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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF
THE OFFICE OF
THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES AGENCY
MUSKOGEE AREA of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
(Record Group 75)

Compiled by Kent Carter, September 1994

The Southwest National Archives branch in Fort Worth, Texas holds most of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records from Oklahoma. This is their extensive inventory of approximately 650 types of records covering enrollment, allotment, leases, finances, probate, programs, and schools. These original records must be viewed in person at the SW National Archives.   Please see Visiting the National Archives.


Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649


RECORDS RELATING TO EDUCATION

 Following the removal to Indian Territory, each of the tribes established a system of day schools and boarding schools that were operated under the supervision of the tribal government with tribal funds. The Secretary of Interior claimed control over these schools under the Curtis Act of 1898 and appointed John D. Benedict to the position of Supervisor of Indian Schools on February 10, 1899. Benedict appointed Assistant Supervisors for each tribe (with the exception of the Seminoles) on April 30, 1899, who exercised control over 1421 day schools and 35 boarding schools. The tribes strongly resisted any loss of authority over their schools but Federal control was increased by an act of Congress of April 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 370) that provided for the termination of the tribal goyernments.

 In 1910, the Department of Interior conducted an investigation of the schools that resulted in the replacement of Benedict by Oscar H. Lipps and the abolishment of the Assistant Supervisor positions. Responsibility for most rural day schools was transferred to the State of Oklahoma and Congress began appropriating funds to pay the tuition of Indian children attending public schools. The Federal government took over control of all tribal boarding schools and closed 12 of the 24 still in operation. On April 1, 1911, John N. Brown was appointed Supervisor of Schools for the Five Civilized Tribes and was subsequently succeeded by A.S. Wyly (1915-1922) and Herbert C. Calhoun (1922-1931).

 On September 1, 1931, George C. Wells was appointed Supervisor of Education for Oklahoma with headquarters in Oklahoma City and exercised administrative control over all educational programs of the BIA in Oklahoma. Percy W. Daniels was appointed Assistant Supervisor of Education in December, 1935, with offices at Muskogee and responsibility for the Five Civilized Tribes. In 1937, Russell M. Kelly replaced Daniels and the title of the position was changed to Superintendent of Education with control over the Cheyenne- Arapaho, Kiowa, Osage, Pawnee, Seneca, and Shawnee. Kelly's title was changed to District Supervisor of Education in 1946 and he exercised supervision over all of Oklahoma. When an Area Office was established at Muskogee in 1949, A. B. Caldwell was appointed Educationist with responsibility for all education programs in Eastern Oklahoma.

 A School Division was established within the Five Civilized Tribes Agency in 1932 that included several Day School Representatives who visited public schools to investigate the enrollment, attendance, and progress of Indian children. In 1935, the Division included eight Education Field Agents and five School Social Workers under the supervision of the Chief Education Field Agent, George Hillman, who reported to the Supervisor of Education in Muskogee through the Superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency. In 1938, it was renamed the Education Division that became the Branch of Education in 1949.


RECORDS OF THE SUPERVISOR OF INDIAN SCHOOLS

Many of the records of the Supervisor including correspondence, reports, and accounts are in the custody of the Oklahoma Ristorical Society. Some have been microfilmed and can be found on DC rolls 45, and 67-72.

580. LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE SUPERVISOR OF SCHOOLS.

1906-1908. 2 ft.
Arranged in rough chronological order.
Original letters received by John D. Benedict, Supervisor of Indian Schools, from Supervisors of Tribal Schools, teachers, and the general public. The letters relate to teacher pay, school administration, enrollment of students, applications for employment, and status of individual students. There are a few letters that were written from 1900 to 1902.
A-18-86-5

581. LISTS OF TEACHERS.

1901-1907. 2 vols. 1 in.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by school.
A record of teachers employed at boarding schools and day schools that gives the teacher's name, position, salary, date entered on duty, sex, age, race, marital status, birthplace, and previous occupation. There is information about teachers at the Jones Academy through 1925 and some information about the number of students enrolled in various schools and average attendance. See also entry 981 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for rosters of school employees in Indian Territory from 1899-1900. Microfilmed as 7RA194. (L5869 and L3166)
A-18-86-5

582. RECORD OF DAY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT.

1904-1907. 5 vols. 8 in.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by school. The volumes include a list of schools.
A record of enrollment and attendance at various day schools that gives the teacher's name and salary, number of Indian and white children enrolled each quarter, number of days attended, and the total amount paid the teacher or the school. (L3169, L3172-3, L3178, L3180)
A-18-86-5

583. RECORD OF PAYMENTS TO TEACHERS.

1900-1910. 9 vols. 9 in.
Arranged chronologically in roughly yearly segments, thereunder by tribe, and thereunder by school.
A record of salaries paid to teachers in boarding schools and contract day schools. The only information given for each teacher is name, number of days taught, salary, and amount paid. There is sometimes information about supplies. The records include information about the Cherokee Male and Female Seminary and Orphan Asylum. Choctaw volumes microfilmed as 7RA194. See entry 736 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for similar records. (L3179, L3189, L3188, L3187, L3185, and L3181, L3177, L3175, and L5870)
A-18-86-5

584. LISTS OF STUDENTS LEAVING SCHOOL ("DESERTERS").

n.d. 1 vol. .5 in.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the student's surname.
A list of students who left schools apparently without permission that gives the student's name, age, Dawes enrollment number, tribe, and school attended. The bulk of the students were enrolled at Chilocco Boarding.School or Haskell Institute. (L3278)
A-18-86-5

585. VOUCHERS FOR PAYMENTS TO SCHOOLS.

1913. 14 vols. 2 in.
Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by quarter in which payment was made.
Carbon copies of schedules of vouchers for payments to "common schools" (form 587) that gives the school name, district number, county, amount paid, date of payment, and check number. (2-3-33+)
A-18-86-5

586. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHEROKEE BOARD OF EDUCATION.

1900-1903. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically. The volume includes an index to addressees.
Press copies of letters sent by H. W. C. Shelton, President of the Cherokee Board of Education, to the general public. The letters relate to school administration, finances, and enrollment. (171761)
A-18-86-6

587. LETTERS SENT BY THE SUPERVISOR OF CHEROKEE SCHOOLS.

1906-1909. 6 vols. 6 in.
Arranged chronologically. Each volume includes an index to addressees.
Press copies of letters sent by D. Frank Reed, Supervisor of Cherokee Schools, to the general public. The letters relate to school administration, finances, and enrollment. See entry 737 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for attendance statistics for Cherokee Day Schools for 1906.
A-18-86-6

588. REGISTER OF CHEROKEE STUDENTS.

1881-1882. 1 vol. .5 in.
Arranged by school term and thereunder by school.
A handwritten list of "students and borders" at the Cherokee Male and Female Seminaries that gives each student's name, tribal district of residence, age, date of admittance, name of patron, and address. The volume also includes some printed rules and regulations of the seminaries. Microfilmed as 7RA91. (100567)
A-18-86-6

589. MERGED WITH ENTRY 583.

590. RECORDS RELATING TO SCHOOL RESERVATIONS.

1908-1913. 1 vol. 3 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder by school district. There is an alphabetical list of counties that gives the district numbers for which there are records. There is some correspondence dated as late as 1940.
Original petitions from school boards to acquire tracts of land for school reservations, plat maps annotated with the tract location, appraisals, bills of sale, deeds, receipts for patents, and correspondence. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Commissioner to the FCT and school board officials and relates to payments for the land and transfer of title. The land was sold to the county school boards under section 10 of an act of Congress of May 29, 1908 (35 Stat. 444) that authorized the sale of tracts of up to two acres of unallotted land for school reservations. There is a volume that provides a summary of the actions taken on each petition. (no #)
A-18-86-6 and 12 maps @ A-35-13-2

591. RECORDS OF THE SUPERVISOR OF CREEK AND SEMINOLE SCHOOLS.

1905-1910. 1 ft.
Arranged by type of record and thereunder in rough chronological order.
Correspondence, estimates of funds, vouchers, and accounts of Walter Falwell, Supervisor of Creek and Seminole Schools. The bulk of the correspondence is between Falwell and John D. Benedict or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The accounts relate primarily to the Coweta Boarding School and the Eufaula High School. (See also Oklahoma Historical Society microfilm DC roll 67-71)
A-18-86-7

592. LISTS OF CREEK TEACHERS.

1898-1907. 5 vols. 5 in.
Arranged by school term and thereunder by school.
Lists of teachers at Creek boarding and day schools that give the teacher's name, school, and amount paid. Some volumes also contain information about Creek school warrants. (L3296, L3174, L3176, L3182, and L3183).
A-18-86-7

593. RECORDS RELATING TO THE TULLAHASSEE BOARDING SCHOOL.

1910-1914. 2 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged by type of record and thereunder in rough chronological order
Correspondence, enrollment lists, vouchers, abstracts of disbursements, property returns, and physician's statements relating to the Tullahassee Boarding School that was operated by the Creek tribal government for black children. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Superintendent of the school and the Supervisor of Creek Schools and relates to administration, finances, and enrollment. See Virginia E. Landerdale, 11The Tullahassee Mission" in The Chronicles of Oklahoma (Volume 26 Number 3). L3218 from 70200).
A-18-86-7


RECORDS OF THE SUPERVISOR OF EDUCATION

The records described below were maintained primarily by Herbert C. Calhoun, Russell M. Kelly, and A. B. Caldwell but include some records created or maintained by the Chief Education Field Agent and the Education Division at the FCT Agency at Muskogee. It has been impossible to separate the records because of the close relationship between various Supervisors or Superintendents of Education in Oklahoma City or Muskogee and the staff of the FCT Agency that was involved with education programs.

594. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE SUPERVISOR OF EDUCATION.

1925-1937. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by surname of addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by Herbert C. Calhoun and Perry W. Danielson to field agents, school officials, and the general public. The bulk of the correspondence relates to employment but there are some letters pertaining to school enrollment, supplies, facilities, and payment of tuition.
A-18-88-1

595. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.

1934-1961. 3 ft.
Arranged chronologically.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Superintendent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, members of Congress, the Director of Education of the BIA, the Supervisor of Education in Oklahoma City, Superintendents of various schools, Education Field Agents, officials of agencies of the State of Oklahoma, and the general public. The correspondence relates to employment of teachers and field agents, repair and construction of school buildings, supplies, enrollment of students, and funding for education programs. (46663)
A-18-88-1

596. NARRATIVE AND STATISTICAL REPORTS.

1930-1954. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically.
Carbon copies of annual narrative and statistical reports of the Supervisor of Education to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The reports provide information about enrollment and attendanceof students, operation of boarding and day schools, contracts with denominational schools, activities of school social workers, relief programs, and funding for education programs. Most of the reports contain photographs and maps. There are some reports of Education Field Agents and Principals of boarding schools for Cheyenne-Arapaho, Pawnee, Seneca, Choctaws (in Mississippi), and Haskell Institute.
A-18-88-1

597. RECORDS RELATING TO FIELD AGENTS AND SCHOOLS.

1930-1946. 8 ft.
Arranged in chronological segments (1930-35, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1930-1943, and 1944-46) and thereunder by name of the field employee or the school.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Supervisor of Education or the Superintendent of the FCT Agency to Education Field Agents, School Social Workers, Superintendents or Principals of schools, and various officials concerned with education programs; weekly and monthly statistical reports and narrative reports; reports of visits to schools and families of students; photographs of school buildings and students; and school census reports. The correspondence relates to employment, pay, facilities, and funding for education programs. There is some correspondence between Herbert Calhoun and Day School Representatives from 1926-1930 and School Social Workers for 1948-1949.
A-18-88-1

598. OFFICE FILES OF RUSSELL KELLEY.

1937-1963. 6 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, lsits of employees and teachers, financial reports, budget estimates, minutes of staff meetings, agenda and summaries of conferences, and publications of some Indian schools. The records relate to arts and crafts programs, exhibits at fairs and meetings, conferences of the Oklahoma Education Association and other educational groups, health, programs for deaf and blind students, repair and maintenance of school facilities, issuance of clothing and shoes to children of indigent Indians, and the operation of boarding and day schools. There are some minutes of meetings of an inter-tribal council (1951-1958) and a guidance committee on educational grant approvals (1958-1963). There is also a 1935 report on rural schools for Indians submitted by S. L. Smith. Although the bulk of the records were created while Russell Kelley was Supervisor of Education, there are a few records that were accumulated by his successor, A. B. Caldwell.
A-18-88-3

599. RECORDS RELATING TO SPECIAL INDIAN DAY SCHOOLS.

1931-1955. 2 ft.
Arranged by name of school or type of record.
Correspondence, circulars, lists of students and teachers, attendance reports, copies of contracts with school districts, and vouchers for payments to school districts. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Supervisor of Education and teachers, county school officials, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. There is a folder for each school that contains records relating to the acquisition and disposal of land and buildings and often includes photographs of school buildings.
A-18-88-4

600. RECORDS RELATING TO APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLLMENT IN SCHOOLS.

1926-1955. 48 ft.
Arranged by school and thereunder by term (see Appendix VI). Beginning in 1950, the applications are arranged alphabetically.
Correspondence, applications for enrollment, reports and recommendations on applications, and lists of students in various schools. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Supervisor of Education in Muskogee and Principals of schools, Education Field Agents, and parents of children and relates to actions taken on applications, attendance, Aesertions, and graduation. The original application for enrollment is generally found among the records of the appropriate school. (71A1210)
A-18-88-5 and A-18-92-7

601. RECORDS RELATING TO CONTRACT SCHOOLS.

1910-1949. 18 ft.
Arranged by school (see Appendix VI) and thereunder by school term.
Correspondence, copies of contracts (SF-33), vouchers for payments (SF-193a), and attendance reports (5-252). The bulk of the correspondence is between the Supervisor of Education or the Chief Education Field Agent and officials of county boards of education or principals of schools and relates to the award of contracts for the instruction of Indian children and the payment of tuition. The attendance reports generally provide each student's name, age, tribe, degree of Indian blood, date entered school, grade, and number of days attended. (46611)
A-18-90-2

602. CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO ENRICHMENT FUNDS.

1928-1947. 5 ft.
Arranged by county.
Correspondence and reports relating to the payment of funds to school districts for the enrichment of educational programs for Indian children. The correspondence is between the Chief Education Field Agent and officials of school districts, Principals of schools, Education Field Agents, and the Supervisor of Education. The funds were generally used to buy books and school supplies. (76467-68)
A-18-90-3

603. PUBLIC SCHOOL ATTENDANCE REPORTS.

1931-1937. 16 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder by school term.
Reports prepared on a printed form of attendance by Indian children in public schools that gives the school name, county, district number and the name, age, sex, tribe, grade of each student and the number of days they attended. The forms were used to support tuition payments by the Federal government under regulations of April 18, 1931. (46345-361)
A-18-90-4

604. EDUCATION SURVEY FORMS.

1930. 1 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder by family.
A record prepared on printed forms of information gathered from May to December, 1930, about the educational level of Indian families. The information given for each family includes each member's name, age, Dawes enrollment number (if any), address, and ability to read and write. The form also includes some information about health conditions, ownership of property, and occupations. There are also a few narrative and statistical reports based on the survey. See also entry 626. (358519-20).
A-18-90-7

605. ANNUAL SCHOOL CENSUS REPORTS.

1938-1947. 10 ft.
Arranged in yearly segments and thereunder by county.
Carbon copies of reports prepared by Education Field Agents on printed forms (5-255 and 5-255a) of Indian children attending school. The report provides the following information for each child: name, sex, age, grade, tribe, degree of Indian blood, distance from home to school, name of parent or guardian, name of school attended, and length of school term. In addition to the detailed report, there is a summary report that provides the number of children by sex enrolled and not enrolled in school in various age groups. There is some correspondence between the Education Field Agents and the Supervisor of Education about the preparation and submission of the reports. (70078-80)
A-18-90-7

606. CENSUS REPORTS OF INDIAN CHILDREN.

1951-1954. 2 ft.
Arranged by school term and thereunder by county.
Carbon copies of census reports on children of more than 1/4 Indian blood enrolled in public schools prepared by County Superintendents of Education on printed forms. The information given for each child includes name, age, sex, tribe, grade, school district number, name of parent or guardian, and address. There are also some statistical summaries based on the census reports.
A-18-92-1

607. RECORD OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT.

1934-1947. 20 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder in segments including students in public schools, boarding schools, students out of school, students less than 1/4 Indian blood, etc. Cards within each segment are arranged alphabetically. There appear to be cards for Carter, Choctaw, Jefferson, Love, McClain, McCurtain, Marshall, and Pushmatta Counties.
A record of students prepared on printed 5 x 8 inch cards ("Permanent School Census Card 5-255b") that gives each student's name, tribe, degree of Indian blood, date of birth, parents' names, and a yearly record of school enrollment that includes the name of the school, grade, and number of days attended. These cards were maintained by the Education Field Agents at Ardmore and Hugo. There are no cards for Freedmen. (351667-9)
A-18-96-2

607A. INDEX TO STUDENTS IN SCHOOLS.

1920-1945. 25 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by student's name.
A record prepared on various types of printed cards of students attending various public and Indian schools. The information generally given for each student includes name, date of birth, age, sex, degree of Indian blood, parent's name and their roll numbers (if any), address, grade, and name of school attended.
A-17-22-3

608. RECORD OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES.

1911-1946. 2 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by school and thereunder alphabetically by employee's surname.
A record prepared on 5 x 8 inch cards (form 310) of employees of Indian boarding schools and the Education Division of the FCT Agency. The information given for each employee includes name, school, salary, date of birth, sex, race, marital status, and a list of positions held and dates of duty. (389732)
A-18-92-2


RECORDS OF FIELD OFFICES

 Fifteen District Agents were appointed on June 20, 1908 in accordance with an act of Congress of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. 312) that provided for "local representatives" of the Secretary of Interior to work with officials of county courts to protect the interests of minor children of enrolled members of the Five Civilized Tribes. Each District Agent was a political appointee who was responsible for a designated area and reported to W. W. Bennett, Supervisor of District Agents, who maintained an office in Muskogee and was under the administrative control of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Although the District Agents were appointed to deal with probate and guardianship matters, they spent the majority of their time investigating applications for removal of restrictions and supervising the lease or sale of allotted land and the collection and distribution of funds for individual restricted Indians.

 The position of District Agent was abolished in 1912 and the political appointees were replaced by employees of the Union Agency who were designated Field Clerks and performed most of the functions of the District Agents but had no responsibilities for probate or guardianship. In 1914, Congress authorized funds for the employment of Probate Attorneys for the Five Civilized Tribes (see entries 333-346). The Probate Attorneys worked closely with the Field Clerks.

 A Field Division under a Supervising Field Agent was established within the FCT Agent in 1915 and the forty counties within its jurisdiction were divided into 18 districts with a Field Agent or Field Clerk in each responsible for supervising the lands and funds of restricted Indians. There were frequent changes in the number of districts and their boundaries and farmers, land appraisers, extension agents, and social workers were assigned to some districts at various times. When an Area Office was established at Muskogee in 1949, six District Field Offices were created at Miami, Tahlequah, Okmulgee, Talihina, Wewoka, and Ardmore with a District Agent at each responsible for all employees within the district.

 See the file on Samuel Anderson in entry 552 who was a Creek and a Field Clerk. The file contains information on Congressional investigations and tribal affairs. See also entry 317 that contains information on field clerks and investigations.


GENERAL RECORDS

609. REGISTER OF DISTRICT AGENTS.

1908-1912. 16 pages
Arranged numerically by district and thereunder chronologically by date of appointment.
A list of District Agents and Acting District Agents that gives name, dates of service, and office location. There are some notations about employment of government farmers and assistants. (69866)
A-18-92-3

610. REGISTER OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM FIELD CLERKS.

1909-1914. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged by name of agent and thereunder chronologically by date received.
A record of reports and letters received from District Agents and Field Clerks that gives the date sent, subject, and file number. The volume also includes a list of agents and Probate Attorneys. (L3341)
A-18-92-3

611. LETTERS SENT BY THE SUPERVISING DISTRICT AGENT.

1910-1912. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. The volume includes an index to subjects.
Press copies of letters sent by Charles F. Bliss, Supervising District Agent, to the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, the Superintendent of the Union Agency, District Agents, and the general public. The letters relate to investigations of allotment contests, removal of restrictions, sale of land, payments to individual Indians, guardianship of minors, and activities of District Agents. See entry 307 for a description of circulars sent to District Agents from 1914 to 1919.
A-18-92-3

612. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FIELD DIVISION.

1925-1931. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Supervising Field Agent or the Superintendent of the FCT Agency to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Probate Attorneys, Field Clerks, and the general public. The letters relate primarily to the receipt and payment of money due individual Indians. (53969-70)
A-18-92-3

613. WEEKLY REPORTS OF FIELD AGENTS.

1935-1943. 1 ft.
Arranged by office and thereunder chronologically. There are a few reports for the period 1933-1934.
Carbon copies of weekly narrative and statistical reports submitted by Field Agents that provide information about land sales, applications for removal of restrictions, leases, disbursements, places visited, and number of visits made. Some similar reports for the period before 1933 are included in the records described in entry 616. (46687)
A-18-92-3

614. WEEKLY REPORTS OF LAND APPRAISERS.

1937-1942. 1 ft.
Arranged by name of appraiser and thereunder chronologically by date of report.
Carbon copies of weekly narrative and statistical reports submitted by Land Appraisers assigned to various districts. The reports provide information about the number of requests for appraisals, the number of appraisements made, the number of miles traveled, and types of special assignments completed. The reports also include information about assistance provided to Probate Attorneys.
A-18-92-3

615. RECORDS OF SUPERVISING AGENT W. W. BENNETT.

1904-1910. 1 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, reports, copies of documents filed in county courts in guardianship and probate proceedings, copies of leases and contracts, and testimony taken in investigations of various District Agents. The bulk of the correspondence is between Bennett and the Dawes Commission, the Union Agency, county courts, and the general public and relates to guardianship and probate administration, suits pertaining to land titles, status of allotments to Indians, disbarment proceedings against attorneys, and charges of fraud in the Chickasaw and Cherokee Land Offices and misconduct by District Agents. There are a few documents created between 1902 and 1904.
A-18-92-3

616. RECORDS OF SUPERVISING FIELD CLERKS.

1908-1931. 3 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative and statistical reports, newspaper clippings, circulars, and orders. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Supervising Field Clerk or the Superintendent of the agency and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Field Clerks, government farmers, contract physicians, officials of county courts, Probate Attorneys, and the general public. The correspondence relates to complaints against employees of the agency, charges of fraud and forgery, taxation of Indian land, the sale and lease of land, probate and guardianship administration, the appraisal of land, suits pertaining to title, and activities of District Agents. There is also information about the Nighthawks and activities of Competency Commissions. (54044-5, 55053-4, 54088, and 46653-4)
A-18-92-3

617. RECORDS RELATING TO ABOLISHING DISTRICT AGENTS.

1912. 4 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order.
Correspondence, newspaper clippings, resolutions of tribal organizations, and petitions relating to proposals to abolish District Agents. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Superintendent of the Union Agency and members of Congress, local politicians, judges of county courts, tribal officials, and the general public. Many of the petitions and resolutions support the continuation of the positions and were addressed to the Secretary of Interior.
A-18-92-4

618. RECORDS RELATING TO TITLE TO LAND IN McCURTAIN COUNTY.

1910-1912. 4 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence and copies of documents filed in county court proceedings. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Superintendent of the Union Agency and District Agents, tribal officials, and judges of county courts and pertains to charges of fraud and misconduct by county judges in probate and guardianship matters in McCurtain County. There is some correspondence with Dr. J. H. Stolper and Kate Barnard of the Oklahoma Commission of Charities and Corrections who represented minor children in various hearings. There are some records relating to the Whitehead Arbitration Board and other groups established to determine the legality of conveyances of title to land allotted to or inherited by minor children.
A-18-92-4

619. CASE FILES ON INDIVIDUAL INDIANS. (see also entries 346 and 552.)

1909-1963. 200 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by surname.
Correspondence, copies of deeds and leases, copies of documents filed in county court proceedings, applications for permission to send restricted funds, bills and vouchers for goods and services bought with restricted funds, and various forms relating to the receipt and disbursement of funds of individual restricted Indians. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Superintendent of the agency or Field Clerks and Probate Attorneys, other field employees, tribal officials, and the general public and relates to the sale and lease of land, civil and criminal proceedings, title to land, probate and guardianship administration, health, and education. These records were maintained by various District Agents and subsequently consolidated and many of the documents in these files can also be found in the records described in entry 552). (69A27, 55A560, 54A530, 56A237)
A-18-92-4 and A-25-12-2

620. RECORD OF APPRAISEMENTS.

1915. 2 vols. 2 in.
Arranged by district and thereunder by Range and Township. Each volume contains an index to allottees.
Printed plat maps annotated with the location of tracts of land allotted to restricted Indians. On the page facing the maps, information about each tract has been recorded including name of allottee, date of appraisement, number of acres in cultivation, appraised value of the land, appraised value of any improvements, date sold (if appropriate), and purchase price. The appraisements were required by an agency circular number 254 of August 2, 1915. (L1680)
A-18-92-6

621. INDEX TO CREEKS LIVING IN MUSKOGEE, McCURTAIN, AND WAGONER COUNTIES.

n.d. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by town and thereunder by surname.
An index prepared on 3 x 5 inch cards of Creeks that provides the Indian's name, Dawes enrollment number, degree of Indian blood, county of residence, address, and distance from home to nearest post office. This index was probably maintained by one of the District Agents for reference. (99512)
A-18-92-6

622. RECORDS OF THE SUPERVISOR OF CONSTRUCTION.

1916-1920. 1 ft.
Arranged by district and thereunder in rough chronological order.
Correspondence, bids for construction projects, bills for supplies and services, copies of contracts, plans, and receipts for payment. The correspondence is between J. W. Dickson, Supervisor of Construction for the FCT agency in Muskogee and Field Clerks, contractors, and the general public. The records relate to the construction and repair of homes, barns, and other structures belonging to restricted Indians. The Supervisor of Construction was assigned to the Field Division until the position was abolished in 1922. (69347)
A-18-92-6


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT ARDMORE

623. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1908-1945. 6 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, narrative and statistical reports, appraisements of land and reports of title searches, copies of documents filed in court proceedings, maps, and newspaper clippings. The records relate to sale and lease of land, collection of royalties, taxation of Indian land, payments to individual Indians, title to land, relief programs for destitute Indians, enrollment of children in schools, and hospitalization of restricted Indians. The records relate primarily to Choctaws and Chickasaws living in Carter, Garvin, Love, McCurtain, and Murray Counties. (70339-385)
A-18-94-6

624. CENSUS REPORTS ON LIVING ENROLLEES.

1926-1930. 4 in.
Arranged alphabetically by first letter of the enrollee's surname.
A record prepared on printed forms of "Living Members of the Five Civilized Tribes Owning Restricted Indian Land, June 30, 1927." The information contained in the form includes the Indian's name, Dawes enrollment number, tribe, degree of Indian blood, age, sex, ability to read and write English, schools attended, marital status, health, occupation, legal description of the land owned, and an opinion as to the Indian's competency. There are also some census reports compiled as of June 30, 1926 and at sometime in 1930 that provide similar information. The records include some correspondence between the agency and the Field Clerk pertaining to the completion of the forms and some photographs of Indians and their homes. The reports appear to include only Indians living in Carter, Garvin, Love, and Murray Counties. Similar reports are included in entries 636, 645, and 367.
A-18-94-7

625. RECORDS OF THE EXTENSION AGENT.

1936-1944 6 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, regulations, orders, narrative and statistical reports, and photographs. The correspondence is between the agent and the Superintendent of the FCT Agency in Muskogee and relates to agricultural programs, relief of destitute Indians, and various Indian credit associations.
A-18-94-7

626. OFFICE FILES OF THE EDUCATION FIELD AGENT.

1930-1947. 2 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, regulations, orders, narrative reports, enrollment reports on Indian children, and school census reports (form 5-255a). The correspondence is between the agent and the Superintendent of the FCT Agency in Muskogee, the Supervisor of Education in Oklahoma City, other Field Agents and social workers, and the general public and relates to enrollment of Indian children in school, payment of tuition to public school districts, relief programs, health clinics, and payments to individual restricted Indians. The records include some reports of school social workers and forms from an education survey conducted in 1930 (see also entry 604).
A-18-96-1

627. OFFICE FILES OF THE SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER.

1940-1947. 8 in.
Arranged by school or subject.
Correspondence and enrollment reports. The correspondence is between the School Social Worker and the Supervisor of Education in Chicago, the FCT Agency in Muskogee, and the principals of various Indian and public schools and relates to the enrollment of Indian children and the payment of tuition and other assistance to schools or the individual Indian. There is correspondence relating to Carter Seminary, Chilocco Boarding School, Euchee and Eufaula Indian Schools, Haskell Institute, Goodland Indian Orphanage, Bacone College, Murray State School of Agriculture, and St. Elizabeth's Boarding School. (89511-12)
A-18-94-7

628. CASE FILES OF THE SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER.

1930-1947. 3 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by student's surname.
Correspondence, applications for enrollment, and various reports on home conditions and financial status of Indian children. The correspondence is between the social worker and the Regional Coordinator in Oklahoma City, the Supervisory Social Worker in Muskogee, other field employees, principals of schools, and the parents or guardians of restricted Indian children. The social worker's "case record" form generally includes the child's name, tribe, degree of Indian blood, grade, school, and notes about attendance and progress. (89507-11)
A-18-94-7


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT DURANT

629. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DISTRICT AGENT.

1908-1909. 4 vols. 4 in.
Arranged in two segments (letters to Muskogee and letters to other agents) and thereunder chronologically. Each volume contains a register of letters. There are some copies of letters and circulars received from 1910-1917.
Press copies of letters sent by the District Agent to the Supervising District Agent in Muskogee, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, other District Agents, and the general public relating to removal of restrictions, appraisements, guardianship, title to land, leases, and accounts of individual Indians. In one volume, original letters received from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs have been pasted over the copies of letters sent by the District Agent.
A-18-96-4

630. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1930-1943. 1 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, narrative and statistical reports, and lists of Indians receiving relief payments or assistance. The correspondence is between the Field Clerk and the Superintendent of the FCT Agency, other field employees, and the general public and relates to accounts of individual Indians, education, health, the CCC-ID, and various relief programs. There are some weekly reports of farm agents and home extension agents.
A-18-96-4

631. RECORD OF APPRAISEMENT OF ALLOTMENTS.

1940-1943. 4 in.
Arranged by county (Atoka, Bryan, Coal, Johnston, and Marshall) and thereunder numerically by Township and Range.
A record of appraisements of allotted land prepared on 5 x 8 inch cards that include a plat map annotated with the location of the land. The information given for each tract includes the allottee's name, tribe, degree of Indian blood, sex, the legal description of the land and its tax status, area, and appraised value.
A-18-96-5

632. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FARM EXTENSION AGENT.

1935-1937. 6 in.
Arranged alphabetically by addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Farm Extension Agent to the general public relating to the delivery of checks, sale or lease of land, purchase of livestock or machinery, and construction or repair of buildings. There are some bills for goods and services and receipts for payment.
A-18-96-5

633. CASE FILES OF THE SOCIAL WORKER.

1938-1948. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the Indian's surname.
Correspondence, applications for relief (form 5-363A) or permission to spend restricted funds, budgets prepared for individual Indians, and purchase orders for goods and services. The applications generally include the restricted Indian's name, tribe, degree of Indian blood, age, and information about physical, living, and financial conditions.
A-18-96-5


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT HOLDENVILLE

634. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1934-1947. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Field Clerk to the Superintendent of the FCT Agency, other field employees, and the general public. The letters relate to the delivery of checks, accounts of individual Indians, lease and sale of land, enrollment of children in schools, and admittance to hospitals and clinics.
A-18-96-5

635. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1934-1946. 8 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, narrative and statistical reports, and lists of restricted Indians. The records include some reports of school social workers and contract physicians and nurses and relate primarily to relief programs, the CCC-ID, and health clinics. There is also a negative photostatic copy of a list of living enrolled Indians owning land in Pontotoc County.
A-18-96-5


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT OKMULGEE

636. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1935-1952. 4 ft.
Arranged by subject in accordance with the BIA decimal classification system.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, narrative and statistical reports, and various publications of the BIA including Indian Education (1936-1938) and Indians at Work (1938-1940). The correspondence is between the Field Clerk and the Superintendent of the FCT Agency, other field employees, and the general public and relates to land appraisements, the sale and lease of allotted land, collection and distribution of funds for individual Indians, relief programs, CCC-ID, and WPA. There are some applications for relief (form 5-363A), reports on Indians hospitalized, summaries of extension reports, and annual school census reports (form 5-255a). There are some weekly reports of school social workers and land appraisers and a list of living enrolled Indians (#100550).
A-18-96-6

637. OFFICE FILES OF THE FARM EXTENSION AGENT.

1935-1938. 4 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, and narrative and statistical reports. The correspondence relates primarily to relief programs, sale or lease of land, and accounts of individual Indians.
A-18-96-7

638. AGRICULTURAL LEASE CASE FILES.

1936-1943. 4 ft.
Arranged in chronological segments (1936-1938, 1939, and 1943) and thereunder alphabetically by surname of the Indian leasing the land.
Correspondence, copies of leases, appraisal reports, reports of title searches, and receipts for payment of rentals. The correspondence is between the Field Clerk or Agricultural Extension Agent and the Superintendent of the FCT Agency, the Indian owning the land, and the general public and relates to approval of lease applications and the collection of revenue. The copies of the leases are generally marked "triplicate." (86221-7)
A-18-96-7

639. LOAN CASE FILES.

1941-1946. 1 ft.
Arranged numerically by loan number (1-209) assigned chronologically by date of loan. There are some gaps.
Correspondence, applications for loans, promissory notes (form 5-843), purchase orders and bills of sale, receipts, and chattel crop and livestock mortgages. The applications were made under the Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act and the loans were used to buy machinery, livestock, and seed. The correspondence relates to delivery of checks, terms of the loans, and payments. (86229-30)
A-18-98-1

640. OFFICE FILES OF THE EDUCATION FIELD AGENT.

1941-1947. 8 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, rosters of employees, and school census reports (form 5-255a). There are some applications for admission to Indian boarding schools and reports on the financial condition of student's families. The reports of children enrolled in schools relate to Creek, Okfuskee, and Okmulgee Counties.
A-18-98-1

641. CASE FILES OF THE EDUCATION FIELD AGENT.

1925-1946. 3 ft.
Arranged by county (Okmulgee, Okfuskee, McIntosh, and General) and thereunder alphabetically by student's surname.
Correspondence, applications for enrollment, reports on home conditions, and some grade reports. The correspondence is generally between the Education Field Agent and the FCT Agency in Muskogee or the parents of restricted Indian children and relates to enrollment and attendance and financial matters.
A-18-98-1

642. CASE FILES OF THE SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER.

1934-1946. 4 ft.
Arranged by county (McIntosh and Haskell) and thereunder alphabetically by the Indian's surname.
Correspondence, applications for relief (form 5-363A), applications for enrollment in Indian boarding schools, and a "case record" form. The correspondence relates to enrollment and attendance of children in schools, admittance to hospitals, and relief payments and assistance to individual Indians. The "case record" generally includes the Indian's name, tribe, degree of Indian blood, and information about financial and living conditions. (351967-70)
A-18-98-2

642A. LAND TRANSACTION FILES.

1950-1968. 7 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder by Township and Range.
Correspondence, conservation plans and maps, farm inventory and farm summary cards, soil and moisture conservation plans, farmer-district agent cooperative agreements, and copies of leases. These records relate to tracts of land that were eventually sold by the original allottee or their heirs. (69A27/381069-74)
A-15-2-1

642B. EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE SUBJECT FILES.

1959-1966. 1 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence and various narrative and statistical reports relating to Employment Assistance and Adult Vocational Training programs. (69A27/381075-6)
A-15-2-1


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT STILWELL

643. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1936-1947. 1 ft.
Arranged by type of records and thereunder chronologically.
School attendance reports, school census reports (form 5-255a), and some correspondence of O. Padgett, Education Field Agent. The attendance reports relate to students in Adair and Sequoyah counties and generally include the student's name, age, and grade. The correspondence relates to enrollment, attendance, books, and clothing. (418621-2)
A-18-98-3


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT VINITA

644. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1939-1951. 6 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, lists of indigent Indians, and some narrative and statistical reports. The correspondence relates primarily to land sales and leases, applications for removal of restrictions, accounts of individual Indians, and relief programs including the WPA. There is a file on acquisition of restricted land for the Choteau Power Plant and records relating to activities of the Kenwood Indian Cooperative Livestock Association.
A-18-98-3

645. CENSUS REPORTS ON LIVING ENROLLEES.

1927-1930. 3 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the Indian's surname.
A record prepared on printed forms of "Living Members of the Five Civilized Tribes Owning Restricted Indian Allotted Land, June 30, 1927." The information contained in the form includes the Indian's name, Dawes enrollment number, tribe, degree of Indian blood, age, sex, ability to read and write English, schools attended, marital status, health, occupation, legal description of the land owned, and an opinion as to the Indian's competency. Similar reports are among the records described in entry 367, 624, and 636. (85711)
A-18-98-3

646. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1941-1949. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by first letter of the surname of the addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Field Clerk to the general public relating to removal of restrictions, appraisements, land sales and leases, title to land, loans, and admittance to hospitals.
A-18-98-3


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE AT WEWOKA

647. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1930-1937. 2 ft.
Arranged in two segments (1930-1932 and 1932-1937) and thereunder alphabetically by surname of the addressee or the Indian who is the subject of the letter.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent relating to financial affairs of individual Indians and the sale or lease of land. There are some reports of field employees relating to land appraisements and financial transactions.
A-18-98-3

648. OFFICE FILES OF THE FIELD CLERK.

1916-1937. 2 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, circulars, orders, regulations, and narrative and statistical reports. The correspondence relates to office administration, accounts of individual Indians, enrollment of children in schools, admittance to hospitals, and land sales and leases. There are some copies of agricultural leases and surveyors notebooks and a volume containing the names of Indians seeking admittance to hospitals.
A-18-98-4

649. OFFICE FILES OF THE HOME EXTENSION AGENT.

Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, calendars of activity, plans for meetings, narrative and statistical reports, pamphlets and policy manuals, lists of members of various clubs, and some photographs. The correspondence relates to visits to Indian homes and various home extension programs.
A-18-98-4


Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649