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My Paternal Ancestors

Bibles of the Peiffer & Quigley Family

Family Bibles of the Peiffer

& Quigley Families c. 1896

Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

Introduction

Surname Index

Family Location Information

Ancestral Migration Routes

Immigrant Ancestors

War Veterans

Source Documents

Photographs & Images Archive

The Fabella High

School Yearbook

 

Contact Information

 

 

 

 

Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

INTRODUCTION

 

        I’ve traced my family line back to a Henry Phifer. Henry was born about 1805 somewhere in the German – France border area known as the Alsace region. Henry married a MaryAnn (possibly Council) about 1828 again probably in German.  They had two certainly and possibly three children the eldest of which may have been a female.  The other two were Henry Jacob b. 24 Apr 1830 and Elizabeth b. abt 1832 all three having been born in either Germany or Pennsylvania. I descend from this Henry Jacob Phifer or Peiffer as he spelled it in his adult years.  I believe they immigrated to the USA about 1840 as they appear on the 1840 Federal Census for 7th Ward, Philadelphia County, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They also appear on the 1850 Census for the same location but sometime before the 1860 Census they relocated across the Delaware River to Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey where Henry and MaryAnn are listed. It is assumed that the son Henry Jacob must have married in this same time frame. 

 

        Henry Jacob or simply Jacob as he was commonly referred to, married a Magdalina HUFF on 26 Dec 1852 in Philadelphia, PA. Nothing more is known of Magdalina’s family other than it is thought that her mother’s given name was Catherine and that Catherine may have remarried to a man whose surname was Gilbert.  Jacob is thought to have been married three times in life siring 11 children. Eight of these were with Magdalina until her death in 1870 and the other three were with his third wife Caroline. 

 

        One of Jacob’s sons was Elwood Stokes Peiffer Sr. b. 29 Dec 1864 in Bordentown Twp, Burlington Co., NJ.  He married Katherine S. Bozarth 9 Sep 1886 daughter of Leander Budd and Margaret W. Shinn Bozorth.  They in turn had two children – boys, Albert Jacob and Elwood Stokes Jr.  Albert Jacob had no offspring and Elwood Stokes Jr.  had but two.  Elwood Stokes Jr.  married Ethel Cecelia Quigley 20 Sep 1916 daughter of Thomas  & Martha Platt Rhubart Quigley.  Elwood Jr. and Ethel had two children, Elizabeth Cecilia and Thomas Quigley Peiffer.

 

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

SURNAME INDEX

The following are the surnames of direct ancestral lines found in my paternal family tree.  Web pages have or will be constructed for each name.  For more information about a specific family you are invited to click on the appropriate surname link listed below.

       ASAY;   BISHOP;   BOZARTH;   BROWN;   COUNCIL;   GILBERT;   HALL;   HUFF;   MASON-MARSON;  NAILOR / NAYLOR;   PEIFFER;   PLATT;   QUIGLEY;   RHUBART;   RIDGEWAY;   RINEAR;   SEARS;   SHINN;  WEST

The following LINK will take you to a database that contains all of the above surnames.

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley;

Rhubart; and allied families

Rootsweb (mytree2 yellow)

searching the web (gold)

Free Genealogy Surname

Search Help from Google

searching the web (gold)

This free genealogy site to help you get the best genealogy searches from Google™ by using your family tree, for your research. It will create a series of different searches using tips or "tricks"

Google Surname Search 1

that will likely improve your results. The different searches will give you many different ways of using Google and the Internet to find ancestry information about this or any other Surname. 

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

World (Countries)2 green

FAMILY LOCATION INFORMATION

World (Countries)2 green

Researching the locations where my ancestors lived has provided me with valuable evidence needed to fill-in the gaps in my family tree.  It has also led me to many interesting facts that enhance the overall picture of each family group. 

 

 

 

UNITED KINGDOM

 

 

IRELAND

 

 

GERMANY

 

 

UNITED STATES

NEW JERSEY

Burlington Co.;   Mercer Co.

PENNSYLVANIA

Philadelphia Co.; 

Use this LINK to find out more

ANCESTRAL LOCATIONS link button

about the locations listed above.

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

covered wagon w oxen (rose) right

ANCESTRAL

MIGRATION ROUTES

covered wagon w oxen (rose) left

Tracing your own family’s paths of migration can prove crucial in identifying previous generations and eventually, figuring out where and how they arrived in the “New World” as well as where they eventually settled.  Knowing the network of trails American pioneers traveled can help you guess where to start looking.  The trail descriptions provided on these pages will assist you in understanding the routes your ancestors may have taken to find new homes and opportunities in the vast area now encompassed by the United States.

LINK to more information about direct ancestors within our database for whom

 we have identified probable migration routes to new opportunities in America:

AMERICAN MIGRATION ROUTES:

Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart; and allied families

 

LINK to our galleries of images dedicated to American migration routes:

American Migration Image Archives

 

Your LINK to resources and research strategies designed to assist with investigating

 the paths taken by your ancestor’s as they moved throughout the United States:

Researching Our Migrating Ancestors

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

castlegarden (enhanced)

Castle Garden, America’s first

immigration center 1830-1892

IMMIGRANT

ANCESTORS

ellis_island_image (CROPPED)

Ellis Island, immigration

reception center 1892-1921

Almost everyone has had a desire to know from where his or her ancestors emigrated.  Once this discovery is made you will most likely begin to track your ancestors back in time and place. Finding an immigrant ancestor's place of origin is the key to finding earlier generations of the family. It provides access to many family history resources in that home area. Once you know a former place of residence or a birthplace, you may be able to add more generations to your pedigree. Learning about your family's history and experiences can be a source of enjoyment and education for you and your family.

 

IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS:

Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart; and allied families

Your LINK to more information about the ancestors within our BPQR database

 identified as progenitors of their family lines in America.

 

IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS:  Research & Resources

Your LINK to resources and research strategies designed to assist with your research

 to learn more about Ancestors  who immigrated to the New World.

 

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

 

WAR VETERANS

 

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US Navy Seal (white)

US Air Force Seal (White)

marinesSeal (gold)

Coast Guard Seal (gold)

The discovery that an ancestor was involved in one of our national wars or conflicts is usually an exciting and fulfilling experience.  The information we glean from records regarding military units and battles fought tends to provide researchers and their families with a heightened feeling not only of our ancestors’ sacrifices but also our own sense of having roots back to those important events that made our country what it is today. Information about the war veteran’s of one’s family is also an excellent means of gaining the attention of children as well as indifferent relatives.

LINK to more information about persons in our BPQR database identified as veterans of

America’s wars, and the various military units in which they served our country:

WAR VETERANS - Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart; and allied families

 

LINKS to some of the military units in which they served our country:

Flag_of_New_Jersey

New Jersey Militia – Revolutionary War

Flag_of_New_Jersey

Col. Richard Somer’s Regiment, NJ Militia - Revolutionary War

12th NJ Flag 1

12th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment (USA)Civil War

Seabees Patch (WWII) 140x143

87th Naval Construction Battalion, USNWorld War Two

LINK to our archives of source documents and picture galleries of the aforementioned military units.

Military Image Galleries

Your LINK to information designed to assist with your research to

 learn more about ancestors who served in the United States military:

Researching our War Veterans

 

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

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SOURCE

DOCUMENTS

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The documents contained herein have been located during my research of this family, and used as evidence to prove many of the facts contained within the database of this family’s record.

 

    Most of these documents can be considered as primary or secondary.  Primary evidence is usually defined as the best available to prove the fact in question, usually in an original document or record.     Secondary evidence is in essence all that evidence which is inferior in its origin to primary evidence. That does not mean secondary evidence is always in error, but there is a greater chance of error.  Examples of this type of evidence would be a copy of an original record, or oral testimony of a record’s contents.  Published genealogies and family histories are also secondary evidence.

     Classifying evidence as either primary or secondary does not tell anything about its accuracy or ultimate value.  This is especially true of secondary evidence.  Thus it is always a good idea to ask the following questions: (1) How far removed from the original is it, (when it is a copy)?;  (2) What was the reason for the creation of the source which contains this evidence?; and (3) Who was responsible for creating this secondary evidence and what interest did they have in its accuracy?

SOURCE:  Greenwood, Val D., The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, 2nd edition, Genealogical Publishing  Co., Baltimore, MD 21202, 1990, pgs. 62-63

 

You are welcome to download any of the documents contained within this archive.  Should you encounter a problem obtaining a copy you may get in touch with me via the contact information found at the end of this page.

Documents 1a

Use the following LINK to view the source documents pertaining to my maternal family.

 

SOURCE DOCUMENTS

Documents 1a

 

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Bozarth; Peiffer; Quigley; Rhubart and allied families (BPQR)

Family Collage2 Frame

PHOTOGRAPHS & IMAGES ARCHIVE

Family Collage2 Frame

During my research I have collected images and photographs that are of general interest to a particular family.  Some of them are presented on this website because I believe they tend to provide the reader with additional information which may aid in the understanding of our ancestors past lives.

 

If you have any photographs or other images relating to any of the families named in our

SURNAME INDEX  we would greatly appreciate hearing from you.

 

Use the following LINKS to ascertain whether I have any images that pertain to this family.

FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS and IMAGES

 

 

 

 

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High School framed
 
William MacFarland
High School
“Class of 1941”
Bordentown, N.J.

 

Fabella cover

 

The Fabella Yearbook represents the High School Senior Year of my parents Thomas Quigley Peiffer and June Eleanor Moreland. This particular copy of The Fabella is my mother’s copy and as such the notes of endearment are directed towards her and her future. 1941 was a very difficult year for our graduating seniors what with the war in Europe and of what was yet to come on December 7th of that year.   Some comments were handwritten near the photos of many of my mother’s friends and acquaintances. However, since your ancestor may have written these comments, I encourage you to take a look to see if your relative left any written words that could provide you with some thoughts of your family member.

 

I would be happy to search my copy of ‘The Fabella” if you simply contact Tom using my contact info below.

 

The Fabella High School Yearbook

 

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CONTACT INFORMATION

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Living Relatives (grill)

TOM

Email Address

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Living Relatives (grill)

Dig for Roots

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Dig for Roots