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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF
THE OFFICE OF
THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES AGENCY
MUSKOGEE AREA of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
(Record Group 75)

Compiled by Kent Carter, September 1994

The Southwest National Archives branch in Fort Worth, Texas holds most of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records from Oklahoma. This is their extensive inventory of approximately 650 types of records covering enrollment, allotment, leases, finances, probate, programs, and schools. These original records must be viewed in person at the SW National Archives.   Please see Visiting the National Archives.


Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649


 

RECORDS OF THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES AGENCY

From its creation in 1874 until the late 1890's, the staff of the Union Agency generally included only the Superintendent, several clerks, and thirty to forty Indian Policemen who assisted with the occasional distribution of payments to tribal members and the constant effort to remove non-Indians from the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes. The responsibilities of the agency were significantly increased by the Curtis Act of June 30, 1898 (30 Stat. 495) that required the Superintendent to place Indians in possession of the land allotted to them by the Dawes Commission, collect revenue from tribal taxes and fees, receive payments for lots in townsites and issue deeds or patents to the lots, investigate and pay warrants issued by tribal governments, and supervise the leasing and sale of allotted and unallotted land. The Curtis Act placed the Union Agency under the general supervision of a U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory whose headquarters was also at Muskogee.

By 1906, the staff of the Union Agency had increased to more than 120 employees who worked in Muskogee and in the field in close cooperation with the staff of the Dawes Commission. The Chief Clerk of the agency supervised the Mailing Division that was responsible for more than 500 incoming and 700 outgoing letters per day, the Cashier's Office that maintained the general accounts, and Accounting Division responsible for the collection and disbursement of millions of dollars of tribal and individual funds, and an Indian Payments Division that disbursed various funds to officially recognized tribal members. The agency also included a Townsites Division that supervised appraisements and collected payments, a Deeds Division that issued town lot and allotment deeds and patents, a Lease Division that investigated applications for authority to approve oil and gas or agricultural leases, a Royalties Division that collected payments from lessors and credited the funds to the accounts of individual Indians, a Restrictions Division that investigated applications from allottees for the removal of restrictions on the sale of their land and supervised the subsequent sales, and a Roads Division that processed petitions for the establishment of public roads and highways.

On June 28, 1908, fifteen District Agents were appointed under an act of Congress of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. 312) to protect the interests of minor Indian children. These District Agents were political appointees who reported to the Secretary of Interior through a Supervising District Agent in Muskogee and were only under the general supervision of the Union Agency. In 1912, the District Agents were replaced by Field Agents appointed under the Civil Service System who were supervised directly by the Union Agency. The Field Agents were assigned to offices located throughout the forty counties under the agency's jurisdiction and spent the majority of their time investigating applications for the removal of restrictions on allotted land, appraising land, and supervising the sale of allotted land and the distribution of the proceeds to individual Indian allottees. Farmers and Land Appraisers were often assigned to assist the Field Agents.

An act of Congress of August 1, 1914 (38 Stat. 598) abolished the positions of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes and Superintendent of the Union Agency and merged their responsibilities into a new position designated Superintendent to the Five Civilized Tribes. Gabe E. Parker was appointed to the position on December 22, 1914. The staff of the Dawes Commission was consolidated with the staff of the Union Agency on April 4, 1915 to form the Five Civilized Tribes Agency which was organized into seven divisions. The Cashier's Division under the Chief Clerk and Special Disbursing Agent was responsible for both tribal and individual Indian funds and the Mailing Division continued to process all correspondence. A Land Division was responsible for the completion of enrollment and allotment matters, the sale of unallotted land and townsites, and the maintenance of "old records." A Lease Division processed applications for oil, gas, coal and asphalt, and agricultural leases. A Royalty Division collected and disbursed all revenues from leases. A Restrictions Division investigated applications for removal of restrictions on allotted land, conducted appraisals, and held public sales. A Field Division supervised the activities of 18 Field Agents and associated Farmers and Appraisers. Several law clerks under the supervision of the Superintendent worked with Probate Attorneys who were appointed by the Secretary of Interior beginning in 1912 and attorneys working under contracts with the tribes on the numerous legal problems associated with the lands and funds of the Five Civilized Tribes.

An investigation of the agency was conducted for the Secretary of Interior in 1926 by Special Inspector H. H. Fiske which resulted in the removal of Shade E. Wallen as Superintendent and the appointment of Charles L. Ellis. On September 1, 1926, the Land, Royalty, Restrictions, and Lease Divisions were consolidated to form the Individual Indian Money Division (IIM Division) and the Mailing Division was abolished. In 1927, the IIM Division was renamed the Indian Lands and Money Division with responsibility for the sale and leasing of allotted and unallotted land and the management of the funds of restricted Indians.

In 1931, the Cashier's Division was renamed the Finance Division and several new units were established including an Agricultural Extension Division which supervised Government Farmers and coordinated relief and rehabilitation programs. A Construction Division was created to manage all construction and repair projects involving restricted Indians and a School Division was established to work with officials of county and state agencies to enroll Indian children, monitor attendance, and distribute educational assistance funds. A Legal Division under a Supervising Attorney was formed to coordinate the activities of the two law clerks at the agency headquarters and the seven Probate Attorneys working in the field.

The School Division was renamed the Education Division in 1938 and a Field Health Division was established under a Senior Physician who supervised contract physicians and nurses at various schools and clinics and three Indian Hospitals. In 1940, the Finance Division was renamed the Accounts Division with responsibility for operating funds of the agency and the trust accounts of individual Indians.

District Directors were appointed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs in July, 1946, to provide administrative direction to schools and agencies within designated geographic areas. The Five Civilized Tribes Agency was included in District Five which had its headquarters at Oklahoma City. In August, 1949, the District Directors were abolished and Muskogee was selected as the site for one of eleven Area Offices with responsibility for all activities of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in eastern Oklahoma. An Area Office was established at Anadarko to supervise western Oklahoma. The Superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency also served as the Area Director and the staff of the agency assumed the responsibilities assigned to the Area Office in addition to their other duties.

The agency was reorganized in December, 1949, to make its structure consistent with the central office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Divisions were established for Administration, Resources, Community Services, and Law. An Administrative Officer and Special Disbursing Agent supervised the Division of Administration which included Branches of Budget and Finance, Property and Supply, Personnel, and Buildings and Utilities. The Division of Resources included Branches of Extension and Credit, Land, Roads, and Minerals. The Division of Community Services included Branches of Education, Welfare, and Health. District Field Offices were maintained at Miami, Tahlequah, Okmulgee, Talihina, Wewoka, and Ardmore. This organizational structure remained relatively constant from 1949 until 1972 when the majority of the records described in this inventory were accessioned.

Many of the early records of the Union Agency were destroyed by a fire in the agency's offices on February 23, 1898. The letters sent by the agency to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from 1875 to 1880 have been reproduced on rolls 865 to 877 of National Archives Microfilm Publication M234 and letters sent by the predecessor agencies have been reproduced in the same publication. Some of the records of the Union Agency and the Five Civilized Tribes Agency are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been mentioned in this inventory whenever possible. See also pages 352-353 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for a description of a few records of the Union Agency which are at the main National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.


GENERAL RECORDS

289. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED.

1899-1908. 10 vols. 2 ft.
The index is divided into chronological segments. Within each segment, entries are arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the sender's surname and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt.
An index to letters received from the Dawes Commission, the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory, officials of the Treasury Department, and the general public. The information given for each letter includes the date written, date of receipt, name of sender, file number assigned, and a brief summary of the subject. In some cases, there is a notation about the office within the agency responsible for the reply. Many of the letters indexed in these volumes are among the records described in entry 294. (L1898, 11-6-55 and 56, 12-2-1 and 2, 29-4-19 and 20, L3094=10-2-38, and L3010).
A-10-84-1

290. REGISTER OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER.

1905-1908. 4 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically by date of receipt.
Register of letters received from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that gives date of receipt, file number, a brief summary of the subject, and the office responsible for the reply. (11-5-62 to 64, 11-6-42).
A-10-84-3

291. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER.

1909-1925. 58 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically by date of receipt.
Original letters and telegrams received from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and other officials of the Bureau. The letters relate to all phases of agency operations and often include a carbon copy of the reply. In some cases the incoming letters is not in the file by a copy of the reply is.
A-10-84-3

292. LETTERS RECEIVED PROVIDING INSTRUCTIONS.

1905-1914. 4 vols. 4 in.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt. The volume contains letters from 1905-1907 includes an index to subjects.
Press copies of correspondence between the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and letters received by the Union Agency from the Commissioner relating to allotment of land, financial affairs of tribal governments, payments to individual Indians, and removal of intruders. Many of the letters transmit the opinions of the Assistant U.S. Attorney General pertaining to allotment. There are some opinions issued by U.S. courts and acts and resolutions of tribal governments.
A-10-86-6

293. REGISTER OF MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS RECEIVED.

1905-1908. 17 vols.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically by date received.
Register of letters received from the Dawes Commission, the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory, field employees of the agency, and the general public. The information given for each letter includes the date it was written, date received, the sender's name and address, file number, a brief summary of the subject, and the office within the agency responsible for the reply. (12-2-3 to 11, 12-3-1 to 7, L1657).
A-l0-88-1

294. MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS RECEIVED.

1909-1925. 1168 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically by date of receipt. There are a few letters from 1899-1908.
Original letters and telegrams received from the Dawes Commission, the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory, field employees of the agency, and the general public. The letters relate to all phases of the agency's operations.
A-10-88-2

295. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1917-1946. 126 vols. 16 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. There are a few letters for the period from 1903-1916.
Copies of letters and telegrams sent that relate to all phases of the agency's operations including administration, financial affairs of individual Indians, and the sale and leasing of land. See entry 323 for letters sent from 1951-1961.
A-11-4-4

296. LETTERS SENT TO THE INDIAN INSPECTOR.

July-August, 1906. 1 vol. .5 in.
Press copies of letters sent relating to payments to individual Indians, removal of restrictions from allotted land, oil and mineral leases, collection of tribal taxes, and removal of intruders.
A-1-4-7

297. TELEGRAMS SENT.

1900-1905. 3 vols. 3 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Press copies of telegrams sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Teritory, and the general public. The telegrams relate primarily to personnel, accounts, property, and payments to individual Indians.
A-11-6-1

298. INDEX TO LETTERS SENT.

1907-1908. 4 vols. 1 ft.
The index is divided into segments: 1907 A-L, 1907 M-Z, and 1908 A-Z. Within each segment, entries are arranged alphabetically by the first tw6 letters of the surname of the addressee.
An index to the records described in entry 300. The information given for each letter includes the addressee, date sent, division within the agency that prepared the letter, and a brief summary of the subject. (L2616, L3013, L3029).
A-11-6-1

299. INDEX TO LETTERS SENT RELATING TO LEASES.

19O7. 3 vols. 3 in.
Arranged alphabetically by the first two letters of the surname of the addressee.
An index to letters sent by the Lease, Royalty, and Accounts Divisions that contains the name of the addressee, date sent, a brief summary of the subject, and a reference to the volume of press copies described in entry 300. (L2304, L2614).
A-11-6-1

300. MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS SENT.

1899-1931 and 1936-1946. 3996 vols. 333 ft.
Press copies and carbon copies of letters sent to field employees of the agency, tribal officials, and the general public. The letters relate to all phases of the agency's operations including payments to individual Indians, the sale and leasing of land, removal of restrictions, employment, and financial affairs.
A-1-6-2

301. INDEX TO ISSUANCES.

1936. .5 in
Arranged alphabetically by subject.
A photo static copy of an index to circulars, orders, and circular letters issued by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The index is date August 15, 1936, and contains the type, number, subject, and date issued. Many of the issuances indexed are among the records described in entries 303 to 305.
A-12-90-4

302. LISTS OF ISSUANCES.

1936-1952. 1 in.
Arranged by type of issuance and thereunder by a number assigned chronologically by date of issuance.
Typed lists of numbered circulars, orders, circular letters, purchasing office circulars, orders issued by the Secretary of Interior, Civil Service Commission circulars, and Executive Orders. The information given for each issuance includes number, date issued, and subject.
A-12-90-4

303. ORDERS.

1936-1952. 4 in.
Arranged numerically by order number assigned chronologically by date of issuance.
An incomplete set of copies of orders and supplements to orders issued by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and other officials of the Bureau. The orders relate primarily to administrative procedures and personnel. Similar orders are described in entries 129 and 130 of Preliminary Inventory 163.
A-12-90-4

304. CIRCULARS.

1907-1950. 2 ft.
Arranged numerically by number assigned chronologically by date of issuance.
Copies of circulars issued by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that provide general information about policy and procedures, request or give information, or give detailed instructions. Similar records are described in entry 132 of Preliminary Inventory 163.
A-12-90-4

305. CIRCULAR LETTERS.

1935-1952. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date issued.
Copies of circular letters issued by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that are similar to the circulars described in entry 304. The circular letters relate to personnel policies, administrative procedures, health, education, and extension activities.
A-12-90-4

306. AGENCY CIRCULARS.

1905-1942. 2 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged numerically by number assigned chronologically by date of issuance.
Printed copies of circulars issued by the Superintendent of the agency to employees and the general public. The circulars relate to personnel policies, office procedures, payments, and regulations pertaining to land sales and leases.
A-12-90-4

307. LETTERS SENT TO FIELD CLERES.

1914-1919. 1 vol. 3 in.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. The volume contains an index to subjects.
Copies of circulars, orders, and notices sent to field clerks and other field employees of the agency relating to procedures and employment regulations. (L3345).
A-12-90-5

308. FORMS AND FORM LETTERS.

n.d. 1 ft.
Arranged by type of form and thereunder numerically by form number.
Copies of forms and form letters developed by the agency that relate to land sales, leases, payments, accounts, and restrictions on individual Indians.
A-12-90-5

308A. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE UNION AGENCY.

1876-1878. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Consists of statements of account current with weekly abstracts of public funds. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1223).
A-6-86-2

308B. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW AGENCY.

1867, 1870-1873. 1 vol. .75 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Press copies. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1224).
A-6-86-2


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT

The records described below appear to have been maintained separately from the bulk of the agency's correspondence by the Superintendent or someone in the Superintendent's office. In some cases, the records of more than one Superintendent were consolidated and arranged by unknown employees of the agency.

309. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE OF DANA KELSEY.

1905-1914. 3 ft.
Arranged in chronological segments (1905-1907, 1907-1909, and 1909-1914) and thereunder alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by Dana Kelsey to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and other Federal agencies, the Dawes Commission, employees of the Union Agency, and the general public. The correspondence relates to general administration, allotment of land, the sale and leasing of land, and the financial affairs of individual Indians. (from 55047-50)
A-12-90-5

310. PERSONAL CORRESPONDENCE OF DANA KELSEY.

1905-1914. 1 ft.
Arranged in chronological segments (1905-1907, 1907-1909, and 1909-1914) and thereunder alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by Dana Kelsey to members of Congress, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, officials of other Federal agencies, and the general public. Many of the letters are marked "Personal" and relate to recommendations for employment with the agency, the political activities of Kelsey and agency employees, investigations of the agency or its employees, and Kelsey's business affairs.
A-12-90-6

311. LETTERS SENT BY DANA KELSEY.

1907-1909. 1 vol. 80 pages.
Arranged chronologically by date sent.
Press copies of letters sent by Kelsey to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs or to the Acting Superintendent of the agency when Kelsey was in Washington, D.C. The letters relate primarily to personnel, supplies, accounts, and oil and mineral leases.
A-12-90-6

312. OFFICE FILES OF DANA KELSEY.

1909-1914. 2 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative and statistical reports, printed notices, accounting forms, and newspaper clippings relating to the receipt and disbursement of funds, employees, sale and leasing of land, townsites, collection of royalties from mineral leases, restrictions on individual Indians, probate, and the activities of various divisions within the agency.
A-12-90-6

313. CORRESPONDENCE OF BENJAMIN MOSSMAN.

May, 1908-April, 1909. 2 in.
Arranged alphabetically by surname of addressee.
Original letters and telegrams received and copies sent by Benjamin Mossman as Acting Agent in charge of the Union Agency. The bulk of the correspondence is between Mossman and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, field employees of the agency, and the general public and relates to land sales, probate matters, accounts, personnel actions, and payments to Choctaws and Chickasaws.
A-12-90-6

314. CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1919-1934. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent relating to personnel administration, recommendations for employment, oil and gas leases, probate matters, Congressional legislation, and visits to the agency. There are a few letters to officials of the Bureau other than the Commissioner and most letters are marked "Personal." These letters were maintained separately from the records described in entries 291 and 295.
A-12-90-6

315. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE ("MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS").

1921, 1930, 1934-1935. 1 ft.
Arranged in yearly segments and thereunder alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the addressee.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent to employees of the agency and the general public. The correspondence relates to employment, education, payments, financial affairs of individual Indians, and removal of restrictions. These letters were maintained separately from the records described in entries 294 and 300.
A-12-90-7

316. ANNUAL NARRATIVE REPORTS.

1916-1947. 2 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date of report.
Carbon and printed copies of annual narrative reports of the agency's activities submitted to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The reports often contain statistical information and many of the carbon copies have been annotated with editorial comments. The reports often include photographs of construction projects, agricultural activities, and groups of people. There are some similar reports for the period after 1947 among the records described in entry 323. The original reports for the period from 1907-1938 have been reproduced as National Archives Microfilm Publication M1011.
A-12-90-7

317. SUPERINTENDENTS' OFFICE FILES.

1920-1939. 12 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, orders, circulars, printed regulations, narrative and statistical reports, speeches given by Bureau officials, press releases, photographs, and newspaper clippings. The correspondence is between the Superintendent and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, field employees of the agency, tribal officials, and the general public. There are some publications and newsletters issued by the Bureau and tribal organizations. The records relate to agency administration, land sales and leases, education and the operation of schools under contract, health, relief and Emergency Conservation Work, Congressional investigations and investigations of agency employees conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Board of Indian Commissioners, tribal organizations and tribal self-government, and Congressional legislation including the Wheeler-Howard and the Thomas-Rogers Acts. There is a copy of a report of an investigation of the agency submitted on April 12, 1916, and a report of Special Supervisor W. L. Bowie on the kidnapping of Jackson Barnett. It appears that these records were consolidated in the office of Lola Rambo who served in Various administrative positions in the office of the Superintendent. Similar records for the period after 1939 are described in entries 323 and 324.
A-12-90-7

318. MERGED WITH ENTRY 552.,

319. CASE FILES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS.

1923-1926. 8 in.
Arranged by case number.
Correspondence, transcripts of testimony given in hearings, copies of court orders and other documents filed in court proceedings, and newspaper clippings. The bulk of the correspondence is between H. H. Fiske, Inspector in Charge of the agency and field employees, Probate Attorneys, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Oklahoma, and officials of the Justice Department and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The investigations relate to charges of fraud in leasing, probate, guardianship administration and charges of corruption made against employees of the agency including Superintendent Shade E. Wallen. See also entries 344, 615, and 616.
A-12-92-3

320. RECORDS RELATING TO LOANS AND INVESTMENTS.

1913-1921. 8 in.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the addressee.
Correspondence and circulars relating to loans to guardians of restricted Indians for the purchase of land or for investment. The correspondence is generally between the Superintendent and Probate Attorneys, field employees of the agency, and the applicants for the loans.
A-12-92-3

321. MERGED WITH ENTRY 552

322. RECORDS RELATING TO VETERANS.

1923-1929. 1 vol and 8 in.
Arranged alphabetically by the name of the veteran.
Correspondence between the Superintendent and field employees of the agency, officials of the Veterans Bureau, and the general public. The letters relate to benefits for Indian 'veterans. There is also a "Register of Indians in the World War" that contains each veteran's name, tribe, military unit, and residence (#05081).
A-12-92-3


RECORDS OF THE AREA DIRECTOR

In July, 1946, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointed District Directors to provide "administrative direction and technical assistance" to agencies within designated geographic areas. Dover P. Trent was appointed Director for District Five that included all of Oklahoma and had its headquarters in Oklahoma City. In August, 1947, the Five Civilized Tribes Agency assumed administrative control over the Quapaw Agency at Miami, Oklahoma with the District Director retaining responsibility for the "general supervision" of all activities in Oklahoma

In 1949, the District Directors were abolished and eleven Area Offices were established. Muskogee was designated as the site of one of the Area Offices with responsibility for the "over-all direction and coordination" of activities of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Eastern Oklahoma. The Area Director in Muskogee also served as the Superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency and the staff of the agency assumed responsibilities assigned to the Area Office in addition to their other duties.

323. CENTRAL FILES.

1947-1962. 12 ft.
Arranged by subject in accordance with the Bureau of Indian Affairs decimal classification system (see Appendix II.
Correspondence, circulars, memoranda to employees, orders, minutes of meetings of economic development committees and conferences, news releases, and statistical reports. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Area Director and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, officials of Federal and State agencies, and the general public. Much of the correspondence relates to health and education programs. The records include a file of correspondence on the heirs of Jackson Barnett (006), reports on activities at the Osage Indian Agency, and newspaper clippings relating to law suits involving the Area Director. (from 360206-7).
A-12-92-3

324. OFFICE FILES OF W.O. ROBERTS AND P.L. FICKINGER.

1946-1961. 6 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, intra- agency memoranda, monthly narrative reports, minutes of management committee meetings, orders, circulars, press releases, speeches by the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and "Management Improvement Plans" for most Area Offices. The records also include correspondence, newspaper clippings, and related material pertaining to the Zeb Lowe and Billy Jenkins murder cases (see also file 175.1 in the records described in entry 323). There are also minutes, reports, and working papers of the Southwest Field Committee and the Arkansas-White-Red Basins Inter-Agency Committee (see also file 103.20 in entry 323) and a copy of a report on "The Five Civilized Tribes: Progress and Problems" dated March 1, 1948. It is not clear why these records were maintained separately. (50562-69).
A-12-92-5

325. ESTATE DISTRIBUTION CASE FILES.

1951-1959. 8 in.
Arranged numerically by case number.
Correspondence between the Area Director and heirs and tribal attorneys, orders of courts relating to the distribution of estates, inventories of estates, proof of death and heirship forms, mailing certificates for distribution orders, and memos to the Individual Indian Money Section of the agency relating to payments to heirs. The distribution of the estates of deceased allottees of the Five Civilized Tribes was made by the Area Director in accordance with an act of Congress of August 12, 1953 (67 Stat. 558). (from 384476).
A-12-92-7

325A. BUDGET OFFICE PROGRAM FILES.

1957-1961. 2 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, memoranda, budget requests and justifications, authorizations, schedules, vouchers, and other accounting documents relating to the planning and implementation of budgets for various programs and administrative expenses. The records relate to both the Muskogee and Anadarko Area Office. (70A26, 436247-8).
A-12-92-7


RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF TRIBAL OPERATIONS

In 1950, a Tribal Relations Assistant was appointed to work with officials of tribal governments under the supervision of the Area Director. The title of the position was changed to Tribal Affairs Officer in 1955 with the establishment of an Office of Tribal Operations. The staff of the office was responsible for assisting tribal governments with the conduct of tribal business, advising on the employment of attorneys by the tribes, assisting with the preparation of tribal rolls, distributing judgment awards resulting from tribal claims, reviewing tribal budgets, and advising on the investment of tribal funds. In addition to the Five Civilized Tribes Agency, the Office of Tribal Operations in Muskogee had jurisdiction over the Choctaw Agency in Mississippi, the Seminole Agency in Florida, and the Osage and Quapaw Agencies in Oklahoma. The Quapaw Agency at Miami, Oklahoma was designated the Miami Field Office in 1949 and supervised the Quapaw, Peoria, Modoc, Wyandotte, and the Seneca-Cayuga tribes.

326. CENTRAL FILES.

1943-1971. 12 ft.
Arranged by subject in accordance with the Bureau of Indian Affairs decimal classification system (see Appendix II).
Correspondence, reports, circulars, press releases, minutes of meetings, contracts with tribal attorneys, and publications. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Tribal Affairs Officer or the Area Director and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, officials of other Federal and State agencies, officials of tribal governments, and the general public. The records relate to the organization and activities of tribal governments, tribal elections, enrollment, claims, payments, health programs and facilities, community planning and welfare programs, relocation, and terminations of Federal control over Indians. There are some records created from 1938-1942 relating to the American Indian Federation and other Indian organizations. (72A1599, 75A873, 75A1429/393318-393336).
A-12-94-1

327. OFFICE FILES OF THE TRIBAL AFFAIRS OFFICER.

1947-1971. 24 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by subject.
Correspondence, reports of various branches of the Area Office and other Indian agencies, minutes of tribal council meetings, copies of tribal resolutions, tribal membership and voting rolls, and some tribal newsletters and publications. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Area Director and officials of tribal governments and the general public and relates to tribal elections, enrollment, claims by tribes and individuals, distribution of tribal funds, claims for recognition by various groups, and the withdrawal or termination of Federal control over Indians. The records include information about the Eastern or Emigrant Cherokee claims and operations at the Choctaw Agency in Mississippi and the Seminole Agency in Florida. There are records relating to the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Delaware, Miami, Mississippi Choctaw, Modoc, Osage, Ottawa, Absentee Shawnee, Eastern Shawnee, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees, Peoria, Quapaw, Seneca-Cayuga, and Wyandotte. There are a few records created between 1934 and 1946. It is not clear why these records were maintained separately. (72A1599, 75A873, 75A1429, 75-79-18 and 19)
A-12-94-2


RECORDS OF TRIBAL ATTORNEYS

Prior to 1907, each tribe maintained its own system of courts and retained attorneys to represent its interests in proceedings in Federal courts and negotiations with the Department of Interior. The tribal courts were basically abolished by the Curtis Act of 1898 and an act of Congress of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. 312.) required that all contracts between tribes and attorneys be approved by the Secretary of Interior. The tribal attorneys were active in probate and guardianship matters, cases involving fraudulent leases and land conveyances, and suits relating to title to land. Some records relating to contracts with attorneys are in the 174 files in entry 326.

328. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE CREEK TRIBAL ATTORNEY

1914-1915. 6 in.
Arranged alphabetically by surname of addressee.
Copies of letters sent and some original letters received by Richard C. Allen, National Attorney of the Creek Tribe. The correspondence is between Allen and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Superintendent of the agency, officials of the Justice Department, Probate Attorneys, members of the tribe, and the general public and relates to guardianship and probate matters, title to land, leases, loans, eligibility for enrollment, status of allotments, payments, and some criminal proceedings. (from 69416)
A-12-90-3

329. CASE FILES OF THE CREEK NATIONAL ATTORNEYS.

1911-1920. 7 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the surname of the plaintiff or the Indian who was the subject of the case.
Correspondence and copies of papers filed in proceedings involving the interests of the Creek tribe that were heard in Federal and State courts. The correspondence is between various persons serving as National Attorney for the Creek tribe and the Secretary of Interior, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Superintendent of the agency, officials of the Justice Department, judges and officers of courts, Probate Attorneys, and the general public. The cases relate to probate and guardianship matters, criminal proceedings, leases, sale of allotted land and lots in townsites, and payments to individual Indians. There are records relating to several significant cases pertaining to duplicate or fraudulent allotments of land containing oil including the Tommy Atkins, Susie Crow, Monday Yargee, and Martha Jackson cases and cases relating to oil leases including the Creek Nation vs Frisco Oil and Gas and Red River vs Cimarron Oil and Gas. There is also a carbon copy of the record prepared in James Bullet et al vs D. Replogle et al heard in Creek County District Court (case number 6067). See also entries 346 and 357. (from 53938-952).
A-12-90-3 and 12-96-1

330. CASE FILES RELATING TO CREEK TOWNLOTS

1908-1910. 1 ft.
Arranged numerically by docket number.
Copies of bills of complaint, answers, replications, demurrers, affidavits, motions, and orders filed in equity cases heard by the U.S. Circuit Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma. The cases all relate to fraudulent appraisal and sale of townlots in Muskogee and Tulsa and were filed by M. L. Mott, the Creek National Attorney. (from 69416-9).

331. LISTS OF CREEK DEEDS.

1909. 75 pages.
Arranged numerically by deed number assigned chronologically by date issued.
A typed list of deeds held in the office of the Principal Chief to land allotted to Creeks. The information given for each deed includes number, the allottee's name and enrollment number, and the date the deed was recorded. It appears that the list was compiled by the Creek National Attorney in conjunction with the preparation of suits to quiet title to allotted land. (from 69419).
A-12-96-3

332. CASE FILES OF ATTORNEYS FOR THE SEMINOLE TRIBE.

1910-1917. 4 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the Indian who was the subject of the legal action. There are also a few folders pertaining to general subjects such as indictments and grand jury actions.
Correspondence, copies of contracts and leases, copies of affidavits and other papers filed in actions heard in the District Court of Seminole County, printed plat maps (form 168) annotated to show the location of allotted and leased land, and summaries of conveyances to allotted land. The bulk of the files appear to have been maintained by James Q. Gresham, Special Assistant to the U.S. Attorney General, who was detailed to represent the Seminole tribe from 1910 to 1914. Most of the files relate to civil actions pertaining to title to allotted land, probate matters, and guardianship administration although there are some criminal cases pertaining to forged deeds and illegal conveyances of land. The correspondence is between Gresham or other attorneys representing the Seminole tribe and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, officials of the Department of Interior or Justice Department, field employees of the agency, officials of the District Court for Seminole County, private attorneys, and the general public. There are a few cases that relate to Creeks. (from 53974-9).
A-12-96-3


RECORDS OF PROBATE ATTORNEYS

An act of Congress of April 28, 1904 (33 Stat. 573) transferred jurisdiction over probate and guardianship matters from tribal courts to the Federal Courts in Indian Territory. When Oklahoma was admitted as a state on November 16, 1907, the county courts assumed jurisdiction over all probate proceedings. In June, 1908, fifteen District Agents were appointed by the Secretary of Interior under an act of Congress of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. 312) to investigate the conduct of guardians and to work with officials of the county courts to protect the interests of minor children (see entries 609-619). Three "special assistant agents" who were attorneys were assigned to the Union Agency in Muskogee to work on probate matters in cooperation with attorneys working under contracts with the tribal governments.

In June, 1910, the Commissioner of Charities and Corrections for the State of Oklahoma, Kate Barnard, was authorized to intervene in the county courts on behalf of minor children as a result of investigations that disclosed fraud and corruption in guardianship administration. In 1912, the District Agents were abolished and the Union Agency relied on tribal attorneys until 1914 when Congress authorized funds for the payment of Probate Attorneys. The forty counties under the supervision of the newly established Five Civilized Tribes Agency were divided into sixteen districts with a Probate Attorney assigned to each district. They reported to a Supervising Probate Attorney at the agency headquarters in Muskogee and were responsible directly to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs although they worked closely with the staff of the agency on matters relating to the determination of heirs, the distribution of estates, the partition of inherited land, and guardianship administration. The jurisdiction of the Probate Attorneys was limited to "restricted allottees and their heirs" by an act of Congress of May 25, 1918. (40 Stat. 579)

A Law and Probate Division was established within the Five Civilized Tribes Agency on July 1, 1931, that included the Supervising Probate Attorney, seven Probate Attorneys working in the field, and two law clerks. On June 9, 1933, it was renamed the Legal Division that became the Division of Law within the Muskogee Area Office in 1949. The Division was designated the Office of the Field Solicitor in 1952.

333. CORRESPONDENCE OF PROBATE ATTORNEYS

1927-1934. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the sender or the subject of the letter. There are a few letters dated as early as 1915.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Supervising Probate Attorney or the District Probate Attorneys to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Superintendent of the agency, field employees of the agency, and the general public. The letters relate to guardianship administration, probate, and title to land. There are some copies of petitions, motions, orders, and other documents filed in court proceedings. Each folder is marked "Old Miscellaneous." (from 46289-93).
A-12-96-3

334. ANNUAL NARRATIVE REPORTS.

1932-1936. 3 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Carbon copies of reports submitted by the Supervising Probate Attorney to the Superintendent of the agency. The reports provide detailed information about the work performed by each District Probate Attorney and clerks, summarize important cases, and generally include statistical reports that contain information about the number of cases processed in each county. (from 46281-8)
A-12-96-4

335. MONTHLY REPORTS.

1914-1939. 6 ft.
Arranged in yearly segments and thereunder alphabetically by the name of the attorney.
Originals and copies of monthly narrative and statistical reports submitted by District Probate Attorneys and clerks to the Supervising Probate Attorney or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The reports contain a daily summary of activity and information about the number and types of cases processed. There is also some correspondence between the attorneys and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs about probate administration. (from 46281-8 and 54090-3).
A-12-96-4

336. OFFICE FILES OF THE SUPERVISING PROBATE ATTORNEY.

1924-1938. 4 in.
Arranged by subject. There are a few documents created between 1914 and 1923.
Correspondence, instructions, circulars, notices, narrative and statistical reports, lists of cases, copies of documents filed in court proceedings, and newspaper clippings. The records relate primarily to conveyances of title, oil and gas leases, and tax assessments on allotted land. It appears that the bulk of the records were maintained by Supervising Probate Attorney J. H. Finley.
A-12-96-6

337. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT ARDMORE.

1913-1916. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the correspondent.
Original letters received and copies of letters sent by the Probate Attorney to members of Congress, officials of county courts, the Superintendent of the agency, field employees of the agency, other Probate Attorneys, and the general public. The letters relate to guardianship administration, the lease and sale of land, probate of estates, and the education of minor children. The jurisdiction of the Ardmore office generally included Carter, Love, and Marshall counties.
A-12-96-6

338. OFFICE FILES OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT ANDMORE.

1914-1935. 4 ft.
Arranged by subject. There are some documents created between 1936 and 1947.
Correspondence, copies of narrative and statistical reports, circulars, regulations, applications by Indians for payments, notices of sale of land, lists of cases, and copies of documents filed in court proceedings. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Probate Attorney and the Superintendent of the agency, other Probate Attorneys, officials of county courts, guardians, and the general public and relates to probate of estates, sale of inherited land, title to land, and payments to individual Indians. There are a number of records relating to the "Mullen Case" which involved the cancellation of agricultural leases in 1914 and subsequent legal proceedings. There are also a few original allotment certificates and patents.
A-12-96-6

339. OFFICE FILES OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT DURANT.

1914-1940. 3 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative and statistical reports, circulars, regulations, notices of sale, copies of oil and gas leases, and lists of cases. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Probate Attorney and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Superintendent of the agency, other Probate Attorneys, field employees of the agency, and the general public and relates to probate of estates, guardianship administration, and title to land. The jurisdiction of the Durant office generally included Atoka, Bryan, Coal, Latimer, Marshall, and Pittsburg counties.
A-12-96-6

340. OFFICE FILES OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT MUSKOGEE.

1916-1927. 1 ft.
Arranged alphabetically (H to Z only) by the first letter of the surname of the Indian who was the subject of the correspondence.
Correspondence, contracts, leases, accounting forms, and copies of documents filed in court proceedings. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Probate Attorney and the Superintendent of the agency, field employees of the agency, and the general public and relates to title to land, leases, and the accounts of Cherokee Indians living in McIntosh county. (from 90216)
A-12-96-5

341. OFFICE FILES OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT VINITA.

1922-1940. 8 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative and statistical reports, notices of land sales, and circulars relating to leases, payments to individual Indians, trust accounts, school attendance, and office procedures. It appears that the records were maintained by Probate Attorney Mary A. Monroe in the Vinita office that was responsible. for Craig, Mayes, and Ottawa counties. (from 46289)
A-12-96-5

342. OFFICE FILES OF THE PROBATE ATTORNEY AT WEWOKA.

1920-1943. 2 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative and statistical reports, lists of cases, and some instructions and circulars. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Probate Attorney and the Superintendent of the agency, other Probate Attorneys, the Seminole tribal attorney, and the general public and relates to payments to individual Indians, guardianship administration, and title suits. The Wewoka office generally exercised jurisdiction only over Seminole county.
A-12-96-7

342A. INDEX TO HEIRS.

n.d. 4 ft. Arranged alphabetically.
A handwritten index to heirs of deceased Indians prepared on 3x5 inch cards. The only information given is the name of the heir and their enrollment number (if any) and the name of the deceased Indian and their enrollment number. (from 455177)
A-12-96-1

343. HEIRSHIP DEPOSITIONS.

1914-1945. 5 ft.
Arranged by district (Durant, Holdenville, and Wewoka) and thereunder alphabetically by the first letter of the surname of the deceased Indian.
Notarized depositions submitted by heirs of deceased allottees on a printed form ("Proof of Heirship"). The information contained in the form includes the deceased allottee's name, tribe, enrollment number, date of death, spouse's name and enrollment number, and the names of children or other heirs. The forms were submitted by the heirs of Seminole and Creek Indians seeking shares in the distribution of estates and subsequent payments. Similar forms are often found in the records described in entry 346. (from 89593-4).
A-12-96-7

344. RECORDS RELATING TO PROBATE LEGISLATION.

1923-1926. 8 in.
Arranged in roughly chronological order.
Correspondence, transcripts of testimony given at Congressional hearings, copies of speeches, resolutions, copies of publications of the Indian Rights Association, and newspaper clippings relating to proposed legislation and Congressional investigations of allegations of fraud in probate administration. The bulk of the correspondence is between Superintendent Shade E. Wallen and members of Congress, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Probate Attorneys, tribal officials, and the general public. Related records are described in entries 317 and 319. (from 46289).
A-12-96-5

345. DOCKETS OF PROBATE CASES.

1913-1930. 16 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged by county and thereunder numerically by case number assigned chronologically by the date the case was opened.
A record of proceedings held in cases filed in Oklahoma State courts in which Probate Attorneys were involved. The information given for each case generally includes the docket number, names of parties involved and their attorneys, the enrollment number and tribe of the Indian involved, and a chronological summary of the papers filed and proceedings held. The majority of the cases relate to guardianship administration or title to land and were heard in Carter, Eufaula, Grady, Latimer, Love, McLain, McIntosh, Murray, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Tulsa, and Wagoner counties.
A-12-98-2

346. CASE FILES ON INDIVIDUAL INDIANS. (See also entries 552 and 619.)

1910-1952. 220 ft.
Arranged alphabetically.
Correspondence, copies of papers filed in state and Federal courts, appraisals of land, leases, deeds and other documents relating to land title, depositions filed by heirs, applications by Indians or their guardians for permission to spend trust funds, guardian's annual reports, court documents relating to the appointment of guardians, court orders approving leases and deeds, determination of heirs reports, bills and invoices for goods and services, receipts for payments, and various forms relating to the receipt and expenditure of funds held in trust for individual Indians. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Probate Attorneys and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Superintendent of the agency, field employees of the agency, guardians, officials of county courts, and the general public and relates to the identification of heirs, the distribution of estates, guardianship administration, title to land, payment of bills and taxes, eligibility for benefits, and the administration of leases. Related records are described in entry 552. (from 46265-280, and 69195-283).
A-12-98-2 and A-18-98-5


RECORDS OF THE FIELD SOLICITOR

The Superintendent of the Union Agency received advice and assistance with the complicated legal issues relating to the administration of the lands and funds if individual Indians from tribal attorneys, Probate Attorneys, and attorneys provided by the Secretary of Interior. The Supervising Probate Attorney maintained his office at the agency headquarters at Muskogee and served as the Superintendent's primary legal advisor. In 1952, the position was designated the Field Solicitor.

One of the primary concerns of the agency was title to allotted land that was alienated by the original allottee or the allottee's heirs. In an effort to clear title to allotted land, the Federal government instituted more than 300 suits in equity under an act of Congress of May 27, 1908. (35 Stat. 312) These actions, generally referred to as the "Thirty Thousand Land Suits," were heard in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma (see entry 40E2G for a docket and 40E2H for indexes, the court still has the record books) and involved almost four million acres of land. The majority of the suits were dismissed or settled within three years but the last cases were not decided until 1925.

346A. LISTS OF SUITS.

n.d. 5 in.
Unarranged.
Originals and copies of lists of suits filed in Federal courts. The information given generally includes the legal description of the tract of land involved and its appraised value, the names of the parties and their attorneys, a summary of title instruments recorded in county courts, and a summary of papers filed and actions taken in court proceedings. (from 46362)
A-13-2-4

347. INDEXES TO TITLE SUITS.

n.d. 3 vols. 5 in.
There is one volume for grantors and two volume for grantees. Within each volume, names are arranged alphabetically by first letter of surname of the person involved in the suit.
Indexes to "Grantors Involved in Suits" and "Grantees Involved in Suits." The only information given is the individual's name and an alpha-numeric file number that does not match any records that have been located. The two volumes for "grantees" contain different names with no apparent duplications. (L1672).
A-13-4-2

348. INDEX TO DEFENDANTS IN EQUITY SUITS.

n.d. 37 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by first letter and then first vowel.
An index prepared on 5 x 8 inch cards that gives the name of the defendant and their attorney, docket number of the case, a page number reference to the bill of complaint, the name of the person allotted the land in dispute, the allottee's age and degree of Indian blood, the legal description of the land and type of allotment (Homestead or Surplus), the type of title instrument in question and the date it was executed and recorded, the amount paid for the land, and a record of actions taken in the case. All of the suits were heard in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma. (from 69402-418).
A-13-4-2

349. CASE FILES ON ALLOTTEES.

1908-1917. 55 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder alphabetically by the allottee's surname.
Correspondence, copies of papers filed in state and Federal courts, abstracts of title searches, case summaries, investigative reports, and some copies of quit claim deeds and other title instruments. The correspondence is generally between the Special Assistant U.S. Attorney in Muskogee and parties involved in the suits. The papers filed in court include Disclaimers of Right to Title and a combined Motion to Dismiss and Decree of Dismissal. (from 46362-417).
A-13-4-5 and A-15-2-4

350. CASE FILES ON DEFENDANTS.

1909-1912. 56 ft.
Arranged in two groups and thereunder alphabetically. It is not clear why the cases were divided into two groups but the majority of the cases in the second group are marked "Dismissed."
Correspondence, investigation reports on title instruments, abstracts of conveyance reports, and some copies of deeds and plat maps (form 169) annotated to show the location of land in question. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Special Assistant to the U.S. Attorney General in Muskogee and the Superintendent of the agency, District Agents, and defendants in title suits. The reports on title instruments were prepared by District Agents and include the type of title instrument, the name of the grantor and grantee, the legal description of the land, the amount paid for the land, the date the instrument was recorded, and a reference to a volume and page in county records where the instrument was recorded. (from 53824-879).
A-13-4-7

351. ABSTRACTS OF TITLE INSTRUMENTS.

n.d. 7 ft.
Arranged in two groups. Abstracts in the first group are arranged alphabetically by the surname of the grantor and abstracts in the second group are arranged numerically by Range.
Carbon copies of the text of warranty deeds, quit claim deeds, mortgages, and other title instruments to allotted land that were recorded in county courts. The information given for each instrument includes type, county of records, name of grantee and grantor, the legal description of the land, the number and date of issuance of the allotment certificate for the land, the date patents were recorded, and some information about the heirs of the original allottee. The abstracts also refer to unidentified lists. The bulk of the instruments were recorded between 1904 and 1908. (from 70043-7).
A-13-6-7

352. COPIES OF TITLE INSTRUMENTS.

n.d. 2 ft.
Arranged numerically (4001 to 5999 and 7001 to 9000).
Carbon copies of texts of warranty deeds, mortgages, assignments of mortgages, quit claim deeds, Guardian's Deeds, and other title instruments to allotted land that were recorded in county courts. The copies include some information about leases and a reference to the volume and page where the original instrument was recorded. There are some original Choctaw-Chickasaw Homestead Patents and copies of allotment documents. The bulk of the instruments were recorded between 1908 and 1909. (from 69886).
A-13-8-2

353. CASE FILES ON LAND CONDEMNATION.

1938-1946. 3 ft.
Arranged numerically by docket number assigned chronologically by the date the case was opened.
Correspondence, reports by field employees of the agency on the title and value of land in question, forms relating to the payment of damages, and copies of petitions, orders, and judgments filed in civil cases to condemn land for the Fort Gibson Dam and Reservoir Project on the Grand River in the Arkansas River Basin. The civil suits were filed by the Department of Interior. (from 416383-7).
A-13-2-4

354. GRAND RIVER DAM AUTHORITY LAND CONDEMNATION CASE FILES.

1939-1946. 1 ft.
Unarranged.
Correspondence, reports by field employees of the agency on the title and value of land in question, and copies of notices, petitions, orders, and other documents filed in court proceedings to condemn land for the Grand River Dam Authority. The bulk of the cases are civil suits that were heard in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma but there are also a few cases heard in Oklahoma state courts. None of the cases in this group of records are duplicated among the records described in entry 353. (from 61194).
A-13-2-4

355. PETITIONS AND ORDERS IN LAND CONDEMNATION SUITS.

1940-1966. 11 ft.
Arranged numerically by case number assigned chronologically by the date the case was opened.
Correspondence, petitions, orders, notices, and other documents filed in civil cases pertaining to land condemnations heard in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern and Northern Districts of Oklahoma. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Superintendent of the agency and various Special Assistant U.S. Attorneys and tribal attorneys and relates to requests for copies of petitions and tribal interest in lands involved in condemnation proceedings. There are some maps of tracts of land in question. In most cases, the order indicates that no tribal land is included in the area being condemned. Records relating to some of these suits are also included in the records described in entry 353. (7KR-75- 84-005).
A-13-10-5 and A-28-88-1

356. DOCKET OF DUPLICATE AND FRAUDULENT ENROLLMENT CASES.

n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged numerically by case number. The volume includes an index to enrollees.
A handwritten record of actions taken in cases of duplicate or fraudulent enrollment that generally gives only the enrollee's name and case number. The volume also includes a typed list of cases that provides some information about the land selected for allotment by the enrollee. There is also some correspondence between the Creek National Attorney and the Superintendent of the agency.
A-13-2-6

357. CASE FILES ON DUPLICATE AND FRAUDULENT ENROLLMENT.

1910-1956. 3 ft.
Arranged numerically by case number with an index to enrollees.
Correspondence, transcripts of hearings, copies of enrollment cards, plat maps annotated to show the location of land selected as allotments, depositions of heirs, quitclaim deeds, leases, and 'records relating to the removal of restrictions and payments that were made to persons fraudulently enrolled or enrolled under more than one name. There is also a carbon copy of a report made by the Acting Superintendent of the agency to the U.S. Court of Claims in case number F-373 that involved many of the enrollment cases. See also entry 329.
A-13-10-6

358. RECORDS RELATING TO ENROLLMENT UNDER AN ACT OF AUGUST 1, 1914.

1914-1918. 1 ft.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, narrative reports, lists of applicants and their attorneys, affidavits, claims by attorneys for payment of fees, and related material pertaining to claims for enrollment under an act of Congress of August 1, 1914. The correspondence is between the Superintendent of the agency and claimants, attorneys, field employees of the agency, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Many of the records relate to claims by Webster Ballinger for payment of fees for representing claimants.
A-13-10-5

359. MISCELLANEOUS CASE FILES.

1911-1925. 4 ft.
Arranged alphabetically by surname of the Indian who was involved in the proceedings or who was the subject of the case.
Correspondence and copies of documents filed in proceedings in Federal and state courts. The bulk of the cases relate to duplicate or fraudulent enrollment of Creeks and title to land. There are records relating to the Susie Crow and Minnie Atkins enrollment cases and cases relating to oil leases and ownership of the "Red River Bed" that were heard in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma (equity cases 2024 and 2025) and the Western District of Oklahoma (equity case 75). There are similar cases among the records described in entry 329. (from 46362 and 53879).
A-13-2-6


Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649