Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

 

 

 

Top of Page

Our Maternal

 

WALKER*

 

Family Ancestors

Walker - Scotland (purple)

Web-Site Home Page2 135.jpg

*We have located two distinct Walker family lineages.  Both families are included on this webpage.

Margaret Walker &

Her Descendants

William Walker &

His Descendants

Source Documents

Family Images Gallery

Researching

by Location

Origins of

the Surname

Variations of

the Surname

Armorial Bearings,

Symbols and Mottoes

Gen-Resources

 

 

Family Tree 4 (20 grey)

MFamily 1

margaret walker

& her descendants

Family Tree 4 (20 grey)

Family History

Ancestral Lineage

Migrations of the

 American Family

Family History 1

Family History

The only ancestor currently known of this Walker lineage is our 9th great-grandmother Margaret Walker. Margaret was most likely born in England about 1615.  This year is based upon an approximate age of 20 years when documented marriage took place.  Margaret probably lived in that area of England were the counties of Lancashire and West Yorkshire border.  In 1635 Margaret married Thomas Eubank at Penrith, now in the county of Cumbria, England*.  Two known off-spring, both sons, are attributed to this union.  The youngest son Thomas was born around 1650.  As such it is assumed that Margaret (Walker) Eubank died after that year in the county of Lancashire, England where the other son, Richard, is documented as having been born.   Our ancestral line continues through the aforementioned son Richard Eubank who is said to have been born in 1644.

* Cumbria was formerly a part of Cumberland an historic county of North West England that existed from the 12th century until 1974. Cumberland bordered Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and Dumfriesshire in Scotland to the north.

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

Ancestral lineage 1

 

Ancestral Lineage

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

Additional information about the persons in our database  as   well  as   a   complete

Surname Locator MMPS.jpg

listing of individuals with this surname may be reviewed by clicking on this LINK.

DESCENDANT REGISTER

Generation 1

MARGARET1 WALKER was born about 1615 in England. She died after 1650 in Lancashire, England. She married Thomas Eubank on 30 Jun 1635 in Penrith, Cumberland, England. He was born in 1610 in England. He died after 1650 in Lancashire, England.

 

Thomas Eubank and Margaret Walker had the following children:

 

·            RICHARD2 EUBANK was born in 1644 in Lancashire, England. He died in 1698 in Talbot County, Maryland.

 

·            THOMAS EUBANK was born in 1650 in England. He died on 09 Feb 1732 in Talbot County, Maryland. He married Martha Harrison in 1681 in England. She was born about 1654 in Talbot County, Maryland.

searching the web (gold)

Free Surname
 Search Engines

searching the web (gold)

The WorldConnect Project is a set of tools, which allow users to upload, modify, link, and display their family trees as a means to share their genealogy with other researchers.

RootsWeb (logo2) drop shadow2 copy.jpg

The WorldConnect Project continues to grow, as it now contains several hundred million records thus it offers researchers the single largest collection of family trees on the Internet.

Use this free genealogy site to help you get the best genealogy searches from Google™ by using your family tree, for your research. It will create a series of different searches using tips or "tricks"

Google Surname Search 1

that will likely improve your results. The different searches will give you many different ways of using Google and the Internet to find ancestry information about this or any other Surname. 

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

wagon2 (grey left)

Migration of Family 1

Migrations of the
American Family

wagon2 (grey)

       Tracing our own family’s paths of migration can prove crucial in identifying previous generations and eventually, figuring out where and how they arrived in the “New World” as well as where they eventually settled.  Knowing the network of trails American pioneers traveled can help you guess where to start looking.  The trail map(s) provided below may assist you in understanding the routes that our direct ancestors of this family may have taken to find new homes and opportunities in the vast area now encompassed by the United States.

      During the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries hundreds of thousands of Europeans made the perilous ocean voyage to America.  For many it was an escape from economic hardship and religious persecution.  For most it was an opportunity to start over, own their own land, and make a better future for their descendents.

Immigration records show a number of people bearing the name of WALKER, or one of its variants, as arriving in North America between the 17th and 20th centuries.  Some of these immigrants were: John Walker, Roger Walker, and Isabel Walker, who all immigrated to Virginia in 1623; Augustine Walker, who settled in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1630; James Walker, who arrived in St. Christopher in 1635.

Use the following links to find more early immigrants with this surname:

$ Search Ancestry.com Immigration Records; or Free Ship’s Passenger lists at OliveTreeGenealogy.com

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Family Tree 4 (20 grey)

Family 2

William walker

& his descendants

Family Tree 4 (20 grey)

Family History

Ancestral Lineage

Migrations of the

 American Family

Family History 2

Family History

     It is believed that, our 4th great-grandfather, William Walker was born circa 1755 in Virginia. Although it is quite probable that he served in the Revolutionary War but no verifiable records have yet been found.  It is known that he married his wife Sarah in Virginia and that they lived in Montgomery County, which is located in the southwestern part of that state.  To this union at least six known off-spring were born between 1790 and 1801. It is believed that sometime around 1793 or 1794 William moved his family from Montgomery County into that area of eastern Kentucky and eventually settled in a locality then in Mason County and now encompassed by Floyd County since 1800.  Based upon research of property transactions of families allied with Walker such as Brown, Salisbury and Lesley it appears that William settled near Allen City where Beaver Creek joins with the Levisa RiverWilliam Walker continued to live in Floyd County until his death in 1818.  County court records show that August 17, 1818, his son Robert Walker moved to be named as administrator of his father’s estate. Apparently the court ruled against his motion which would lead one to wonder about his relationships with his siblings.

     Our descendancy continues through William and Sarah’s eldest daughter Jemima Walker.  Jemima was born at Montgomery County, Virginia in 1791.  In 1816 she married Robert Brown at Floyd County.  Jemima produced at least ten known off-spring between 1817 and 1837.  Around 1826 Jemima and her family, which now included four children, left Floyd County and headed west to Edgar County, Illinois. It was here that the other six of Jemima’s children were born.   It appears that the Brown family remained here until about 1851.  They would eventually move west into Missouri along with seven of their ten children.  Jemima and her family settled in a part of Osage County that would become Maries County in 1855.  The property was located just east of Bloomington on Lanes Prairie, and the Dry Fork Creek. The land had been entered by their son, Solomon W. Brown, a short time before upon his return from the Mexican War. Jemima lived her until her death in 1871 at age 79 years.  She is buried with her husband Robert in nearby Pinnell Cemetery. Our lineage continues through their daughter Lydia Ann Brown, 1834-1913.

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

Ancestral Lineage 2

 

Ancestral Lineage

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

Additional information about the persons in our database  as   well  as   a   complete

Surname Locator MMPS.jpg

listing of individuals with this surname may be reviewed by clicking on this LINK.

DESCENDANT REGISTER

Generation 1

  

 WILLIAM1 WALKER was born about 1755 in Virginia, USA. He died on 17 Aug 1818 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He married Sarah Walker (nee?) about 1789 in Virginia. She was born in 1757 in Virginia, USA. She died in 1801 in Floyd County, Kentucky.

 

William Walker and Sarah Walker (nee?) had the following children:

 

i.     ROBERT2 WALKER was born about 1790 in Virginia, USA.

 

ii. JEMIMA WALKER was born on 29 Jun 1791 in Montgomery County, Virginia. She died on 08 May 1871 in Johnson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She married Robert Brown, son of James Brown (??) on 18 Feb 1816 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He was born on 30 Dec 1772 in Washington County, Virginia. He died on 29 Dec 1852 in Osage County, Missouri.

 

iii. ELIZABETH WALKER was born about 1793 in Montgomery County, Virginia. She died in 1887 in Halbert, Floyd Co., Kentucky. She married William Salisbury, son of Richard Salisbury and Polly Milton on 17 Mar 1812 in Floyd Co., Kentucky. He was born in 1783 in Henry Co., Virginia??. He died about 1857 in Floyd County, Kentucky.

 

iv. MOSES WALKER was born about 1795 in Mason County, Kentucky ?. He died about 1855 in Maries County, Missouri. He married (1) BELINDA MEADE in 1844 in Danville, Vermilion Co., Illinois. She was born in Edgar County, Illinois. She died in Maries County, Missouri. He married (2) ELIZABETH STRATTON in Illinois. She was born about 1795. She died about 1843 in Vermillion County, Illinois ?.

 

v. JANE "JENNY" WALKER was born on 04 Apr 1799 in Fleming County,  Kentucky. She died on 15 Jul 1866 in Clarksville, Red River Co., Texas. She married Richard Francis Giddens on 28 Dec 1818 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He was born on 04 Dec 1798 in Wilkes County, North Carolina. He died on 20 Nov 1870 in Clarksville, Red River Co., Texas.

 

vi. RHODA WALKER was born about 1801 in Floyd County, Kentucky ?. She died on 26 Aug 1859 in Danville, Vermillion Co., Illinois. She married Milton Leslie on 11 Dec 1821 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He was born on 29 Nov 1800 in Tazwell County, Virginia. He died on 08 Feb 1872 in Danville, Vermillion Co., Illinois.

Generation 2

 

JEMIMA2 WALKER (William1) was born on 29 Jun 1791 in Montgomery County, Virginia. She died on 08 May 1871 in Johnson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She married Robert Brown, son of James Brown (??) on 18 Feb 1816 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He was born on 30 Dec 1772 in Washington County, Virginia. He died on 29 Dec 1852 in Osage County, Missouri.

 

Robert Brown and Jemima Walker had the following children:

 

i.   SOLOMON WALKER 3 BROWN was born on 19 Sep 1817 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He died on 28 Oct 1879 in Johnson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He married Hannah R. James, daughter of John James and First Nm. Unk.? Moreland on 01 Mar 1849 in Crawford County, Missouri. She was born on 18 Sep 1823 in Tennessee. She died on 26 Jan 1893 in Missouri.

 

ii.   ELIZABETH BROWN was born on 19 Jun 1819 in Floyd County, Kentucky. She died on 03 Jul 1883 in Galena, Cherokee Co., Kansas. She married James Skelton Bradshaw on 17 Nov 1836.

 

iii.     DAVID BROWN was born about 1820 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He died about 1847.

 

iv.     SARAH REBECCA BROWN was born about 1824 in Floyd County, Kentucky. She died between 1880-1900 in Baxter County, Arkansas. She married James A. Deatherage on 03 Jan 1858 in Phelps County, Missouri. He was born about 1825 in Tennessee.

 

v.      NANCY BROWN was born on 19 Jan 1828 in Edgar County, Illinois. She died on 28 Feb 1852 in Maries County, Missouri. She married James M. Bradshaw on 19 Jan 1851 in Edgar County, Illinois.

 

vi.     TANDY B. BROWN was born about 1830 in Edgar County, Illinois. She died about 1847 in Mexico ?.

 

vii.   ROBERT BROWN JR. was born in 1833 in Edgar County., Illinois. He died between 1871-1880 in Jefferson Twp., Maries co., Missouri. He married Amanda Smith on 12 Jul 1868 in Osage County, Missouri. She was born about 1843 in Tennessee. She died between 1871-1880 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri.

 

Robert Brown Jr. was born about 1836 in Edgar Co., Illinois.

 

viii.  LYDIA ANN BROWN was born in May 1834 in Paris Twp., Edgar County, Illinois. She died on 15 Mar 1913 in Voorhees Twp., Stevens Co., Kansas. She married John P. Moreland, son of John Moreland and Sarah Bennett on 24 Apr 1853 in Crawford County, Missouri. He was born on 08 Dec 1832 in McMinn County, Tennessee. He died on 28 Jun 1917 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri.

 

ix.     RHODA S. BROWN was born about 1835 in Edgar County, Illinois. She died on 18 Sep 1910 in Phelps County, Missouri. She married (1) THOMAS KNIGHT about 1867 in Missouri. He died between 1870-1880 in Johnson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri ?. She married (2) NATHANIEL M. MONTGOMERY on 01 Dec 1885 in Phelps County, Missouri.

 

x.      CAROLINA BROWN was born about 1837 in Edgar County, Illinois. She married THOMAS PARKER.  

searching the web (gold)

Free Surname
 Search Engines

searching the web (gold)

The WorldConnect Project is a set of tools, which allow users to upload, modify, link, and display their family trees as a means to share their genealogy with other researchers.

RootsWeb (logo2) drop shadow2 copy.jpg

The WorldConnect Project continues to grow, as it now contains several hundred million records thus it offers researchers the single largest collection of family trees on the Internet.

Use this free genealogy site to help you get the best genealogy searches from Google™ by using your family tree, for your research. It will create a series of different searches using tips or "tricks"

Google Surname Search 1

that will likely improve your results. The different searches will give you many different ways of using Google and the Internet to find ancestry information about this or any other Surname. 

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

wagon2 (grey left)

Migrations of Family 2

Migrations of the
American Family

wagon2 (grey)

     It is believed that sometime around 1793 or 1794. William Walker moved his family a distance of about 200 miles over the Appalachian Mountains and into Kentucky. Most likely he traveled from Montgomery County, Virginia west along the Levisa River what is now Floyd County, Kentucky.  Today much of this can be driven on what is now U.S. Route 460 and U.S. Route 23.  William settled near Allen City where Beaver Creek joins with the Levisa River.  William Walker continued to live in Floyd County until his death in 1818. 

      Around 1826 several of William Walker’s married children began to leave Floyd County for better land and opportunities in the west.  This group would include William’s son Moses Walker, daughters Jane Walker and

husband Richard F. Giddens, Rhoda Walker and husband Milton Lesley, as well as our 3rd great-grandmother Jemima Walker husband Robert Brown and their four children would all head west to Edgar County, Illinois.  To accomplish this move they may have floated down the Levisa and Big Sandy Rivers to Catlettsburg where they would come upon the Ohio River.  Once on the Ohio River they could float downstream to mouth of the Wabash River.  From Here they would travel upstream for about 165 miles to Edgar County whose eastern boundary lies on the

Walker Migrations 1794-1851

click on thumbnail for larger image

Wabash.   An overland route would be more direct but also more strenuous.  If this type of route was taken by the Brown family they would certainly have traveled west from Floyd County to Louisville, Kentucky located on the Ohio River.  Here they would cross over into southern Indiana and take a trail that would that would approximate present day U.S. Route 150 to Edgar County.

     Around 1851 Jemima Walker and her family would move west into Missouri along with seven of their ten children.  Jemima and her family settled in a part of Osage County that would become Maries County in 1855.  The property was located just east of Bloomington on Lanes Prairie, and the Dry Fork Creek.

 

The Development of an Historical Migration Route

It is understood that in many if not all cases we do not know exactly what routes our ancestors took as they migrated throughout the United States.   As such certain assumptions have been utilized to re-create the migration path presented above.  With regard to 18th and 19th century land routes we assume that they travelled along few trails and roads that were in existence at the time.  Research shows that a great many of these old paths and trails are today designated as U.S. Highway Routes.  For example, a major east-west route of migration known as the National Road is now U.S. Route 40, and a primary north-south migration route of the 18th century followed the Great Indian War and Trading Path is now U.S. Route 11.  In some situations the re-created migration route may travel along state routes that connect or run through the seat of a county as that populated place is probably the oldest settlement in the area. The use of water as a migration route is also likely.  For example, during the late 18th and early 19th centuries many families travelled west on the Ohio River as they moved on the new lands in Missouri or the Old Northwest Territory.  As such when applicable water routes have been included as the possible migration route.   

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Resources 22

Source documents

walker

Source
Documents

 

Resources 22

The documents contained within this “Source Documents Archives” have been located during our research of this family, and used as evidence to prove many of the facts contained within the database of this family’s record.   We have source documents related to the following persons within our database with this surname.

Margaret Walker and Her Descendants

·       None

·        

William Walker and His Descendants

·       Elizabeth WALKER Salisbury - 1850 U.S. Census

·       Elizabeth WALKER Salisbury - 1880 U.S. Census

·       Elizabeth WALKER Salisbury – Headstone

·       Jemima Walker - 1816 Marriage Bond

·       Jemima WALKER Brown - 1860 Census

·       Jemima WALKER Brown - 1870 U.S. Census

·       Jemima WALKER Brown - headstone 1

·       Jemima Walker Brown - headstone 2

·       Robert J. Walker - Civil War Invalid Pension Card

·       Robert J. Walker - Civil War Widow's Pension Card

·       Sarah WALKER Deatherage - 1880 U.S. Census

·       Walker - History of Maries Co., Chapter 24

This Link will take you to our

Source Docs Archives (230x71)

archive of source documents.  

You are welcome to download any of the documents contained within this archive that does not cite a copyright.  Should you encounter a problem obtaining a copy you may get in touch with us via the contact information found at the end of this web-page.

     Most of these documents can be considered as primary or secondary evidence.  Primary evidence is usually defined as the best available to prove the fact in question, usually in an original document or record.  Secondary evidence is in essence all that evidence which is inferior in its origin to primary evidence. That does not mean secondary evidence is always in error, but there is a greater chance of error.  Examples of this type of evidence would be a copy of an original record, or oral testimony of a record’s contents.  Published genealogies and family histories are also secondary evidence.

     Classifying evidence as either primary or secondary does not tell anything about its accuracy or ultimate value.  This is especially true of secondary evidence.  Thus it is always a good idea to ask the following questions: (1) How far removed from the original is it, (when it is a copy)?; (2) What was the reason for the creation of the source which contains this evidence?; and (3) Who was responsible for creating this secondary evidence and what interest did they have in its accuracy?

SOURCE: Greenwood, Val D., The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, 2nd edition, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD 21202, 1990, pgs. 62-63

Documents 1a

If you have any source 
documents relating to this 
family, we would greatly 
appreciate hearing from you.

Documents 1a

Arrow (red up) 23X21.JPG

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Family Collage grad 3 framed copy

Images gallery

walker

Family Images
Gallery

Family Collage grad 3 framed copy

During our research we have collected images and photographs that are of general interest to a particular family.  Some of them are presented on this website because we believe they tend to provide the reader with additional information which may aid in the understanding of our ancestors past lives.

 

If you have any photographs or other images relating to 
this topic, we would greatly appreciate hearing from you.

This Link will take you to our

Family Image Archives

collection of family photographs.  

searching the web (Purple)

Free Image Search
help from Google

searching the web (Purple)

Use the power of Google™ to find more interesting images about this topic. This button will link you to the Google Images Search   page.   Enter   the   topic   you   are

Google Image Search Search

searching in the box and click “Search Images”. At the “Images” display page you will see the image, as well as the website of which it is associated.

arrow up lt blue 30x30

World 1(lime)

Ancestral locations

walker

 

Researching 
by Location

World 1(lime)

Researching the locations where our ancestors lived has provided us with valuable evidence needed to fill in the gaps in our family trees.  It has also led us to many interesting facts that enhance the overall picture of each family group.

Locations of

Direct Ancestors

Locational Distribution

of  this Surname

Where In the World

are my Ancestors?

 

Locatiof Direct Ancestors

Locations of Our Direct Ancestors

 

The names of states and counties on the following list were derived from the known places where the Direct Ancestors in the “Ancestral Lineage” (see above) were born, married, and / or died.

Margaret Walker and Her Descendants

COUNTRY

STATE

COUNTY / SUBDIVISION

UNITED KINGDOM

ENGLAND

Lancashire;  Cumbria

William Walker and His Descendants

COUNTRY

STATE

COUNTY / SUBDIVISION

UNITED STATES

VIRGINIA

Montgomery

KENTUCKY

Floyd

ILLINOIS

Edgar

MISSOURI

Maries

Use this LINK to find out more about this

ANCESTRAL LOCATIONS link button

ancestral family and the locations listed above.

Arrow (red up)

Locational distributionstors

Locational Distribution of This Surname

Knowing the geographical areas where the surname you are researching is clustered and distributed is an indispensable tool in deciding where to focus your research.  We believe that the “Public Profiler” website will open up to you a wide range of solutions which implement current research in spatial analysis.  This site provides an array of local spatial information tools useful to the genealogist. 

The information presented herein shows where the WALKER surname is distributed within North America as well as in the United Kingdom, the probable country of origin of this family.      Statistics show that there are approximately 3,028 persons per million of population with this surname, within The United Kingdom, and 1,844 persons per million of population within the United States.  New Zealand is found to be the country in the world where this surname is the second most highly clustered having approximately 2,866 persons per million of population.  The top region of the world where this surname is the most highly clustered is the  Opotiki District, New Zealand, with 10,384  

NORTH AMERICA

UNITED KINGDOM

WALKER-Surname Dist. NA

WALKER-Surname Dist. UK

click on thumbnail for larger image

persons per million, and Brimingham, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom is the top city where this surname is found.

Click on the LINK to the right to see more information about the World distribution of a surname.  You can get

Public Profiler World Names (logo)

Arrow (red up)

greater detail for any of the following maps by clicking on the area, i.e state, county that you are interested in.

Looking for world (dk grn)

Wjere are my ancestors Ancestors

Where in the World
are My Ancestors?

Looking for world (dk grn) right

Resources which enhance our knowledge of the places inhabited by our ancestors are almost as important as their names. The LINK to the right will take you to Maps, Gazetteers,   and  other  helpful   resources 

Maps & Gazetteers 3

that will assist in discovering Ancestral Locations.  These web sites comprise only a small portion of what is available for researchers interested in learning more about where their ancestors lived.

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Origins of the surname

walker

Origins of the Surname

An Introduction

to the Surname

Source/Meaning

of the Surname

History of

the Surname

More About

Surnames

 

An Introduction to the Surname

     The practice of inherited family surnames began in England and France during the late part of the 11th century.   Surnames were first utilized in the Germanic region of central Europe during the second half of the 12th century.  The custom of taking on surnames began in the southern areas of Germany, and gradually spread northward during the Middle Ages.  It took about three hundred years for this tradition to apply to most families and become a constant part of one’s identity.

     With the passing of generations and the movement of families from place to place many of the original identifying names were altered into some of the versions that we are familiar with today.  Over the centuries, most of our European ancestors accepted their surname as an unchangeable part of their lives.  Thus people rarely changed their surname.  Variations of most surnames were usually the result of an involuntary act such as when a government official wrote a name phonetically or made an error in transcription. 

europeanlangs.gif

Map of European Languages

 

Research into the record of this WALKER family line indicates that the variations, meanings and history of this surname are most likely linked to that area of Europe where English and Scottish linguistic traditions are commonly found. 

 

Arrow (red up)

 

Source(s) & Meaning(s) of the Surname

     Most of the modern family names throughout Great Britain have originated as a result of the following circumstances: patronym or matronym, names based on the name of one's father, mother or ancestor, (Johnson, Wilson). Each is a means of conveying lineage; occupation (i.e., Carpenter, Cooper, Brewer, Mason); habitational (Middleton, Sidney, or Ireland) or topographical (i.e. Hill, Brook, Forrest, Dale); nicknames (i.e., Moody Freeholder, Wise, Armstrong); status (i.e. Freeman, Bond, Knight); and acquired ornamental names that were simply made up.

     The WALKER surname has both English and Scottish origins.  It is primarily an occupational name for a fuller, or an officer whose duty consisted of walking or inspecting a certain space of forest groundJob descriptive surnames such as this one denoted the actual occupation of the name-bearer, and became hereditary when a son followed the father into the same skill or business.  The word Walker comes from the Middle English word “walkere”, and before that the Old Englishwealcere”, which is an agent derivative of “wealcan” meaning “to walk, or tread”.  Fuller was the regular term for the occupation during the Middle Ages in western and northern England. The Walker surname compares with Fuller and Tucker as a surname related to the processing of cloth.  As a Scottish surname it has also been used as a translation of Gaelic Mac an Fhucadair ‘son of the fuller’.

     WALKER can also be a locational or habitational surname from a place called Walker in Northumberland, England. This name originated from the Old Norse word "kiarr", and means "The wall by the marsh".

Arrow (red up)

 

History of the Surname

    Surnames as we know them today were first assumed in Europe from the 11th to the 15th century. They were not in use in England or Scotland, before the Norman Conquest of 1066, and were first found in the Domesday Book of 1086. The employment in the use of a second name was a custom that was first introduced from the Normans who had adopted the custom just prior to this time.    Soon thereafter it became a mark of a generally higher socio-economic status and thus seen as disgraceful for a well-bred man to have only one name.  It was not until the middle of the 14th century that surnames became general practice among all people in the British Isles

The WALKER surname is of Anglo-Scottish origins and was first found in Yorkshire, England where the Walker family was seated from early times. This ancient and distinguished surname, with over fifty entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and having no less than sixty Coats of Arms. 

The first recorded spelling of the English family name is shown to be that of Richard le Walkere. This was dated 1248, in "Select Documents of the Abbey of Bec", Warwickshire.  Other early examples of recordings in England include Robert le Walker, in the Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire in 1260;  a Walker in Northumberland who is recorded as Walkyr in the "Inquisitiones post mortem", dated 1268; Johanna Walkere of Yorkshire was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379.

The WALKER name was taken early to Scotland by settlers, and Thomas dictus Walkar of Berwick, 1324, appears to be the first on record. William Walker held land in Inverrys Scotland in the year of 1381. Johannes Walker was a juror on an inquest held in the episcopal lands of Aldrochty in 1393. Donald Walcare, held lands in St. Leonard's, Edinburgh in 1457. Johannes Walcar (hatmaker) was the burgess of Perth, 1546.

Some noteable persons with this surname or close varient spellings of it are: Alice Walker (born 1944), American author; Madam C. J. Walker, African-American entrepreneur; Junior Walker (1931–1995), musician; Edward Alexander Walker, American Medal of Honor recipient; Mary Edwards Walker (1832–1919), American activist; Gilbert Walker (1868–1958), English meteorologist; Herschel Walker (born 1962), American football player; and Mort Walker (born 1923), American cartoonist; . Sir Edward Walker was the purchaser of Shakespeare's house at Stratford-on-Avon in 1675.

Arrow (red up)

More About Surname Meanings & Origins

British Surnames

Although the Domesday Book compiled by William the Conqueror required surnames, the use of them in the British Isles did not become fixed until the time period between 1250 and 1450.  The broad range of ethnic and linguistic roots for British surnames reflects the history of Britain as an oft-invaded land. These roots include, but are not limited to, Old English, Middle English, Old French, Old Norse, Irish, Gaelic, Celtic, Pictish, Welsh, Gaulish, Germanic, Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the British Isles, there are basically five types of native surnames. Some surnames were derived from a man's occupation (Carpenter, Taylor, Brewer, Mason), a practice that was commonplace by the end of the 14th century.  Place names reflected a location of residence and were also commonly used (Hill, Brook, Forrest, Dale) as a basis for the surname, for reasons that can be easily understood.  Nicknames that stuck also became surnames.  About one-third of all surnames in the United Kingdom are patronymic in origin, and identified the first bearer of the name by his father (or grandfather in the case of some Irish names). When the coast of England was invaded by William The Conqueror in the year 1066, the Normans brought with them a store of French personal names, which soon, more or less, entirely replaced the traditional more varied Old English personal names, at least among the upper and middle classes. A century of so later, given names of the principal saints of the Christian church began to be used. It is from these two types of given name that the majority of the English patronymic surnames are derived and used to this day.  Acquired ornamental names were simply made up, and had no specific reflection on the first who bore the name. They simply sounded nice, or were made up as a means of identification, generally much later than most surnames were adopted. 

Use this LINK to find the ethnic origin and meaning of last names. Surname dictionary and

Surname Ancestry - button

genealogy helps include names of Irish, German, English, French, Italian, and Jewish descent.

Arrow (red up)

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Copy of Variations (smith) plae blue

Variations of the surname

walker

Variations of
the Surname

 

Copy of Variations (smith) plae blue

Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to unfold and expand often leading to an overwhelming number of variants.  As such one can encounter great variation in the spelling of surnames because in early times, spelling in general and thus the spelling of names was not yet standardized.  Later on spellings would change with the branching and movement of families. 

Spelling variations of this family name include: Walker, Walkere and many more.

 

The complexity of researching records is compounded by the fact that in many cases an ancestors surname may also have been misspelled.  This is especially true when searching census documents.   The Soundex Indexing System was developed in an effort to assist with identifying spelling variations for a given surname.  Soundex is a method of indexing names in the 1880, 1900, 1910, and 1920 US Census, and can aid genealogists in their research. 

The Soundex Code for WALKER is W426. Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code are:  WALKER | WALKEROFWIGTON | WELCHER | WELKER | WILKERSON | WOOLGAR .

looking from tree 2

Searching for more Information about this and other surnames?

Surname Locator Resources Button

Use LINK button to view our Surname Locator & Resources page.

looking from tree 3

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Amorial bearings, symcbols and mottoes

walker

Armorial Bearings, Mottoes & Symbols

3shieldbarMH

In the Middle Ages heraldry came into use as a practical matter. It originated in the devices used to distinguish the armored warriors in tournament and war, and was also placed on seals as marks of identity. As far as records show, true heraldry began in the middle of the 12th century, and appeared almost simultaneously in several countries of Western Europe.  In the British Isles the College of Arms, (founded in 1483), is the Royal corporation of heralds who record proved pedigrees and grant armorial bearings.

Gallery of Images

Descriptions of the

Armorial Bearings

More About Hearldic Bearings

Motto(es) of

this Surname

Image gallery

Gallery of Images

Walker - Drogheda Ulster

Figure 1

Walker 3

Figure 2

Walker -Sand Hutton Yorkshire

Figure 3

Walker - Wakefield

Figure 4

Walker - Ireland

Figure 5

Walker - Bringwood

Figure 6

Walker - Leicester

Figure 7

Walker - Scotland

Figure 8

walker - Burke

Figure 9

wALKER Clan Badge MASTER copy

Figure 10

Figure 11

Figure 12

Arrow (red up) 23X21

ARMORIAL BEARINGS

Descriptions of the Armorial Bearings

The associated armorial bearings for this surname and close variant spellings are recorded in Burke’s General Armorie and Rietstap’s Armorial General.  The additional information, presented below, is offered with regard to the armorial bearings depicted above:

FIGURE 1These arms haven attributed to a Walker of Drogheda a town in County Louth on the east coast of Ireland.  The arms show a a silver shield containing a black lion. The crest (not shown) is a gold lion’s head with a wreath of laurel* around the neck. *The utilization of laurel in the crest signifies, “Peace and/or triumph; success, renown, glory and victory.”

FIGURE 2: These arms were granted to Sir George Walker, 1st Baronet (c. 1643–1690).  The Baronetcy, of Bushey Hall in the County of Hertfordshire was created in the Baronetage of England on 28 January 1680.  After the death of his son, Sir Walter Walker, 2nd Baronet the baronetcy became extinct.  The entire coat-of-arms is described as having a gold shield with a blue pile.  Within the pile are three caltrops.  The crest (not shown) features a blue ostrich hold a gold caltrop* in its claw. *A caltrop or caltrap is a weapon made up of two or more sharp nails or spines arranged in such a manner that one of them always points upward from a stable base.  Considered the landmines of antiquity, they were useful to slow down the advance of the enemy army and to force the enemy into certain paths and approaches, or to provide a passive defense as part of a defensive works system.

FIGURE 3:  These armorial bearings were granted to Sir James Walker, 1st Baronet (1803–1883) of Sand Hutton in the County of Yorkshire.  This Walker Baronetcy, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 9 December 1868.  Sir Victor Stewart Heron Walker, 6th Baronet (born 8 October 1942) is the current Baronet. This coat-of-arms is described as having a silver shield containing a red chevron with three golden annulets* all between three blue crescents.   The crest shows a bent right arm, in armor, coming out of grey battlements, the hand is holding a green lizard.  The motto of this Walker is, “Honesta quam magna.”  *An annulet is a finger ring and it represents, “Fidelity.”

FIGURE 4: This coat-of-arms was originally granted in 1563 to William Walker of Wakefield, Yorkshire, England The arms are described as having a silver shield containing a black fesse that is embattled counter embattled all between three black crescents. The descendants of this Walker have created different crests but the arms have essentially remained the same.  For example, the coat-of-arms of John Walker of Hillingdon in Greater London and Wakefield, Yorkshire contains the greyhound’s* head and black collar but also included three silver crescents, and the crest, (as shown), of another Walker of Wakefield has only the greyhound’s head with a black collar.  *The heraldic greyhound signifies, “Courage, vigilance, and loyalty.”

FIGURE 5: These arms belonged to a John Walker of Ireland.  Walker was a Counsellor-of-law who died in 1626.   Sir Bernard Burke has depicted the arms as having a silver shield with a black bend between three black boars' heads*.

*The heraldic meaing of a boar’s head is, “ Hospitality.”

FIGURE 6 These arms were granted in 1660 most likely to Richard Walker of Bringewood Forge, in Herefordshire.   The shield is red and contains a silver cross raguly* between four lions heads wearing gold crowns. The heraldic meaning of the cross is, “faith in Christianity”.  *The raguly lines of the cross signify, “ Difficulties that have been encountered.”

 

FIGURE 7: These arms have been ascribed to a Walker of Leicestershire, Warwickshire and Inner Temple, London.  Burke describes the arms as having a white or silver shield with a black chevron between three black crescents and on a canton of the second a dove* with an olive branch.  The motto of this Walker is, “Passant cressant en honSur.”  *The dove indicates, “Loving constancy and peace; outreach; the Holy Spirit; with an olive branch in its bill, it signifies a harbinger of good tidings.”

FIGURE 8: These arms were granted to a Walker of Scotland. The golden shield contains three red palets that are surmounted by St. Andrew’s saltire (cross) and a blue chief holding a crescent between to mullets. *A saltire, or Saint Andrew's Cross, is a heraldic symbol in the form of a diagonal cross or letter x.  Saint Andrew is said to have been martyred on such a cross. This cross is found on the flag of Scotland.

FIGURE 9: These arms have been recognized as belonging to a Walker of the British Isles.  The shield is red with a silver chevron between three silver crosses. On the chief are three stag’s heads*. The crest (not shown) is of a stag’s head.  The arms of the Walker Baronetcy, of Oakley House in the County of Suffolk incorporates the same elements with the addition of other charges such as a black anchor, and a  representation of the diamond decoration appropriate to the rank of Pasha of the Ottoman Empire, which was conferred on Sir Baldwin Walker, by the Sultan, for his gallant and distinguished services in Syria. The motto of this Walker family is, “Ready and faithful.” *A stag or reindeer represents, “One who will not fight unless provoked; peace and harmony.”

FIGURE 10: This is an image of the Walker Clan Badge* that feature the clan crest of a cornucopia, as well as the clan motto, “Cura Et Industria” which translates as, “Care and industry.” *A Scottish crest badge is a heraldic badge worn to show allegiance to an individual or membership in a specific Scottish clan.[

FIGURE 11: This is an example of the Walker Hunting Tartan*. Hunting tartans tend to be made up of subdued colors, such as dark blues and greens. Despite the name, hunting tartans have very little to do with actual hunting.

FIGURE 12: This is an example of the Walker Dress Tartan*. Dress tartans are based on the earasaid tartans worn by Highland women in the 17th and 18th centuries. Dress tartans tend to be made by replacing a prominent color with the color white. They are commonly used today in Highland dancing.

* It is generally regarded that "clan tartans" date no earlier than the beginning of the 19th century. The naming and registration of official clan tartans was begun in 1815 by the Highland Society of London. Today almost all Scottish clans have several tartans attributed to their name. Although it is possible for anyone to create a tartan and name it any name they wish, the only person with the authority to make a clan's tartan "official" is the recognized chief of the clan.

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

Heraldic bearings

More about Heraldic Bearings

The art of designing, displaying, describing, and recording arms is called heraldry. The use of coats of arms by countries, states, provinces, towns and villages is called civic heraldry.   A Coat of Arms is defined as a group of emblems and figures (heraldic bearings) usually arranged on and around a shield and serving as the special insignia of some person, family, or institution.  Except for a few cases, there is really no such thing as a standard "coat of arms" for a surname.  A coat of arms, more properly called an armorial achievement, armorial bearings or often just arms for short, is a design usually granted only to a single person not to an entire family or to a particular surname.  Coats of arms are inheritable property, and they generally descend to male lineal descendents of the original arms grantee.  The rules and traditions regarding Coats of Arms vary from country to country. Therefore a Coat of Arms for an English family would differ from that of a German family even when the surname is the same. 

Some of the more prominent elements incorporated into a  coat of arms are :

Crest - The word crest is often mistakenly applied to a coat of arms.  The crest was a later development arising from the love of pageantry.  Initially the crest consisted of charges painted onto a ridge on top of the helmet.

Wreath or Torse The torse is a twist of cloth or wreath underneath and part of a crest. Always shown as six twists, the first tincture being the tincture of the field, the second the tincture of the metal, and so on.

Mantling The mantling is a drapery tied to the helmet above the shield. It forms a backdrop for the shield.

Helm or Helmet - The helmet or helm is situated above the shield and bears the torse and crest. The style of helmet displayed varies according to rank and social status, and these styles developed over time, in step with the development of actual military helmets.

Shield or Arms - The basis of all coats of arms.  At their simplest, arms consist of a shield with a plain field on which appears a geometrical shape or object.  The items appearing on the shield are known as charges.

Motto - The motto was originally a war cry, but later mottoes often expressed some worthy sentiment. It may appear at the top or bottom of a family coat of arms.

COA elements (grey 10)

Arrow (red up) 23X21

MOTTO(ES)  

Motto(es) of this Surname

     A motto is a word or sentence usually written upon a scroll and generally placed below the shield, but sometimes, especially in Scotland, above the crest.    Many ancient mottoes were war-cries such as the Douglas motto of “Forward.”    Many mottoes refer to the name of the bearer, for example “cole regem” for Coleridge.   In general most mottoes convey a sentiment, hope, or determination, such as the Cotter motto “Dum spiro spero” where the meaning is “While I have breath I hope“.     Mottoes are often used by several successive generations, but may be changed at any time by the grantee. The languages most in use are Latin, French, and English.  Exceptions are seen in Scotland where they are often in the old Lowland dialect, and in Wales, often in the language of the principality.   

Several mottoes have been located that are associated with the WALKER surname and its close variant spellings:  “Agincourt”;  “Cura et industria” = “By care and industry”;  “Dum spiro spero” = “While I have breath I hope”;  “Honesta quam magna” = “How great are honourable things”;  “In Domino confide” = “I trust in the Lord”;  “Juncti valemus” = “Being joined we are powerful”;  “Nec sperno, nec timeo” = “I neither despise nor fear”;  “Nil conscire sibi” = “To have a conscience free from guilt”;  “To be conscious of nothing of one’self, i.e. against one’s self”;  “Nil desperandum” = “Never despair”;  “No sine periculo” = “I swim without danger”;  “Non est vivere sed valere vita” = “Not living, but health is life”; 

“Orthes”;  “Passibus œquis” = “(Walk) With measured tread”;  “Per varios casus” = “By various fortunes”;  “Prœsta et persta” = “Promise and persevere”;  “Semper vigilans” = “Always watchful”;  “Vimiera”;  “Walk in the way of God.”

Looking for more information about family mottoes?
Click on these links to visit some of the websites we really like!!

Heraldry & Crests mottos button

Armorial Gold button copy

Fleur De lis Design button copy

Arrow (red up) 23X21

Searching for more information about heraldry? Click on the button at the  right to look at our webpage featuring links   to   websites   having  

Heraldry Resources copy

images of a wide variety of arms, crests, and badges.  They may also feature additional heraldry resources as noted in the accompanying descriptions.

arrow up lt blue 30x30

WWW (tan left)

Web resources

walker

Gen-Resources

 

WWW (tan right)

This search engine may

provide you with additional

Google Search (yellow)

information to assist with

your research about this topic.

General Surname Resources

·             Our Surname Locator And Resources web page contains the following: (1) links that will take you to an updated listing of all surnames as posted in our three databases at the Rootsweb WorldConnect Project; (2) the Surname List Finder a tool that finds sound-alike matches for a given surname from among RootsWeb's thousands of surname lists; (3) the Soundex Converter that can be used to find the soundex code for a surname, plus other surnames/spellings sharing the same soundex code;  (4) Surname Message Boards the world's largest online genealogy community with over 17 Million posts on more than 161,000 boards; (5) Surname Mailing Lists of all surnames having mailing lists at RootsWeb, as well as topics that include (6) Surname Heraldy, and  (7) Mapping a Surname. 

·              Your genealogy research of this surname can be facilitated by use of Surname Web. This website links to the majority of the surname data on the web, as well as to individual family trees, origin and surname meaning if known, and many other related genealogy resources. 

·              Surname Finder provides easy access to free and commercial resources for 1,731,359 surnames. On each surname specific "finder" page, you can search a variety of online databases all pre-programmed with your surname.

·             Use All Surnames Genealogy to get access to find your surname resources .  There are almost 1300 links in this directory.

·             SurnameDB Free database of surname meanings - This site SurnameDB.Com contains a large FREE to access database (almost 50,000 surnames) on the history and meaning of family last names.

·             Public Profiler / World Names - Search for a Surname to view its Map and Statistics.

·             Linkpendium Surnames - Web sites, obituaries, biographies, and other material specific to a surname.

·              Cyndi's List - Surnames, Family Associations & Family Newsletters Index - Sites or resources dedicated to specific, individual family surnames.  

Free Records (Blue) lt orange

Free Records & Databases

FREE Records
 & Databases

Free Records (Blue) lt orange

All of the records and databases we’ve collected are FREE and can be accessed and searched online without having to pay for a subscription.   We have divided our collected into 14 record types as follows: Biographical; Birth; Cemetery; Census & City Directories; Church; Court; Death; Immigration & Naturalization; Land; Marriage; Military; Newspapers; Occupational; and Tax Records.    We try not to list any sites that have only a few records for the purpose of getting you to a website that will charge a fee to actually see the record beyond just a name.  

This Link will take you to our

FREE Records - button 2

collections of FREE Records.  

library_clipart1

 

Our Genealogy 
Reference Library

library_clipart1 right

The following Link will take you to our library of genealogy reference books.   Here you will find bibliographies, family histories and books about names.  In addition, there are texts that pertain to ethnic and religion groups, history, geography as well as other books that will assist you with your research.

This Link will take you to our

Research Library - button 1 copy

collections of reference books.  

Click on these links to visit some of the websites we really like!!

Surname Web (logo)

Surname Finder (Logo)

All Surnames Genealogy (logo)

arrow up lt blue 30x30

About this webpage

About This Webpage

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Mail1B0-- Email us with your comments or questions. 

We do like to hear from others who are researching the same people and surnames.

We need your help to keep growing!  So please Email coolmailus your

photos, stories, and other appropriate information about this topic.

 

RULES OF USE
You are welcome to download any information on this page that does not cite a copyright. 

We only ask that if you have a personal website please create a link to our Home Page.

-- This webpage was last updated on --

01 October 2012

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)