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Tinlin, Tinline and Tinling DNA Study

 

 

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Below are my DNA results.  This was a test only of my “Y line”, i.e. my straight male lineage, which should make these the values for all Tinlin descended from Robert Tinlin of Kirkwhelpington.  If all Tinlins, Tinlines and Tinlings are really descended from the same individual, then all males with that name should carry these or very close values.  I’m hoping more men with these last names will be willing to have their DNA tested so that we can start comparing and testing our lineages.  A good example of a large-scale study can be found at this DNA site for the many Hill families: http://www.hilldna.com/results.html.  On that page you can see how different DNA test results can be grouped together to show which individuals are descended from a common ancestor.

 

Despite the rarity of the Tinlin surname, my values turned out to be pretty “generic European”.  My haplogroup is R1B1, the most common in Europe.  Wikipedia has an entry on R1B here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_R1b_(Y-DNA) (there are many others on the web).  I have not yet paid the extra fee to find out which sub-branch of R1B1 I belong to, but will probably do that eventually.  The R1B1 group took an interesting path from Africa through India and up into the Caucasus, and then turned west into Europe.  During the Ice Age, they retreated southwards into Spain, then, once the glaciers melted, headed north to the British Isles.  My marker values were closest to others with straight-male ancestors from England, Scotland and Ireland, in that order, and there seemed to be less affinity with those of Scandinavian or other European origin.

 

Of others who took the 37-marker test, only 3 individuals were close to my values (all were 4 steps away from mine).  Most interestingly, one of these was a Tinning with ancestors from Cumberland.  Many of the Tinling families in Cumberland became Tinnings and I think the possibility for this Tinning and I to be so close could not be just coincidence, when several thousand others were not.  This means that the two names are probably the same and we share a common male-line ancestor.  The other two individuals were named Walker and Hudson.  People can have the same values but different surnames for several reasons.  One is that their male-line common ancestor may have lived before the families took their respective surnames.  The other is that there may have been an illegitimacy somewhere in one or the other person’s line. 

 

I have just requested the company where I had my DNA tested to set up a Tinlin-Tinline-Tinling surname project.  The company can be reached here:

Family Tree DNA - Genealogy by Genetics, Ltd.
World Headquarters
1919 North Loop West, Suite 110 Houston, Texas 77008, USA
Phone: (713) 868-1438 | Fax: (832) 201-7147

Website: http://www.familytreedna.com/default.asp

 

If you would like to take part, it is best that you order the 37-marker test.  You will be sent a kit in the mail and all you have to do is rub a swab inside your cheek and send it back to them.  The cost is roughly $200 per person.  Only male individuals can take part in this particular study (as it is testing for the Y chromosome).

 

 

MY Y-LINE VALUES (37-marker test)

 

 

1

393

13

2

390

24

3

19*

14

4

391

11

5

385a

11

6

385b

15

7

426

12

8

388

12

9

439

12

10

389-1

13

11

392

13

12

389-2

29

13

458

17

14

459a

9

15

459b

10

16

455

11

17

454

11

18

447

25

19

437

15

20

448

19

21

449

29

22

464a**

14

23

464b**

15

24

464c**

16

25

464d**

17

26

460

11

27

GATA H4

11

28

YCA II a

19

29

YCA II b

23

30

456

16

31

607

15

32

576

18

33

570

18

34

CDY a

36

35

CDY b

38

36

442

13

37

438

12

*Also known as DYS 394

**On 5/19/2003, these values were adjusted down by 1 point because of a change in Lab nomenclature.