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THE JONES FAMILY
OF THE
CHOCTAW NATION, INDIAN TERRITORY

HALITO  HSPACE= HELLO

The Jones family were Choctaws who were removed from Mississippi to Indian Territory on the Choctaw Trail of Tears. They most likely arrived in December of 1832 and first settled along the Red River. They were descendants of the Ancient Mississippi Temple Mound Builders and are now know as the Oklahoma Choctaws

Much has been written about Principal Chief Wilson N. Jones who was at one time the wealthiest man in Indian Territory. Little, however has been written about the other Jones families of the Choctaw Nation.

Solomon Jones was born about 1808 in Mississippi, He most likely was a brother of Captain Nathaniel Jones, the father of Wilson N. Jones. He died about 1879 in Blue County Indian Territory (now Bryan Co., Oklahoma). He had seven known sons. All but the three oldest sons are Original Enrollees of the "Final Rolls" of the Five Civilized Tribes (commonly referred to as the Dawes Commission or "Dawes Rolls") Choctaw By Blood. Many of the grandchildren of Solomon Jones were also Original Enrollees.


....."Thus the first Indians began their removal as early as October, 1830, although the main removal was to occur during the years 1831, 32, and 33. It was a 350 mile journey. Most of the territory covered was wild and unsettled. It was not uncommon for the emigrants to walk half a day through waist high water in a swamp. Little has been documented about this transfer of human beings from one domain to another. It was properly known as the Trail of Tears. Death followed every step. When they arrived at their destination, few of their elders had survived the trip. They were a bewildered, dirty, bedraggled and ill group when they arrived."
By Chief David Gardner

Choctaw Family Forced Removal

 

In 1830, the TREATY OF DANCING RABBIT CREEK forcibly relocated the entire Choctaw nation from their homeland in Mississippi west to what is now known as Southeastern Oklahoma. Over twenty thousand Choctaws were moved on this long journey. Seven thousand survived this removal on what has come to be called
"The Trail of Tears".

 


OKLAHOMA COUNTIES LOCATED IN THE CHOCTAW NATION

  • ATOKA
    First called Shappaway. The name was later changed to Atoka in honor of Captain Atoka. Created from portions of Atoka, Blue, Jack's Fork and Kiamichi counties of the Choctaw Nation

  • BRYAN
    Created from portions of Blue and Jackson counties in the Choctaw Nation

  • CHOCTAW
    Created in 1907 out of the districts of Apukshunubbee and Pushmataha and contains portions of Jackson, Kiamitia (Kiamichi), Cedar and Towson counties of the Choctaw Nation.

  • COAL
    Created from parts of Atoka and Jack's Fork in the Pushmataha district of the Choctaw Nation

  • HASKELL
    Haskell County was one of the first permanent Choctaw settlements in the Indian Territory. Many Choctaws arrived by steamboat at Tamaha, and settled there along the Arkansas River.

  • HUGHES   (part of)
    A small part of Hughes county was in what was Tobucksy county in the Moshulatubbee District of the Choctaw Nation

  • LATIMER
    Created from parts of Gaines, Sugarloof, San Bois, Skullyville, Wade and Jack's Fork of the Apukshunnubbee, Pushmataha and Moshulatubbee districts of the Choctaw Nation

  • LE FLORE
    Created from parts of Skullyville, Sugarloof, Wade, Nashoba and Cebar counties of the Apukshunnubbee and Moshulatubbee districts of the Choctaw Nation

  • PITTSBURG
    Pittsburg County, Oklahoma was created from portions of Atoka, Gaines, Jack's Fork and Tobucksy counties of the Choctaw Nation, and was named for Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

  • PUSHMATAHA
    Created from portions of Jack's Fork, Cedar, Noshoba, Kiamichi and Wade counties of the Choctaw Nation.

  • McCURTAIN
    Created from parts of Nashoba, Ceder, Towson, Buktucklo, Eagle and Red River counties of the Apukshunnubbee district of the Choctaw Nation



 

Do not stand at my grave and weep; I am not there. I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow; I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain; I am the gentle autumn's rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush, I am the swift uplifting rush
of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft star that shines at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.
I am not there; I did not die
.
(Author unknown)

 

CHOCTAW TRIBAL MEMBERS OBITUARIES
Obituaries from the BISHINIK The Bishinik is the official publication of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

A Federal law passed in 1990
now requires museums and Universities
to return human remains and sacred objects to the tribes.
Anyone who may know of a grave being desecrated, destroyed or damaged in any way or if you know of someone selling grave goods or burial items, please
call Terry Cole, 1-800-522-6170, ext. 2243

 

 

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THANKS FOR STOPPING BY

November 6, 1999

 

 

 

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