in the 1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Stephen Corban

1 free white male under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 10 and 16 years of age (Elisha Corban should have been about 15 years old at the time of the census)
1 free white male between 16 and 18 years of age
1 free white male between 16 and 26 years of age
1 free white male between 26 and 45 years of age (Stephen Corban should have been about 40 years old at the time of the census)

1 free white female under 16 years of age
1 free white female between 26 and 45 years of age (Rachel should have been about 34 years old at the time of the census)

3 persons engaged in Agriculture."
(1820 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)
Stephen Corban in 1840 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi, 1840. 132 "The Stephen Corban family (spelled Corbin in census) is listed in the 1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi as follows:

Stephen Corban (Corbin)

1 free white male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white male between 15 and 20 years of age
1 free white male between 20 and 30 years of age
1 free white male between 50 and 60 years of age (Stephen would have been about 60 years old at the time of the census)

1 free white female between 5 and 10 years of age
1 free white female between 50 and 60 years of age

Slaves:
2 males under 10 years of age
4 males between 10 and 24 years of age
1 male between 24 and 35 years of age
1 male between 36 and 55 years of age

3 females under 10 years of age
3 females between 10 and 24 years of age
1 female between 24 and 35 years of age
1 female between 56 and 100 years of age

22 Total

10 employed in Agriculture."
(1840 US Census, Franklin County, Mississippi)

"William Graves is 3 houses down from Stephen Corban. Stepen Corban's grand-daughter will marry William Grave's son in 1846."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Stephen married Rachel Hill .2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   William Corban (born on 5 Sep 1802 Montgomery County, TN - , died in Franklin County, MS.)

         ii.   Margaret Corban (born about 1803 Tennessee)

122     iii.   Elisha Corban (born on 6 Apr 1805 Corbandale, Montgomery County, TN. - died in 1884 in Franklin County, MS.)

         iv.   Rosanna Corban (born on 11 Sep 1806 Montgomery County, TN - died on 5 Mar 1877 in Jefferson County, MS)

          v.   Robert Corban (born about 1809 Montgomery Co., TN)

         vi.   Lucinda J. Corban (born on 27 Jun 1812 Montgomery County, TN - died on 17 Jul 1887 in Miami, Montgomery, Ohio.)

        vii.   Lydia Corban (born on 14 Oct 1814 Franklin County, Mississippi - , died in Mississippi)

       viii.   Charnel Corban (born on 16 Sep 1819 Franklin Co., MS - , died in Franklin County, MS.)

         ix.   Thomas H. Corban (born in 1822 Franklin County, MS - , died in Franklin County, MS.)

          x.   Stephen M. Corban (born in 1828 Franklin County, MS. - , died in Louisiana)


245. Rachel Hill,2,5 daughter of Thomas Hill and Jane Wells , was born about 1786 in South Carolina 2 and died in 1852 in Franklin County, MS., about age 66.2

Rachel married Stephen Corban .2

246. John A. Kinnison,2,5 son of Nathaniel Kinnison and Priscillia Guice , was born on 25 Dec 1781 in Opalusas Parish, La. 2 and died after 1880 in Franklin County, MS..2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

Found on 1870 Census Age 88

John married Susannah Guice 2 on 21 Jul 1803.2

Children from this marriage were:

123       i.   Mary Ann Kinnison (born on 3 Mar 1815 Mississippi - died before 1835)

John next married Susanna Guice ,2 daughter of Abram L. Guice and Cynthia C. Kinnison , on 21 Jul 1803 in Mississippi Territory, Adams County, MS..2 Susanna was born on 4 Sep 1783 in Tennessee 2 and died in Oct 1880 in Franklin County, MS., at age 97.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Robert F. Kinnison (born on 25 Aug 1805 - died on 15 Aug 1818)

         ii.   Abijah F. Kinnison (born on 5 Dec 1806 - died on 30 May 1887)

        iii.   Anna 'Mina' S. Kinnison (born on 21 Dec 1808)

         iv.   Sarah J. Kinnison (born on 13 Sep 1810)

          v.   Priscilla R. Kinnison (born on 16 Apr 1812)

         vi.   Susan (Susannah) C. Kinnison (born on 11 Oct 1813 - died in Sep 1887)

        vii.   Elijah I. (J) Kinnison (born on 23 Nov 1816)

       viii.   Ephraim G. Kinnison (born on 28 Mar 1819 - died before Feb 1863)

         ix.   Rebecca E. Kinnison (born on 1 Oct 1821 - died on 5 Nov 1863)

          x.   Hannah E. (L) Kinnison (born on 24 Mar 1824)

         xi.   John A. Kinnison (born on 11 Sep 1826)

        xii.   Martha 'Patsy' Guice (died after 1880)


247. Susannah Guice,2,5 daughter of Abram L. Guice and Ann Stump , was born on 4 Sep 1783 in N. 2 and died in Oct 1880 in Franklin County, MS., at age 97.2

Susannah married John A. Kinnison 2 on 21 Jul 1803.2

252. Edward Currie,2,5 son of Malcolm Currie and Unknown , was born about 1748 in Surrey County, NC. 2 and died on 11 Nov 1841 in Jefferson County, MS., about age 93.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

MILITARY SERVICE: Private, North Carolina Militia,

SOURCE OF ABOVE DATA: HAZEL SHORT DATA AND -JERSEY SETTLERS VOLUME 2 PAGE 359

EDWARD SERVED ON THE COMMITTEE OF SAFETY OF SURREY COUNTY, N.C. AND WAS A PRIVATE IN THE NORTH CAROLINA MILITIA

WPA, JEFFERSON COUNTY, MS. The Currie's were early settlers of Buie Community which is now Union Church, Ms. Most were Presbyterian.

Edward married Elizabeth .2

Children from this marriage were:

126       i.   Malcolm Currie (born on 12 Feb 1780 - died on 14 Aug 1868 in Mississippi)

         ii.   Jeanette Currie (born about 1776)

        iii.   Daughter Currie ()

         iv.   Archibald Currie (born in 1781 - died in 1857)

          v.   John Currie ()

         vi.   Edward Currie ()


253. Elizabeth 2,5 was born about 1745 in Scotland 2 and died on 21 May 1838 in Jefferson County, MS., about age 93.2

Elizabeth married Edward Currie .2

254. Alexander Farrar 2,5 was born on 29 Feb 1764 in VA. 2 and died on 25 May 1832 in Adams County, MS., at age 68.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

Other Wives: Sarah Chaney ( Died in Childbirth 4 September 1832, Widow with 2 Children, of William Wilds, Daughter of William Chaney, K. Ott's Gr Gr Grfather

Estate Papers in Natchez Ms. Hadksy

Alexander married Jane Davis 2 on 20 Aug 1785.2

Children from this marriage were:

127       i.   Rhoda Farrar (born on 26 Apr 1791 MS. - died on 5 Dec 1831)

         ii.   Daniel Farrar (born on 23 May 1786 Moss Grove, Adams County, MS. - died on 9 Sep 1845 in Kingston, Adams County, MS.)

        iii.   Elizabeth Ann (Eliza) Farrar (born on 18 May 1789 - died in Oct 1839)

         iv.   Alexander Farrar Jr. (born on 30 Apr 1794)

          v.   Alice Farrar (born on 17 Sep 1786 - died on 20 Sep 1852)

         vi.   Jane Farrar (born on 20 Jun 1802 - died on 11 Oct 1857)


255. Jane Davis 2,5 was born on 10 Jun 1760 2 and died on 21 Feb 1821 in Adams County, MS., at age 60.2

Jane married Alexander Farrar 2 on 20 Aug 1785.2
picture

previous  Ninth Generation  next




288. Robert Ferguson 21 was born in 1680 and died in 1724, at age 44.21

Robert married Amelia Murray 21 about 1703.21

Children from this marriage were:

144       i.   John Ferguson I (born in Scotland)


289. Amelia Murray 21 was born about 1685 21 and died about 1726, about age 41.21

Amelia married Robert Ferguson 21 about 1703.21

296. Allen McGill .30

Allen married MacCormick .21

Children from this marriage were:

148       i.   Archibald McGill ()


297. MacCormick .21

MacCormick married Allen McGill .30

300. John Fairley .21

John married Watson .21

Children from this marriage were:

150       i.   John Fairley (born about 1717 Argyleshire, Scotland - died on 4 Jul 1798 in Richmond County, North Carolina)


301. Watson .21

Watson married John Fairley .21

304. Nicholas Boyce 21 was born about 1730.21

Nicholas married Lady Henrietta Scott .21

Children from this marriage were:

152       i.   Robert Scott Boyce (born about 1756)


305. Lady Henrietta Scott,21 daughter of Maj. Gen. Lord Henry Scott and Mary Howard .

Henrietta married Nicholas Boyce .21
Moses Miller Sr. 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

320. Moses Miller Sr.,11 son of Moses Mounier and Mary , was born in 1715 in Atlantic Ocean, en route from France to America 11 and died in 1792 in South Carolina, at age 77 11.,171

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: 1715-1749. 11 "Moses Miller (ca. 1715 - 1792). According to Bible records of his granddaughter in Winston County, Mississippi, he was born on the Atlantic en route to America. He was the son of Moses Mounier.

In 1747, he married Ann Jeffords. Ann Jeffords was the daughter of John Jeffords, planter of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, and his wife Margaret. She was the sister of John and Daniel Jeffords. (NOTE: John would marry Moses Miller's sister Magdalene). Moses Miller was named in the will of John Jeffords, 1750, as executor.

In 1749, Moses Miller was one of the appraisers of the property of his uncle, Estienne Mournier."
(The Hugeunot Millers)

• Lease and Release: 5 May 1755. 172 "In 1755, Moses Miller and wife, Ann Jeffords, executed a document called Lease and Release to Robert Collins. In Lease and Release, the owner leases the land for a token sum to the receiver for one year, which gives the receiver possession of the land. The Release, often signed the next day, is an indenture between owner and lesee, transferring ownership of the tract for a specified sum.

MOSES MILLER AND WIFE ANN

To lease for one year

ROBERT COLLINS

Moses Miller and wife Ann lease for one year 1755 - Moses and wife of Berkeley County, planter, to Robert Collins, merchant, all that tract of land and plantation containing 63 acres in Berkely butting and bounding as is occupied by the said grant butt and bound on the east side of the eastward branch of Cooper River according to said grant which was in error and mistake to the true butting and bounding of said land which otherwise butts and bounds on a Branch that makes out of the Eastern Branch of Cooper River - known and distinguished by (?) Dutart, deceased, and northeast to land of Peter Robert, now property of Peter Bonneau Heirs. Lease for one year.

Signed:
Moses Miller
Ann Miller

Witness:
John Holmes
Joseph Dell

Recorded May 5, 1755"
(Moses Miller and wife Ann to Robert Collins, Records of Charleston County, S.C., Book PP, Page 481)

• Lease and Release: 1755. 172 "MOSES MILLER AND WIFE ANN OF ST. THOMAS and ST. DENNIS

To Release: ROBERT COLINS

Whereas King Charles II by letter patent 11 day of July, 1773, by Robert Johnson Governor did give and grant to Moses Monier, father of the above Moses Miller (Miller in English being the same as Monier in French) - land 63 acres described as in lease to said Collins - reserving to the King all white pine trees and 1/10 mines, silver and gold, being in Berkely County...consideration 100 pounds. And whereas the said Moses Monier, sometime on or about the 4th day of October of his Lord 1740 departed this life and whereas the said Moses Monier died intestate the said tract of land 63 acres did descend unto Moses Miller, as elsest son and heir at law of the said Moses Monier his father.

Signed:

Moses Miller
Ann Miller"
(Moses Miller and wife Ann to Robert Collins, Records of Charleston County, S.C., Book PP, Page 481)

"So it was, that in 1755, Moses Miller, along with other of his Huguenot comrades, pushed into that vast area of unidentified borders north of the Santee called Craven County, where he was to spend the rest of his life."
(The Huguento Millers)
Moses Miller in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1790 US Census, Georgetown County, South Carolina, 1790. 149 "Moses Miller Sr. is listed in the 1790 US Census, Georgetown County, Prince George Parish, South Carolina as follows:

Moses Miller:

2 free white males over 16 years of age.
2 free white females

45 slaves"
(1790 US Census, Georgetown County, South Carolina)

• Death of Children: 1,11 "The only child of Moses Miller and Ann Jeffords that lived to be married was Moses Miller Jr. Ann died young, Mary died at the age of 23 and was never married and Magdalene died when she was 2 years old. Deaths at a young age would plague my branch of the Miller family for generations."
(Warren Graham Trest)

Moses married Ann Jeffords .11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Ann Miller (born in 1749 Berkeley County, South Carolina)

160      ii.   Moses Miller Jr. (born in 1752 Berkeley County, South Carolina - died on 25 Sep 1822)

        iii.   Mary Miller (born in 1757 Berkeley County, South Carolina - died in 1780)

         iv.   Magdalene Miller (born in 1761 - died in 1763)

Moses next married Ann Potts .11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Sarah Miller ()

         ii.   Stephen Miller ()


321. Ann Jeffords,11 daughter of John Jeffords and Margaret , was born in Berkeley County, South Carolina 11 and died between 1761-1765 in Georgetown District, South Carolina.11

Ann married Moses Miller Sr. .11

376. Issac Farmer,163 son of Issac Farmer and Elizabeth Braswell , was born about 1748 in North Carolina 163 and died before 1805 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina 165.,173

Noted events in his life were:

• Military: Revolutionary War, North Carolina. 141 The DAR Lookup Service forwarded the following:

A search of our Patriot Index provided the information found below.

FARMER Jr, Isaac
Birth: NC Circa 1748
Rank: PS
Service: NC
Death: NC Before (ante) 2- -1805
Patriot Pensioned: No
Widow Pensioned: No
Children Pensioned: No
Heirs Pensioned: No
Spouse: (1) Christian Barnes
Spouse: (2) Elizabeth X "
(DAR Records)


Issac Farmer in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1790 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1790. 164 "Issac Farmer is listed in the 1790 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Isaac Farmer
1 free white male under 16 years of age
4 free white males over 16 years of age

6 free white females

3 slaves."
(1790 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)
Issac Farmer Sr. in 1800 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

• Census: 1800 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1800. 165 "Issac Farmer is listed in the 1800 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina as follows:

Issac Farmer
1 free white male under 10 years of age
1 free white male between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white male 45 years of age or older

3 free white females under 10 years of age
1 free white female between 10 and 15 years of age
1 free white female between 16 and 44 years of age.

10 slaves."
(1800 US Census, Edgecombe County, North Carolina)

Issac married Christian Barnes 141.,163

Children from this marriage were:

188       i.   Asael Barnes Farmer (born about 1778 - died after 1820)

Issac next married Elizabeth .141


377. Christian Barnes,141,163 daughter of John Barnes and Christian , was born about 1748.163

Christian married Issac Farmer .163

384. Daniel Graham,42 son of John Graham and Unknown , was born about 1708 in Knapsdale Parish, Argyleshire, Scotland 42,123 and died about 1750 in Scotland, about age 42.42 Other names for Daniel were Dhual 42, Donald, and White Donald.

Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: Shoemaker. "His occupation was that of a shoemaker. He was known to the Argylshire Gael as "Dhanl Bane" or "White Donald" (because of his hair color) and they always added "The Shoe Maker" to the end of his title."

• Notes on Daniel Graham: "According to the Clan Graham's Geneologist, the following notes were sent:

Daniel's name was Dhual. "He was a man of tremendous strength and physical power and a perfect rusher with his fists", according to a letter from Dougald Graham in 1847.

He was white headed and always known amongst the Argylshire Gael as "Dhanl Bane" or White Donald, and "The Shoe Maker" was always added to the end.

The letter from Dougald Graham states that Daniel flogged an Italian Prize Fighter when he was traveling through the area. According to Dougald, this story was told by his father and Allen McLean."
(Clan Graham Geneology)

Daniel married Jennet Williamson 42,123 about 1728 in Scotland.42

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Isabel Graham (born about 1730 Scotland)

192      ii.   Archibald Graham (born about 1735 Iverary, Argyleshire, Scotland - died about 1810 in Richmond County, North Carolina)

        iii.   Graham ()


385. Jennet Williamson 42,123 was born about 1710 in Scotland 42 and died after 1738 in Scotland.42 Other names for Jennet were Jane 42, and Janet.

Jennet married Daniel Graham 42 about 1728 in Scotland.42

448. Isaac Collier,2,5 son of Charles Collier and Judith Myhill , died in 1771 in Brunswich County, VA..2

Noted events in his life were:

• Will: 8 Jul 1771. "His will was written in Brunswick County, Va. (Will book A page 101) date 8 July 1771 and probated on 28 Oct. 1771.
8 children"

(Barbara Celotto)

Isaac married Ann Vines .2

Children from this marriage were:

224       i.   Isaac H. Collier Sr. (born about 1740 Brunswick County, VA. - died before 1803 in Adams County, MS.)


449. Ann Vines,2,5 daughter of Thomas Vines and Mary Hill , died after 1771.2

Ann married Isaac Collier .2

476. William James Foster 2,5 was born in 1724 in South Carolina 168 and died before 1784.2

William married Mary Smith 2.,168

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   James Foster (born on 2 Aug 1752 - died on 14 Nov 1835)

         ii.   William Foster (born about 1760 - died on 12 Jul 1834 in Mississippi)

238     iii.   Thomas Foster (born on 19 Sep 1762 Fairfax County, Virginia - died on 30 Sep 1829 in Adams County, Mississippi)

         iv.   Nancy Foster ()

          v.   John Foster ()

         vi.   Moses Foster (born in 1775 South Carolina)


477. Mary Smith 2,5,168 was born about 1727 in Abbeville, South Carolina 2,169 and died in 1819 in Adams County, MS., about age 92 2.,169

Mary Foster in 1790 US Census 
(Click on Picture to View Full Size)

Noted events in her life were:

• Census: 1790 US Census, Abbeville, South Carolina, 1790. 174 "There is a Mary Foster listed in the 1790 US Census, Abbeville, South Carolina as follows:

3 free white males 16 years of age or older
2 free white males under 16 years of age
3 free white females"
(1790 US Census, Abbeville, South Carolina)

• Migration: South Carolina to Mississippi. "If this is the same Mary Foster in Abbeville District, South Carolina in the 1790 census, her eldest male children must have already migrated to Mississippi (since they show up in 1790 tobacco records by then). She must have migrated later to be live with her sons in Adams County, Mississippi and is buried there according to her tombstone."
(Warren Trest)

• Tombstone: "Sacred To The Memory Of Mrs. Mary Foster
Aged 92 Years, 1819"

"She is buried in the Foster Cemetery, Adams County, Mississippi.
CEMETERY IN PRETTY LOCATION AS YOU ENTER IT FROM FOSTER'S MOUND, BUT OF COURSE NOT WELL KEPT. BROKEN STONES, PARTLY FENCED, ACROSS FROM FOSTER'S MOUND. "
(Natchezbelle.org)

Mary married William James Foster .2

478. Zachariah Smith 2,5,175 was born on 19 Apr 1734.2

Zachariah married Frances Prestwood 2,168,175 on 1 Sep 1756.2

Children from this marriage were:

239       i.   Sarah Smith (born on 22 Jun 1768 - died in 1837 in Adams County, Mississippi)

         ii.   Zacharia Smith (born on 16 Jan 1770 - died on 28 Nov 1830)


479. Frances Prestwood 2,5,168,175 was born on 27 Mar 1741 in Virginia 168.,175

Frances married Zachariah Smith 2,175 on 1 Sep 1756.2

488. William Corban,2,5 son of Mathuel Corbin and Unknown , was born on 7 Feb 1751 in Halifax County, NC 2 and died on 1 Jan 1826 in Montgomery County, TN., at age 74.2

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information:
"WILLIAM CORBAN, born 1775 or before (1750-1760 jlg), died 10 January 1826 (jlg)/1828, Montgomery County, Tn., married before 1780 to Mary."
(Barbara Celotto)

William married Mary (Corban) 2 in Halifax County, NC.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   William Corban Jr. (born about 1775 Halifax Co., NC - died before Feb 1786 in Halifax County, N. C.)

244      ii.   Stephen Corban (born in 1780 Halifax County, North Carolina - died on 14 Oct 1851 in Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Lydia (Lidie) Corban (born on 25 Dec 1785 Halifax County, N. C. - died after 1860 in Mississippi)

         iv.   Patsy Corban (born in Halifax Co. NC - , died in Montgomery County, TN)

          v.   Tabitha Corban (born in Halifax Co., NC - , died in Montgomery County, TN)

         vi.   Sally Corban (born in Halifax Co., NC - , died in Montgomery County, TN)


489. Mary (Corban) 2.,5

Mary married William Corban 2 in Halifax County, NC.2

490. Thomas Hill 2,5 died before 3 Dec 1819 in Jefferson County, MS..2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(Thomas Hill-will dated 3 December 1819, Jefferson County, Ms. Wife Sarah Hill, Elizabeth Sibley, Granddaughters Louisa and Doraha, daughters of deceased son, Elisha Hill, Daughter Paysey McGraw, Sons, John and Hardy Hill, Daughter, Nancy Suggs, my children, Ester Sibley, May Owen, Lydia Williams and Rachel Corban, Exec. Willis McDonald, Wit.B. W. M. Martin, Wiley McDonald (from abstract of Will book b (a) 1800-1833 Jefferson County, ms. compiled by Gordon M. Wells. page 92)
(IN A LETTER WRITTEN TO GORDON WELLS BY KATHRYN CHRISTEN SHE ASK IF HE IS THE SAME THOMAS HILL WHO MARRIED JANE WELLS IN S.C. 1785--MB FILE

Thomas married Jane Wells .2

Children from this marriage were:

245       i.   Rachel Hill (born about 1786 South Carolina - died in 1852 in Franklin County, MS.)


491. Jane Wells 2.,5

Jane married Thomas Hill .2

492. Nathaniel Kinnison 2,5 was born about 1755 2 and died after 1834 in Franklin County, MS..2

Noted events in his life were:

• Alt. Death: Alt. Death, Between 1834-1840. 2

Nathaniel married Priscillia Guice 2 about 1776.2

Children from this marriage were:

246       i.   John A. Kinnison (born on 25 Dec 1781 Opalusas Parish, La. - died after 1880 in Franklin County, MS.)

Nathaniel next married Priscilla Guice ,2 daughter of Christopher Guice Sr. and Mary Elizabeth Bickley , between 1776-1780 in Pro. PA. Or VA..2 Priscilla was born on 20 Feb 1755 in Germany 2 and died before 1840.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   William Kinnison (born about 1783)

         ii.   Mary Ann Kinnison (born about 1786)

        iii.   Sarah 'Sallie' Kinnison (born about 1788)

         iv.   Nathaniel Kinnison (born on 2 Feb 1793)

          v.   Isaac Kinnison ()


493. Priscillia Guice,2,5 daughter of Christopher Guice Sr. and Mary Elizabeth Bickley , was born on 20 Feb 1735 in PA. 2 and died before 1840 in MS..2

Priscillia married Nathaniel Kinnison 2 about 1776.2

494. Abram L. Guice,2,5 son of Jacob Guice and Mary Elizabeth Bickley , was born on 5 Feb 1805 in Guice Biblle 2 and died on 4 Mar 1866 in Franklin County, MS., at age 61.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

Albert E. Guice, Nephew of A. L. Guice, Died Feb. 11, 1863.

Mary Ann Guice, Wife of John H. Williams, Died April 8, 1870.

Noted events in his life were:

• Alt. Birth: Alt. Birth, 30 Dec 1746, Germany ?. 2

Abram married Cynthia C. Kinnison ,2 daughter of William Kinninson and Mary Magdalene Coffman , on 8 Jan 1829 in Fort Nashboro, Tenn..2 Cynthia was born on 18 Nov 1808 in Pennsylvania 2 and died on 1 May 1816 in Franklin County, MS., at age 7.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Priscilla Susannah Guice (born on 18 Mar 1830 - died on 11 Aug 1833)

         ii.   Susanna Guice (born on 4 Sep 1783 Tennessee - died in Oct 1880 in Franklin County, MS.)

        iii.   Mary Elizabeth Guice (born on 29 Apr 1833 Tennessee - died on 27 Jun 1862 in Concordia Parish, La.)

         iv.   Anna Guice (born on 23 Sep 1785 Tennessee)

          v.   John Kinnison Guice (born on 22 Nov 1834)

         vi.   Nancy Guice (born on 10 Sep 1787 Tennessee - died in 1821)

        vii.   Sarah Ann Guice (born on 13 Oct 1836)

       viii.   Daniel M. 'Dave' Guice (born about 10 Dec 1787 - died on 1 Oct 1849 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ix.   Hannah Matilda Guice (born on 7 Mar 1838)

          x.   Jacob Guice (born on 1 Jun 1789 Tennessee - died on 28 Apr 1852)

         xi.   Isaac Allen Guice (born on 3 Nov 1839 - died on 13 Jul 1862)

        xii.   Jesse A. Guice (born on 26 Dec 1791 Mississippi - died on 1 Feb 1859 in Natchez, Adams County, MS.)

       xiii.   Martha Malinda Guice (born on 3 Apr 1840)

        xiv.   Jonathan Guice Jr. (born on 8 Dec 1793 Mississippi - died on 1 Jul 1858 in Cado Parish, La.)

         xv.   Louisa Addelaide Guice (born on 28 Jul 1842)

        xvi.   Salome Guice (born on 28 Jan 1795 - died on 4 Aug 1825)

       xvii.   Sophia Emma Guice (born on 13 Jun 1844)

      xviii.   Ephrain Guice (born on 23 Apr 1797 Mississippi - died on 11 Oct 1856 in Yazoo County, MS.)

        xix.   Alice Indiana Ione Guice (born on 30 Jul 1847)

         xx.   Elizabeth Guice (born on 23 Dec 1798 - died in 1834 in Cathoula Parish, La.)

        xxi.   Octavia Araminta Guice (born on 16 Jun 1849)

       xxii.   Barbara Guice (born on 2 Oct 1800 - died in 1852)

      xxiii.   Nathaniel Guice (born on 1 May 1803 - died on 6 Mar 1850 in Concordia Parish, La.)

       xxiv.   J. Louisa Guice (born on 19 Jan 1807 - , died in Catahoula Parish, La.)

Abram next married Ann Stump 2 in 1780 in Ft. Nashboro, TN..2

Children from this marriage were:

247       i.   Susannah Guice (born on 4 Sep 1783 N. - died in Oct 1880 in Franklin County, MS.)


495. Ann Stump,2,5 daughter of Fredrick Stump and Ann Smavley , was born on 29 Apr 1763 in PA. 2 and died on 1 May 1816 in Franklin County, MS., at age 53.2

Ann married Abram L. Guice 2 in 1780 in Ft. Nashboro, TN..2

504. Malcolm Currie 2,5 was born in Scotland.2

Malcolm married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

252       i.   Edward Currie (born about 1748 Surrey County, NC. - died on 11 Nov 1841 in Jefferson County, MS.)


picture

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610. Maj. Gen. Lord Henry Scott .21

Henry married Mary Howard .21

Children from this marriage were:

305       i.   Lady Henrietta Scott ()


611. Mary Howard .21

Mary married Maj. Gen. Lord Henry Scott .21

640. Moses Mounier,11 son of Pierre Mounier and Louise Robinet , died on 4 Oct 1740 in Berkeley County, South Carolina,11 and was buried in French Church of St. Denis, Berkeley Co., S.C..11 Other names for Moses were Moses Miller 11, and Moise Mounier.

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: 11 "Moses Mounier - Berkley County, South Carolina planter and mariner. He lived and reared his family at the Huguenot settlement called Orange Quarter, which is located on the banks of French Creek, a tributary of the Cooper. He died October 4, 1740."
(The Huguenot Millers)

• Assumption of Parents: 1,11 "On December 7, 1728, the Huguenot immigrant, Peter Monier (Pierre Mounier) executed an agreement which is unique. It is sworn to before Anthony Bonneau, Berkely Court Justice, in the presence of Francis Deshamps, Catherine Peyre and Phillip Combe. According to this agreement, Peter Monier was leaving his property to Moses Monier with the promise that Moses Monier would take care of him for the remainder of his life. Peter Monier stated: "That the said Peter Monier for and in consideration of the love he beareth unto said Moses Monier and more especially for the considerations and promises hereafter mentioned to be performed by the said Moses Monier, doth make this covenant."

The property involved was a tract of land containing seventy acres situated and lying and being in Berkeley County on the southeast side of the Eastern Branch of the "T" of Cooper River. It butted and bounded to the southwest on a creek commonly called Lynch's Creek, to the southwest on the land of Peter Dutarte, to the northeast on the lands of Johnson Lynch, and to the northwest on land then in the possesion of Nicholas Bochet. Included were all houses, buildings, fences, pastures, orchards, trees, woods, underwoods, timber and timber trees, ways, passages, wells, and water courses. Also, to Moses Monier went two Negro women named Molly and Margaret, a stock of cattle, household goods, and what Pierre called his "manisonhouse". Peter Monier then laid down some precise stipulations. Moses Monier would provide him with meat, drink, washing, and apparel fit and convenient for Peter Monier. Peter Monier would dwell for the remainder of his life in his mansionhouse in the room which he then occupied. Peter Monier also required that he be kept clean and supplied with firewood in cold weather. Lastly, he requested that he be sufficiently entertained."
(Huguenot Millers)
(Agreement, Peter Monier to Moses Monier, Probate Court Records, Charleston, S.C., Book G, page 406)

"There is no record that proves that Pierre Mounier is the father of Moses Mounier, but I am making the assumption that this is true based on the agreement that Moses ould take care of Pierre the rest of his life for all of the possesions that Pierre held."
(Warren Graham Trest)

• Occupation: Planter and Mariner, Berkeley County, South Carolina. 11 "Moses Mounier lived at the Orange Quarter, on the banks of French Quarter Creek. Estienne Mournier (his brother) lived on a plantation north of Cainhoy. Moses Mournier was a mariner who went to sea in the tradition of Rochellese. Estienne Mournier was a plantation owner and Charleston merchant. They were both rice growers. Moses Mournier never owned the large acerage that his brother Estienne did, although property apprasals indicate that he prospered."
(Huguenot Millers)

• Land: 11 Jul 1733, Berkeley County, South Carolina. 11 "Moses Mournier was given a land grant dated July 11, 1733, which Moses Mournier recieved sixty-three acres from King Chales II by Robert Johnson, Governor of the Province."
(Huguenot Millers)

• Marriage of Children: "Two of his daughters, Susannah and Mary, would marry Elias and Jacob Bonneau, brothers, and two of his children, Moses Sr. and Magdalene would marry Ann and John Jeffords, brother and sister."

• Probate: 1 Feb 1747, Berkeley County, South Carolina. 11 "An appraisal of the goods and chattel of Moses Mounier was made by Peter Bochet, Henry Mouzon and Stephen Miller, Jr., and was filed February 1, 1747. The appraisal is as follows:

"1 feather bed and straw bed, 1 p. sheets, 2 blankets, 1 half gallon pott, 1 quart pott, 1 pint pott, 1/2 pint pott, 1 Gill pott, 1 funnel, 3 silver spoons, 1 silver watch, 1 rice sive, box and dice, tea box and cannisters, 2 tea potts, 1 milk pott, 2 decanters, 1 small butter pott, 1 mugg, 5 punch bowls, 1 tumbler, 1 wine glass, a parcel of old China and earthing plates, 2 prs. scales and waits, 1 corner buffet, 13 chairs, 5 tables, salt cellar, candle sticks, pepper box, vinegar crewit, 2 butter potts, 3 juggs, 1 pr. fire doggs, 1 par. smoothing irons, 1 trevitt, 1 gridiron, 2 frying pans, 1 spitt, 1 pr. tongs and shovels, 1 loger head and steam corn mill, 4 wedges, 4 rings, 1 X cutt saw, 2 hoes, 2 axes, 1 spade, 1 whipp saw, 1 hand saw, a parcel of pewter plates, basons and dishes, a parcel of knives and forks, 2 1/2 doz. pewter spoons, a parcel of old books, a French Bible, 2 diaper table cloths and 3 napkins, 2 tea kettles, 1 morter, 3 brass cocks and a parcel of old iron, 1 pr. stillyards, 2 feather beds, 2 bolsters, 1 blanket, 2 quadrants, 1 slate, 1 sand glass, 1 crane bill, 1 milk pan, 1 butter pott, 2 old chests, 1 spinning wheel, 1 billiard table, stick ball, candle sticks, 1 gun, cartridge box, powder horns, cutlash, 4 iron potts, 2 hooks, 2 hammers, 1 mans saddle and bridle, 11 head of cattle, 3 hides, 12 hoggs, 7 slaves - Rose, a Negro wench, Margott, Jamey, a man, Betty, a girl, Phillise, Prince, a boy, and Cuffee."

("A True and Perfect Inventory and Appraisment of the Goods and Chattels of Moses Miller, deceased," Probate Court Records, Charleston, South Carolina)

Moses married Mary .11

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Susannah Miller (died before 1746)

         ii.   Mary Miller (died before 1765)

320     iii.   Moses Miller Sr. (born in 1715 Atlantic Ocean, en route from France to America - died in 1792 in South Carolina)

         iv.   Magdalene Miller ()

          v.   William Miller (died on 31 Dec 1778)

         vi.   Samuel Miller ()

        vii.   Jacob Miller ()


641. Mary 11 died in Berkeley County, South Carolina,11 and was buried in French Church of St. Denis, Berkeley Co., S.C..11 Another name for Mary was Mary Miller.

Mary married Moses Mounier .11

642. John Jeffords .11

John married Margaret .11

Children from this marriage were:

321       i.   Ann Jeffords (born in Berkeley County, South Carolina - died between 1761-1765 in Georgetown District, South Carolina)

         ii.   Daniel Jeffords ()

        iii.   John Jeffords ()


643. Margaret .11

Margaret married John Jeffords .11

752. Issac Farmer 173 was born about 1711 in Surry County, Virginia 173 and died about 1770 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, about age 59.173

Issac married Elizabeth Braswell .173

Children from this marriage were:

376       i.   Issac Farmer (born about 1748 North Carolina - died before 1805 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina)


753. Elizabeth Braswell .173

Elizabeth married Issac Farmer .173

754. John Barnes,173 son of John Barnes and Ann Jones , was born about 1720 173 and died between 1787-1790 in Wayne County, North Carolina.173

John married Christian .173

Children from this marriage were:

377       i.   Christian Barnes (born about 1748)

         ii.   Zilphia Barnes ()


755. Christian .173

Christian married John Barnes .173

768. John Graham 123 was born about 1688 in Scotland 123 and died after 1720 in Scotland.123

Noted events in his life were:

• History of the Grahams: "The monkish writers allege that the Grahams can trace their descent from a fabulous personage called Grame, who is said to have commanded the army of Fergus II. in 404, to have been governor of the kingdom in the monarchy of Eugene, and in 420 to have made a breach in the wall erected by the Emperor Severus between the Firth of Forth and the Clyde, and which was supposed to have derived from the Scottish warrior the name of Grζme's Dyke. The 'gallant Grahams,' as they are termed in Scottish ballad and song, do not require the aid of fable to increase their fame, for few of our great old houses have such an illustrious history.

Like most of the ancient Scottish families, the Grahams are of Anglo-Norman origin, and they settled in Scotland during the twelfth century. The first of the race whose name occurs in the records of Scotland was a Sir William de Gnζme, who received from David I. the lands of Abercorn and Dalkeith, which descended to Peter, the elder of his two sons. Peter's grandson, Henry, by his marriage to the heiress of the family of Avenel, acquired their extensive estates in Eskdale. He was one of the magnates Scotia who, in the Parliament of 5th February, 1283-4, bound themselves by their oaths and seals to acknowledge as their sovereign the Princess Margaret of Norway, the grand-daughter of Alexander III., in the event of that monarch's death without male issue. His son, Sir Nicholas, was one of the nominees of Robert Bruce when, in 1292, he became a competitor for the crown. His grandson, Sir John de Graham of Dalkeith, who died without issue, was the last of the original stock of the family. His estates were divided between his two sisters: the elder, who married William More, inherited the lands of Abercorn; the younger became the wife of William Douglas of Lugton, ancestor of the Earls of Morton, and conveyed to him Dalkeith, and the estates of the Avenels in Eskdale.

The male line of the family was carried on by John, the younger son of Sir William de Graham. Among the muniments in the possession of the Duke of Montrose there is a charter by William the Lion, probably of the date of 1175, granting to David de Graham, second son of John, the lands of Kynnabre, Charlton, and Barrow-field, in the county of Forfar, and of the fishing of the Water of Northesk.
A few years later the same monarch bestowed upon Radulph of Graham the lands of Cousland, Pentland, and Gogger, in Midlothian. Alexander II. in 1227 confirmed a grant made by Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, to David de Graham (who must have been the son of the first mentioned David), of the whole waste lands of Dundaff and Strathcarron, which was the King's forest, in exchange for the lands of Gretquerquer, in Galloway.

Other extensive grants of estates were made from time to time to the Grahams by Alexander III., and by several great nobles their feudal superiors. The most noteworthy of these gifts was a grant by Robert Bruce, in 1325, of the lands of Old Munros, in the shire of Forfar, to David Graham, elder, and an exchange with that monarch, in 1326 or 1327, of the lands of Old Montrose for the lands of Cardross, in the county of Dumbarton, where the restorer of Scottish independence spent the last years of his life. [Report by William Fraser: Second Report of Commission on Historical MSS. pp. 166-7.]

The second Sir David de Graham, who held the office of sheriff of the county of Berwick, was one of the national, or Comyn, party during the minority of Alexander II., and resolutely opposed the intrigues of the English faction. He obtained from Malise, the powerful Earl of Strathern, the lands of Kincardine, in Perthshire, where the chief residence of the family was henceforth fixed. His second son, the patriotic Sir John de Graham of Dundaff, may be regarded as the first eminent member of the family. He is still fondly remembered as the bosom friend of the illustrious Scottish patriot Wallace. He was killed at the battle of Falkirk, July 22, 1298, fighting gallantly against the English invaders under Edward I., and was buried in the churchyard of that town. His tombstone, which has been thrice renewed, bears in the centre his coat-of-arms; at the upper part, round an architectural device, is the motto, 'Vivit post funere virtus,' and at the lower part the following inscription:-
'Mente manuque potens, et ValIζ fidus Achates;
Conditus hic Gramus, bello interfectus ab Anglis.
22nd July, 1298.
HER LYS
Sir John the Grζme, baith wight and wise,
Ane of the chiefs reskewit Scotland thrise;
Ane better knight not to the world was lent,
Nor was gude Grζme, of truth and hardiment.'
Dundaff Castle, now in ruins, stands on high ground a few miles from the battlefield, and commands four passes leading down in as many directions to the low country. It belongs to the Duke of Montrose, the chief of the Grahams, in whose possession there is an antique sword, a short, broad weapon, on which the following lines are inscribed:-
'Sir John ye Grζme verry wicht and wyse,
Ane o' ye chiefes relievet Scotland thryse,
Fought with ys sword, and ner thout schame
Commandit nane to beir it bot his name.'

Sir Patrick and Sir David, the elder and the younger brothers of this celebrated patriot, embraced the cause of Baliol in the contest for the crown, and swore fidelity to Edward I. in 1292. It is probable, however, that this act of homage was rendered under compulsion, and was disavowed on the first opportunity, for in 1296 Sir David and his nephew were taken prisoners by the English monarch. They were released in the following year, on condition of serving under the English banner in the French wars. Sir Patrick fell at the mismanaged and disastrous battle of Dunbar, in 1296. Hemingford, the English chronicler, says he was 'a stout knight, wisest among the wise in council, and among the noblest the most noble.'

From this time downwards the Grahams have taken a prominent part in public, and especially in warlike, affairs. The son of Sir David, who bore his name, which seems to have been a favourite one among the early Grahams, was a zealous adherent of Robert Bruce, and defended the independence of his native country so stoutly, that he was excepted from the pacification which King Edward made with the Scots in 1303-4. Along with two of his kinsmen, he signed the famous letter to the Pope vindicating in noble terms the independence of Scotland. He died in 1327. It was he who exchanged with King Robert Bruce the estate of Cardross for Old Montrose. His son, also named Sir David, was taken prisoner with his sovereign, David II., at the battle of Durham. Sir David's son, Sir Patrick of Graham, was the ancestor both of the Montrose and Menteith Grahams. His son and successor, by his first wife, Sir William, carried on the main line of the family. His eldest son, Patrick, by his second wife, Egidia, niece of Robert II., married- probably about the year 1406-Eufemea Stewart, Countess Palatine of Strathern, and either through courtesy of his wife, or by creation, became Earl Palatine of Strathern.

The elder son of Sir William Graham by his first wife predeceased him, leaving two sons. By his second wife, the Princess Mary Stewart, daughter of Robert II., Sir William had five sons, from the eldest of whom descended the Grahams of Fintry, of Claverhouse, and of Duntrune, and the third was the ancestor of the gallant Sir Thomas Graham, Lord Lynedoch. Patrick Graham, Sir William's second son, by the Princess Mary, was consecrated Bishop of Brechin in 1463, and was translated to St. Andrews in 1466. He was a learned and virtuous prelate, worthy to succeed the illustrious Bishop Kennedy, his near relative-a model bishop. Anxious to vindicate the independence of the Scottish Church, over which the Archbishop of York claimed jurisdiction, he visited Rome, and procured from the Pope a bull erecting his see into an archbishopric, and appointing him metropolitan, papal nuncio, and legate a lalere, in Scotland for three years. On his return home the Archbishop was assailed with vindictive malignity by his ecclesiastical rivals. The inferior clergy rejoiced in his advancement; but the dignitaries of the Church, through envy and dread of the reforms which he was prepared to inaugurate, became his inveterate enemies. By bribing the King, James III., they succeeded in obtaining the degradation and imprisonment of the unfortunate prelate, on the plea that he had infringed the royal prerogative by applying to the papal court without the King's license. It is alleged, in a report recently found in the Roman archives, that Graham had proclaimed himself divinely appointed to reform ecclesiastical abuses, and had revoked indulgences granted at Rome, appointed legates, and had committed other similar illegal acts. There is reason to believe that the persecution which the Archbishop underwent had affected his mind. Schevez, an able, but unprincipled and profligate ecclesiastic, who succeeded Graham in the primacy, and was the leader of the hostile party, had him declared insane, and procured the custody of his person. He was confined first in Inchcolm, and afterwards in the castle of Loch Leven, where he died in 1478.

Sir William Graham was succeeded by his grandson, PATRICK GRAHAM of Kincardine, who was made a peer of Parliament in 1451, under the title of LORD GRAHAM. His grandson, WILLIAM, third Lord Graham, was created EARL OF MONTROSE by James IV., 3rd March, 1504-5. His title, however, was not taken from the town of Montrose, but from his hereditary estate of 'Auld Montrose,' which was then erected into a free barony and earldom. He fell at the battle of Flodden, 9th September, 1513, where he and the Earl of Crawford commanded one of the divisions of the Scottish vanguard. One of the younger sons of the Earl by his third wife was the ancestor of the Grζmes of Inchbrakie.

WILLIAM, second Earl of Montrose, held several offices of trust in connection with the person of the young king, James V., and his daughter, Queen Mary. JOHN, third Earl, was one of the most powerful noblemen in Scotland in his own day, and was deeply involved in the plots and intrigues of the early part of the reign of James VI. He assisted the profligate Earl of Arran in bringing the Regent Morton to the block, which led to a feud between him and the Douglases. He twice held the office of High Treasurer of Scotland, and was appointed Lord Chancellor in 1599. After the accession of James to the throne of England, the Earl was nominated Lord High Commissioner to the Parliament which met at Edinburgh, 10th April, 1604. On resigning the office of Chancellor, a patent was granted to him by the King, in December of that year, appointing him Viceroy of Scotland for life, with a pension of £2,000 Scots. He presided at the meeting of the Estates at Perth, 9th July, 1606, which passed the ecclesiastical enactments termed the Five Articles of Perth, so obnoxious to the Presbyterian party. At his death in 1608, the King thought fit to order that the Earl, in consequence of his high position, should be buried with peculiar pomp and splendour, and promised to give forty thousand merks to cover the expense. But the promises of James in regard to pecuniary matters were not often performed. The money was never paid, and the costly funereal ceremonial imposed a heavy burden on the Earl's son.

JOHN GRAHAM, fourth Earl of Montrose, showed, by an incident mentioned in Birrel's Diary, that in his youth the hot blood of the Grahams ran in his veins, though in his mature years he was quiet, peaceful, and prudent in his conduct. '1595, the 19th January, the young Earle of Montroes [at this time he was only Lord Graham] fought ane combate with Sir James Sandilands at the Salt Trone of Edinburgh, thinking to have revengit the slauchter of his cousine, Mr. Johne Graham.' This Earl lived the retired life of a country gentleman, and seems to have been very domestic in all his habits. It appears from the family accounts that he amused himself with archery and golfing, and indulged a good deal in the use of tobacco. He was appointed President of the Council in July, 1626, and died 14th November of the same year, in the prime of life. But his burial was not 'accompleissit' until the 3rd of January, 'and the haill friends remainet in Kincardin thereafter, sateling his Lordship's affairs, till Soinday, the 7th of January.' An account-book which has been preserved shows the enormous expense that was incurred in 'accompleissing' the burial, and in entertaining for eight weeks the array of kinsmen who had congregated in the family mansion to do honour to the obsequies of the deceased nobleman. They feasted upon 'Venison, Beif, Muttoune, Lamb, Veill, Geis, Caponis,' and other poultry; and of game and wildfowl 'Capercailzies, Black Cokis, and Ethe henis, Termaganis, Muir foulls, Wodcoks, Peitrecks [partridges], Plewvers, and Birsall foulls,' in great abundance. Of liquors there were consumed one puncheon of 'claret wyn' and one puncheon of 'quhyt wyn,' besides nine gallons of 'Ester aill.' This protracted hospitality and costly mode of performing funerals may account for the sumptuary laws frequently enacted by the Scottish Estates, for the purpose of limiting the ruinous expenses incurred on such occasions. No less than three years' rental of the estate of the deceased has sometimes been spent in 'accompleissing' his burial.
The glory of the house of Graham is JAMES, the fifth EARL and first MARQUIS OF MONTROSE. His mother was Lady Margaret Ruthven, eldest daughter of William, first Earl of Gowrie. The Ruthvens were noted for their fondness for magical pursuits, and the mother of the great marquis seems to have partaken of the family superstition. Scot of Scotstarvit asserts that she 'consulted with witches at his birth.' She predeceased the Earl, leaving an only son and five daughters. Her husband bears affectionate testimony to her worth and beauty, and says of her she was 'a woman religious, chaste, and beautifull, and my chiefe joy in this world.'

The young Earl was only fourteen years of age at the time of his father's death, in 1626. Two years previously he had been placed under a private tutor in Glasgow, obviously with the view of preparing him to enter a university; and in January, 1627, he was enrolled as an alumnus in the University of St. Andrews. The accounts of his tutor show that, during the residence of the youthful nobleman at that celebrated seat of learning, his recreations were riding, hunting, hawking, archery, and golf. He showed a fondness also for poetry and chess, and for heroic and romantic histories. The frequent entries in his accounts of donations to the poor-to a 'rymer,' a dumb woman, a dwarf, 'poor Irishe women,'-show that his purse was always open to the needy. He was no less liberal to minstrels, morrice-dancers, jugglers, town officers and drummers, and to the servants-coachmen, footmen, and nurses-in the country houses which he visited. He seems, even at this early period, to have attracted public attention and expectations, for in a poem by William Lithgow, entitled 'Scotland's Welcome to her Native Son, and Soveraigne Lord, King Charles,' the Genius of Scotland, addressing the King, thus refers to the youthful head of the Grahams:-
'As for that hopefull youth, the young Lord Grahame,
James Earl of Montrose, whose warlyke name
Sprung from redoubted worth, made manhood try
Their matchless deeds in unmatched chivalry-
I do bequeath him to thy gracious love,
Whose noble stocke did ever faithful prove
To their old aged auncestors; and my Bounds
Were often freed from thraldome by their wounds;
Leaving their roote, the stamp of fidele truth,
To be inherent in this noble youth:
Whose Hearts, whose Hands, whose Swords, whose Deeds, whose Fame
Made Mars, for valour, canonize THE GRAHAME.'

On quitting the university, Montrose, in his seventeenth year, married Lady Magdalene Carnegie, sixth daughter of the first Earl of Southesk. It was probably owing to the tender age of the young couple that the father of the bride binds himself in the marriage contract, dated 10th November, 1629, 'to entertain, and sustain, in house with himself honourably the saids noble Earl and Mistress Magdalene Carnegie, his promised spouse, during the space of three years next after the said marriage.' The young Earl continued to prosecute his studies after his marriage, under private tutors;, and, in 1633, leaving his wife and young children at Kinnaird with his father-in-law, he visited the Continent, and spent three years in France and Italy. He returned home in 1636, being then in his twenty-fourth year. On his appearance at court, he was ungraciously received by the King, whose frigid manners were fitted to repel, rather than to attract, an ardent and high-spirited youth. It has been alleged by various writers that the indignation of Montrose at the coldness with which he was treated by Charles made him throw himself into the hands of the Covenanters; but there is no evidence to warrant this assertion. Scotland was at this time in a state of great excitement, in consequence of the attempt of Charles and Laud to introduce the English Liturgy into the Scottish Church; and Montrose has emphatically declared in several documents that he had arrived at the deliberate conviction that 'Churchmen's greatness,' and Episcopal civil government, had grown to be equally destructive of liberty and prerogative. He therefore at once joined the Covenanting party, and became one of their most active leaders. In 1639 he was sent to chastise the prelatic town of Aberdeen, and to compel the inhabitants, who were principally Episcopalians, to take the Covenant. The temperate manner in which he performed this task did not meet with the full approbation of his party. 'The discretion of that generous and noble youth,' says Baillie, 'was but too great. All was forgiven to that unnatural city.'

After Montrose left Aberdeen, Lord Aboyne, at the head of a strong body of Highlanders, obtained possession of the town, evidently with the consent of the citizens, and the Covenanting general was a second time dispatched to this stronghold of the Episcopalians and Royalists, which the Highlanders evacuated on his approach. He treated the inhabitants with most unjustifiable severity, levied on them a contribution of ten thousand merks, pillaged their houses, carried off or destroyed their corn, and plundered both the fishermen of the town, and the farmers and peasantry of the adjacent country. Montrose then marched westward to attack the strongholds of the Gordons, but retraced his steps on learning that Aboyne had arrived with reinforcements, and had again taken possession of Aberdeen. The Highlanders, however, fled at the first discharge of the artillery of the Covenanting forces, and the unfortunate city once more fell into the hands of Montrose, who imposed a fine of sixty thousand merks sterling upon the citizens.

When the Covenanters at length took up arms in defence of their liberties, and entered England in 1640, Montrose was the first man who forded the Tweed, at the head of his own battalion; and, a few days after, he routed the vanguard of the English cavalry at Newburn, on the Tyne. Like Falkland, Hyde, and other moderate Reformers in the English Parliament, Montrose now became dissatisfied with the proceedings of the more extreme members of his party, and was apprehensive that the ultimate views of the Covenanters were inconsistent with the rights and just authority of the Sovereign. It has been alleged that he resented the preference given by the other leaders to the chief of the Campbells, the hereditary rival of his family. 'Montrose,' says Clarendon, 'had always a great emulation, or rather great contempt, of the Marquis of Argyll, as he was too apt to contemn those he did not love. The people looked upon them both as young men of unlimited ambition, and used to say that they were like Czesar and Pompey: the one would endure no superior, and the other would have no equal.'

No decided step, however, was taken by Montrose in opposition to Argyll until July, 1640, when the Covenanting army was encamped on Dunse Law. At that period a bond was privately offered for his signature, proposing that some person should be appointed captain-general of the country north of the Forth, and implying that this person should be the Earl of Argyll. Montrose indignantly refused to subscribe this bond, and, in conjunction with the Earls of Marischal, Home, Athole, Mar, and other influential noblemen, including Lord Almond, the second in command of General Leslie's army, he entered into what was called the Cumbernauld Bond, from the place where it was prepared, for their mutual aid and defence in case of need. This bond was speedily discovered by Argyll and his friends, and the subscribers were called to account for their procedure by the Committee at Edinburgh; but their formal renunciation of the bond was accepted as a satisfactory settlement of the affair. The confidence of the party, however, in Montrose was shaken, and, in June, 1641, he was accused of carrying on a secret correspondence with the King, and, along with three of his friends, was confined in the castle of Edinburgh. He remained a close prisoner there until the beginning of 1642, when he was set at liberty, on the intercession of King Charles himself.

After the breaking out of the Civil War, Montrose, who greatly disliked the timorous and trimming policy of the Marquis of Hamilton, the King's minister for Scotland, urged that an army of Royalists should be raised at once, to prevent the Covenanters from making common cause with the English Parliament. 'Resist,' he said, 'resist force with force. The King has loyal subjects in Scotland; they have wealth, and influence, and hearts stout and true; they want but the King's countenance and commission. The only danger is delay. If the army of the Covenant be allowed to make head, loyalty will be overwhelmed. The rebellious cockatrice must be bruised in the egg. Physic is too late when the disease has overrun the body.' There can be little doubt that if Montrose had been permitted at this juncture to raise an army in behalf of the royal cause, the Covenanting forces could not have ventured to quit Scotland. But his advice, which was as sagacious as it was bold, was disregarded, and the result was that a powerful army, under General Leslie, was sent to the assistance of the Parliament, and turned the scale in their favour.

On the ruinous failure of Hamilton's policy, and his consequent disgrace and imprisonment in the beginning of 1644, Montrose was appointed by the King Lieutenant-General in Scotland, and shortly after was advanced to the dignity of marquis. He made a daring attempt to cut his way into Scotland at the head of a small body of cavalry, with the view of raising the Scottish royalists on the side of the King, but was encountered on the Borders by a greatly superior force, and compelled to fall back on Carlisle. After the fatal battle of Marston Moor, however, he set out in August, 1644, in the disguise of a groom in attendance on two of his friends, Sir William Pollock and Colonel Sibbald, and succeeded in reaching the Highlands without detection. He found at Blair Athole two hundred Highlanders and about twelve hundred Irish auxiliaries, indifferently armed and disciplined, who had shortly before landed in the West Highlands under Alaster Macdonald, better known as Colkitto, [He was the son of Coil Keitache MacGillespic Macdonald of Colonsay. Keitache means left-handed.] to aid the royal cause. Montrose immediately displayed his commission from the King, and raised the royal standard. The Highlanders flocked to it in considerable numbers, and the Marquis, finding himself at the head of a powerful force, lost no time in directing his march to the low country. At Tippermuir, three miles from Perth, he encountered (1st September) an army of six thousand Covenanters, under Lord Elcho, whom he defeated, with the loss of three hundred men, and of all his artillery, arms, and baggage. Perth immediately surrendered, and the victors obtained from the terror-stricken citizens a seasonable supply of clothing and arms. The approach of Argyll at the head of a superior force compelled Montrose to leave Perth. The Highlanders in his army, according to their immemorial custom, quitted his standard and returned home to secure their spoil. The murder of Lord Kilpont [see THE EARLS OF MENTEITH] still further diminished his army, as the followers of that nobleman left the standard, to convey the body of their chief to the sepulchre of his ancestors. With a force reduced to less than two thousand men, Montrose proceeded northward to Aberdeenshire. Here, at the Bridge of Dee, he encountered and defeated another army of the Covenanters, under Lord Burleigh and Lord Lewis Gordon, one of the sons of Huntly, and pursued the fugitives into the town of Aberdeen. That ill-fated town was given up to pillage, and suffered cruelly from the excesses of Montrose's Irish troops, who put to death without mercy all whom they found in the streets. In some instances they even compelled their victims to strip before they killed them, lest their clothes should be soiled by their blood. 'The women durst not lament their husbands, or their fathers slaughtered in their presence, nor inter their dead, who remained unburied in the streets until the Irish departed.' It has been justly said that the people of Aberdeen had a right to expect very different treatment from an army fighting under the royal banner, for they had always been favourable to the cause of the King; and Montrose himself, when in the service of the Covenanters, had been the agent in oppressing, for its devotion to the royal cause, the very city which his troops so cruelly plundered, on account of its enforced adherence to the Parliament.

On the approach of Argyll at the head of a superior force, Montrose proceeded up the Spey; then doubling back, he plunged into the wilds of Badenoch, and thence into Athole, always pursued, but never overtaken by the enemy. 'That strange coursing,' as Baillie terms the series of marches and countermarches, 'thrice round about from Spey to Athole, wherein Argyll and Lothian's soldiers were tired out, and the country harassed by both, and no less by friends than foes, did nothing for their own defence.' Completely tired out by these rapid and harassing marches, Argyll returned to Edinburgh, and resigned his commission as general, declaring that he had not been adequately supported. It was supposed that Montrose would remain until the spring in the district of Athole, but having obtained a strong reinforcement of Macdonalds, Stewarts of Appin, and other Jacobite clans, he resolved to attack Argyll in his native fastnesses. Guided by a clansman of Glencoe, who declared that there was not a farm, or half a farm, under Maccallum More but he knew every foot of it, Montrose made his way into Argyllshire, through paths hitherto deemed inaccessible, and plundered and laid waste the whole country with merciless severity. Dividing his forces into three bodies, in order to make the work of devastation more complete, he traversed the whole of the devoted district for the space of a month, killing the able-bodied men, driving off the flocks and herds, and laying the houses in ashes. As Spalding says, 'He left no house or hold, except impregnable strengths, unburnt; their corn, goods, and gear; and left not a four-footed beast in Argyll's haill lands; and such as would not drive they houghed and slew.' The thirst of feudal vengeance, it has been justly said, may explain, but can in no degree excuse, these seventies.
On leaving Argyllshire, Montrose withdrew towards Lochaber, for the purpose of organising a general rising of the clans. He was followed by a strong body of the Campbells, under their chief; while General Baillie, at the head of a considerable army, was advancing from the east, and Lord Seaforth, with another force, was stationed at Inverness. Their object was, by a combined movement from different points, to surround and overpower their active enemy. Montrose, however, resolved to forestall their operations, and to fall upon the Campbells before they could be joined by Seaforth and Baillie. He accordingly retraced his steps over a succession of mountains covered with snow, and through passes 'so strait,' as he said, 'that three men could not march abreast,' and on the evening of the 1st of February, came in sight of the Campbells at Inverlochy, near Fort William. The privations borne by his forces during this march must have been very great. 'That day they fought,' says Patrick Gordon of Cluny, 'the General himself and the Earl of Airlie had no more to break their fast upon before they went to battle but a little meal mixed with cold water, which out of a hollow dish they did pick up with their knives. One may judge what wants the rest of the army must suffer. The most part of them had not tasted bread for two days, marching over high mountains in knee-deep snow, and wading brooks and rivers up to their girdles.'

At sunrise next day the battle took place. The Campbells, under the command of Sir Duncan Campbell of Auchinbreck, commenced the attack, and, as Montrose says, 'fought for some time with great bravery;' but in the end they were completely defeated, with the loss of their general, along with many of his principal officers, and fifteen hundred men, who were killed in the conflict or the pursuit, which lasted for nine miles.

After his victory at Inverlochy, Montrose marched to the northeast, laying waste the country as he proceeded. At Elgin he was at length joined by a detachment of the Gordons, who had hitherto held aloof from him; and Seaforth also soon after repaired to his standard. He now issued orders for all who were capable of bearing arms, between the ages of sixteen and sixty, to join his banner, under pain of military execution, and those who did not immediately obey his summons he treated as rebels, 'plundering, burning, and spoiling the houses, biggins, and cornyards of the haill lands of the gentry; carrying off the horses, nolt, sheep, and plenishing [furniture] from others; laying the villages in ashes, and destroying the fishermen's boats and nets.' The Lowlands of Aberdeenshire and Moray were laid waste with fire and sword by the savage hordes of Irishmen and Highlanders. Elgin and Banff were given up to be pillaged by them 'pitifully; no merchants' goods nor gear left; they saw no man in the street but was stripped naked to the skin.' Brechin, Stonehaven, and Cowie, with the shipping, and the buildings on the estate of Dunnotar, were in succession consigned to the flames, amidst the tears and lamentations of the defenceless and wretched inhabitants. These ruthless barbarities were all the more inexcusable that they were inflicted on the tenantry and retainers of Montrose's old friend and fellow-soldier, Earl Marischal, avowedly, because he refused to abandon the Covenant for which they had formerly fought side by side.

About this time Montrose lost his eldest son, John, a youth of great promise, in his fifteenth year, who died of sickness brought on by the fatigues of their rapid marches. His second son, James, 'a young bairn about fourteen years,' says Spalding, 'learning at the schools in Montrose,' was seized by Sir John Urrey, and carried off to Edinburgh. The Covenanting forces under Baillie were reinforced at this juncture by a considerable levy of cavalry under Urrey; and Lord Lewis Gordon, who had twice already changed sides in the contest, withdrew from the royal forces with a large part of the Gordons. Montrose was in consequence compelled to abandon the open country, and once more to retire northwards. Before carrying this movement into effect he attacked and stormed the town of Dundee, 4th April. But while his troops were dispersed in quest of liquor and plunder, he received intelligence that Baillie and Urrey, with four thousand men, were within a mile of the town. He instantly called off his soldiers from the spoil, and by a series of masterly movements kept the enemy at bay; and after a retreat of three days and two nights, harassed at every step by his pursuers, he at last effected his escape to the mountains. 'I have often,' says his biographer, Dr. Wishart, 'heard those who were esteemed the most experienced officers, not in Britain only, but in France and Germany, prefer this march to his most celebrated victories.'

The Covenanting generals unwisely divided their forces. Urrey marched northwards to Inverness, where he was joined by the Frasers and other friendly clans, and turned, with an overwhelming force, against Lord Gordon, who was stationed at Auchindoun. Montrose, who was in Menteith, in Stirlingshire, hearing of this movement, with his characteristic promptitude and rapidity hastened along the Braes of Balquhidder, thence down the side of Loch Tay, and through Athole and Angus; he then traversed the Grampian mountains, and effected a junction with Lord Gordon on the Dee. Urrey's forces were still superior in numbers to the royal army, and without waiting for Baillie's co-operation, he attacked Montrose at the village of Auldearn, near Nairn (May 4, 1645). The battle was stoutly contested, but the Covenanters were in the end defeated, mainly through the treachery of Colonel Drummond, one of Urrey's officers, who was afterwards tried by a court-martial and shot. Nearly two thousand men, including a considerable number of officers and several men of rank, were slain, and their whole baggage, ammunition, and money, along with sixteen colours, fell into the hands of the victors.

After this signal victory, Montrose marched to Elgin, laying waste the country as usual with fire and sword. Nairn and Elgin were plundered, and the principal buildings set on fire. Cullen was reduced to ashes, and 'sic lands as were left unburnt up before were now burnt up.' Meanwhile, learning that Baillie was ravaging the estates of Huntly, he marched northward, and brought him to action at the village of Alford, on the Don (July 2nd). The issue was for some time doubtful, but partly by the skilful manoeuvring of their general, the Royalists were successful, though their victory was embittered by the death of Lord Gordon in the heat of the conflict.

The fame of Montrose's victories having attracted considerable numbers, both of Lowlanders and Highlanders, to his standard, he descended from the mountains and marched southwards at the head of nearly six thousand men. He approached Perth, where the Parliament was then assembled. As a numerous army, however, had taken up a strong position in the neighbourhood, he did not venture to attack it, but directed his march toward Stirling, as usual laying waste the country, burning the cottages, and killing the defenceless inhabitants. Castle Campbell, a noble antique edifice, was left in ruins by the same unsparing spirit of vengeance. Even the town and lordship of Alloa, belonging to the Earl of Mar, did not escape the ravages of the Irish kernes, though the Earl, who was favourably inclined to the royal cause, had hospitably entertained Montrose and his officers. Passing by Stirling, which was strongly garrisoned and defied their attack, the Royalists continued their march to the southwest, and encamped near the village of Kilsyth.

The army of the Covenanters was meanwhile following the footsteps of Montrose, and was now close at hand. Baillie, who was well aware that his raw and undisciplined levies were utterly unfit to cope with Montrose's veterans, wished to avoid a battle, but he was overruled by the Committee of Estates, who forced him to quit the strong position he had taken up, and to commence the attack. After a brief struggle Baillie's forces were totally defeated with the loss of upwards of four thousand men.

This crowning victory made Montrose for the time master of Scotland. The leaders of the Covenanting party fled for refuge to Berwick, and numbers of the Lowland nobility, who had hitherto stood aloof, now declared in favour of the royal cause. Montrose proceeded to Glasgow, which he laid under a heavy contribution, and put to death some of the principal citizens as incendiaries. The city of Edinburgh sent commissioners to entreat his clemency. A special commission was sent by the King, appointing Montrose Lieutenant-Governor and Captain-General of Scotland, and he issued a proclamation for a new Parliament to meet at Glasgow in October.

From the outset of his career the object which Montrose had in view was to clear Scotland of the Covenanting forces, and then to lead his victorious army into England, to the assistance of the King. In accordance with this plan he now directed his march towards the Borders, where he expected to be joined by a body of fifteen hundred horse, under Lord Digby. But the Highlanders, according to their usual custom, now quitted the army, and returned home for the purpose of depositing their plunder in a place of security. The Gordons, with their leader, Lord Aboyne, soon after followed their example, so that, when Montrose began his march towards the Tweed, his force had dwindled down to a body scarcely more numerous than when he was wandering through Athole and Badenoch.
Meanwhile General David Leslie had been despatched from the Covenanting army in England to the assistance of the Estates. Montrose had heard of his approach, but as Leslie directed his march along the eastern coast, he supposed that it was his intention to cut off his retreat to the mountains, which seems to have been the case. But when Leslie reached Tranent he learned that Montrose was encamped in fancied security in Ettrick Forest. He therefore altered his course and marched with all speed down the vale of the Gala, to Melrose, which he reached on the evening of September 12th. The royal army was only five or six miles distant from that place. The infantry were posted on a level plain called Philiphaugh, on the northern side of the Ettrick, while Montrose had taken up his quarters with the cavalry in the town of Selkirk, on the opposite bank of the river. Favoured by a thick mist, Leslie, early next morning, forded the Ettrick and came close upon the encampment of the Royalists without being discovered by a single scout. The surprise was complete. The noise of the conflict conveyed to Montrose the first intimation of the approach of the enemy. Hastily collecting his cavalry, he galloped across the river to the scene of action, where he found matters in a state of hopeless confusion. After repeated and desperate attempts to retrieve the fortunes of the day, he was at length compelled to make his escape from the field, and cutting his way through the midst of his enemies, followed by the Marquis of Douglas, Lord Napier, and about thirty horsemen, he fled up the Vale of Yarrow, and over Minchmoor to Peebles. Next day he was joined by the Earls of Crawford and Airlie, accompanied by about two hundred of the fugitive cavalry, and with these scanty remains of his army he succeeded in regaining his Highland fastnesses. The fruits of his six splendid victories were thus swept away at one blow, and all hope of his retrieving the royal fortunes was extinguished.

For some little time after his overthrow at Philiphaugh, Montrose maintained a guerilla warfare in Athole. But after Charles had taken refuge with the Scottish army in England, he issued orders to Montrose to disband his followers, and to withdraw from the kingdom. Reluctantly obeying this command, the Marquis laid down his arms, and, having arranged the terms with General Middleton (July 22nd, 1646), he embarked, 3rd September, in the disguise of a servant, in a small Norwegian vessel, along with a few friends, and sailed for Norway. He afterwards proceeded to Paris, where he resided for some time. He was offered, by Cardinal Mazarin, in March, 1648, the rank of General of the Scots in France, and of a Lieutenait-General in the French army, with most liberal pay; but he was dissatisfied with the conditions offered him. As he told his nephew, the second Lord Napier, with a touch of his old haughtiness, he thought 'that any imployment below ane Marischall of France was inferiour to him; besides the Frenches had become enymies to our king, and did laboure still to foment the differences betwixt him and his subjects.' He therefore declined the Cardinal's offer, and proceeded through Geneva to Germany, where he had been informed he would be welcome. At Prague, he was graciously received by the Emperor Ferdinand, who bestowed upon him the baton of a Field-Marshal, and gave him the command of the levies to be raised on the borders of the Spanish Netherlands. In order to avoid hostile armies, he returned to Flanders by Vienna, Presburg, Dantzic, and Copenhagen, where he met with a cordial reception, and thence to Brussels. While residing at this place he heard of the execution of King Charles, which deeply affected him, and he wrote some well-known verses to his memory, expressing the highest veneration for that ill-fated sovereign.

Montrose was still constantly meditating a descent upon Scotland in favour of the royal cause, and was at the Hague while Prince Charles was in treaty with the leaders of the Covenanting party for a restoration to the Scottish throne, on the principles embodied in the National Covenant. The Marquis earnestly recommended him not to accept the Crown on the stringent terms proposed by them, and offered to replace him by force of arms on the throne of his ancestors. Charles, with characteristic baseness and duplicity, continued to negotiate a treaty with the Commissioners deputed by the Scottish Estates, while at the same time he encouraged Montrose to persevere in his enterprise, and sent him the George and Garter. The Marquis, having obtained a small supply of money and arms from the Queen of Sweden, and the King of Denmark, embarked at Hamburg, in the spring of 1650, with six hundred German mercenaries, and landed on one of the Orkney islands. Two of his vessels, laden with arms and ammunition, and about a third of his forces, were lost on the voyage. He constrained a few hundreds of the unwarlike fishermen to join him, and early in April he crossed to Caithness, with the design of penetrating into the Highlands. But just as he approached the borders of Ross-shire, at a place called Drumcarbisdale, on the river Kyle (27th April), he fell into an ambuscade laid for him by Colonel Strachan, who had been despatched in all haste with a body of horse to obstruct his progress. The Orkney men threw down their arms at once, and called for quarter. The German mercenaries retreated to a wood, and there, after a short defence, surrendered themselves prisoners. Montrose's few Scottish followers made a desperate resistance, but were most of them cut to pieces. As Sir Walter Scott remarks, 'the ardent and impetuous character of this great warrior, corresponding with that of the troops which he commanded, was better calculated for attack than defence-for surprising others rather than for providing against surprise himself. His final defeat at Dunbeith so nearly resembles in its circumstances the surprise at Philiphaugh, as to throw some shade on his military talents.' Montrose, who was wounded and had his horse killed under him, seeing the day irretrievably lost, fled from the field. Along with the Earl of Kinnoul and other two or three friends, they made their way into the desolate and mountainous region which separates Assynt from the Kyle of Sutherland, with the view of passing into the friendly country of Lord Reay. The Earl of Kinnoul sunk under the effect of hunger, cold, and fatigue, and Montrose himself fell into the hands of Macleod of Assynt, a mean and sordid chief, who delivered him up to the Covenanting general. He was conveyed to Edinburgh in the peasant's habit in which he had disguised himself. 'He sat,' says an eye-witness, 'upon a little shelty horse without a saddle, but a quilt of rags and straw, and pieces of rope for stirrups, his feet fastened under the horse's belly with a tether, and a bit halter for a bridle; a ragged old dark-reddish plaid, and a Monter cap upon his head, a musketeer on each side, and his fellow-prisoners on foot after him.' At the house of the Laird of Grange, where he spent one night, he nearly effected his escape by a stratagem of the lady, who 'plied the guards with intoxicating drink until they were all fast asleep, and then she dressed the Marquis in her own clothes. In this disguise he passed all the sentinels, and was on the point of escaping, when a soldier; just sober enough to mark what was passing, gave the alarm, and he was again secured.'

When he reached Dundee the citizens, greatly to their honour, although they had suffered severely from his arms, expressed sympathy for their fallen foe, and supplied him with clothes and other necessaries suitable to his rank. 'The Marquis himself;' says Sir Walter Scott, 'must have felt this as a severe rebuke for the wasteful mode in which he had carried on his warfare; and it was a still more piercing reproach to the unworthy victors who now triumphed over an heroic enemy, in the same manner as they would have done over a detected felon.'
Montrose reached Edinburgh on Saturday the 18th of May, and it was resolved by his ungenerous enemies to bring him into the capital with a kind of mock procession. At the foot of the Canongate, near Holyrood, he was received by the executioners, with the magistrates and the town-guard. His officers walked on foot bound with cords; then followed the Marquis himself, placed on a high chair in a cart, bareheaded, and bound to the seat with cords; the hangman, wearing his bonnet, rode on the foremost of the four horses that drew the cart. 'In all the way,' says a contemporary chronicler, 'there appeared in him such majesty, courage, modesty-and even somewhat more than natural-that those common women who had lost their husbands and children in his wars, and who were hired to stone him, were upon the sight of him so astonished, and moved, that their intended curses turned into tears and prayers.' As the procession moved slowly up the Canongate, it stopped opposite Moray House, where the Marquis of Argyll, his son Lord Lorne, and his newly-married wife-a daughter of the Earl of Moray-with the Chancellor Lord Loudon, and Warriston, appeared at a balcony for the purpose of gratifying their resentment by gazing on their dreaded enemy. But on Montrose 'turning his face towards them, they presently crept in at the windows, which being perceived by an Englishman, he cried up it was no wonder they started aside at his look, for they durst not look him in the face these seven years before.'

Deputations both from the Parliament and the General Assembly waited upon the redoubted Cavalier in prison, and strove hard to induce him to make some acknowledgment of his alleged offences. He firmly vindicated, however, the course which he had taken in the royal service. Referring to his most vulnerable procedure, the ravages committed by his soldiers in plundering the country, he pleaded that 'soldiers who wanted pay could not be restrained from spoilzie, nor kept under such strict discipline as other regular forces. But he declared that he did all that lay in his power to keep them back from it; and as for bloodshed, if it could have been thereby prevented, he would rather it had all come out of his own veins.' The main point which they pressed against him was his breach of the Covenant, he declared that he still adhered to the Covenant which he took. 'Bishops,' he added, 'I care not for them; I never intended to advance their interest. But when the King had granted you all your desires, and you were every one sitting under his vine and fig tree, that then you should have taken a party in England by the hand, and entered into a league and covenant with them against the King, was the thing I judged my duty to oppose to the utmost.' Mr. James Guthrie, one of the deputation from the General Assembly, expressed their great grief that, in consequence of the impenitence of the Marquis, they could not release him from the sentence of excommunication. 'I am very sorry,' was his dignified rejoinder, 'that any actions of mine have been offensive to the Church of Scotland, and I would with all my heart be reconciled to the same. But since I cannot attain it on any other terms unless I call that my sin which I account to have been my duty, I cannot for all the reason and conscience in the world.'
Before Montrose reached Edinburgh, the Parliament had resolved to dispense with the form of a trial, and to proceed against him upon an act of attainder passed in the winter of 1644, while he was ravaging the territory of Argyll. The barbarity of his sentence was studiously aggravated by the most disgraceful insults. He was condemned to be hanged upon a gibbet thirty feet high, on which he was to be suspended for three hours; his head was to be affixed to an iron spike on the Tolbooth of Edinburgh; his limbs were to be placed on the gates of the four principal towns in Scotland, and his body (unless he should be released from the excommunication of the Kirk) was to be interred in the Boroughmuir, under the gallows. Montrose was summoned before the Parliament to hear this brutal and cruel sentence read. The Chancellor, the Earl of Loudon, a cadet of the Campbell family, loaded him with coarse and virulent abuse. The Marquis defended himself with great courage, temper, and dignity. 'He behaved himself all this time in the house,' says Sir James Balfour, a hostile witness, 'with a great deal of courage and modesty, unmoved and undaunted as appeared, only he sighed two several times, and rolled his eyes alongst all the corners of the house; and at the reading of the sentence he lifted up his face, without any word speaking.' He was then conveyed back to prison, where another deputation of ministers, with mistaken, though no doubt honest zeal, waited upon him and endeavoured to draw from him some expressions of penitence for taking up arms in behalf of the King. He at last put a stop to their exhortations with the words, 'I pray you, gentlemen, let me die in peace.'

That evening when left alone, he wrote with the point of a diamond on his prison window the following lines:-
'Let them bestow on every airth a limb,
Then open all my veins, that I may swim
To Thee, my Maker, in that crimson lake;
Then place my parboiled head upon a stake;
Scatter my ashes, strew them in the air;
Lord ! since thou knowest where all these atoms are,
I'm hopeful thou'lt recover once my dust,
And confident thou'lt raise me with the just.'
The next day, May 21st, was fixed for his execution, and Wishart mentions that Johnston of Warriston, the Clerk-Register, entered the Marquis's cell while he was combing the long curled hair which he wore, according to the fashion of the Cavaliers, and asked him what he was about, in a tone which implied that he regarded this as but an idle employment at so solemn a time. 'While my head is my own,' replied Montrose with a smile, 'I will dress and adorn it; but when it becomes yours, you may treat it as you please.' He walked on foot from the Tolbooth to the scaffold, which had been erected in the middle of the market-place between the Cross and the Tron. 'He was clad in rich attire,' says a contemporary, 'more becoming a bridegroom than a criminal going to the gallows. None of his friends or kinsmen were allowed to accompany him, neither was he permitted to address the people from the scaffold; but the calm and dignified speech which he delivered to those around him was taken down, and circulated at the time. Dr. Wishart's narrative of his exploits and his own manifesto were hung around his neck. He himself assisted to fasten them, merely saying with a smile at this new display of the malice of his enemies, 'I did not feel more honoured when his Majesty sent me the Garter.' 'Then,' says an eye-witness, 'with the most undaunted courage, he went up to the top of that prodigious gibbet, where, having freely pardoned the executioner, he gave him three or four pieces of gold, and inquired of him how long he should hang there, who said three hours; then commanding him, at the uplifting of his hands, to tumble him over, he was accordingly thrust off by the weeping executioner. The whole people gave a general groan, and it was very observable that even those who at first appearance had bitterly inveighed against him, could not now abstain from tears. 'Tis said that Argyll's expressions had something of grief in them, and that he did likewise weep at the rehearsal of his death, for he was not present at the execution.'

The sentence pronounced upon Montrose was carried out in all its brutal and shocking details. At the Restoration, in 1660, his head was taken down from the Tolbooth in the presence of Lord Napier and a number of the leading barons of the house of Graham, and the scattered limbs were collected and interred, with great pomp and ceremony, in the tomb of his grandfather, the Viceroy of Scotland, in the church of St. Giles.

Montrose, who was thus cut off at the age of thirty-seven, was one of the most distinguished Scotsmen whom the seventeenth century, fertile in great men, produced. His talents for irregular warfare were of the highest order. He was a poet and a scholar as well as a soldier, and wrote and spoke clearly and eloquently. His genius was of the heroic cast, and in the opinion of the celebrated Cardinal de Retz-no mean judge of character-closely resembled that of the ancient heroes of Greece and Rome. 'Montrose,' says Lord Clarendon, 'was in his nature fearless of danger, and never declined any enterprise for the difficulty of going through with it, but exceedingly affected those which seemed desperate to other men; and did believe somewhat to be in himself above other men, which made him lean more easily towards those who were, or were willing to be, inferior to him (towards whom he exercised wonderful civility and generosity) than with his superiors or equals. . . . He was not without vanity, but his virtues were much superior, and he well deserved to have his memory preserved and celebrated among the most illustrious persons of the age in which he lived.' Montrose was no doubt ambitious and fond of applause; as he himself frankly acknowledged, 'he was one of those that loved to have praise for virtuous actions.' But Clarendon admits that he was a man of 'a clear spirit,' 'a man of the clearest honour, courage, and affection to the King's service.' 'A person of as great honour, and as exemplary integrity and loyalty, as ever that nation (the Scottish) bred.' It is impossible, however, to deny that Montrose waged war in a sanguinary spirit, and that he permitted, if he did not authorise, his troops to lay waste the country in a cruel and vindictive manner. His own defence against this charge has already been quoted, and it has been pleaded in extenuation that this was 'the fault of his country and his age, and that his enemies showed as little of mercy and forbearance.'

In his personal deportment, Montrose was dignified yet graceful. His features, though not handsome, were singularly expressive. 'His hair was of a dark brown colour, and a high nose, a full, decided, well-opened, quick, grey eye, and a sanguine complexion, made amends for some coarseness and irregularity in the subordinate parts of the face. His stature was very little above the middle size; but in person he was uncommonly well built, and capable both of exerting great force, and enduring much fatigue. He was a man of a very princely carriage, and excellent address, which made him treated by all princes for the most part with the greatest familiarity. He was a complete horseman, and had a singular grace in riding.' 'As he was strong of body and limb, so he was most agile, which made him excel most others in those exercises where these two are required. His bodily endowments were equally fitting the court as the camp.'

Two days after his execution, the heart of Montrose was taken out of his body, which, in accordance with his sentence, was buried at the foot of the gallows on the Boroughmuir. This feat was accomplished by 'conveyance of some adventurous spirits appointed by that noble and honourable lady, the Lady Napier, taken out and embalmed in the most costly manner by that skilful chirurgeon and apothecary, Mr. James Callander, and then put in a rich case of gold.' This interesting relic was in the possession, last century, of Francis, fifth Lord Napier, great-grandson of the lady who had it embalmed. Its subsequent extraordinary fortunes are narrated in a letter from Sir Alexander Johnstone, formerly Chief Justice of Ceylon, which is printed in the Appendix to Mr. Napier's 'Life of Montrose.' According to Sir Alexander, the gold filigree box containing the heart of Montrose was given by Lord Napier, on his deathbed, to his eldest and favourite daughter, who afterwards became Mrs. Johnstone and Sir Alexander's mother. She accompanied her husband to India, and during the voyage the gold box was struck by a splinter, in action with a French frigate. 'When in India,' continues Sir Alexander, 'my mother's anxiety about it gave rise to a report amongst the natives of the country that it was a talisman, and that whoever possessed it would never be wounded in battle or taken prisoner. Owing to this report it was stolen from her, and for some time it was not known what had become of it. At last she heard that it had been offered for sale to a powerful chief, who had purchased it for a large sum of money.' Sir Alexander happened to pay a visit to this chief, and induced him to restore the stolen property. It was again lost by Mr. and Mrs. Johnstone, from its being secreted, along with some other plate, in a well at Boulogne during the French Revolution, and was never recovered by them. 'We can scarcely conceive a stranger turn of fate,' says Earl Stanhope, 'than that the same nerves and sinews which had throbbed to the eager pulse of a Scottish hero in the Highlands, should, a century afterwards, come to be worshipped as a talisman on an Indian idol shrine.'

The 'Great Marquis of Montrose,' as he is usually termed, was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, JAMES, who was born about the year 1631. He was restored to the family dignities and estates, and had a new patent of marquis granted to him after the Restoration, 12th October, 1660. With great good feeling, he refused to vote on the trial of the Marquis of Argyll, the noted enemy of his father. He received, on the 21st of August, 1661, a charter of the Lordship of Cowal, forfeited by the chief of the Campbells, and was appointed one of the extraordinary Lords of Session, June 25th, 1668. But he had a strong aversion to the intrigues and factions of a public career during that stormy period, and preferred the peace and repose of private life. The 'Good Marquis,' as he was designated, was peculiarly amiable in his disposition. He died in 1669, and was succeeded by his son-JAMES, third Marquis, who was appointed by Charles II. Captain of the Guard, and afterwards President of the Council. Unmindful of the example set him by his father, he acted as chancellor of the jury who brought in a verdict of guilty against the Earl of Argyll, his cousin-german, 12th December, 1681, one of the most iniquitous acts of that shameful period. The Marquis died prematurely in 1684, leaving an only son, JAMES, fourth Marquis and first Duke of Montrose. He was a mere child at the time of his father's death, and was left to the guardianship of his mother, along with the Earls of Haddington and Perth, Hay of Drummelzier, and Sir William Bruce of Kinross. On the 1st of February, 1688, however, the Marchioness was deprived of this office, on pretence of her marriage with Sir John Bruce, younger, of Kinross, but in reality it was believed because King James wished to have the young nobleman brought up as a Roman Catholic. Fortunately the expulsion of the arbitrary and unconstitutional sovereign from the throne frustrated his design; but his feeling on the subject was made evident by his removal from their seats on the bench of Lords Harcarse and Edmonstone, the judges who had voted in favour of the tutors selected by the father. The young Marquis spent some time travelling on the Continent. He grew up singularly handsome and engaging in his manners, and joined the Whig party, by whom he was highly esteemed and honoured. He was appointed High Admiral of Scotland in February, 1705, President of the Council, February 28th, 1706, was a steady supporter of the Union between Scotland and England, and was created Duke of Montrose on the 24th of April, 1707. He was five times chosen one of the representative peers of Scotland, and held that position from 1707 to 1727. He was also appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal, February 23rd, 1709, but was removed from that office in 1713 by the Tory Ministry. On hearing that Queen Anne was dying, the Duke, along with other Whig peers, hastened to Edinburgh, and, on the announcement of her death, they proclaimed George I., who had appointed the Duke one of the Lords of Regency. He then hastened to London to receive the new King, and six days after George had landed, he appointed Montrose Secretary of State for Scotland in room of the Earl of Mar, and he was sworn a Privy Councillor October 4, 1717. He was appointed Keeper of the Great Seal in Scotland; but, in consequence of his opposition to Walpole, he was dismissed from that office in April.

The Duke made a great addition to his hereditary estates by purchasing the property of the Duke of Lennox in Dumbartonshire, along with the hereditary sheriffdom of that county, the custodianship of Dumbarton Castle, and the regality of Lennox. His Grace was for many years involved in a kind of private, or local, war with the celebrated freebooter, Rob Roy Macgregor. They had some transactions in common in cattle dealing, the Duke having lent Rob considerable sums of money to enable him to carry on his speculations in the cattle trade. Unfortunately a sudden depression of markets, and the dishonesty of a partner named Macdonald, rendered Rob totally insolvent. The Duke, who conceived himself deceived and cheated by Macgregor's conduct, employed legal means to recover the money lent to him. Rob's landed property of Craigroyston was attached by the regular form of legal procedure, and his stock and furniture was seized and sold. Considering himself harshly and oppressively treated by the Duke, Macgregor carried on a predatory war against his Grace for thirty years, drove away his cattle, on one occasion robbed his factor of £300 which he had just received as rent, and repeatedly carried off quantities of corn from the granaries on the estate. The Duke made vigorous, but fruitless, efforts to destroy his troublesome adversary. On one occasion he actually surprised Macgregor and made him prisoner; but he succeeded in making his escape, in the manner described in Sir Walter Scott's novel of 'Rob Roy.'

The Duke, who was Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, died 7th January, 1742. The eldest of his four sons died in infancy. The second was created a peer of Great Britain by the title of Earl and Baron Graham of Belford, 23rd May, 1732, with remainder to his brother. He died unmarried in 1741. The third son-
WILLIAM, second Duke of Montrose, along with his younger brother, George, was placed under the tuition of David Mallet, or rather Malloch, from whom they were not likely to have learned much that was good, and along with him made the tour of Europe. The Duke was noted for his great personal courage. Boswell mentions that when riding one night near Farnham, on his way to London, Montrose (then Lord Graham) was attacked by two highwaymen on horseback; he instantly shot one of them, upon which the other galloped off. His servant, who was very well mounted, proposed to pursue and take the robber; but his Grace said, 'No, we have had blood enough; I hope the man may live to repent.' Under the Jurisdiction Act of 1747, the Duke recovered for the sheriffship of Dumbartonshire £3,000; for the regality of Montrose, £1,000; of Menteith, £200; of Lennox, £578 18s. 4d.; and of Darnley, £300; in all £5,078 18s 4d., instead of £15,000, which he claimed. The Duke became an adherent of William Pitt, and the family have ever since been attached to the Tory party. He died September 23rd, 1790, and was succeeded by his only surviving son- JAMES, third Duke of Montrose. He represented in the House of Commons, first the borough of Richmond, in Yorkshire, at the general election of 1780, and subsequently Great Bedwin in 1784. He was appointed one of the Lords of the Treasury on the formation of the Ministry of Mr. Pitt in 1783, became Paymaster of the Forces in 1789, and one of the Commissioners of the Indian Board. He was appointed Master of the Horse in 1790-an office which he resigned for that'of Lord Justice-General of Scotland in 1795. He was also President of the Board of Trade, June 10, 1804, and Joint Postmaster-General, July 13 in the same year. He was removed by the Ministry of 'All the Talents' in 1806, but on the return of the Tories to power in the following year, he was again made Master of the Horse, an office which he held until 1821, when he succeeded the Marquis of Hertford as Lord Chamberlain. Like his father, he was Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, and was also Lord-Lieutenant of the counties of Stirling and Dumbarton, in which, before the Reform Bill, his influence was predominant. He died December 30th, 1836.

Sir Nathaniel Wraxall, in the 'Memoirs of his own Times,' says of this Duke: 'Few individuals, however distinguished by birth, talents, parliamentary interest, or public services, have attained to more splendid employments, or have arrived at greater honours, than Lord Graham under the reign of George III. Besides enjoying the lucrative sinecure of Justice-General of Scotland for life, we have seen him occupy a place in the Cabinet while he was Postmaster-General, during Pitt's second ill-fated administration. If he possessed no distinguished talent, he displayed various qualities calculated to compensate for the want of great ability, particularly the prudence, sagacity, and attention to his own interests so characteristic of the Caledonian people. Nor did he want great energy as well as activity of mind and body. During the progress of the French Revolution, when the fabric of our constitution was threatened by internal and external attacks, Lord Graham, then become Duke of Montrose, enrolled himself as a private soldier in the City Light Horse. During several successive years he did duty in that capacity night and day, sacrificing to it his ease and his time, thus holding out an example worthy of imitation to the British nobility.'

The Duke was succeeded by his son JAMES, fourth Duke, who was Lord-Lieutenant of Stirlingshire, and commander of the Royal Archers of Scotland. He was esteemed and liked as a nobleman of an amiable disposition, but he took no prominent part in public affairs. He died in 1874, and was succeeded by his third and only surviving son- DOUGLAS BERESFORD MALISE RONALD GRAHAM, the fifth and present Duke, born in 1852. Lady Beatrice Violet, the second daughter of the late Duke, wife of the Hon. Algernon W. Fulke-Greville, is the authoress of several clever and popular works. Lady Alma, the youngest daughter, is the present Marchioness of Breadalbane."
(electricscotland.com)

John married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   Mary Graham (born about 1702 Scotland)

384      ii.   Daniel Graham (born about 1708 Knapsdale Parish, Argyleshire, Scotland - died about 1750 in Scotland)


896. Charles Collier,2,5 son of Isaac Collier Sr. and Mary Sarah Lockey , was born about 1670 in England 2 and died in 1722 in York County, VA., about age 52.2

General Notes:

Noted events in his life were:

• Will: "Will proved in York County, Va. on 20 Aug. 1722. He married (2) Mary _____. 6 children"
(Barbara Celotto)

Charles married Judith Myhill .2

Children from this marriage were:

448       i.   Isaac Collier (died in 1771 in Brunswich County, VA.)

         ii.   Thomas Collier (died in 1722)

        iii.   Elizabeth Collier ()

         iv.   Charles Collier (died on 12 Jul 1753 in York County, VA.)


897. Judith Myhill,2,5 daughter of John Myhill and Mary Lockey .

Judith married Charles Collier .2

898. Thomas Vines 2.,5

Thomas married Mary Hill .2

Children from this marriage were:

449       i.   Ann Vines (died after 1771)


899. Mary Hill 2.,5

Mary married Thomas Vines .2

976. Mathuel Corbin 2.,5

Mathuel married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

488       i.   William Corban (born on 7 Feb 1751 Halifax County, NC - died on 1 Jan 1826 in Montgomery County, TN.)


986. Christopher Guice Sr. 2,5 was born on 25 Jul 1718 in Germany 2 and died in Jul 1787 in Ft. Nashboro, TN., at age 69.2 Another name for Christopher was Christopher Guice.

Noted events in his life were:

• Alt. Death: Alt. Death, Abt Jul 1787, Fort Nashboro, TN. 2

Christopher married Mary Elizabeth Bickley 2 about 1744.2

Children from this marriage were:

494       i.   Abram L. Guice (born on 5 Feb 1805 Guice Biblle - died on 4 Mar 1866 in Franklin County, MS.)

493      ii.   Priscillia Guice (born on 20 Feb 1735 PA. - died before 1840 in MS.)

        iii.   David Guice (born on 30 Apr 1748 Germany)

         iv.   Hannah Guice (born on 2 Jan 1750 - died about 1800 in Ft. Opolousas, La.)

          v.   Michael Guice (born on 29 Oct 1751)

         vi.   Catherine Guice (born on 10 Sep 1753)

        vii.   Priscilla Guice (born on 20 Feb 1755 Germany - died before 1840)

       viii.   Christopher Guice Jr. (born on 5 Dec 1756 - died between 1813-1816)

         ix.   Elizabeth Guice (born on 15 Jul 1757)

          x.   Susannah Guice (born on 12 May 1760)

         xi.   Rachel Guice (born on 20 Mar 1762)

        xii.   Daniel Guice (born on 2 Jan 1764)

       xiii.   Jacob Guice (born on 26 May 1767 - died on 3 May 1835 in Franklin County, MS.)

        xiv.   Abraham Absalom Guice (born on 26 Mar 1769 - died on 20 Mar 1834 in Monroe, Ouachita Parish, La.)

         xv.   Ann Guice (born on 4 Feb 1788)

        xvi.   Mary Guice (born on 27 Mar 1790)


987. Mary Elizabeth Bickley,2,5 daughter of Adam Bickley and Unknown , was born about 1770 in South Carolina 2 and died on 15 Aug 1853 in Hamburg, Franklin County, MS., about age 83.2

Mary married Jacob Guice 2 on 8 Oct 1789 in Ft. Nashboro, Tenn., Davidson County (Now Nashville) North Carolina.2

Children from this marriage were:

          i.   David W. Guice (born on 10 Sep 1789 - died between 1832-1840)

         ii.   Mary B. Guice (born on 30 Jun 1791 - died on 15 Apr 1835)

        iii.   John Adam Bickley Guice (born on 15 Oct 1793 - died on 31 Dec 1828)

         iv.   Absalom Christopher Guice (born on 2 Jan 1796)

          v.   Catherinne A. Guice (born on 21 Dec 1797 - died on 4 May 1834)

         vi.   Hannah E. Guice (born on 29 Nov 1799 - died on 6 Oct 1885)

        vii.   Priscilla D. Guice (born on 25 Jan 1802 - died on 19 Jun 1843)

494    viii.   Abram L. Guice (born on 5 Feb 1805 Guice Biblle - died on 4 Mar 1866 in Franklin County, MS.)

         ix.   Sarah E. Guice (born on 27 Feb 1807 - died on 4 May 1834)

          x.   Susannah A. Guice (born on 22 Oct 1810 - died on 10 May 1834)

         xi.   Isaac Kinnison Guice (born on 18 Mar 1813 - died on 7 Jan 1895)

        xii.   Moses Elijah Guice (born on 27 Dec 1815 - died before 9 Feb 1853)

Mary next married Christopher Guice Sr. 2 about 1744.2

Noted events in his life were:

• Alt. Death: Alt. Death, Abt Jul 1787, Fort Nashboro, TN. 2

988. Jacob Guice,2,5 son of Christopher Guice Sr. and Mary Elizabeth Bickley , was born on 26 May 1767 2 and died on 3 May 1835 in Franklin County, MS., at age 67.2

General Notes: [graves 2002 good.FBK]

(Tennessee Soldiers in The Revolution" (Ouachita Parish Library, Monnroe, La.) give the marriage date as February 2, 1789, (p. 61 vol. 1 p. 3). This date is probably correct. See birth of first child.
12 Children (according to Bible and family tree, Tillman-Hamilton Vol. 2).

DOC. JACOB GUICE 12-2

* * * * *

12/31/1788 "Arrivals at Natchez" ADAM BICKLEY from Kentucky.
8/14/1797 Spanish grant by Carondelet JACOB GUICE, ADAM BICKLEY original owner.
Land claim Book B, p. 544, No. 533 - on Coles Creek 30 miles NE from Fort bounded by lands of Thomas Daniel. New Orleans, Claim filed 3/10 /1805. Located on Cole's creek, 400 arpents, 30 miles NE from Fort. witnessed by Nathaniel Kinnison.
JACOB GUICE -
10/5. - 8/1802 served as representative in Natchez court and knows as Captain Guice's District.
6/6/1803 overseer over roads in Guice's district and overseer for peer.
6/11/1803 Justice of Peace
10/22/1804 unrecorded land claims #1931 witnessed by Jacob Guice and Christopher Guice. Land on Morgan's Fork of the Homochitto River.

12. JACOB GUICE (Christopher) continued...

3/8/1804 on jury, Adams county
7/1804 served on jury at Natchez court
1805 taxes Adams county, 640 acres on Coles creek
1807 taxes Adams county 640 acres on Homochitto (same land)
1808 taxes Coles creek, Jefferson county, Miss. Terr., 400 acres.
1810 census Franklin county
1810 Justice of peace and member of Quorum, Franklin county
1810 tax rolls, 400 acres on Coles creek, Spanish donation
1813 tax rolls Coles creek
12/23/1815 $2100 T7 R1E sec. 25, 640 acres by donation
1816 census Franklin county
1820 census Franklin county, Jacob Guice, Sr.

2 males under 5 2 females 10-16
1 male 10-16 3 females 16-26
1 male 16-26 1 female over 45
1 male 26-45
1 male over 45

1830 census Franklin county Jacob Guice, Sr.
1 male 10-15 1 female 15-20
1 male 15-20 2 females 20-30
1 male 60-70 1 female 30-40
1 female 50-60

Jacob Guice died May 3, 1835 in Franklin county

1850 census Franklin county #873 (?)
Guice, Mary E. 75 female $1600 S.C.
Absalom 54 m Miss.
Magee, Martha J. 60 f
Trimble, Hannah 17 f
Trimble, Absalom 8 m

Jacob married Mary Elizabeth Bickley 2 on 8 Oct 1789 in Ft. Nashboro, Tenn., Davidson County (Now Nashville) North Carolina.2

989. Mary Elizabeth Bickley,2,5 daughter of Adam Bickley and Unknown , was born about 1770 in South Carolina 2 and died on 15 Aug 1853 in Hamburg, Franklin County, MS., about age 83.2

990. Fredrick Stump,2,5 son of Christopher Stump and Margaretha (Stump) , died on 20 May 1820 in Nashville, TN..2

Fredrick married Ann Smavley .2

Children from this marriage were:

495       i.   Ann Stump (born on 29 Apr 1763 PA. - died on 1 May 1816 in Franklin County, MS.)


991. Ann Smavley 2,5 died on 26 Nov 1804 in Ft. Nashboro, TN..2

Ann married Fredrick Stump .2
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1280. Pierre Mounier,11 son of Louis Mounier and Elizabeth Martinaux , was born in Re', France.

Pierre married Louise Robinet .11

Children from this marriage were:

640       i.   Moses Mounier (died on 4 Oct 1740 in Berkeley County, South Carolina)

         ii.   Estienne Mounier (died in 1748)


1281. Louise Robinet,11 daughter of Louis Robinet and Unknown , was born in France.

Louise married Pierre Mounier .11

1508. John Barnes,173 son of Thomas Barnes and Diana Bragg , was born about 1666 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia 173 and died between 1736-1737 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.173

John married Ann Jones 173 in 1702.173

Children from this marriage were:

754       i.   John Barnes (born about 1720 - died between 1787-1790 in Wayne County, North Carolina)


1509. Ann Jones 173 was born in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

Ann married John Barnes 173 in 1702.173

1792. Isaac Collier Sr.,2,5 son of Robert Collier and Margery Strange , was born about 1606 in London, England 2 and died after 1688 in York County, VA..2

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: ISAAC COLLIER BORN in LONDON, ENGLAND, and moved to YORK COUNTY, VA. IN 1671

His will was written on 10 Mar. 1687 and was probated on 29 May 1688 in York County, Va. He married (1) lizabeth Baptist of St. Antholin Parish, London, d/o Edward Baptist. One child. He married (2) Mary Sarah Lockey of London. She married (2) Peter Bennet. five children

He was the 4 th child."
(Barbara Celotto)

Isaac married Mary Sarah Lockey .2

Children from this marriage were:

896       i.   Charles Collier (born about 1670 England - died in 1722 in York County, VA.)

         ii.   Isaac Collier Jr. (born on 4 May 1653 St. Antholin Parish, Londond - died about 1675 in Hampton, Elizabeth Co., VA.)

        iii.   Thomas Collier (died about 1704 in York Co., VA.)

         iv.   Abraham Collier (died in 1704)

          v.   Sarah Collier ()


1793. Mary Sarah Lockey 2,5 was born in London, England 2 and died after 1699.2

Mary married Isaac Collier Sr. .2

1794. John Myhill 2.,5

John married Mary Lockey .2

Children from this marriage were:

897       i.   Judith Myhill ()


1795. Mary Lockey,2,5 daughter of Edward Lockery and Unknown .

Mary married John Myhill .2

1974. Adam Bickley .2

Adam married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

987       i.   Mary Elizabeth Bickley (born about 1770 South Carolina - died on 15 Aug 1853 in Hamburg, Franklin County, MS.)


1976. Christopher Guice Sr. 2,5 was born on 25 Jul 1718 in Germany 2 and died in Jul 1787 in Ft. Nashboro, TN., at age 69.2 Another name for Christopher was Christopher Guice.

1977. Mary Elizabeth Bickley,2,5 daughter of Adam Bickley and Unknown , was born about 1770 in South Carolina 2 and died on 15 Aug 1853 in Hamburg, Franklin County, MS., about age 83.2

1980. Christopher Stump,2,5 son of John George Stump and Anna Margaretha (Stump) , died on 29 Oct 1779.2

Christopher married Margaretha (Stump) .2

Children from this marriage were:

990       i.   Fredrick Stump (died on 20 May 1820 in Nashville, TN.)


1981. Margaretha (Stump) 2.,5

Margaretha married Christopher Stump .2
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2560. Louis Mounier 11 was born in France.

Louis married Elizabeth Martinaux .11

Children from this marriage were:

1280       i.   Pierre Mounier (born in Re', France)


2561. Elizabeth Martinaux 11 was born in France.

Elizabeth married Louis Mounier .11

2562. Louis Robinet 11 was born in France.

Louis married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

1281       i.   Louise Robinet (born in France)


3016. Thomas Barnes, son of Edward Barnes and Unknown , was born about 1645 and died about 1683 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, about age 38.

Thomas married Diana Bragg .173

Children from this marriage were:

1508       i.   John Barnes (born about 1666 Isle of Wight County, Virginia - died between 1736-1737 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia)


3017. Diana Bragg 173 was born about 1628.173 Another name for Diana was Ann.173

Diana married Thomas Barnes .

3584. Robert Collier,2,5 son of Thurston Collier and Elizabeth Tunstall , was born about 1556 in County Staffordshire, England 2 and died in 1625 in London, England, about age 69.2

Noted events in his life were:

• Occupation: Pewterer, London, England. 2

• General Information: "He moved to London before 1579 and married Margery Strange, a widow of St. Botolph, Aldgate. He was a pewterer and became a man of some renown in London. He died ther in 1625. Four children."
(Barbara Celotto)

Robert married Margery Strange .2

Children from this marriage were:

1792       i.   Isaac Collier Sr. (born about 1606 London, England - died after 1688 in York County, VA.)

         ii.   Charles Collier (born about 1580 London, England)

        iii.   John Collier (born about 1594 London, England - died before 8 Jan 1650 in County Surrey, England)

         iv.   Mary Collier (born about 1600 - died after 1650)


3585. Margery Strange 2.,5

Margery married Robert Collier .2

3590. Edward Lockery 2.,5

Edward married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

1795       i.   Mary Lockey ()


3960. John George Stump 2.,5

John married Anna Margaretha (Stump) .2

Children from this marriage were:

1980       i.   Christopher Stump (died on 29 Oct 1779)


3961. Anna Margaretha (Stump) 2.,5

Anna married John George Stump .2
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6032. Edward Barnes .173

Edward married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

3016       i.   Thomas Barnes (born about 1645 - died about 1683 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia)


7168. Thurston Collier,2,5 son of Sir Robert Collier and Agnes Venable , was born about 1542 in England 2 and died in England.2

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: "Thurston was the 3rd Son and had three children. Robert was the 3rd child."
(Barbara Celotto)

Thurston married Elizabeth Tunstall .2

Children from this marriage were:

3584       i.   Robert Collier (born about 1556 County Staffordshire, England - died in 1625 in London, England)


7169. Elizabeth Tunstall 2.,5

Elizabeth married Thurston Collier .2
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14336. Sir Robert Collier,2,5 son of James Collier and Isabella Levenson , was born about 1515 in England 2 and died in 1586 in England, about age 71.2 Another name for Robert was John Collyer.

Noted events in his life were:

• General Information: "A Coat of Arms was conceded to Robert Collyer of Darleston by letter patent in 1538. Sir Robert had 13 children."
(Barbara Celotto)

Robert married Agnes Venable 2 on 1 Mar 1552-1553 in England.2

Children from this marriage were:

7168       i.   Thurston Collier (born about 1542 England - , died in England)


14337. Agnes Venable,2,5 daughter of Sir Thomas Venable and Unknown .

Agnes married Sir Robert Collier 2 on 1 Mar 1552-1553 in England.2
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28672. James Collier,2,5 son of Robert Collier and Isabella Doddington , was born about 1490 in England 2 and died on 3 Mar 1547-1548 in England, about age 57.2

James married Isabella Levenson .2

Children from this marriage were:

14336        i.   Sir Robert Collier (born about 1515 England - died in 1586 in England)


28673. Isabella Levenson 2,5 was born in Wolververhampton, England.2

Isabella married James Collier .2

28674. Sir Thomas Venable 2.,5

Sir married (name unknown).

Children from this marriage were:

14337        i.   Agnes Venable ()


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57344. Robert Collier 2,5 was born about 1453 in France 2,176 and died in 1522 in County Staffordshire, England, about age 69 2.,177

Noted events in his life were:

• Alt. Death: 1501.

Robert married Isabella Doddington .2

Children from this marriage were:

28672        i.   James Collier (born about 1490 England - died on 3 Mar 1547-1548 in England)


57345. Isabella Doddington,2,5 daughter of Sir John Doddington and Elizabeth Hussey , was born about 1460 in County Staffordshire, England.2

Isabella married Robert Collier .2
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previous  Seventeenth Generation




114690. Sir John Doddington 2.,5

Sir married Elizabeth Hussey .2

Children from this marriage were:

57345        i.   Isabella Doddington (born about 1460 County Staffordshire, England)


114691. Elizabeth Hussey 2.,5

Elizabeth married Sir John Doddington .2


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