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PUBLIC HOUSES AND BEERHOUSES

IN TODMORDEN AND WALSDEN

 

click HERE to go straight to the list of pubs

 

The consumption of spirits such as gin abounded in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, so much so that the general drunkenness of the poor people, who found it a way of seeking oblivion from the terrible conditions they endured, became a major issue with the government.

 

In 1825 the duty had been halved on gin causing a massive rise in the sale, leading to even more drunken and abusive behaviour in the "gin palaces". It became known as "mother's milk" and later "mother's ruin". It was regularly given to babies and children as a cure all - hence it's nickname.

 

To try and alter the drinking habits of the nation, the government abolished the duty on beer in an effort to promote it's sales as a "healthy" alterative to gin. Beer was seen as the lesser evil to gin and the hope was that people would be less inclined to get into the same drunken state as they did from spirits.

 

The Duke of Wellington's Beerhouse Act of 1830 came into force, allowing anyone to apply for a licence to sell just beer and cider (not spirits) from their home for six days of the week. They had to close on Sundays.

The cost of a licence was 2 guineas and to obtain one you applied to the local excise officer and not the local magistrates, as was the case with the public house that sold both beer and spirits. This caused a rise in the number of licensed premises by a half in the years after 1831. Cottages and houses were selling home brewed ale at the front and carrying on another business at the back. They could open for twenty-four hours and usually did, which meant that the new act did nothing at all to lessen the conditions in the pubs and beerhouses. There were still the same drunken scenes, gambling, fighting and other associated raucous behaviour. People would drink until their money ran out, go back to work to earn some more and then back to the pub to spend it again. A never ending round of drink and work, with drink taking precedence. It led to the rise of the Temperance movement.

 

As the bill was passing through the House of Lords it was reported that a Peer had been overheard saying that if the Act were passed, the people would continue in their drunkenness and could be ruled and governed over at will. On reading this report, William Marshall, a mule spinner of Old Friths Mill, Dulesgate, a man who like a drink in moderation, declared that he would never touch another drop, and he never did.

 

A second act in 1834 was passed to categorise the publican's licence into three types: a full one was granted for the sale of beer and sprits each year by the local magistrates, and the beerhouses were divided between "on" or "off" sales.

 

Some of the beerhouses remained unnamed and were known as "jerry shops" whilst the ones that decided to put up a named sign were called "white signs".

 

This then was the state of the licensing laws in the early19th century.

 

In Todmorden and Walsden, the first to take advantage of the new laws were Jeremiah Suthers, who opened The Peacock in York St., and James Dawson who opened the Black Horse at Knowlwood. Up on the tops at Sourhall, about 1832, a beerhouse aptly named "The First Move" was opened by William Eastwood and on the other side of the road John Crowther opened one and named it "The Last Shift", which reflected the decline of the hand loom weaving industry. They did a roaring trade in the early days, but the novelty soon wore off and they had to shut up shop as their trade declined.

 

The following is a list of the main public houses and beerhouses in existence in Todmorden and Walsden, taken from various directories, census returns and other sources. It is probably by no means definitive and we apologise for any omissions. We intend to record each individual pub history, the people who lived in them and the various activities that took place in them. Any stories or snippets that anyone knows about any of these pubs would be welcome.

WE NEED YOUR HELP ...

 

As we discover more about each of the pubs, a link to a story on that pub will be added. If you have any contributions for this project, PLEASE tell us, no matter how little you think you know. We are interested in everything about the pub, from its history to its landlords

 

LEGAL AND ILLEGAL ANTICS IN 1863

some snippets from the Halifax Guardian about

the goings on in various pubs, kindly provided by

John Alan Longbottom

REGISTER OF PUB LICENCES AND TRANSFERS 1936 to 1963

FOR TODMORDEN AND WALSDEN

transcribed from the originals by John Alan Longbottom

please click on the individual pub you wish to read more about

 

BAY HORSE

DULESGATE

GREYHOUND

88 ROCHDALE RD. TODMORDEN

Shannon & Chesapeake

Millwood, Todmorden

Bay Horse

Cross Stone

Half Way House

Cockden Eastwood

SHEPHERDS REST

HEYHEAD, LANGFIELD

Bear's Head Inn

Carr House

Hare & Hounds

Burnley Rd., Todmorden

Shepherds Rest

Castle St.

BIRD I' TH' HAND

WALSDEN

GENERAL HAVELOCK

3, SALFORD, TODMORDEN

Shoulder of Mutton

102, Burnley Rd., Todmorden

Black Bull

Gauxholme

Hole in the Wall

Honey Hole

Slave's Rest

Todmorden

Black Horse

Knowlwood

Hollins Inn

Walsden

Spinners Rest

Knowlwood

Black Swan

North St Todmorden

Jockey Tavern

Burnley Rd., Cornholme

Sportmans

Shaw Lane, Stansfield

BLUE BALL, DULESGATE, CLOUGHFOOT

Lord Nelson

Cheapside, Todmorden

Sportmans

Keb Cote

Boars Head Inn,

Carr House Fold Stansfield

Masons Arms

Gauxholme

SPORTSMAN'S ARMS

LUMBUTTS

BRITISH QUEEN INN

CLOUGHFOOT

Moorcock Inn

Highgate, Todmorden

Spring Gardens

Todmorden

BUTCHER'S ARMS, WALSDEN (BORDER ROSE)

NAVIGATION INN GAUXHOLME

Staff Of Life

Knotts Grove

Castle

Stansfield

New Inn Holme,

Stansfield

Star Inn Lord St.,

Todmorden

Castle Inn

Longfield Rd

NEW INN

ROOMFIELD LANE

TODMORDEN

Station House Hotel

Eastwood

Cattle Market Inn

North St., Todmorden

Nudger Inn,

near Hebden Bridge

SUN INN

MOVERLEY, WALSDEN

Clarence Inn

11, Higher Crescent Todmorden

Old Canteen Inn,

Canteen

Swan with Two Necks

Millwood

Coach and Horses

Waterside

Patmos Inn

Burnley Rd

Thorne Inn

Shore

Coach House Inn

Scaitcliffe

PEACOCK, YORK ST. TODMORDEN

TOP BRINK

LUMBUTTS

CROSS KEYS

WALSDEN

Peeping Tom

Knotts Grove

VIADUCT TAVERN

GAUXHOLME

DOG & PARTRIDGE

LUMBUTTS

Poultry Dealers Arms

Kitson Wood Rd

Waggon & Horses

Burnley Rd., Stansfield

Dusty Miller

12, Square Rd., Walsden

Queen Hotel

Railway Station

Waggon & Horses

Walsden

Fountain Inn

Meadow Bottoms Todmorden

Railway Hotel

Lydgate Todmorden

Weaver's Arms

Blind Lane

Fox and Hounds

10, Patmos, Todmorden

RAILWAY HOTEL

WALSDEN

WELLINGTON INN

HALIFAX RD. TODMORDEN

Freemasons Arms

Blind Lane

Roebuck

Portsmouth

WHITE HART INN

MARKET PLACE

TODMORDEN

Frieldhurst Tavern

Todmorden

Rope & Anchor

Roomfield Lane Todmorden

WHITE LION

WADSWORTH MILL

Friendly Inn

Lydgate Todmorden

ROSE & CROWN

CASTLE CLOUGH

HALIFAX ROAD

Wood Mill Inn

Bottoms, Stansfield

Glen View Tavern

Burnley Rd., Portsmouth

Rose and Crown

4 and 6 Canteen

WOODCOCK INN

(BELLS ARMS) WALSDEN

Golden Lion

Fielden Square, Todmorden

Royal George

Church St, Todmorden

Woodman

Underbank

Grapes Inn

9, Rochdale Rd., Todmorden

Royal George

Halifax Rd., Todmorden

WOODPECKER INN

SHADE

Royal Oak

Springside, Todmorden

York Hotel

Halifax Rd., Todmorden

 

Further reading can be obtained from the excellent book "Todmorden Old Pub Trail" by Barbara Rudman, published by George Kelsall and Barbara Rudman ands can be obtained from the Tourist Information Office, Todmorden or From George Kelsall's book shop, 22, Church St., Littleborough OL15 9AA Tel 01706 70244

 

 

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