Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

 

 

Migration Home button3 150x75 copy

top

Routes of the
Southeastern 
Gulf Plains

Pioneer Woman  (paleblue)

Migration Back button 150x75 copy

Historic Trails, Roads and Migration Routes

Introduction

List of Trails, Paths,

Roads & Routes

Directory of Historic

 Fords and Ferries

Image Gallery

Internet Resources

About This Webpage

 

 

Introduction

Introduction

 

     In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France.  This immense new territory, a portion of which was explored and mapped by the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804–1806, encompassed much of the interior land between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Northwest.  Jefferson believed the Louisiana Territory provided the key to the future prosperity of the then-agrarian nation by bringing a seemingly endless supply of potential farmland within American territorial borders.

     During the War of 1812 Indian resistance slowed migration into the fertile region lying between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River; yet, after the war thousands of Americans penetrated into the southeastern gulf plains also known as the Old Southwest. The system of managed expansion that had proved so successful in the Old Northwest Territory was replicated in the South.  By 1836 the Republic of Texas had been created and new U. S. states, including, Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas, entered the union.

     Many migrants seeking better opportunities through inexpensive or even free land in places like the eastern parts of Texas and Oklahoma as well as Arkansas began to move through the southeastern gulf plains in the quest for a better life.  As a result thousands began to move along early established routes such as the Federal Road and Natchez Trace.  In addition, technological advances in transportation such as steamboats assisted countless migrants moving up and down the Mississippi River into Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana.  Soon these states as well as Missouri became a staging ground for future migration into the Trans-Mississippi West .   

arrow up lt blue 30x30

List of routes

List of Routes

 

Generally historic roads, trails and migration routes are defined as having their terminus in present day Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, as well as eastern Texas and Oklahoma.

Gulf Plains Area map

Looking For A Specific Place or Keyword ??

Use the “Find” function in the Edit pull down menu.  You can also access this function by holding down the Control key while pressing the F key (Ctrl+F) on your keyboard. 

 

Key A 21

Key B

Key C

Key D

Key E

Key F

Key G

Key H

Key I

Key J

Key K

Key L

Key M

 

Key N

Key O

Key P

Key Q

Key R

Key S

Key T

Key U

Key V

Key W

Key X

Key Y

Key Z

Image Gallery= link to the “Image Gallery” for this route.

Map = link to a map of this route.  These maps have been developed from accounts found in various research sources.  The route lines, on each map, have been linked to the current modern roads found to be the closest to the original route descriptions.  Locations marked along the route are usually places named within the aforementioned research sources.

Road Trip = link to a webpage about ad driving trip along this route.  Here you will find an in-depth introduction to the route, links to additional information, as well as a map of the entire route and a listing of the U.S. counties through which it passes. The driving tour is divided into individual segments of 1 to 2 hours driving time.  Each segment includes a map, directions, and features of historical interest.

Info. Link = link to a webpage containing additional facts about this route.

Route = each route has a specific Identifier code (ID Code).   Each ID Code includes a number that identifies the cultural / geographical  area of the United States in which we have developed information about the route, the letter of the alphabet under which it is filed and a dedicated number for the route.  Thus data about the route designated as 5C2 would be found on the webpage for “Routes of the Southeastern Gulf Plains”, filed under the letter C route number 2*.  *The specific route number will not conform to a descending order as new routes are added to the database.

Broken Link !!

If you encounter a broken information link Cut & Paste the entry to your browser’s search component.

NAME (A)

 

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Alabama-Chickasaw Trail

Route: 5A1;  Info. Link: (1)

Wetumpka, AL

Columbus, MS

Trail running from near old Fort Toulouse in Alabama to Columbus, Mississippi. There it joined up with the Lower Creek Trading Path and the Tombigbee – Arkansas River Trail both of which led to the Mississippi River.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 112.

Alabama, Choctaw & Natchez Trail

Route: 5A2;  Info. Link: (1)

Wetumpka, AL

Jackson, MS

Trail running from near old Fort Toulouse in Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi where it joined with the Natchez Trace to Natchez, Mississippi.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 124.

Alabama - Mobile Road

Route: 5A3;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Mobile, AL

Wetumpka, AL

This road is the same route followed by the Federal Road between Mobile, Alabama and old Fort Toulouse.  Here it connected to with the following east-west routes: Augusta, Macon, Montgomery, and Mobile Trail, Alabama-Chickasaw Trail, and the Alabama, Choctaw, and Natchez Trail

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 125

Alachua-Tampa Bay Trail

Route: 5A4;  Info. Link: (1)

Alachua, FL

Tampa, FL

This Native-American path ran north from the Tampa Bay area.  Along the way it crossed over the Southern St. Augustine-Apalachee Trail.  At Alachua it connected with the trail from St. Augustine to the mouth of the Flint River.   SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 122.

Arkansas Road

 

see Southwest Trail

Atascosita Road

Route: 5A6;  Info. Link: (1);

 

Refugio, TX

Liberty, TX

Established by the Spanish before 1757 as a military highway to East Texas. After the development of the cattle industry in Texas, the route was followed by cattle drivers from South Texas to New Orleans.

Augusta, Macon, Montgomery

and Mobile Trail

Route: 5A7;

Montgomery AL

Macon, GA

This trail runs between Montgomery, Alabama and Macon, Georgia and later became a part of the old Federal Road.   At the Montgomery terminus it connects with the Alabama-Mobile Trail to Mobile, Alabama.  At the Macon end it connects with the Lower Creek Trading Path to Augusta Georgia.  Later this route was also known as the Macon – Montgomery TrailSOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 61.

Augusta-St. Augustine Trail

Route: 5A8;  Info. Link: (1),(2)Map: (1)

Augusta, GA

St. Augustine, FL

US Route 1 follows much of this historic route from Augusta to St. Augustine, Florida. In the southern part of central Georgia it intersected with the Old Trading Path from Savannah to Pensacola. 

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #110.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (B)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Bellamy Road

Route: 5B1;  Info. Link: (1);

Pensacola, FL

St. Augustine, FL

This route was the first major U.S. federal highway in early territorial Florida.  Congress authorized its construction in 1824.  It would be a 25-foot (7.6 m) wide road, connecting Pensacola to St. Augustine. It was built by John Bellamy who completed the project in two years, at a cost of $20,000. The route would become known as the Bellamy Avenue.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (C)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Camino Real de los Tejas

Route: 5E1;

 

See El Camino Real de los Tejas

Chakchiuma Trails

Route: 5C1;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Pontotoc, MS

Friars Point, MS

Meyer’s map shows this route as approximating present day MS Route 9, then MS Rt. 341 from Pontotoc to Bruce where it begins to again follow MS Route 9.  A few miles south of Calhoun City the route forks right onto MS Rt. 8 until it intersects with U.S. Route 49E/49 the north to Clarksville.  From Clarksville it goes along Friars Point Road to Friars Point on the Mississippi River.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 65

Cherokee Trace

Route: 5C2;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Cherokee, AL

Middleton, TN

This ancient Native-American trail was used regularly by white settlers.  It branched from the Natchez Trace a few miles west of Cherokee, AL and travelled in an east-west direction toward Iuka then Corinth approximating present-day US Route 72.  The route generally followed the way of the Southern Railway through Chewalla and Pochahontas, TN.  Near Middleton, TN it connected with the West Tennessee Chickasaw Trail (5W1) that went on the Bolivar, TN where it intersected the Bolivar-Memphis Trail which is approximated by US Route 64.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 90, page 822.

Chickasaw Trace

Route: 5C3;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Image Gallery: (1)

Nashville, TN

Dancy, MS

Name for the northern most leg of the Natchez Trace which ran through the Chickasaw Nation to Nashville, Tennessee.  The name “Mountain Leader’s Trace” was also applied to this part of the Trace during the early days of European settlement. According to maps showing Chickasaw land cessions in 1836 by it is believed that the Chickasaw Nation extended south along the Natchez Trace to Line Creek in Webster County, Mississippi.

Chickasaw Trail

Route: 5N7

 

This is another name used for the Natchez Trace.

Chickasaw-Tunica Old Fields Trail

Route: 5C4;  Map: (1)

Etta, MS

near Lula, MS

Meyer’s map shows this route running west from the Memphis, Pontotoc, and Mobile Bay Trail  to the Tunica village of “Tunica Old Fields” located on the east side of the Mississippi River between Helena, Arkansas and Friars Point, Mississippi.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 104.

Choctaw-Bay St. Louis Trail

Route: 5C5;  Map: (1)

Meridian, MS

Bay St. Louis, MS

This route branches from the Memphis, Pontotoc, and Mobile Bay Trail near Meridian, Mississippi, and approximates US Route 11 south to Poplarville, MS then State Routes 53, 603 and US Rt. 90 to its southern terminus.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 93.

Choctaw-Chickasaw Trail

Route: 5C6;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Port Gibson, MS

Dancy, MS

Name for the middle section of the Natchez Trace which ran through the Choctaw Nation. 

Choctaw–Mobile Bay Middle Route

 Route: 5C7;

Winona, MS

Mobile, AL

Meyer’s map shows this route branching from the Tombigbee-Arkansas River Trail near Winona, Mississippi. It then travels south to the Choctaw village of Yowani.  From that point it continues on the Memphis, Pontotoc, and Mobile Bay Trail to Mobile.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 121.

Columbia-Liberty Trail

Route: 5C8;  Map: (1)

Columbia, MS

Liberty, MS

Meyer’s map shows this east-west route as approximating US Route 98 from Columbia on the Pearl River to McComb, Mississippi.  From McComb to Liberty it follows State Route 48.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 103

Congress Trace

Info. Link: (1)

 

See the Notchey

Coosa-Tugaloo Indian Warpath

Route: 5C9;  Map: (1)

near Toccoa, GA

near Ohatchee, AL

Meyer’s map shows this east-west route as having the former Cherokee town of Tugaloo at its eastern Terminus.  It ran through the State of Georgia and crossed into Alabama a few miles southeast of Borden Wheeler Springs.  It western terminus was at old Fort Strother the site of which is now in St. Clair County, Alabama on the Coosa River

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 87

Cotton Gin Port, St. Stephens, and Mobile Bay Trail

Route: 5C10;  Map: (1)

Amory, MS

Shubuta, MS

Meyer’s map shows the northern terminus of this route as Cotton Gin Port on the east bank of the Tombigbee River at a crossing of vital Indian trails.  It connected with the Memphis, Pontotoc, Mobile Bay Trail near present day State Line, MS.  Just north of that location the trail probably crossed another old path that ran between the Chotaw villages of Yowani and Hobucakintopa (now St. Stephens). During the period of white settlement commercial water traffic from the Mobile Bay could only go as far north as St. Stephens before having to go overland.  Thus it is most probable that this part of the aforementioned trail became a spur trail that ran to and from St. Stephens.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 120.

Coushatta-Nacogdoches Trace

Route: 5C12;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

near Bon Wier, TX

Nacogdoches TX

The route of this nearly straight trail went from the Coushatta village on the Sabine River to Nacogdoches. The Spanish post of Nacogdoches was an important factor in the pattern of living developed by the Coushatta and Alabama Indian tribes in the Big Thicket.  Nacogdoches served as governmental administration center, military post, source of supplies and presents, and a market for deer hides, bear oil, and other items sold by the Indians near Nacogdoches.

Coushatta Trace

Route: 5C11;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

near Bon Wier, TX

near Columbus, TX

The Coushatta Trace was a road from Louisiana into Texas that was used by the Coushatta Indians in their hunting and trading activities. It was an important middle road between the better-known and Spanish-patrolled Atascosito Road along the Texas coast and the Old San Antonio Road farther inland.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (D)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Dubuque - Osage Road

Route: 5D1;  Info. Link: (1)

near Lead Hill, AR

Osage, AR

This route is one of the oldest roads in the upper White River region of Arkansas. It was opened for travel about 1830 by William Sneed, his son Charles and a neighbor, John Boyd. The Dubuque - Osage Road was built about the same time as the Fallen Ash Military Road and intersected it in the general region of Carrollton, Arkansas. Both of these routes were of great importance in the settlement and development of the upper White River valley.

Duck River and Northeast Mississippi Trail

Route: 5D2;  Map: (1)

Elysian Grove, TN

near Tupelo, MS

This footpath originated at the Native-American settlements near the confluence of the Duck and Tennessee Rivers in Humphreys County, Tennessee. It then ran south along the Tennessee River to Savannah, TN then into Mississippi where it probably intersected with the Cherokee Trace, near Corinth, MS.  According to Meyers, he was not able to verify the southern terminus of this route but he did believe that it probably joined the Natchez Trace in the northeastern corner of Mississippi.  Thus It is probable that this trail proceeded south from Corinth and joined the Natchez Trace near the present day city of Tupelo, MS.  The Chickasaw settlement of Chickasaw Old Town or Underwood Village is said to have been located in this locale on the west side of Bear Creek.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #18, p.853.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (E)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

El Camino Real de los Tejas

Route: 5E1;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1)

Image Gallery: (1),(2);  Road Trip: (1)

near El Indo, TX

Natchitoches, LA

El Camino Real de los Tejas has existed for more than 300 years. This old Spanish migration route extended from Guerrero, Mexico up into western Louisiana. This route also included another route called the “Lower Road”.  Due to the limitations of U.S.-Mexico border crossings one would have to approximate the southern terminus of this route at the Eagle Pass, TX crossing which is located about 30 miles north of Guerrero, Mexico.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (F)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Fallen Ash Military Road

Route: 5F2;  Info. Link: (1),(2)  Map: (1);  

Jacksonport, AR

Fayetteville, AR

This road, also known as the Jacksonport Road, was constructed by the U.S. Government around 1830 and was of great importance in the settlement and development of the upper White River valley. It was also one of the routes used to forcibly move Native-American from their homeland east of the Mississippi River to the Oklahoma Territory in 1838.  At Fayetteville, AR the route intersected with the existing north–south that ran between Fort Smith and St. Louis, see Old Wire Road

Fayetteville Road

Route: 5F1;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1);

Versailles, MO

Fayetteville, AR

This north-south route was originally laid out in 1836.  It generally followed MO Rt. 5 south from the city of Versailles in Morgan County, Missouri to intersect with the Old Wire Road at Lebanon, MO. From here south to Fayetteville it shared the route with the Old Wire Road.  The section of this route south from Springfield, MO was referred to by those in Arkansas as the Springfield Road.

Federal Horse Path

Route: 5F3;  Info. Link: (1) 

 

The name of this trail came into use around 1806.  By 1811 it became known as the Federal Road which was the most important early east-west road in the Southeastern Gulf Plains states. See Federal Road.

Federal Post Road

 

Another early name for the Federal Road.

Federal Road (Creek Lands)

Route: 5F3;  Info. Link: (1);  Road Trip: (1);

Map: (1),(2),(3),(4),(5)Image Gallery: (1)

Athens, GA

Augusta, GA

New Orleans, LA

This route has been also known as the Traveler’s Road, Federal Post Road, and Federal Horse Path. It originally started as a project in 1805 when the Creek Indians gave permission for the development of a horse path through their nation for more efficient mail delivery between Washington, D.C. and New Orleans, Louisiana.  In Georgia, there are two major branches of this route that intersect at Macon, Georgia.  The northern branch is an extension of the Upper Road from Athens, Georgia.  The southern branch is an extension of the Fall Line Road from Augusta, Georgia.  The Federal Road also has several major branches in Alabama.  They are the Greenville Branch, the Natchez-Lower Creek Branch, and the Selma-Mobile Branch.  The latter two are named after the Native-American trails they followed, see routes 5N4 and 5S3.  The Federal Road (Creek Lands) should not be confused with the Federal Road (Cherokee Lands) which is addressed within part 3 of this website.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (G)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Gaines Trace

Route: 5G1;  Info. Link: (1),(2)

Image Gallery: (1);

Muscle Shoals, AL

Fort Stoddert, AL

This road was constructed 1811 and 1812 in the Mississippi Territory. The portion from the Tennessee River to Cotton Gin Port was surveyed in 1807 and 1808 by Edmund P. Gaines, the road's namesake.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 66

Georgia–Tennessee River Road

Route: 5G2;  Map: (1)

Dallas, Georgia

Guntersville, AL

Meyer identifies this east-west route as “The Old Road from the Tennessee River to Georgia”.  His map shows this route as approximating present day U.S. Route 278 from Dallas, Georgia to Gadsden, Alabama.  Then U.S. Route 431 north to Guntersville, Alabama, on the Tennessee River.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 64.

General Carroll’s Military Road

Route: 5G3; 

New Orleans, LA

 Jackson, MS

This road was built by the U.S. Army during the War of 1812.  Today this route is generally traced by U.S. Highway Route 51.  

Great Indian War &

Trading Path (AL)

Route: 5G4;  Info. Link: (1) (2)

Bridgeport, AL

Mobile, AL

That section of the Great Indian War and Trading Path which lay within the boundaries of the present day U.S. State of Alabama.

Great Osage Trail

Route: 5G5;  Info. Link: (1)

St. Louis, MO

Joplin, MO

The Osage Indians and other tribes traveled among a variety of routes later named "Osage Trails" by white settlers.  The famous Route 66 through southern Missouri Ozarks follows the path of one such "Osage Trail."  Today Interstate 44 approximates the trail across Missouri. Part of this route later became incorporated into the Old Wire Road.

Great South Trail

Route: 5G6;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Nashville, TN

Montgomery, AL

 

This route was formerly a great animal trail that lead south from the settlements around the “Great Salt Lick” at Nashville.  It crossed the Harpeth River near present day Franklin, TN, and generally followed several streams south to the Native-American town known as Chickasaw Old Fields, near present day Whitesburg, AL.  From this place it travelled south to Montgomery, AL.  Andrew Jackson used this part of the route during his  invasion of the Creek Country in 1813.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #20, p.850.

Green Grass Trail

Route: 5G7;  Info. Link: (1);

unknown

After the Texas Revolution, this trail was used by new colonists to come to the area around Rusk County in East Texas.  Most of them came from the Old South, particularly Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, attracted by the availability of abundant cheap land.  The Green Grass Trail ran near Beckville and led to the site of Pinehill in Rusk County.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (H)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME ( I )

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (J)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Jacksonport Road

 

Another name for the Fallen Ash Military Road. See route 5F2.

Jackson’s Creek Country

 Invasion Route

Route: 5J1;  Info. Link: (1),(2)  Map: (1)

Fayetteville, TN

Montgomery, AL

The route used by General Andrew Jackson during the Creek War of 1813–1814. From Chickasaw Old Fields, near present day Whitesburg, AL.  this route follows the Great South Trail.  During this military event Jackson established Fort Deposit, Fort Strother, and Fort Williams. Then he moved on Tohopeka where the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, occurred on March 27, 1814.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 62.

Jackson's Military Road

Route: 5J2;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1)

Image Gallery: (1),(2);  Road Trip: (1)

Nashville, TN

New Orleans, LA

Built by Andrew Jackson during the War of 1812. After the war it was this 516 mile road was improved with federal funds, and it was named after Jackson.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 67

Jacksonville-Apalachee Bay Trail

Route: 5J3;  Info. Link: (1)

Jacksonville, FL

Saint Marks, FL

This Native-American trail was first traveled by European settlers sometime between 1820 and 1835. It ran east-west between the area now occupied by the city of Jacksonville and old Fort St. Marks on the Apalachee Bay.

Jacksonville-St. Augustine Trail

Route: 5J4;  Info. Link: (1) 

Jacksonville, FL

St. Augustine, FL

This route name is listed as trail #52 on Marcy Price’s 2005 map of U.S. Migration Trails.  It most likely follows the same course as the Palatka – Jacksonville Trail.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (K)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Kaw Trace

 

See Great Osage Trail

Kentucky Stock Road

Route: 5K1;  Info. Link: (1) 

Danville, KY

Huntsville, AL

A cattle drovers' path connecting Middle Tennessee north to Danville, Kentucky and south to Chattanooga, TN This route roughly follows modern US-127.  It was later extended to  Huntsville, Alabama.

King’s Road

Route: 5K2;  Info. Link: (1)    

St. Augustine, FL

Natchitoches, LA

Originally created by the Spanish in 1632, in part using Native American trails. Utilized in the 17th century to connect the Spanish settlement of St. Augustine, Florida to Spanish colonies in Mexico.  It is most probable that this route ran east-west to Natchitoches, LA where it connected with the Camino Real de los Tejas.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (L)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

La Bahía Road

Route: 5L1;  Info. Link: (1)

Goliad, TX

Natchitoches, LA

Also known as the Opelousas Road. Originally an east-west Indian trail in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas and eventually extended to Washington-on-the-Brazos and Goliad. The western portion of the road was laid out by the Spanish and was known as the Atascosito Road.

Liberty-Nacogdoches Road

Route: 5L3;  Info. Link: (1)

Nacogdoches, TX

El Orcoquisac, TX

An important early north-south route that passed through six East Texas counties, was established by Spanish authorities as a line of communication between the post of Nacogdoches and the settlement of El Orcoquisac, on the east side of the Trinity River near its mouth.

Lower Creek Trading Path

Route: 5L4;  Info. Link: (1)  Map: (1),(2)

Augusta, GA

Columbus, MS

Probably the most heavily traveled Indian trail in Georgia this began at Augusta, GA and ran westward across the state. Later the Federal Road would trace this route between Augusta and Macon, GA.  From Macon the path swings northwestward toward present day Birmingham, AL. This part was known as the Old Alabama Road.  From Birmingham it continues west to the Creek towns on the Chatthoochee below today's Columbus.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 60.

Lower Road

Route: 5L5; 

Cuero, TX

Robertson Co., TX

Generally followed a route to the east of the El Camino Real de los Tejas to San Antonio where it went northeast to Cuero, Texas, then north where it intersected with the aforementioned El Camino Real de los Tejas.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (M)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Macon-Montgomery Trail

Route: 5M1;  Info. Link: (1) 

Macon, GA

Montgomery, AL

Many settlers travelling to Alabama, Mississippi, northern Louisiana and Texas used this trail. From Macon, GA the trail followed present day U.S. Route 80 to reach the middle parts of Georgia and Alabama.  This trail was also a segment of the large route known as the Augusta, Macon, Montgomery, and Mobile Trail.

McCreay’s Road

Route: 5M2

Evergreen, AL

Natchez, MS

This military road was built during the War of 1812 as a short-cut between the Federal Road in Alabama and the Mississippi River at Natchez.  Today this road would follow U.S. Highway 84 through Alabama to Hattiesburg, MS and then U.S. Route 98 to Natchez. 

SOURCE: Eldridge, Carrie, An Atlas of Southern Trails to the Mississippi, pp. 28-29..

Memphis, Pontotoc & Mobile Bay Trl.

Route: 5M3;  Info. Link: (1),(2),(3),(4)Map: (1)

Memphis, TN

Mobile, AL

This Indian trail led from the Chickasaw Bluff on the Mississippi River at the present site of Memphis, TN to the Chickasaw towns in Pontotoc County, MS then southwesterly to the Choctaw towns in Neshoba and Kemper Counties, and from there to the Indian settlements of the Mobile, Tohome, and other tribes around Mobile Bay. 

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast,  Trail 105, p.816.

Middle Creek Trading Path

Route: 5U2; 

McCormick, Co., SC

Randolph Co., AL

According to Meyer’s map the eastern terminus of the route was at Fort Charlotte, in SC where it connects to a trail to Charleston, SC.  The western terminus was located on the Tallapoosa River in Randolph Co., AL.  Most research shows that this route is also named the Upper Creek Trading Path or the Okfuskee Path.  We are not sure why Meyer named it the Middle Creek Trading PathSOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast,  Trail 114.

Middle Memphis–Pontotoc Trail

Route: 5M4;  Map: (1)

Memphis, TN

New Albany, MS

This trail followed higher and drier ground than the Memphis, Pontotoc & Mobile Bay Trail.  Its route took it through the present settlements of Germantown and  Collierville in Tennessee.  Then Mount Pleasant, Hudsonville, and New Albany in Mississippi where it connected with the West Tennessee Chickasaw Trail (5W1) that went south to the Native-American settlements at Old Pontotoc.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 119, page 819.

Middle Tennessee Chickasaw Trace

 

Another name for a segment of the Natchez Trace.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #19, p.815.

Mobile and Natchez Trail

Route: 5M5;  Info. Link: (1),(2)Map: (1)

Mount Vernon, AL

Natchez, MS

The name given to the segment of the King’s Road (Rt. 5K2) that ran between Fort Stoddard on the Mobile River to the Mississippi River.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 99, page 828.

Mobile–Lower Creeks Trail

Route: 5M6; 

Mobile, AL

Grove Hill, AL

Meyer’s map shows this north-south route travelling along the west bank of the Mobile River to Fort Stoddard where it intersected with several other paths. Then north to where it joined the Natchez-Lower Creeks Trail.  This route is followed closely by current US Route 43.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 118.

Mountain Leader’s Trace

 

See Chickasaw Trace, Rt. 5C3

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (N)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Nacogdoches-Neches Saline Road

Route: 5N1;  Info. Link: (1);

Nacogdoches, TX

near Bullard, TX

This migration route greatly facilitated the settlement of East Texas between the Neches and Angelina rivers. This road originated from an ancient Indian trail which led from near the site of present Nacogdoches to the Brooks Saline on the Neches River, seven miles west of the site of present Bullard in Smith County.

Natchez Trace

Route: 5N7;  Info. Link: (1)  Map: (1)

Image Gallery: (1),(2);  Road Trip: (1)

Nashville, TN

Natchez, MS

A native-American Indian Trail originally used by traders to return north after transporting their goods down the Mississippi river.  By 1814, the trail had become a military road extending to New Orleans.  aka Chickasaw Trail

Natchez-Atchafalaya Trail

Route: 5N2;  Map: (1)

Stacy, LA

Atchafalaya, LA

The name given to a branch of the King’s Road (Rt. 5K2) that ran north-south in Louisiana between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. According to Meyer’s map the trail branched south about 20 miles west of Natchez.  It traveled along the east side of the Red River and the Atchafalaya River to an undetermined southern terminus.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 101.

Natchez-Lake Ponchartrain Trail

Route: 5N3;  Map: (1)

near Huron, MS

Mandeville, LA

Meyer’s map shows this trail branching off the Mobile and Natchez Trail at a place southeast of Liberty, MS.  It then appears to cross the Tangipahoa River near present day Kentwood, MS.  From there it runs down along the Tchefuncta River to its mouth at Lake Ponchartrain.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 96.

Natchez-Lower Creeks Trail

Route: 5N4;  Info. Link: (1), (2), (3)

Natchez, MS

St. Stephens, AL

This historic migration route ran between the Mississippi River and the trading post at St. Stephens, AL on the Tombigbee River.  Here it connected with many other trails most notably the Alabama and Mobile Trail that went to Montgomery, AL.  Later this route was improved by white settlers and became known as the Three Chopped Way (5T3).  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 91, page 828.

Natchez-New Orleans Trail

Route: 5N5;  Map: (1)

Natchez, MS

New Orleans, LA

Meyer’s map shows this trail as running along the eastern side of the Mississippi River.  This route was later is also called the River RoadToday this historic route follows several Louisiana roads, such as U.S. Route 61,  along the east side of the river through Baton Rouge.  See also River Road.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 92

Natchez-Texas Trail

Route: 5N6;  Info. Link: (1) 

Natchez, MS

Natchitoches, LA

From the Mississippi River this trail lead up the Red River Valley to Natchitoches, LA where it continued on into Texas as the Camino Real de los Tejas.  SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 100, page 828.

Natchitoches Trace

 

Another name for the Southwest Trail.

National Road

 

Another name for the Southwest Trail.

Notchey Trace

Route: 5N8;  Info. Link: (1),(2),(3)Map: (1)

near Denver, TN

Tupelo, MS

This route was a military road that ran between the west side of the Tennessee River, opposite of the now lost historical place of Reynoldsburg in Humphreys Co., TN, south to Chickasaw Old Town in the Territory of Mississippi where it connected to the original Natchez Trace.  Except for about 10 additional miles to the Mississippi River landing this road followed the route of the Native-American Duck River and Northeast Mississippi Trail. In 1817, the United States Congress appropriated $4,000 for the purpose of opening the road. This road became known under a number of names, including Natchez Trace, and Congress Trace.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (O)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Oakfuskee Trail

Route: 5O1;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Roanoke, AL

Melrose, AL

Meyers map, as well as Marcy Price’s map (Trl.85), shows the Okfuskee Trail as a very short north-south trail as approximating U.S. Rt. 430.  Meyers map shows it as the western terminus of the Middle Creek Trading Path (5M7).  This Trail ran between the Lower Creek Trading Path and the Coosa-Tugaloo Indian Warpath (5C9) and continued on the Fort Strother.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 113.

Okfuskee Path

Route: 5U1;   Info. Link: (1),(2);

 

Okfuskee Path appears to be utilized by many researchers as a name for the main branch of the Upper Creek Trading Path.  It may be that this name was used because the Trading Path intersected with the Okfuskee Trail (5O1), or that the western terminus of the Trading Path was at the Upper Creek settlement of Okfuskee Town where the British built Fort Okfuskee circa 1735. See Upper Creek Trading Path (5U1).

Old Alabama Road

Route: 5U2;  Info. Link: (1)

Image Gallery: (1)   

 

Originally the Native-American Lower Creek Trading Path.  This east-west trail, used by pioneers to settle the southeastern U.S. states. It became a stagecoach route and part of the New Orleans to New York Mail Line.  See Lower Creek Trading Path (5L4).

Old Military Road

Route: 5S5;   Info. Link: (1)

 

In 1831 President Andrew Jackson signed an act of Congress to improve the Southwest Trail.  At that time the route became known as the Old Military Road.  See Southwest Trail (5S5).

Old Preston Road

Route: 5P3;

 

See Preston Trail (5P3)

Old San Antonio Road

Route: 5E1;  Info. Link: (1); 

Image Gallery: (1);  Road Trip: (1)

San Antonio, TX

Robeline, LA

During the Spanish colonial period, this route was a major part of the primary overland trail from Mexico, to the Red River Valley in what is now northwest Louisiana.  This route mostly followed the original El Camino Real de los Tejas.

Old Trading Path of the South 

Route: 5O4;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1),(2),(3)

Screven Co., GA

Pensacola, FL

This historic Native-American trading path ran between the Savannah River and the Pensacola Bay. A route used by settlers to travel west from the Atlantic coast to the southern parts of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi.  Also referred to as The Old Trading Path from Savannah to Pensacola.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 111, page 828

Old Wire Road

Route: 5O5;  Info. Link: (1), (2);  Map: (1)

St. Louis, MO

Fort Smith, AR

This route was originally laid out in 1836. It followed the Great Osage Indian Trail an old Native American route, referred to by those in Arkansas as the "Springfield Road" or the Fayetteville Road”.

Old Wolf Path

Route: 5U1;  Info. Link: (1) 

 

The "Old Wolf Path" was a Native-American trail and a horse path that is said to have passed through Burnt Corn, AL and led to Pensacola, FL.  It was often used by the Creek Indians to travel to Pensacola to trade with the European-Americans in the area.  See Upper Creeks-Pensacola Trail (5U1) for additional information.

Opelousas Road

Route: 5L1;   Info. Link: (1)

Alexandria, LA Natchitoches, LA Goliad, TX

Another name for the La Bahia Road during the nineteenth century, when it was used as a cattle trail.  See La Bahía Road

Osage Trace

Route: 5G5; 

 

See Great Osage Trail (5G5)

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (P)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Palatka–Jacksonville Trail

Route: 5P1;  

Palatka, FL

Jacksonville, FL

This ancient native-American footpath connected Timucuan villages located in the St. Johns River basin with the coastal area around St. Augustine, FL.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #108.

Path to the Choctaw Nation

Route: 5P2;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Natchez, MS

Port Gibson, MS

Name for the southwestern segment of the Natchez Trace which terminated at Natchez.

Preston Trail

Route: 5P3;  Info. Link: (1) 

Preston, TX

Austin, TX

Preston Trail, later known as the Old Preston Road, was a road created by the Republic of Texas in 1841.  This road closely followed an existing trail that led across the area that had been used for centuries. This road was a main transportation artery from Central Texas to North Texas in the latter half of the 19th century. Today Texas State Highway 289 follows near this former road.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (Q)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (R)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Red River Road

Route: 5S5; 

 

See Southwest Trail (5S5)

River Road

Route: 5N5;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1),(2)

Natchez, MS

New Orleans, LA

Before stern-wheeled steamboats, riverboat men relied on the Mississippi’s mighty current to propel their flat-bottomed boats to New Orleans. The same strong currents made up-river travel impossible, so they walked or rode back to Natchez along the River Road which followed and ancienbt Native-American path known as the Natchez-New Orleans Trail.  See Natchez-New Orleans Trail for more information.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (S)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

San Antonio–Laredo Road

Route: 5S1;  Map: (1)

San Antonio, TX

Laredo, TX

One of a several roads in southeastern Texas that lead to the Rio Grande River.  This north-south route was utilized by early Mexicans to migrate north into the area of southern Texas around San Antonio.  

Savannah-Jacksonville Trail

Route: 5S2;  Info. Link: (1),(2)Map: (1);

Savannah, GA

Jacksonville, FL

This trail was the major north-south route for Native-Americans travelling along the Atlantic Coast line.  At its southern terminus it connected with the Palatka – Jacksonville Trail and continued on to the Spanish settlement at Saint Augustine.  It is not likely that it was used as a migration route to the Florida Territory until after the removal of the Native-Americans in the 1830’s.  

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 84.

Savannah-Pensacola Trading Path

Route: 5O4; 

Screven Co., GA

Pensacola, FL

Meyer actually refers to this route as the “Old Trading Path from Savannah to Pensacola.”  See Old Trading Path of the South (5O4),for more imformation.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 111

Selma–Mobile Trail

Route: 5S3;  Map: (1);

Selma, AL

Claiborne, AL

This north-south route follows along the east side of the Alabama River to the mouth of Mill Creek near Claiborne, AL where it joined with the Alabama and Mobile Road (5A3).  

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 115.

Southern St. Augustine – Appalachee Trail

Route: 5S4; 

Picolata, FL

Chaires, FL

 

According to Meyer’s map, this route branched off of the St. Augustine-Flint River Trail near Fort Picolata.  It then led west through the Gainesville area then crossed the Suwanee River and headed in a northwesterly direction.  It connected with the northern trail from St. Augustine and Jacksonville to the Appalachee Bay (5S6), and the trail from Tugaloo to the Appalachee Bay, on the west side of the St. Marks River.  

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 123.

Southwest Trail

Route: 5S5;  Info. Link: (1),(2)  Map: (1)

Image Gallery: (1),(2);  Road Trip: (1)

St. Louis, MO

near Fulton, AR

This route was originally an American Indian trace that was later improved by European-American pioneers. This north-south road ran between St. Louis on the Missouri River and the Red River in Arkansas. During the early decades of the 19th-century it was a primary route migration for American settlers bound for Mexican Texas.  Over the years this route has had many other names such as Arkansas Road, National Road, U.S. Road, Old Military Road, Natchitoches Trace, Congress Road and Red River Road.

Springfield Road

Route: 5O5;  

 

see Old Wire Road (5O5)

St. Augustine-Jacksonville-Apalachee Trail

Route: 5S6; 

St. Augustine, FL

Jacksonville, FL

St. Marks, FL

Meyer’s map shows this route as primarily running between Jacksonville to Saint Marks on the Apalachee Bay. A spur ran from St. Augustine through Fort Picolata and joined with the main route near present day Macclenny, FL.  Much of the main route is approximated by U.S. Route 90.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 85.

St. Augustine-Flint River Trail

Route: 5S7; 

St. Augustine, FL

near Reynoldsville, GA

Meyer’s map traces this route from the Atlantic Coast through Fort Picolata then west to the area around present day Alachua, FL.  From here it turned in a northwesterly direction and met the St. Augustine-Jacksonville-Apalachee Trail near Live Oak, FL.  From that point it shared the route west with the afore-mentioned trail to near historic Fort Scott on the Flint River

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #107, p.828.

St. Augustine-Savannah Road

Route: 5S8; 

St. Augustine, FL

Savannah, GA

 

This is probably a later name for an improved road that followed the Native-American Savannah-Jacksonville Trail (5S2) to Jacksonville where it continued on the Palatka – Jacksonville Trail (5P1) to St. Augustine.  Today the road is approximated by U.S. Route 17 to Jacksonville, and U.S. Route 1 to St. Augustine.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (T)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

Tallapoosa Trail

Route: 5T1;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

Calebee, AL

Ashland, AL

Meyer’s map shows this route as branching off from the Augusta, Macon, Montgomery, and Mobile Trail (5A7) and proceeding north along County Routes (CR) 4 and 30 to State Route (SR) 229.  In Tallapoosa County the route is marked as SR 63 and SR 9 in Clay County.  At Ashland it turns north west on SR 77 and continues to its junction with the Lower Creek Trading Path (5L4).

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 102

Tenaha Trail

Route: 5T2; 

unknown

After the Texas Revolution, this trail was used by new colonists to come to the area around Rusk County in East Texas.  Most of them came from the Old South, particularly Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, attracted by the availability of abundant cheap land.  The Tenaha Trail ran through the present town of  Beckville, TX, and on into Rusk County.

Three Chopped Way

Route: 5T3;  Info. Link: (1) 

Burnt Corn, AL

Natchez, MS

This route followed an ancient Native-American footpath referred to by Meyers as the Natchez-Lower Creeks Trail (5N5).  Three Chopped Way became the first    east-west connection road that tied together the two primary north-south roads, the Natchez Trace and the Old Federal Road.

Tombigbee-Arkansas River Trail

Route: 5T4;  Map: (1)

Columbus, MS

Greenville, MS

Bolivar, MS

According to Meyer’s map this route approximates present day US Route 82, between Columbus and Greenville.  A northeasterly extension route runs along MS Route 448 from Indianola to the mouth of the Arkansas River near Bolivar on the  Mississippi River. SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 69

Trails of Tears

Route: 5T8;  Info. Link: (1)

Image Gallery: (1),(2); 

Eastern U.S. /

Oklahoma Territory

The Trail of Tears was the forced relocation and movement of Native Americans from their homelands to Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma) in the Western United States.

Trammel's Trace

Route: 5T5;  Info. Link: (1),(2),(3),(4);

Map: (1)Image Gallery: (1); 

Fulton, AR

Nacogdoches, TX

The first road into Texas from the north, with origins back to 1813, this route connects with the Southwest Trail at Fulton, AR on the Red River.  Ends in Nacogdoches where it met the El Camino Real de los Tejas, aka. Old San Antonio Road.

Traveler’s Road

 

Another name used for the Federal Road (5F3).

Tugaloo-Apalachee Bay Trail

Route: 5T6;  Info. Link: (1);  Map: (1)

near Toccoa, GA

St. Marks, FL

Meyer’s Map shows this trail as travelling between the uplands of Georgia and South Carolina to the shores of the Gulf Coast. Its northern terminus was at Tugaloo a Cherokee town on the Tugaloo River. The trail passed through the areas of the following Georgia towns: Athens; Macon; Cordele; and Moultrie.  The old trail is approximated on these current roadways: US Rt. 29; GA Rts. 129/144, 41; and U.S. Route 319. 

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #86

Tunica-Lake Pontchartrain Trail

Route: 5T7;  Map: (1)

Woodville, MS

Covington, LA

According to Meyer’s Map this trail branched from the Natchez - New Orleans Trail (5N5) and ran in a southeasterly direction to an intersection with the Natchez – Lake Ponchartrain Trail (5N3). SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail # 97.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (U)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

U.S. Road

 

see Southwest Trail (5S5)

Upper Creek Trading Path

Route: 5U2;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1)

near Plum Branch, SC

Ashland, AL

This Native-American path traveled from the Savannah River to near Ashland, AL where it connected with the Talapoosa Trail (5T1) then on to Okfuskee Town, an early Upper Creek center, on the Tallapoosa River where it  around 1735 the British built Fort Okfuskee  Meyer’s has labeled this route as the Middle Creek Trading Path.  See entries for both routes for more information.

Upper Creeks-Pensacola Trail

Route: 5U1;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1)

Pensacola, FL

Pine Orchard, AL

According to Meyer’s Map this trail ran between the Pensacola Bay and the Mobile Bay then ran in a northeasterly direction to where it intersected with the Alabama and Mobile Road (5A3)SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #106, p.828.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (V)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (W)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

West Tennessee Chickasaw Trail

Route: 5W1;  Info. Link: (1)Map: (1)

 

Jacks Creek, TN

Pontotoc, MS

Meyer designated this route as the West Tennessee Chickasaw Trail in order to distinguish it from the Middle Tennessee Chickasaw Trail aka Natchez Trace.  This trail connected west Tennessee with Chickasaw and Choctaw settlements in Mississippi and Alabama.  It branched from the Cisco and Savannah Trail and ran in a southwesterly direction to Bolivar, TN then south into Mississippi and through New Albany to the Native-American settlements at Old Pontotoc.

SOURCE: Meyer, William. E., Indian Trails of the Southeast, Trail #12, p.815.

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (X)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (Y)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up) 23X21

NAME (Z)

PLACES OF TERMINATION

DESCRIPTIVE  INFORMATION

 

 

 

Arrow (red up)

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Image Gallery

Image Gallery

During our research we have collected images and photographs that are of general interest to a variety of historic American roads, trails and migration routes.  Some of them are presented on this website because we believe they tend to provide the reader with additional information which may aid in the understanding of this topic as well as our ancestors past lives.

Native-American Trails of the Southeastern Gulf Plains

Click on map for larger image

Use this LINK to see the “Image

Road & Routes (button) copy

Gallerythat pertain to this topic.

If you have any photographs or maps or other images relating to historic American 
roads, trails and migration routes we would greatly appreciate hearing from you.

searching the web (Purple)

Free Image Search
help from Google

searching the web (Purple)

Use the power of Google™ to find more interesting images about this topic. This button will link you to the Google Images  Search  page.    Enter  the  topic

Google Image Search Search

you are searching in the box and click “Search Images”. At the “Images” display page you will see the image, as well as the website of which it is associated.

arrow up lt blue 30x30

WWW (tan left)

Inyernet resources

Internet 
Resources

WWW (tan right)

The  Google  search  engine   button

and following web sites may provide 

Google Search (yellow)

you  with  additional  information  to

assist your research about this topic. 

General Resources

·      A Listing of Historic Roads in America

·      Brethren Life: Migrations

·      Trails West

·      Historical U.S. roads and trails - Wikipedia

·      U.S. Historical Maps - Perry-Castañeda Collection

·      Early American Roads and Trails

·      MIGRATIONS.org

·      ROOTS / MIGRATIONS

·      US Migration Trails and Roads – Family Search Wiki

·      American Migration Trails: Eastern United States

·      Historic trails & roads in the U.S.A. by state - Wikipedia

·      Turnpikes and Toll Roads in 19th Century America

·         American Migration Fact Sheets

·         Map guide to American migration routes,1735-1815

·         Migration Book Store

·         Links to Migration Routes Websites

·         Westward Expansion: Trails West

·         Migration Message Boards – Ancestry.com

·         The African-American Migration Experience 

·         United States Migration (Internal) – Family Search Wiki

·         Map of U.S. Trails – Geocities.com

·         American Migration Patterns

·         Migration Routes, Roads & Trails

·         Ancient Traces and Roads - Waymarking.com

Topic Specific Resources

·      Alabama Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Arkansas Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Florida Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Louisiana Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Mississippi Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Oklahoma Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      ississippiTexas Migration Routes -  Family Search Wiki

·      Historic trails and roads in Alabama- Wikipedia

·      Historic trails and roads in Arkansas- Wikipedia

·      Historic trails and roads in Florida- Wikipedia

·      Historic trails and roads in Louisiana- Wikipedia

·         Historic trails and roads in Mississippi- Wikipedia

·         Historic trails and roads in Oklahoma- Wikipedia

·         Historic trails and roads in Texas‎‎- Wikipedia

·         Early American Forts in AL, LA, MS

·         Arkansas Southwest Trail Research

·         Indian Trails and Early Roads in Alabama

·         Early Roads of Alabama

·         Roads and Highways - Encyclopedia of Arkansas

·         Historic Roads and Highways of Florida

·         Early Trails Through Oklahoma

·         Stage Stops & Taverns of Early Alabama Prior to 1840

Download a free 2-page Fact Sheet

Link 1 (script)

about American migration routes.

library_clipart1

Family Historian's
Reference Library

library_clipart1 right

The following Link will take you to our library of genealogy reference books.   Here you will find books about historic American roads, trails, and paths.  In addition, there are texts that pertain to ethnic and religion groups, history, geography as well as other books that will assist you with your research.

This Link will take you to our

Research Library - button 1 copy

collections of reference books.  

arrow up lt blue 30x30

About this webpage

About This Webpage

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~waldron/Mail1B0.gif-- Email us with your comments or questions. 

We do like to hear from others who are researching the same people and surnames.

We need your help to keep growing!  So please Email coolmailus your

photos, stories, and other appropriate information about this topic.

 

RULES OF USE
You are welcome to download any information on this page that does not cite a copyright. 

We only ask that if you have a personal website please create a link to our Home Page.

-- This webpage was last updated on --

01 October 2013

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)

arrow up lt blue 30x30

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)