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PINNELL

 

A Guide for Your Family
 History Research

Pennell of Surry copy

Origins of

the Surname

Variations of

the Surname

Armorial Bearings,

 Symbols and Mottoes

Locations of

the Surname

Internet Resources

Our Family History

 

 

Origins of the Surname

Origins of the Surname

An Introduction

to the Surname

Source/Meaning

of the Surname

History of

the Surname

More About

Surnames

An Introduction to the Surname

An Introduction to the Surname

The practice of inherited family surnames began in England and France during the late part of the 11th century.   Surnames were first utilized in the Germanic region of central Europe during the second half of the 12th century.  The custom of taking on surnames began in the southern areas of Germany, and gradually spread northward during the Middle Ages.  It took about three hundred years for this tradition to apply to most families and become a constant part of one’s identity.        With the passing of generations and the movement of families from place to place many of the original identifying names were altered into some of the versions that we are familiar with today.  Over the centuries, most of our European ancestors accepted their surname as an unchangeable part of their lives.  Thus people rarely changed their surname.  Variations of most surnames were usually the result of an involuntary act such as when a government official wrote a name phonetically or made an error in transcription. 

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Map of European Languages

 

Research into the record of this PINNELL family line indicates that the variations, meanings and history of this surname are most likely linked to that area of Europe where English, Scots, and/or Irish linguistic traditions are commonly found.   

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Sources and Meanings of the Surname

Source(s) and Meaning(s) of the Surname

Most modern Germanic and French family names are a means conveying lineage.  For the most part, German surnames were developed from four major sources: (1) Patronymic & Matronymic surnames most common in northern Germany are based on a parent’s first name, such as Niklas Albrecht (Niklas son of Albrecht);  (2) occupational surnames are last names based on the person’s job or trade for example Lukas Fischer (Lukas the Fisherman);  (3) descriptive surnames are based on a unique quality or physical feature of the individual like Karl Braun (Karl with brown hair); (4) geographical surnames are derived from the location of the homestead from which the first bearer and his family lived such as Leon Meer (Leon from by the sea), or derived from the state, region, or   village of the first bearer's origin for example Paul Cullen (Paul from Koeln/Cologne).

Most of the modern English, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh family names throughout Great Britain have originated as a result of the following circumstances: patronym or matronym, names based on the name of one's father, mother or ancestor, (Johnson, Wilson). Each is a means of conveying lineage; occupation (i.e., Carpenter, Cooper, Brewer, Mason); habitational (Middleton, Sidney, or Ireland) or topographical (i.e. Hill, Brook, Forrest, Dale); nicknames (i.e., Moody Freeholder, Wise, Armstrong); status (i.e. Freeman, Bond, Knight); and acquired ornamental names that were simply made up.

     According to the Dictionary of American Family Names the Pinnell surname is English in origin.  It is a diminutive of Pine.   Pine is both English and French originating from Middle English pine and Old French pin, a topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous pine tree or in a pine forest. It may also be a Norman habitat ional name from any of various places named with this word, such as Le Pin in Calvados; in other cases it may originally have been a nickname for a tall man, one thought to resemble a pine tree. 

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History of the Surname

History of the Surname

Most Germanic Surnames from Central Europe have their roots in the Germanic Middle Ages.  The process of forming family names in what is present day Germany began during Middle High German period in the history of the German language from the early 12th Century to the 16th century The nobility and wealthy land owners were the first to begin using surnames.  Merchants and townspeople then adopted the custom, as did the rural population.  This process took two or three centuries.  In most of the Germanic States of the Holy Roman Empire, the practice of using surnames was well established by the 1500s.

Surnames of the British Isles as we know them today were first assumed in Europe from the 11th to the 15th century. They were not in use in England or Scotland, before the Norman Conquest of 1066, and were first found in the Domesday Book of 1086. The employment in the use of a second name was a custom that was first introduced from the Normans who had adopted the custom just prior to this time.    Soon thereafter it became a mark of a generally higher socio-economic status and thus seen as disgraceful for a well-bred man to have only one name.  It was not until the middle of the 14th century that surnames became general practice among all people in the British Isles

The concept of French Surnames come from the Medieval French word 'surnom' translating as "above-or-over name," surnames or descriptive names trace their use back to 11th century France, when it first became necessary to add a second name to distinguish between individuals with the same given name. The custom of using surnames did not become common for several centuries, however.

EARLY HISTORY OF THE SURNAME

     Although this is an English surname, it may in some cases have an ultimate French origin.  According to the famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley, it has two possible sources both from personal names. The first is a metronymic and derives from the female name of Petronella or Petronilla, both quite popular in the Middle Ages. This was a name which was either introduced by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066, or possibly by the Crusaders returning from the Holy Land in the 12th century, while the second is as a diminutive of the pre-7th century Olde English name Payne, to which has been added a short form of the word "little" to give "Payn-el" or son of Payne. However later research suggests yet a third option, in this case locational from a place called Penn Hall formerly Penehull, in the county of Worcester. In this case Alredus de Penhull is recorded in the Assize Rolls of Worcester in the year 1221, when it appears that he may not have paid his taxes. This is clearly a locational recording, but that of William Pennel, recorded in Colchester, Essex in 1377, suggests a development from a personal name. Other early recordings include Anne Pennyale at St Margarets, Westminster, in 1571, Thomas Pernell of St Columb Major in Cornwall in 1580, Elizabeth Penniall who married Robert Wood at St Margarets, Westminster in 1640, and Samuel Pennell, at St Mary Aldermanry, in the city of London in 1671.

Some Notable Persons, Places, or Things Having This Name

Some of the best known persons, places, or things bearing the PINNELL name, or its close variants are: Pinnel's Case [1602] also known as Penny v Cole, is an important case in English contract lawPennell (Kent cricketer), English professional cricketer;  Chris Pennell (born 1987), English rugby union player;  Eagle Pennell (1952–2002), American independent filmmaker;  Edward Pennell (1894–1974), Royal Flying Corps officer;  Elizabeth Robins Pennell (1855–1936), American writer;  Francis W. Pennell (1886–1952), American botanist;  Gerry Pennell (1959- ), British Executive;  Harry Pennell (1882–1916), Royal Navy Officer;  Henry Singleton Pennell (1874–1907), English recipient of the Victoria Cross;  Joseph Pennell (1857–1926), American artist and author;  Larry Pennell (born 1928), American television and film actor;  Lawrence Pennell (1914–2008), Canadian lawyer and politician;  Maynard Pennell (1910–1994), American businessman;  Nicholas Pennell (1938–1995), English actor;  Rebecca Pennell (1821–1890), American educator;  Robert Franklin Pennell (1850–1905), American educator and classicist;  Russ Pennell (born 1960), American basketball coach;  Steven Brian Pennell (1957–1992), American serial killer;  Theodore Leighton Pennell (1867–1912), Christian missionary and doctor;  Charles A. Pannell, Jr. (born 1946), United States federal judge;  Charles Pannell (1902–1980), British Labour Party politician;  Joseph Pannell Taylor (1796–1864), Union general in the American Civil War;  Norman Pannell, FCIS (1901–1976), British finance manager and Conservative politician;  Phillip Pannell shooting incident, African American teenager killed by a police officer in New Jersey in 1990;  Troy Pannell (born 1976), Australian rules football field umpire in the Australian Football League;  Vane Pennell (1876–1938), British rackets and real tennis player;  Raquel Pinel, Spanish football forward currently playing for Valencia CF in the Spanish league;  Marcel Pinel (1908–1968), French footballer;  Suzanne Pinel, CM is a Canadian children's entertainer and citizenship judge;  Julie Pinel (1710–1737), French composer and harpsichord teacher; and Philippe Pinel (1745–1826), French physician.

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More About Surname Meanings & Origins

More About Surname Meanings & Origins

GERMAN SURNAMES

Many German names have their roots in the Germanic Middle Ages. The process of forming family names began early in the 12th Century and extended through the 16th century. All social classes and demographic strata aided in the development of names. First Names (Rufnamen) identified specific persons. Over time the first name began to be applied to the bearer's whole family.  At first through verbal usage, family names (Familiennamen) were later fixed through writing.  Until the 17th century, first names played a more important role. The earliest family names derived from the first name of the first bearer (Patronym). Later names derived from the place of dwelling and location of the homestead.  If a person of family migrated from one place to another they were identified by the place they came from.  Of more recent origin are names derived from the vocation of profession of the first bearer. These names comprise the largest group and the most easily recognizable, for they tell what the first bearer did for a living.  Another group are names derived from a physical or other characteristic of the first bearer.  Finally, there are names that tell you the state or region a first bearer and his family came from; the age old division in tribes and regions (Low German, Middle German and Upper German) is often reflected in names.

BRITISH SURNAMES

Although the Domesday Book compiled by William the Conqueror required surnames, the use of them in the British Isles did not become fixed until the time period between 1250 and 1450.  The broad range of ethnic and linguistic roots for British surnames reflects the history of Britain as an oft-invaded land. These roots include, but are not limited to, Old English, Middle English, Old French, Old Norse, Irish, Gaelic, Celtic, Pictish, Welsh, Gaulish, Germanic, Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the British Isles, there are basically five types of native surnames. Some surnames were derived from a man's occupation (Carpenter, Taylor, Brewer, Mason), a practice that was commonplace by the end of the 14th century.  Place names reflected a location of residence and were also commonly used (Hill, Brook, Forrest, Dale) as a basis for the surname, for reasons that can be easily understood.  Nicknames that stuck also became surnames.  About one-third of all surnames in the United Kingdom are patronymic in origin, and identified the first bearer of the name by his father (or grandfather in the case of some Irish names). When the coast of England was invaded by William The Conqueror in the year 1066, the Normans brought with them a store of French personal names, which soon, more or less, entirely replaced the traditional more varied Old English personal names, at least among the upper and middle classes. A century of so later, given names of the principal saints of the Christian church began to be used. It is from these two types of given name that the majority of the English patronymic surnames are derived and used to this day.  Acquired ornamental names were simply made up, and had no specific reflection on the first who bore the name. They simply sounded nice, or were made up as a means of identification, generally much later than most surnames were adopted.   Source: http://www.obcgs.com/LASTNAMES.htm

FRENCH SURNAMES

Suffixes & Prefixes - While not in common use as in Italy or Sweden, some French surnames are formed by the addition of various prefixes and suffixes. A variety of French suffixes including -eau, -elet, -elin, -elle, and -elot, mean "little son of" and can be found attached to a given name to form a patronym. Prefixes of French surnames also have specific origins. The prefixes "de," "des," "du," and "le" each translate as "of" and may be found used in patronymic and geographical French surnames. Some French-Norman patronymic surnames will have the prefix "fritz," from the Old French for "son of" (Fitzgerald - son of Gerald). 

Alias Surnames or Dit Names - In some areas of France, a second surname may have been adopted in order to distinguish between different branches of the same family, especially when the families remained in the same town for generations. These alias surnames can often be found preceded by the word "dit." Sometimes an individual even adopted the dit name as the family name, and dropped the original surname. This practice was most common in France among soldiers and sailors.

Germanic Origins of French Names - As so many French surnames are derived from first names, it is important to know that many common French first names have Germanic origins, coming into fashion during German invasions into France. Therefore, having a name with Germanic origins does not necessarily mean that you have German ancestors!

Official Name Changes in France - Beginning in 1474, anyone who wished to change his name was required to get permission from the King. These official name changes can be found indexed in: Jérôme, archiviste. Dictionnaire des changements de noms de 1803 à 1956 (Dictionary of changed names from 1803 to 1956). Paris: Librairie Française, 1974.   Source: French Surname Meanings & Origins

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Variations of the Surname

Variations of
the Surname

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Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to unfold and expand often leading to an overwhelming number of variants.  As such one can encounter great variation in the spelling of surnames because in early times, spelling in general and thus the spelling of names was not yet standardized.  Later on spellings would change with the branching and movement of families. The complexity of researching records is compounded by the fact that in many cases an ancestors surname may have been misspelled.  This is especially true when searching census documents. 

Spelling variations of this family name include: Penell, Pennel, Pennall, Pennells, Penal, Pennell, Peniall, Penniall, Pnnel (dialectal), Penniell, Pernell and many more, (as noted below). 

Spelling variations of this family name may be ascertained through the utilization of several systems developed over the years.  The most prominently known are Soundex, Metaphone, and the NameX systems.  Of the three we recommend NameX as the most accurate for family historians.

Click on the button to find the variants of this or any other surname by utilizing The Name Thesaurus a ground-breaking technology for finding Surname and Forename variants.

The Name Thesaurus Button.jpg

This useful genealogy research tool has identified 385 million variants for 5,929,000 Surnames and 26 million variants for 1,246,000 Forenames, as well as gender identification for more than 220,000 Forenames.

NameX matched 172 spelling variations of the PINNELL surname. The top 20 are:

Metaphone is a phonetic algorithm, first published in 1990, for indexing words by their English pronunciation.  It fundamentally improves on the Soundex algorithm by using information about variations and inconsistencies in English spelling and pronunciation to produce a more accurate encoding. Later a new version of the algorithm named Double Metaphone was created to take into account spelling peculiarities of a number of other languages. In 2009 a third version, called Metaphone 3, achieves an accuracy of approximately 99% for English words, non-English words familiar to Americans, and first names and family names commonly found in the U.S.  The Metaphone Code for PINNELL is PNL.  There are 643 other surnames sharing this code.

Surname

Match Score

Surname

Match Score

Pinell

99

Pinneall

99

Pinnel

99

Pinnelle

99

Pinniell

99

Pinnill

97

Pinnle

97

Pinnele

97

Pinneal

97

Pinneil

97

Pinnall

97

Piniell

97

Pinelle

97

Pineall

97

Pineell

97

Pynnell

97

Pinel

96

Pinnella

96

Pinnelli

96

Pinnello

96

The Soundex System was developed in an effort to assist with identifying spelling variations for a given surname. Soundex is a method of indexing names in the 1880, 1900, 1910, and 1920 US Census, and can aid genealogists in their research.  The Soundex Code for PINNELL is P540.  There are 1340 other surnames sharing this Code. 

If The Name Thesaurus doesn’t adequately address the name you are looking for check out the following link:

Top 10 Tips for Finding Alternative Surname Spellings & Variations

Searching for more Information about this and other surnames?

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Locations of the Surname

Locations of
the Surname

Locational Distribution of this Surname

Historical Distribution of this Surname

 

Locational Distribution of This Surname

Locational Distribution of This Surname

Knowing the geographical areas where the surname you are researching is clustered and distributed is an indispensable tool in deciding where to focus your research.  We believe that the “Public Profiler” website will open up to you a wide range of solutions which implement current research in spatial analysis.  This site provides an array of local spatial information tools useful to the genealogist. 

The information presented herein shows where the PINNELL surname is distributed within North America as well as in Europe the location of origin for this surname.      Statistics show that the country were this surname is the most highly clustered is the United Kingdom with approximately 15.79 persons per million of population.  The density of population in the within the United States is 7.52 persons per million of population.  The top region in the World where this surname is the most highly clustered is Wiamate District, New Zealand with 1370.33 persons per million, and Bristol, England is the top city where this surname is found.

North America

Europe

PINNELL -North America

PINNELL -Europe

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Click on the LINK to the right to see more information about the World distribution of a surname.  You can

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get greater detail for any of the following maps by clicking on the area, i.e state, county that you are interested in.

Looking for more information about the distribution of this surname in GERMANY?
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Looking for more information about the distribution of this surname in the UNITED KINGDOM?
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Forebears

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LINKS to more websites that compute distribution maps for any surname.

·        Database of Surnames in the Netherlands

·        Database of Surnames in Belgium

·        Names Distribution in France

·        Map of the surname: Austria

·        Distribution of Surnames in Spain

·        Map of the Surname: Switzerland

·        Distribution of Surnames in Italy

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Historical Distribution of this Surname

Historical Distribution of This Surname

The main value in historical surname distribution databases and maps is that they enable genealogists to pinpoint the predominant location of a surname. This can quickly narrow down your search for a BDM certificate.  Knowing where to look is half the battle to finding ancestry records; if you can narrow down the search field it can save you a lot of time and trouble.  The core of historical surname distribution is that most people stayed within a fairly close locale.  Concentrations of surnames are clearly visible on Surname Distribution Maps, and name distribution tables (along with an atlas) make it quite likely that the origin of that name is from the area of its highest concentration.

The following “historical locations” for the PINNELL surname and some of its close variant spellings have been primarily extracted from either Burke’s The general armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, Rietstap’s Armorial General, or J. Siebmacher's Great and General Armorial.   These books were published in the mid-19th Century and revised thereafter.  The information therein is relevant to that period as well as earlier times as far back as 1500.   Most of the locations cited by Riestap, and Siebmacher are on the continent of Europe such as Germany, France, Switzerland, etc.       

NAME

PLACE(S)

Great Britain & Ireland

NAME

PLACE(S)

Continental Western Europe

Pennell

Cheshire

Pinel

GuyenneLanguedocBrittanyNormandy  

Pannell

Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk

Panneel

Flanders

Pinel

Jersey

Penel

ArtoisFlanders

Penell

Worchestershire

 

 

(2) = the frequency with which this place occurs.

We recommend that you utilize our Tools for Finding Ancestral LocationsIf you have an elementary knowledge of heraldry you may wish to use this practice to trace your founding forefather.  For more information about this approach to seeking out your ancestral locations see our Using Heraldry as a Family History Research Tool.  

LINKS to various websites that compute surname distribution maps within an historical context.

·        Great Britain Family Names - 1881 Census

·        England and Wales: 1891 Census

·        Scotland: 1891 Census

·        Distribution of surnames in Ireland in 1890

·        Family Name Distribution in Germany: 1942

·        Nom de famille en France: 1891-1915; 1916-40; 1941-65; 1966-90

·        United States: 1920

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Armorial Bearings, Mottoes & Symbols

Armorial Bearings, Mottoes & Symbols

3shieldbarMH

An Introduction to

 European Heraldry

Gallery of Images

Descriptions of the

Armorial Bearings

Heraldry as a Family

History Research Tool

Motto(es) Associated

 With This Surname

 

An Introduction To European Heraldry

An Introduction to European Heraldry

     The art of designing, displaying, describing, and recording arms is called heraldry. The use of coats of arms by countries, states, provinces, towns and villages is called civic heraldry.   A coat of arms, more properly called an armorial achievement, armorial bearings or often just arms for short.  A Coat of Arms is defined as a group of emblems and figures (heraldic bearings) usually arranged on and around a shield and serving as the special insignia of some person, family, or institution.  Except for a few cases, there is really no such thing as a standard "coat of arms" for a surname.    The rules and traditions regarding Coats of Arms vary from country to country. Therefore a Coat of Arms for an English family would differ from that of a German family even when the surname is the same. 

     The seeds of heraldic structure in personal identification can be detected in the account in a contemporary chronicle of Henry I of England, on the occasion of his knighting his son-in-law Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou, in 1127. He placed to hang around his neck a shield painted with golden lions. The funerary enamel of Geoffrey (died 1151), dressed in blue and gold and bearing his blue shield emblazoned with gold lions, is the first recorded depiction of a coat of arms.

       By the middle of the 12th century, coats of arms were being inherited by the children of armigers (persons entitled to use a coat of arms) across Europe. Between 1135 and 1155, seals representing the generalized figure of the owner attest to the general adoption of heraldic devices in England, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy.  By the end of the century, heraldry appears as the sole device on seals.  In England, the practice of using marks of cadency arose to distinguish one son from another: the conventions became standardized in about 1500, and are traditionally supposed to have been devised by John Writhe.

     In the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, heraldry became a highly developed discipline, regulated by professional officers of arms. As its use in jousting became obsolete, coats of arms remained popular for visually identifying a person in other ways – impressed in sealing wax on documents, carved on family tombs, and flown as a banner on country homes. The first work of heraldic jurisprudence, De Insigniis et Armis, was written in the 1350s by Bartolus de Saxoferrato, a professor of law at the University of Padua.

    In the Germanic areas of Central Europe heraldry spread to the German burgher class in the 13th century, and even some peasants used arms in the 14th century.  A German coat of arms is usually referred to by any of the following terms; Wappen, Familienwappen, Blasonierung, Heraldik, or Wappenschablonen.

     In the British Isles the College of Arms, (founded in 1483), is the Royal corporation of heralds who record proved pedigrees and grant armorial bearings.  In Scottish heraldry, the Lord Lyon King of Arms in the Act of 1672 is empowered to grant arms to "vertuous [virtuous] and well deserving persons."

     Although heraldry in France and the lowlands of Belguim and Holland had a considerable history, like England, existing from the eleventh century, such formality has largely died out in these locations. The role of the herald (héraut) in France declined in the seventeenth century.  Many of the terms in international heraldry come from French.

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Gallery of Images

Gallery of Images 

Our galleries contain full-sized images of Coats-of Arms that pertain to the surnames of our direct ancestral lineage.   As most surnames have many variant spellings we suggest that you also view the galleries of our other two sub-sites as they make have a surname that is similar or has a slightly different spelling that the one you are researching

Use this LINK to find images of many unique coat-of-arms in a wide

MMPS Coat-of-Arms Images

variety of surnames many of them not found anywhere else on the internet.

Descriptions of the Armorial Bearings

Descriptions of the Arms

Descriptions some Armorial Bearings Attributed to this Surname

Copyright @ 2013-14

The associated armorial bearings for this surname and close variant spellings are recorded in Burke’s General Armoire, Rietstap’s Armorial General or J. Siebmacher's Great and General Armorial.  The additional information, presented below, is offered with regard to the armorial bearings we’ve identified from the aforementioned sources. 

Crest - The word crest is often mistakenly applied to a coat of arms.  The crest was a later development arising from the love of pageantry.  Initially the crest consisted of charges painted onto a ridge on top of the helmet.

Wreath or Torse – The torse is a twist of cloth or wreath underneath and part of a crest. Always shown as six twists, the first tincture being the tincture of the field, the second the tincture of the metal, and so on.

Mantling – The mantling is a drapery tied to the helmet above the shield. It forms a backdrop for the shield.

Helm or Helmet - The helmet or helm is situated above the shield and bears the torse and crest. The style of helmet displayed varies according to rank and social status, and these styles developed over time, in step with the development of actual military helmets.

Shield or Arms - The basis of all coats of arms.  At their simplest, arms consist of a shield with a plain field on which appears a geometrical shape or object.  The items appearing on the shield are known as charges.

Motto - The motto was originally a war cry, but later mottoes often expressed some worthy sentiment. It may appear at the top or bottom of a family coat of arms.

COA elements (grey 10)

When reading the following descriptions of these armorial bearings you may come across a term that you would like to know more about. 

Glossary of Heraldry Terms2

As such we recommend you utilize this LINK BUTTON to locate additional information within the classic resource book originally published by James Parker and Company in 1894.

In addition to an image of the selected Armorial Bearings, presented below, we have divided each into three specific areas of content.  They are:

About the Proprietor:  A coat-of-arms design is usually granted only to a single person not to an entire family or to a particular surname. Coats of arms are inheritable property, and they generally descend to male lineal descendents of the original arms grantee.  Therefore the descriptive narratives below generally refer to this person as the “proprietor”.   The information given within the category primarily focuses upon the name of the proprietor, when the armorial bearings were granted, and by whom, as well as where he was seated.   

Blazoning the Arms:  In heraldry a blazon is a formal description of the coat of arms, from which the reader can reconstruct the appropriate image.  Primarily our blazons will focus upon a description of the shield, crest and mantling, as well as a motto, if known.  We attempt to construct our blazons utilizing current-day  terminology for better comprehension. 

Interpreting the Arms:  Heraldry symbols such as the colors, lines and shapes found on coats-of-arms are generally referred to as charges.  Although there is some debate over whether or not the charges have any universal symbolism many persons do believe they may represent an idea or skill of the person who originally had the armorial bearings created.  If this assumption has any validity charges may provide clues to early family history of that person. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Panneel of Flanders

Pannell of Lincolnshire

Pannell of Norfolk

Pannell of Yorkshire

Pennell of Cheshire

Pennell of Great Britain

Pennell of Surry

Pinel de Golleville

Pinel de la Taule

Pinel du Feucochart

Pinel of Guyenne

Pinel of Helesches

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Panneel of Flanders

Panneel of Flanders

LINK to full-size image

About the Proprietor: These arms belonged to a Panneel of Flanders Historically, Flanders referred to a region located in the north-western part of present-day Belgium and adjacent parts of France and the Netherlands.

Blazoning the Arms: A blue shield with a silver fesse.  Three gold stars, two in chief and one in base.  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known.

Interpreting the Arms:  The color blue signifies truth and loyalty.  The utilization of silver or white represents peace and sincerity.  The stars symbolize honor, achievement and hope.

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Pannell of Lincolnshire

Pannell of Lincolnshire

LINK to full-size image

About the Proprietor: The spelling of the proprietor’s surname associated with these arms may be either Pannal, Pannel, or Pannell of Lincolnshire as well as Yorkshire.  Places named Pannal and Pannal Ash are located in North Yorkshire, and the Pannell spelling is prominent in Lincolnshire.

Blazoning the Arms:  A silver shield with a black bend.  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known.

Interpreting the Arms: In heraldry the bend represents the scarf or shield suspender of a knight commander; signifies defense or protection.  The color black represents constancy or grief.

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Pannell of Norfolk

Pannell of Norfolk

LINK to full-size image

About the Proprietor: These arms have been attributed to a Pannell of Norfolk, England. Norfolk county in the East of England. It has borders with Lincolnshire to the west, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest and Suffolk to the south.

Blazoning the Arms: A red shield with two white chevrons. Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known.  Another version of this design adds an engrailed border to the white chevrons.

Interpreting the Arms:  The utilization of the color red usually represents a warrior or martyr.  It may also signify military strength and magnanimity.   The chevron generally means protection and is commonly used by builders or others who have accomplished some work of faithful service.

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Pannell of Yorkshire

Pannell of Yorkshire

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About the Proprietor: These arms were granted to a Pannell of Yorkshire.  Yorkshire is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom.  Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, it is now fragmented into North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and East Riding of Yorkshire.

Blazoning the Arms: A silver or white shield holds two red lions (passant guardant) each with a blue crown.   Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: The lion has always held a high place in heraldry as the emblem of deathless courage, and, hence, that of a valiant warrior.  It is said to be a lively image of a good soldier, who must be ‘valiant in courage, strong of body, politic in council and a foe to fear’.  Passant is a word used to express the position of a beast walking past, most frequently applied to the Lion.  Guardant means that the lion’s face is turned towards the spectator.

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Pennell of Cheshire

Pennell of Cheshire

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About the Proprietor:  This coat-of-arms has been associated with a Pennell of Cheshire. Cheshire aka. as Chester is archaically the County Palatine of Chester.  Cheshire is located in the North West of England.  The western edge of the county forms part of England's border with Wales.   Similar arms dating back to 1634, but without this crest, have been attributed to a Penell of Woodstone in Lindridge, Worchestershire.

Blazoning the Arms: A silver or white shield with a red fesse on which are three wheat sheaves.   The crest features and ostrich’s head (couped).  Any motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known.  According to Burke another version associated with Pennell of Cheshire has a red shield with two white chevrons.

Interpreting the Arms: The wheat-sheaf (garb) signifies plenty and commendable hospitality in the bearer. It may also mean that the harvest of the bearer’s hopes is secured.  One of the earliest appearances of garbs in heraldry was on the seal of Ranulph, Earl of Chester who died in 1232.  Garbs became identified thereafter with the Earldom of Chester, though they also appear in the arms of other families, some with a distant connection to the Earls and some without.

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Pennell of Great Britain

Pennell of Great Britain

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About the Proprietor: These armorial bearings are listed in Burke’s General Armoire as belonging to a Pennell of the British Isles.

Blazoning the Arms: An ermine shield with a red bend surmounted by a gold fesse.  The crest shows an arm in armor, couped at the shoulder, and holding a scimetar.  Any motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: The sword is said to be the emblem of military honor and should incite the bearer to a just and generous pursuit of honor and virtue. It is symbolic of liberty and strength. A scimitar is a backsword or sabre with a curved blade, originating in the Middle EastErmine in heraldry is a "fur", or varied tincture, consisting of a white background with a pattern of black shapes representing the winter coat of the stoat.  The ermine spot, the conventional heraldic representation of the tail, has had a wide variety of shapes over the centuries; its most usual representation has three tufts at the end (bottom), converges to a point at the root (top), and is attached by three studs. The ermine spot (so specified), however, may also be used singly as a mobile charge, or as a mark of cadency signifying the absence of a blood relationship.

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Pennell of Surry

Pennell of Surry

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About the Proprietor: This coat-of-arms was granted to William Pennell, Esq., born 1765, was residing at East Mousley, Surry, England at the time of his death in 1860.  He was a Consul-General to the Empire of Brazil.

Blazoning the Arms: A silver shield is charged with a black saltire (engrailed) on which are five golden mullets.  The crest features a griffin (sejant).  Any motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: A saltire is an heraldic symbol in the form of a diagonal cross, like the shape of the letter X in Roman type. Saint Andrew is said to have been martyred on such a cross. This type of heraldic charge generally signifies “resolution”.  The cross in these arms is engrailed.  The engrailed lines refer to the land or earth. The griffin is a mythical creature, with the head, wings and talons of an eagle and the body and hind legs of a lion. It is thus composed of the most royal of the birds and the beasts. The griffin was thought to find and guard mines of gold and hidden treasures.

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Pinel de Golleville

Pinel de Golleville

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About the Proprietor: The Pinel family of Golleville in Normandy were among the oldest in the province going back to the 13th century.  The Pinel nobility was obtained in 1666, and these arms were registered in 1696.  It is most probable that these arms belonged to Francois-Adrien Pinel, Lord of Golleville.

Blazoning the Arms: A gold shield with a red bend surmounted by a black lion (rampant).  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: In heraldic terms the color gold means generosity and elevation of the mind.  The use of red represents a warrior or martyr as well as military strength and magnanimity.   In ancient times when animals were defined in by the position that they were in, the lion held the position of rampant, as is seen in these arms.  A walking cat was originally called a leopard, so the lions of England can probably be more accurately called leopards, but the popularity of the lion led to its acquiring many more positions, and thus the development of a terminology was necessary to describe them all.

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Pinel de la Taule

Pinel de la Taule

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About the Proprietor: These arms probably belonged to Germain Pinel, Count of Bise, who lived during the 19th century.  The seat of this family was located near Narbonne, a community in southern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon region.

Blazoning the Arms: The shield is blue and portioned quarterly.  In the 1st and 4th quarters is a golden harp with white strings.  The 2nd and 3rd quarters contain a silver palm leaf each accompanied by three crosses arranged two on the sides and one at the bottom.  Surmounting all is a gold shield inescutcheon with a blue chief.  A green oak tree on a green terrace is contained on the shield and three silver stars on the chief. The motto associated with these arms is MIHI FIDELITAS DECUS.  Any crest or the specific colors of the mantling are not known.   

Interpreting the Arms:  The harp represents a well-composed person of tempered judgment who also values the time and efforts of contemplation.  The harp also symbolizes the mystical bridge between heaven and earth.  The palm signifies righteousness and resurrection.

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Pinel du Feucochart

Pinel du Feucochart

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About the Proprietor: These arms were most likely granted during the 15 century to Jean Pinel Lord of Feucochart.   The Pinels of Feucochart were seated in Brittany,  cultural region in the north-west of France.

Blazoning the Arms: A blue shield is charged with three golden pine cones.  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: The pine cone is said to represent life.  In this case it may have been utilized to represent the Pinel surname. The color gold symbolizes generosity and elevation of the mind, the color blue signifies the qualities of truth and loyalty.

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Pinel of Guyenne

Pinel of Guyenne

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About the Proprietor: These arms belonged to a Pinel of Guyenne who was ennobled in 1775.  Guyenne or Guienne is an historic region of south-western France. In 1561, Guyenne was made a province, and included Bordelais, Bazadais, Limousin, Périgord, Quercy, Rouergue, Agenais, Saintonge, and Angoumois.

Blazoning the Arms: A silver or white shield charged with a green pine tree.  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: Pine is said to symbolize death and eternal life thereafter.  With regard to theses arms one might surmise that it may have been utilized to represent the Pinel surname.  In heraldry the color silver or white is referred to as argent thus it is not possible to determine which was used.  Argent represents peace and sincerity. 

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Pinel of Helesches

Pinel of Helesches

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About the Proprietor:  According to Burke’s General Armoire these are the arms of Pinel, Seigneur of Helesches, in the Bailiwick of Jersey.  They were bestowed during the reign of  King John of England between 1199 and 1216.

Blazoning the Arms: The shield is partitioned per pale white and gold holding an eagle (displayed) standing on a blue billet (raguly).  Any crest or motto that might be associated with these arms is unknown. The specific colors of the mantling are not known. 

Interpreting the Arms: The eagle was a symbol born by men of action, occupied with high and weighty affairs. It was given to those of lofty spirit, ingenuity, speed in comprehension, and discrimination in matters of ambiguity. The wings signify protection, and the gripping talons symbolize ruin to evildoers. As a Christian symbol, the eagle represents salvation, redemption and resurrection.  The billet represents one who obtained credence, knowledge, and faith in his words and deeds; one who is secret in one's affairs.  The raguly borders of the billet speak of difficulties that have been encountered.

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Heraldry as a Family History Research Tool

Using Heraldry as a Family History  Research Tool

Wondering whether you are descended of the nobility*?  Are you aware of an ancestor who held a prominent political position or had a title such as Sir, or Esquire?  If so you just might be descended from royalty.   If you are of European descent, you are probably a descendant of Charlemagne.  Once you are able to prove your line of descent from him, you will then find thousands of links to other royalty in your list of relatives.  It is rare indeed that the genealogy of a person of European descent, when traceable, doesn’t hit nobility somewhere.  And once it hits one European noble, whether you like it or not, hundreds of new names will become a part of your family.

*The nobility is a class of people who had special political and social status. Nobility is inherited or granted by the Crown as a reward to people who perform a heroic deed, achieve greatness in some endeavor, or hold a prominent government position.

 

    If you have an elementary knowledge of heraldry you may wish to use this practice to trace your founding forefather.  If you know the geographical place (country, county, city) where the family coat-of-arms was first identified, you may well search its history for the family name in question in order to find your direct ancestor.  Remember that most noble European family pedigrees have been thoroughly researched and published.   By putting together the family surname with the known location you may find a treasure trove of valuable information about your ancestors.  Upon pursing your research you should be aware of the possibility of variant spellings of the surname.  See Variations of the Surname for more information about variant spellings of the surname.

  

Many family historians who have not connected with a noble ancestor may just want to know what their family coat-of-arms looks like.  If this is the situation you must know that except for a few cases, there is really no such thing as a standard "coat of arms" for a surname.  A coat of arms is a design usually granted only to a single person not to an entire family or to a particular surname.  Coats of arms are inheritable property, and they generally descend to male lineal descendents of the original arms grantee.  As a result you are advised to seek out a coat-of-arms for the locale where your ancestor resided.

For example: we have an Arnold ancestor who is known to have emigrated to America from the town of Erlangen, in Bavaria, Germany.  Current research shows Erlangen is located in the area of Bavaria known as Middle Franconia.  Upon review of the historic locations for Arnold as noted in one source of armorial bearings we find places in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, The Netherlands and others.   One coat-of-arms is listed as belonging to an Arnold of Franconia, Bavaria.  As such we may conclude that this is the coat-of-arms having some relevance to our ancestor.  He may well be a blood relative of the aforementioned noble Arnold.   He or his ancestor may have been employed by or a serf of the noble Arnold family of that locale.  In some cases the name of the noble family becomes the name of the locale resulting in the ancestor appropriating it a as surname, see Sources and Meanings of the Surname to ascertain whether the surname you are interested in is a locational name.

Some Resources for Locating Nobility

·     Austria-Hungary - untitled nobility

·     Austrian nobility

·     Baltic nobility

·     Bavarian noble families

·     Belgium noble families

·     Croatian nobility

·     Dutch noble families

·     Dutch Noble Family Names, 1814 to Present

·     France – House of Bourbon

·     French nobility – present remaining families

·     Holy Roman Empire – German nobility

·     Holy Roman Empire - nobility (1)

·     Holy Roman Empire – nobility (2)

·     Holy Roman Empire - noble families

·     Hungarian noble families

·     Lithuanian nobility

·     Medieval European Nobility

·     Normandy nobility

·     Norway Aristocracy

·     Polish nobility coats of arms

·     Polish noble families – Barons

·     Polish noble families - Counts

·     Polish noble families - Marquess

·     Scottish nobility

·     Swedish noble families

·     Swiss nobility

If you are interested in the armorial bearings of a particular surname we strongly advise that you utilize the resources provided within this area of our web page.  If you have any questions or need any assistance with regard to using heraldry as a means to further or widen your family history research you are welcome to contact us, see About This Webpage.

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Mottoes of this Surname

Mottoes associated with this surname

Motto(es) Associated With This Surname

British Isles

A motto is a word or sentence usually written upon a scroll and generally placed below the shield, but sometimes, especially in Scotland, above the crest.    Many ancient mottoes were war-cries such as the Douglas motto of “Forward.”    Many mottoes refer to the name of the bearer, for example “cole regem” for Coleridge.   In general most mottoes convey a sentiment, hope, or determination, such as the Cotter motto “Dum spiro spero” where the meaning is “While I have breath I hope“.     Mottoes are often used by several successive generations, but may be changed at any time by the grantee. The languages most in use are Latin, French, and English.  Exceptions are seen in Scotland where they are often in the old Lowland dialect, and in Wales, often in the language of the principality.   

Germany

It is unusual to find a motto associated with the coat-of-arms of a noble of the European continent especially a German family.  This does not necessarily mean that the Germanic culture is devoid of mottos.  For example, the national motto of Germany is “Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit”, meaning Unity and Justice and Freedom.  The German word for motto is “Wahlspruch.”   Some of the more well known German mottoes are as follows: Alte Wunden bluten leicht – Old wounds readily bleed anew;    Blut und Eisen – Blood and iron;  Das beste is gut genug – The best is good enough;  Ein’ feste Burg is unser Gott – Our God is a strong tower of defense;  Ewigkeit – Eternity;  Für Gott und Iht – All for God and her;  Gott is überall – God is over all;  Gott mit uns – God is with us;  Ich dien – I serve;  Krieg – War;  Mehr Licht! – More light!;  Nichts zoviel – Nothing in excess;  Prosit! – Good luck!;    Vaterland – Fatherland;  Vertrau’ auf Gott – Put your trust in God;  Vorwärts! – Forward!;        Zu dienen – At your service.

France

French phrases adopted as mottos, have a certain air of chivalry and perhaps a distinctly feudal sense of duty and allegiance. French mottos are more indicative of the warrior culture of the Middle Ages. Some of these phrases, however, are translations of better known Latin mottos, such as Toujours fidèle for Semper fidelis. Some of these phrases are often found in Old French spelling.  Examples of some well known French mottoes are as follows: Aimez loyaulté - Love loyalty;  Boutez en avant - Push forward;  C’est la seule vertu qui donne la noblesse - Virtue alone confers nobility;  Droit à chacun - To each his right;  En Dieu est ma foy - In God is my faith;  Foy pour devoir - Faith for duty;  Garde la foy - Keep the faith;  Inébranlable - Not to be shaken;  J’ai bonne cause - I have good reason;  Loyauté sans tache - Loyalty without defect;  Maintien le droit - Support the right;  Ni dessus, ni dessous - Neither above nor below;  Oublier ne puis - I cannot forget;  Parle bien ou parle rien - Speak well or say nothing;  Rien sans Dieu - Nothing without God;  Suivez raison - Follow reason;  Tachez surpasser en vertue - Strive to surpass in virtue;  Un Dieu, un roy, un foy - One God, one king, one faith;  Veilliez et ne craignez pas - Watch and fear not.

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                  We have traced our Pinnell roots back to the State of South Carolina.   It is not known whom the first Pinnell was to come to America, although he could be a Thomas Pannell who came to the Virginia colony sometime between 1643 and 1653.

      We have a clear lineage back to our 4th great-grandfather, Peter Pinnell.  Peter was born in 1755 near that part of South Carolina that would eventually become the Camden District in 1769 and York County in 1785.   He married Ann (aka Nancy) Yarborough in 1777 when he was 22 years old. Peter and Ann lived in and around York, Greenville and Spartanburg Counties, all located in northwest South Carolina.    

Peter is recognized as a Patriot of the American Revolution having served in the South Carolina State Militia from 1781 to the end of the war in 1783. 

     Peter and his family left South Carolina sometime between 1801 and 1804.  They moved on to Livingston County, in southwestern Kentucky, which is now part of Caldwell County.  In 1804 Peter purchased 400 acres of land in Livingston County south of the Green River on Flynn Fork. He and his family lived in this location up until about 1830 when he moved on to Crawford County in Missouri.  Peter died in Crawford County in 1845 at the ripe old age of 90.   He is buried in Pinnell Cemetery located in Crawford County, Missouri.

     Asa Pinnell, eldest son Peter Pinnell, was born at Greenville County, South Carolina in 1792. At the age of about 20 years he married Miss Elizabeth Clemens in Christian County, Kentucky.       In 1813 the young couple struck out for Missouri, reaching it that same year.  Although Asa and Elizabeth eventually settled east of Lanes Prairie in what is now Maries County the Pinnell family name is well represented in Crawford County as well.    The fact that he came to Maries County a short time after coming to Missouri is definitely known.  The date is most likely between 1815 and 1818.   It is most probable that he pushed other early settlers such as the Johnson and Snodgrass families hard for the honored place as the "first settler", and if he did not win the race, he undoubtedly ran a close second.

     Asa was one of the first justices of the peace of Crawford County. Asa also followed in the footsteps of his father Peter as a minister in the Methodist Church.  It was in this capacity that he performed the first recorded wedding in the county, in 1824. He was also a member of the first Crawford County Grand Jury in 1831, and Presiding Judge of the County Court in 1835. 

Asa was quite active in public affairs during his long life right up until his death in 1871 when he was 78 years of age.

         On January 27, 1824 William Lewis Pinnell, the third and last son produced by Asa and Elizabeth Pinnell, was born in that part of old Gasconade County that eventually became a part of present day Maries County.  William married Mary Johnson, the daughter of Disbury Johnson, in what is now Maries County on August 13, 1844.  On January 1, 1851 William was appointed the first Postmaster at Lanes Prairie in Maries County.  William was primarily a farmer but he did practice law in addition to being a schoolteacher and a preacher.  In fact his house known as "Double Chimneys" was the home of Methodism in the east end of the Maries County. 

       During his lifetime William fathered at least five (5) children.  He lived his entire life in what is now Maries county Missouri, and died there as the age 63 on July 17, 1887.  His tombstone located at the Bowles Chapel cemetery in Jefferson Township, prominently notes his association with the Masonic Order. 

     Our great-grandmother, Mary Etta Pinnell was born in 1863.  She was the daughter of William Lewis and Mary Johnson Pinnell.  Mary Etta married Jeremiah E. Moreland in 1883. Five children (four sons and one daughter) were produced of this marriage.       After marrying Jeremiah, the couple moved from Missouri to Kansas where sons Guy and John Earl were born.  It is most probable that they lived in this location up to 1893 or 1894.  Eventually Mary and her family moved on to Texas and then Woodward county in the Oklahoma (Indian) Territory.  In 1901 her husband Jeremiah E. passed away leaving Mary alone with at least four children to raise.

      Mary married a second time in 1905 to her neighbor Edwin T. Loyd.  It doesn't appear that the marriage lasted long perhaps a dozen years or so.   Around 1915, Mary and her son Jeremiah Floyd left Oklahoma, perhaps with the Loyd and Thomason families and moved on to Denver, Colorado and eventually California.  It is quite probable that Mary separated from Edwin Loyd while in Colorado.   By 1920 Etta and son Jeremiah Floyd were living in California near her brother William B. Pinnell and his family who were living in the Tule River Township area of Tulare County.  Her sons Guy and John Earl were also living in this area of California at this time.

       She passed away in California in 1929 at the age of 66.  Mary Etta was laid to rest at the Home of Peace Cemetery, in Porterville, on March 26, 1929. 

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PETER1 PINNELL was born on 20 May 1755 in Camden District, South Carolina (Catawba, York Co.). He died on 03 Jun 1845 in Oak Hill, Crawford Co., Missouri. He married Ann "Nancy" Yarborough, daughter of Ambrose Yarborough and Mary Humphrey about 1787 in Union County?, South Carolina. She was born about 1770 in Virginia. She died on 20 Jan 1843 in Brush Creek Twp., Gasconade Co., Missouri.

 

Peter Pinnell and Ann "Nancy" Yarborough had the following children:

 

                              i.    CASSIE2 PINNELL was born on 16 Feb 1788 in Union County?, South Carolina. She married WILLIAM HOLLOMAN.

 

                            ii.    NANCY MARGARET PINNELL was born on 08 Apr 1790 in Union County?, South Carolina. She died on 28 Sep 1855 in Eldorado, Saline Co., Illinois. She married Samuel Elder on 13 Jun 1808 in Christian County, Kentucky. He was born on 03 Nov 1790 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., South Carolina. He died on 14 Jan 1878 in Eldorado, Saline Co., Illinois.

 

                           iii.    ASA PINNELL was born on 12 Dec 1792 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died on 27 Jul 1871 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He married Elizabeth Clemmons, daughter of Joseph Clemmons and Nm. Unk. Clemmons (nee?) in 1812 in Christian County, Kentucky. She was born about 1799 in Kentucky. She died about 1896 in Maries County, Missouri.

 

                           iv.    HIRAM PINNELL was born on 25 Aug 1794 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died about 1865 in Bosque County, Texas. He married Phoebe Bolin on 24 Sep 1816 in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

 

                            v.    DORCAS PINNELL was born on 16 Apr 1796 in Union County?, South Carolina. She died in Mar 1867 in Sullivan, Franklin Co., Missouri. She married Stephen Sullivan on 02 Oct 1816 in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

 

                           vi.    WILLIAM WILEY PINNELL was born on 30 Jul 1798 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died on 16 Jan 1843 in Hermann, Gasconade Co., Missouri. He married MATILDA HUFF.

 

                         vii.    LEWIS PINNELL was born on 20 Sep 1801 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died in 1864 in Crawford County, Missouri. He married (1) MARGARET SIGLER, daughter of Jacob Siegler on 01 Nov 1825 in Caldwell County, Kentucky. She was born about 1806 in Kentucky. She died about 1853 in Crawford County, Missouri. He married (2) CELIA PARR on 01 Oct 1853 in Crawford, Missouri. He married (3) SARAH GOODMAN on 14 Sep 1863 in Crawford Co., Missouri.

 

                        viii.    MARY M. PINNELL was born on 20 Sep 1803 in Union County, South Carolina. She died after 18 Aug 1892 in Crawford County, Missouri ?. She married John Taylor Hyde on 14 Aug 1823 in Missouri.

 

                           ix.    JEREMIAH PINNELL was born on 30 Sep 1805 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died before 1870 in Illinois. He married Annie Crow on 26 Jul 1836 in Crawford Co., Missouri.

 

                            x.    JANE PINNELL was born on 14 Jul 1807 in Union County?, South Carolina. She married JOHN KIMBERLAIN.

 

                                        xi.      WESLEY PINNELL was born on 03 Feb 1810 in Christian Co., Kentucky. He died on 02 Jun 1892 in Crawford Co., Missouri. He married (1) MARIA C . MARQUIS on 23 Jan 1831 in Washington County, Missouri. She was born in 1813 in Missouri. She died in 1852 in Crawford County, Missouri ?. He married (2) MARGARET HAMILTON on 28 Oct 1852 in Crawford Co., Missouri.

 

                         xii.    RICHARD PINNELL was born on 05 Mar 1812 in Christian County, Kentucky. He died in 1848 in Boone Twp., Crawford Co., Missouri. He married Artimisia M. Williams on 27 Jun 1833 in Washington County, Missouri.

Generation 2

ASA2 PINNELL (Peter1) was born on 12 Dec 1792 in Union County?, South Carolina. He died on 27 Jul 1871 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He married Elizabeth Clemmons, daughter of Joseph Clemmons and Nm. Unk. Clemmons (nee?) in 1812 in Christian County, Kentucky. She was born about 1799 in Kentucky. She died about 1896 in Maries County, Missouri. .

 

Asa Pinnell and Elizabeth Clemmons had the following children:

 

i.        LUNSFORD LANE3 PINNELL was born on 23 Mar 1813 in Christian County, Kentucky. He died on 09 Aug 1865 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri.

 

ii.      AUGUSTUS PINNELL was born on 03 Jun 1818 in Missouri. He died on 21 Feb 1900 in Maries County, Missouri. He married Emilia E. Sheperd on 15 Jan 1839 in Crawford County, Missouri. She was born in 1817 in Maries County, Missouri. She died on 12 Feb 1903 in Maries County, Missouri.

 

iii.     WILLIAM LEWIS PINNELL was born on 27 Jan 1824 in Missouri. He died on 17 Jul 1887 in Maries County, Missouri. He married Mary Vinnell Johnson, daughter of Disbury Johnson and Nancy Lucynthia Gardner on 22 Jan 1845 in Osage Co., Missouri. She was born on 17 Nov 1827 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. She died on Jul 1906 in Baucum, Jackson, Oklahoma, USA.

Generation 3

WILLIAM LEWIS3 PINNELL (Asa2, Peter1) was born on 27 Jan 1824 in Missouri. He died on 17 Jul 1887 in Maries County, Missouri. He married Mary Vinnell Johnson, daughter of Disbury Johnson and Nancy Lucynthia Gardner on 22 Jan 1845 in Osage Co., Missouri. She was born on 17 Nov 1827 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. She died on 15 Jul 1906 in Baucum, Jackson, Oklahoma, USA.

 

William Lewis Pinnell and Mary Vinnell Johnson had the following children:

 

I.      ASA DISBURY4 PINNELL was born on 20 Jul 1845 in Lanes Prairie, Jefferson Twp., Osage Co., MO. He died on 30 Mar 1931 in Glenrio, Quay Co., New Mexico. He married Francis Permelia Hawkins, daughter of Thomas Hawkins on 11 Nov 1867. She was born on 04 Aug 1852 in St. James, Phelps Co., Missouri. She died on 28 Aug 1896 in Altus, Jackson Co., Oklahoma.

 

II.    LUNSFORD LANE PINNELL was born on 03 Feb 1848 in Lanes Prairie, Jefferson Twp., Osage Co., MO. He died on 29 Jan 1931 in Kansas City, Missouri. He married (1) MARTHA ELLEN OLIVER on 01 Feb 1866. She was born about 1852 in Kentucky. She died in Feb 1883 in Missouri. He married (2) VIENNA SKAGGS, daughter of George Skaggs on 01 Mar 1885 in Maries County, Missouri. She was born on 14 Jul 1859 in Missouri. She died on 27 Feb 1923 in Joplin, Jasper Co., Missouri.

 

III.   IDA LEORA MAY PINNELL was born on 19 May 1861 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She married James Adolphus Lovelace, son of Thomas Jones Lovelace and Mary Susannah Holeman on 03 Jun 1888 in Lanes Prairie, Maries Co., Missouri. He was born on 14 Jan 1856 in North Carolina, USA. He died in Oakland, Arkansas.

 

IV.  MARY ETTA PINNELL was born on 26 Apr 1863 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She died on 16 Mar 1929 in Tulare County, California. She married (1) JEREMIAH E. MORELAND, son of John P. Moreland and Lydia Ann Brown on 31 Jan 1883 in Lanes Prairie, Maries Co., Missouri. He was born on 30 Aug 1858 in Lanes Prairie, Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He died on 20 Nov 1901 in Woodward County, Oklahoma. She married (2) EDWIN TEETER LOYD, son of William Clayton Loyd and Nancy Angeline Ogden on 29 Nov 1905 in Tangier, Woodward Co., Oklahoma. He was born on 01 Jun 1862 in Charleston, Coles County, Illinois. He died on 20 Apr 1950 in Denver, Colorado.

 

V.   WILLIAM BOWLES MCCLELLAN PINNELL was born on 29 Jan 1866 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He died on 30 Apr 1941 in Porterville, Tulare Co., California. He married Sarah Ann Schockley, daughter of Vincent Schockley and Louvica Arnett on 24 Dec 1887 in Vichy Springs, Maries Co., Missouri. She was born on 05 Nov 1868 in Ozark, Christian Co., Missouri. She died on 15 Feb 1947 in Porterville, Tulare Co., California.

Generation 4

MARY ETTA4 PINNELL (William Lewis3, Asa2, Peter1) was born on 26 Apr 1863 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She died on 16 Mar 1929 in Tulare County, California. She married (1) JEREMIAH E. MORELAND, son of John P. Moreland and Lydia Ann Brown on 31 Jan 1883 in Lanes Prairie, Maries Co., Missouri. He was born on 30 Aug 1858 in Lanes Prairie, Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He died on 20 Nov 1901 in Woodward County, Oklahoma. She married (2) EDWIN TEETER LOYD, son of William Clayton Loyd and Nancy Angeline Ogden on 29 Nov 1905 in Tangier, Woodward Co., Oklahoma. He was born on 01 Jun 1862 in Charleston, Coles County, Illinois. He died on 20 Apr 1950 in Denver, Colorado.

 

Jeremiah E. Moreland and Mary Etta Pinnell had the following children:

 

i.        PEARL5 MORELAND was born on 07 Dec 1879 in Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. She died on 07 Oct 1909 in Woodward County, Oklahoma. She married Wesley A. Thomason on 09 Jan 1898 in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, USA. He was born in Mar 1870 in Arkansas. He died in Denver, Colorado.

 

ii.       IRA CECIL MORELAND was born on 25 Feb 1884 in Lanes Prairie, Jefferson Twp., Maries Co., Missouri. He died on 10 Jan 1908 in Porterville, Tulare Co., California.

 

iii.     GUY HURST MORELAND was born on 16 Aug 1886 in Kansas, USA. He died on 14 Nov 1935 in California, USA. He married Mabelle W. Moreland (nee?) about 1918 in California ?. She was born on 29 Sep 1886 in California, USA. She died on 03 Oct 1974 in Stanislaus County, California.

 

iv.        JOHN EARL MORELAND was born on 15 Nov 1890 in Galena, Cherokee, Kansas, USA. He died on 12 Jun 1968 in Kern County, California. He married Mattie Martha

James on 28 Aug 1912 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California. She was born on 01 Jan 1895 in California, USA. She died on 29 May 1971 in Kern County, California.

 

v.      LUCY MAY MORELAND was born on 24 May 1896 in Woodward County, Oklahoma. She died on 04 Apr 1900 in Woodward County, Oklahoma.

 

vi.     JERRE' FLOYD MORELAND was born on 25 Jun 1899 in Woodward County, Oklahoma. He died on 30 May 1971 in Hightstown, Mercer Co., New Jersey. He married (1) ELLA PEARL SCRUGGS, daughter of John Eldridge Scruggs and Minnie V. McVicker on 17 Feb 1923 in Los Angeles County, California. She was born on 12 Dec 1901 in Poplar, Tulare Co., California. She died on 24 Oct 1957 in Burlington County, New Jersey. He married (2) LILLIAN CAINE, daughter of Edward W. Caine and Belle E. Caine (nee?) about 1960. She was born on 28 Oct 1898. She died in Nov 1976 in Mercer Co., New Jersey.

Source Citations

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The WorldConnect Project continues to grow, as it now contains several hundred million records thus it offers researchers the single largest collection of family trees on the Internet.

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Resources 22

Source documents

Source
Documents

 

Resources 22

The documents contained within this “Source Documents Archives” have been located during our research of this family, and used as evidence to prove many of the facts contained within the database of this family’s record.   We have source documents related to the following persons within our database with this surname.

·         Andrew B. Pinnell - Hist. of Crawford Co., MO, p.1054-55

·         Asa D. Pinnell - 1870 U.S. Census

·         Asa D. Pinnell - 1880 U.S. Census

·         Asa D. Pinnell - 1910  U.S. Census

·         Asa D. Pinnell - 1920 U.S. Census

·         Asa D. Pinnell - 1930 U.S. Census

·         Asa Pinnell - 1850 U.S. Census

·         Asa Pinnell - 1860 U.S. Census

·         Asa Pinnell - 1870 U.S. Census

·         Asa Pinnell – headstone

·         Augustus & Milly Pinnell – headstone

·         Augustus Pinnell - 1850 U.S. Census

·         Cyrena PINNELL Taylor - Biographical Sketch

·         Elizabeth CLEMENS Pinnell - 1880 Census

·         Elizabeth PINNELL Fritts - 1917 death cert.

·         Ethan Allen Pinnell – Biography

·         Ethan Allen Pinnell - Hist. of Crawford Co., MO, p.1054

·         Hiram Pinnell - 1830 U.S. Census

·         Hiram Pinnell - 1840 U.S. Census

·         Lester E. Pinnell – gravestone

·         Lester E. Pinnell - Veterans grave plaque

·         Lunsford L. Pinnell - 1870 U.S. Census

·         Lunsford L. Pinnell - 1880 U.S. Census

·         Lunsford L. Pinnell - 1920 U.C. Census

·         Lunsford L. Pinnell - 1931 Death Certificate

·         Lunsford Pinnell - 1880 Census

·         Lunsford S. Pinnell – headstones

·         Mary Etta Pinnell - J.E. Moreland Marriage App. 1883

·         Mary Etta PINNELL Moreland - 1920 U.S. Census

·         Mary Etta PINNELL Moreland - 1929 Obituary Info.

·      Mary Etta PINNELL Moreland- Edwin Lloyd Marriage 1905

·      Mary Etta PINNELL Moreland Loyd - 1910 U.S. Census

·      Mary V. JOHNSON Pinnell - Headstone

·      Nancy M. PINNELL Elder – gravestone

·      Nancy M. PINNELL Elder gravestone 2009

·      Peter Pinnell - Biography, 1892

·      Peter Pinnell - DAR and SAR plaques

·      Peter Pinnell - History of Crawford Co., MO

·      Peter Pinnell - military headstone

·      Peter Pinnell - Revolutionary War Pension App.

·      Peter Pinnell – tombstone

·      Peter Pinnell (1831-78) – headstone

·      Peter Pinnell Family - Ancestors of Ronald Murray

·      Peter Pinnell Monument and Dedication

·      Pinnell - Burial Sites, Tulare Co. CA

·      Pinnell - Census Info., Tulare Co., CA

·      Pinnell - History of Maries Co., MO (pp.650-656)

·      PINNELL - Land Records

·      Pinnell - Missouri Cemetery Burials

·      Pinnell - Obituaries, Tulare Co., CA

·      Pinnell Family 1910 - by Lunsford L. Pinnell

·      Ralph E. Pinnell – gravestone

·      William B.M. Pinnell - 1900 U.S. Census

·      William B.M. Pinnell – gravestone

·      William L. Pinnell - 1850 U.S. Census

·      William L. Pinnell - 1860 U.S. Census

·      William L. Pinnell - 1870 U.S. Census

·      William L. Pinnell - 1880 U.S. Census

·      William L. Pinnell - headstone

This Link will take you to our

Source Docs Archives (230x71)

archive of source documents.  

     Most of these documents can be considered as primary or secondary evidence.  Primary evidence is usually defined as the best available to prove the fact in question, usually in an original document or record.  Secondary evidence is in essence all that evidence which is inferior in its origin to primary evidence. That does not mean secondary evidence is always in error, but there is a greater chance of error.  Examples of this type of evidence would be a copy of an original record, or oral testimony of a record’s contents.  Published genealogies and family histories are also secondary evidence.

     Classifying evidence as either primary or secondary does not tell anything about its accuracy or ultimate value.  This is especially true of secondary evidence.  Thus it is always a good idea to ask the following questions: (1) How far removed from the original is it, (when it is a copy)?; (2) What was the reason for the creation of the source which contains this evidence?; and (3) Who was responsible for creating this secondary evidence and what interest did they have in its accuracy?

SOURCE: Greenwood, Val D., The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, 2nd edition, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD 21202, 1990, pgs. 62-63

You are welcome to download any of the documents contained within this archive that does not cite a copyright.  Should you encounter a problem obtaining a copy you may get in touch with us via the contact information found at the end of this web-page.

Documents 1a

If you have any source 
documents relating to this 
family, we would greatly 
appreciate hearing from you.

Documents 1a

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Migration routes

Migrations of the
American Family

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       Tracing our own family’s paths of migration can prove crucial in identifying previous generations and eventually, figuring out where and how they arrived in the “New World” as well as where they eventually settled.  Knowing the network of trails American pioneers traveled can help you guess where to start looking.  The trail map(s) provided below may assist you in understanding the routes that our direct ancestors of this family may have taken to find new homes and opportunities in the vast area now encompassed by the United States.

      During the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries hundreds of thousands of Europeans made the perilous ocean voyage to America.  For many it was an escape from economic hardship and religious persecution.  For most it was an opportunity to start over, own their own land, and make a better future for their descendents.

Immigration records show a number of people bearing the name of PINNELL, or one of its variants, as arriving in North America between the 17th and 20th centuries.  Some of these immigrants were: George Pennell settled in Virginia 1655; Abell Pinnell came to South Carolina in 1738; Thomas Pennell settled in New England in 1740.

American Migration(s) of the Pinnell Family

South Carolina to Kentucky c.1808

Kentucky to Missouri c. 1818

Missouri to Oklahoma 1885 - 1899

Oklahoma to California 1915-1920

South Carolina to Kentucky c.1808

     In 1803-04 Peter Pinnell traveled to Livingston County, Kentucky to search for a new home for his family on the western frontier.  He may have made the journey on the advice of either a possible kinsman Edward Pannell who had purchased land in this area in April 1803, or Stephan Sullivan friend and neighbor from South Carolina who, in 1799, had first purchased land in Christian County, Kentucky.    Around this time the lands in western Kentucky were being taken from the Native-American Chickasaw tribe and opened for settlement by European settlers.  The attraction of cheap land and new economic prospects were probably the reason why he decided embark on a 500 mile journey west to Kentucky.  On April 17, 1804 Peter purchased 400 acres of land in Livingston County south of the Tradewater River on Flynn Fork.  This location which became a part of Caldwell County in 1809 is located approximately 9 miles northeast of Princeton, Kentucky.

Pinnell Migration SC to KY

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    Peter Pinnell and his wife Ann “Nancy” Yarborough lived in the area of Union County, South Carolina until about 1808.  It was most likely during the spring or early summer of 1808 when Peter and Ann along with 10 of their children their left friends and family in South Carolina.  The probably traveled along the “Saluda Road”, which follows closely to the path of present day U.S. Route 25 through the Saluda Gap into North Carolina.  Early pioneers who sought to use this route in 1793 "had carried up their four-wheel wagon across the Saluda Gap, … and is probably the old road from Columbia, South Carolina, which passed through Newberry and Greenville districts," and yet known in upper South Carolina as the old State or Buncombe road.   This route would later be known as the “South Carolina State Road” and in North Carolina Buncombe Turnpike  as many families from the coastal area of South Carolina would through the Saluda Gap to reach their summer vacation destinations in the mountains of North Carolina.  After traveling about 75 miles they would arrive in Asheville, North Carolina.  The town was formed only fifteen years earlier at the junction of two Native-American trails and is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains at the confluence of the Swannanoa River and the French Broad River.  In 1795 a plans were created to survey and build a road from Asheville (aka. Buncombe court house) into Tennessee.  By 1800 a crude road was opened from North Carolina to Tennessee, via Warm Springs, following the right bank of the French Broad River to Hot Springs.  There is little doubt that Pinnell family followed this route to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains and enter Tennessee. 

             From Asheville they traveled 120 miles west over many tall mountains and deep rivers, and reached Knoxville, Tennessee which at that time was a thriving a way station for travelers and migrants heading west because of its situation at the confluence of three major rivers in the Tennessee Valley.   In 1808 Knoxville served as capital of the territory south of the Ohio River and as capital of Tennessee (admitted as a state in 1796).  Early Knoxville has been described as an "alternately quiet and rowdy river town.” Early issues of the Knoxville Gazette are filled with accounts of murder, theft, and hostile Cherokee attacks.

     From Knoxville the Pinnell family joined the throngs of pioneers heading west along the Nashville RoadThis wagon road, built in 1788, started in Knoxville, Tennessee and traveled across the Cumberland Plateau west some 180 miles to Nashville.  Old U.S. Route 70 follows much of this passageway.  Upon reaching Nashville they found only a tiny settlement in a vast wilderness was.  It would be almost 30 years more years before Nashville would be selected as the permanent capital of Tennessee. 

     The final part of their migratory journey from South Carolina to Western Kentucky would begin at Nashville and end in the newly created Livingston County, Kentucky a distance of about 100 miles.   It is probable that the family initially settled on the aforementioned property purchased in 1804.  It is believed that they lived here between 1808 and 1810*.    On 12 May 1810, Peter purchased 275 acres of land** in Christian County on the waters of the Muddy Fork of Little River and the waters of Montgomery’s Fork of the Tradewater River

 

*     The 1810 census for Livingston County shows only one Pinnell that being a “Pennell family  living at Smithland, the county seat. 

* * this may be two separate pieces of property

Kentucky to Missouri c. 1818

     In 1812, Asa Pinnell, (our 3rd great-grandfather), the eldest son of Peter Pinnell and Ann Yarbrough married Elizabeth Clemens in Christian County.  The next year, 1813, the young couple struck out for Missouri, reaching it that same year.  Peter Pinnell may have been contemplating following Asa to Missouri as he sold his land in Christian County in October 1813.  Land Records show that Peter and Ann were still living in Christian county through 1816 when they began to sell parts of the aforementioned Caldwell County property on Flynn Fork of the Tradewater River

       Peter and Ann migrated to Missouri in 1817-18 along with several of their children as well as their daughter Dorcas and son-in-law Stephan Sullivan who had recently married in 1816.  It is most probable that the Pinnell/Sullivan group traveled mostly on a water route

Pinnell Migration KY to MO

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from Christian County to Missouri.  If this is true they likely floated down the Muddy Fork Little River to the Cumberland River at Smithland, Kentucky a distance of about 75 miles.  Here they would enter the Ohio River and travel another 60 miles down river to the southernmost tip of Illinois near the present day city of Cairo.  From here the trip would continue up the Mississippi River.  It is probable that theparty left the great river at Ste. Genevieve located 120 miles up river from Cairo.  Ste. Genevieve, founded in 1750, was the first European settlement west of the Mississippi River in present-day Missouri.  By 1818 a new wagon road was opened between Ste. Genevieve to Potosi and then on to Boonslick (Boone’s Lick) on the Missouri River.  Most of this route has become obscured over time but part of the old road still follows State Route 185.  As such it is most probable that if they departed the river at Ste. Genevieve they then traveled along the wagon road to Potosi then towards the aforementioned Boonslick.  It appears that their purpose was not to travel any further than 30 miles northwest of Potosi to the wild and unbroken territory around the Meramec River then located in St. Louis County, 68 miles southwest of the city of St. Louis.  Apparently they were the first settlers in this part of Missouri.  According to the history of Sullivan, Missouri,  the area was founded in the early 1800's, by Stephen Sullivan who with his wife Dorcas had accompanied Daniel Boone on his return trip from Kentucky to secure settlers to populate lands around the Meramec River.  Upon entering the area now known as the Meramec State Park, Boone remarked, "Sullivan, this is the region that I was telling you about.  In these hills you will find copper, lead and game in abundance."  It is doubtful that Stephen and Dorcas Pinnell Sullivan came with Daniel Boone to this area.  It is more probable that it was Stephan’s uncle also named Stephan Sullivan (1768-1857), who actually accompanied Boone from Kentucky in 1799.  From historical records we see that this Stephan Sullivan was more of a contemporary to Daniel Boone and was in western Kentucky as early as 1799.    Therefore it is most probable that the Pinnell/Sullivan family eventually settled on the Meramec River because of Daniel Boone’s recommendation via Stephen Sullivan to his nephew Stephan, the son-in-law of our Peter Pinnell.

      In 1819 the property along the Meramec became a part of the newly formed Franklin County.  In 1825 it then became a part of Washington County.  In 1826 The Peter Pinnell sold the remainder of his Caldwell County, Kentucky property.  These documents show him as a resident of Washington County, Missouri.  In 1830 Peter and Ann Pinnell were living in Meramec Township, then in Franklin County along with their son Lewis, daughter Mary “Polly” and her husband John Hyde,  as well as Stephan and Dorcas Sullivan.     It wasn’t until 1845 that Peter Pinnell’s original Missouri homestead along the Meramec became a part of Crawford County.    When the railroad finally reached the homestead, now a tiny settlement, in 1858 Stephan and Dorcas donated their land for the depot grounds and Stephan built the depot himself.  Soon a town was laid out that the railroad company appropriately named "Sullivan." 

       In the spring of 1838, Peter and Ann moved to a farm on Brush Creek.  It was here that Ann passed away in 1843 at the age of about 75 years.  An elderly Peter now in his late 80’s then moved to the nearby farm of his son Hiram Pinnell located near Oak Hill in Crawford County.  He lived here for the remainder of his life passing away in 1845.

Missouri to Oklahoma: 1885 - 1899

     Sometime around 1885, Peter Pinnell’s great-granddaughter Mary Etta Pinnell and her husband Jeremiah E. Moreland, moved a distance of 200 miles from Maries County, to Kansas.  It is believed that they lived at Galena located in Cherokee County, Kansas.  They probably followed a wagon trail that would become the famous U.S. Route 66 some forty years later.   Galena began as a boomtown for miners because of lead deposits discovered there in 1877.  By the time the Jeremiah Moreland had arrived the town probably has 15 to 20 thousand inhabitants.

      It is most likely that they lived in Galena, Kansas up to 1893 or 1894.  It is possible that Mary Etta and Jeremiah moved their family to the area around Muskogee eastern Oklahoma and resided there for a few years before moving into the western panhandle of Oklahoma.  Although there is no information that Jeremiah and Mary Etta Moreland actually participated in the famous Oklahoma Land Rush of September 16, 1893 it is most probable that he was greatly influenced by this event. We know that by 1899 they were living in a part of the 226-mile tract known as the Cherokee Strip near the town of Woodward, Oklahoma.  As such there is no disputing the fact that the appearance of the Moreland family in this part of Oklahoma followed very closely upon the heels of the settlers who participated in the Land Rush.   If the Moreland Family had moved directly from Galena to Woodward County they may have taken the railroad as it had reached the county by the 1890s.  If Mary Etta and Jeremiah had travelled west from Muskogee he would have probably taken a road that travelled along the North Canadian River to Woodward a distance of about 300 miles.

      The family resided in Tangier Township located just west of the town of Woodward.   Jeremiah E. died, in 1901 at age 43 and is buried in the Tangier/Resthaven Cemetery in Woodward County, Oklahoma.

Maries County, MO to Galena, KS, c. 1885

Moreland Migration - c

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Galena, KS to Woodward, OK, c.1893-99

Moreland Migrations, c

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Oklahoma to California: 1915-1920

Mary Pinnell Moreland, widow of Jeremiah E. Moreland married a second time in 1905 to her neighbor Edwin T. Loyd.       By 1909 all of her children had either died or left for California leaving only Mary and her youngest son Jerre’ F. Moreland.  Her only means of support at this time were her son-in-law Wesley Thomason and husband Edwin Loyd. Around 1915, Mary and her son, and most likely the left Woodward County moved on to Denver, Colorado.  They surely made this trip on the railroad.  It appears that Mary divorced Edwin Loyd.  Where upon she and son Jerre’ moved on west to California to be near her brother William B. Pinnell and his family who were living in the Tule River Township area of Tulare County.  Her sons Guy and John Earl were

Moreland - Migration, 1915-1920TN

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also living in this area of California at this time.  By 1920 Mary Etta Pinnell and her son Jeremiah “Jerre” Floyd Moreland were settled in the Tulare County community of Porterville.  With this move the Pinnell family’s 112 year odyssey from the eastern coast of the United States to the western coast was finished.

Use the following links to find more early immigrants with this surname:

$ Search Ancestry.com Immigration Records; or Free Ship’s Passenger lists at OliveTreeGenealogy.com

The Development of an Historical Migration Route

It is understood that in many if not all cases we do not know exactly what routes our ancestors took as they migrated throughout the United States.   As such certain assumptions have been utilized to re-create the migration path presented above.  With regard to 18th and 19th century land routes we assume that they travelled along few trails and roads that were in existence at the time.  Research shows that a great many of these old paths and trails are today designated as U.S. Highway Routes.  For example, a major east-west route of migration known as the National Road is now U.S. Route 40, and a primary north-south migration route of the 18th century followed the Great Indian War and Trading Path is now U.S. Route 11.  In some situations the re-created migration route may travel along state routes that connect or run through the seat of a county as that populated place is probably the oldest settlement in the area. The use of water as a migration route is also likely.  For example, during the late 18th and early 19th centuries many families travelled west on the Ohio River as they moved on the new lands in Missouri or the Old Northwest Territory.  As such when applicable water routes have been included as the possible migration route.   

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Ancestral locations

Ancestral
 Locations

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Researching the locations where our ancestors lived has provided us with valuable evidence needed to fill in the gaps in our family trees.  It has also led us to many interesting facts that enhance the overall picture of each family group.

Locations of Our Direct Ancestors

The names of states and counties on the following list were derived from the known places where the Direct Ancestors in the “Ancestral Lineage” (see above) were born, married, and / or died.

COUNTRY

STATE

COUNTY / SUBDIVISION

UNITED STATES

CALIFORNIA

Tulare Co.

MISSOURI

Crawford Co., Maries Co., Osage Co.

KENTUCKY

Christian Co.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Greenville co., York Co.

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ANCESTRAL LOCATIONS link button

ancestral family and the locations listed above.

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Resources which enhance our knowledge of the places inhabited by our ancestors are almost as important as their names. The LINK to the right will take you to Maps, Gazetteers,   and  other  helpful   resources 

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that will assist in discovering Ancestral Locations.  These web sites comprise only a small portion of what is available for researchers interested in learning more about where their ancestors lived.

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Images gallery

Gallery of
Family Images

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During our research we have collected images and photographs that are of general interest to a particular family.  Some of them are presented on this website because we believe they tend to provide the reader with additional information which may aid in the understanding of our ancestors past lives.  We have images related to the following persons within our database with this surname.

·         Mary E. PINNELL Moreland - unmarked grave plot

·         Mary Etta Pinnell

·         Peter Pinnell – Cemetery

·         Peter Pinnell Cemetery - Crawford Co., MO

·        Peter Pinnell Cemetery - Entrance

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searching in the box and click “Search Images”. At the “Images” display page you will see the image, as well as the website of which it is associated.

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About this webpage

About This Webpage

 

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-- This webpage was last updated on --

01 February 2014

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)

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Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)