Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF
THE OFFICE OF
THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES AGENCY
MUSKOGEE AREA of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
(Record Group 75)

Compiled by Kent Carter, September 1994

The Southwest National Archives branch in Fort Worth, Texas holds most of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records from Oklahoma. This is their extensive inventory of approximately 650 types of records covering enrollment, allotment, leases, finances, probate, programs, and schools. These original records must be viewed in person at the SW National Archives.   Please see Visiting the National Archives.


Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649


RECORDS OF THE U.S. INDIAN INSPECTOR
FOR INDIAN TERRITORY

 Section 27 of the Curtis Act of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat. 504) authorized the Secretary of Interior to "locate one Indian Inspector in Indian Territory" to perform whatever duties the Secretary thought appropriate. On August 27, 1898, the Secretary assigned J. George Wright to supervise the Union Agency, the Superintendent of Schools in Indian Territory, the Choctaw-Chickasaw Mining Trustees, and the Revenue Inspectors for the Cherokee and Creek tribes. Wright also supervised tribal Townsite Commissions and surveyors appointed under an act of Congress of May 31, 1900 (31 Stat. 221) to plat and survey townsites with populations over 200. The survey work was extended to towns with populations under 200 by an act of Congress of May 27, 1902 (32 Stat.245). In 1904 the Inspector was given responsibility for the care of insane persons in Indian Territory, the authorization of oil and gas pipeline right of way, and the collection of damages resulting from the erection of telephone lines.

 The position of Indian Inspector for Indian Territory was abolished on July 1, 1907 and J. George Wright was appointed Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes to replace Tams Bixby who resigned from that position on June 30, 1907. As Commissioner, Wright continued to exercise the supervisory responsibilities formerly assigned to the Inspector.

 Many of the early records of the Inspector were destroyed by a fire in the offices of the Union Agency which occurred on February 23, 1899. The Oklahoma Historical Society has custody of much of the Inspector's correspondence and has reproduced some of it on microfilm. The annual reports of the Inspector were published as appendixes to the annual reports of the Secretary of Interior and provide a detailed description of Wright's activities and responsibilities. See also Wright's testimony in entry 41 number 202.

1. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

1899-1907. 5 vols. 6 in.
The indexes are divided into chronological segments (1899-1901, 1902, 1903-4, 1905-6, and 1907). Within each volume, entries are arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder chronologically by the date the letter was written. The subject headings used include Authorities, Accounts, Circulars, Curtis Act, Enrollment, Removal of Restrictions, and Schools.
Subject indexes to letters received from the Department of Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The information given for each letter includes the date it was written, the file number assigned by the Inspector, and a short summary of the subject. Some of the letters indexed in these volumes are among the records described in entry 3. (volume numbers 11-5-51 to 55 and L3753).
A-4-084-1

2. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

1899-1907. 6 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt.
A record of each letter received from the Department of Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs which includes the date it was written and received, file number, a short summary of the subject, and remarks about actions taken. Some of the letters registered in these volumes are among the records described in entry 3. (volume numbers 11-5-56 to 61).
A-4-084-1

3. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

1903 and 1907. 2 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned by date of receipt. There are a few letters received between 1899 and 1902 and between 1904 and 1906.
Original letters and telegrams received from the Department of Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The letters relate to policies and procedures, activities of tribal governments, removal of non-Indians from Indian Territory, survey and sale of townsites, schools, payments to Indians, and accounts. The bulk of the letters which were received by the Inspector are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society.
A-4-084-1

4. INDEX TO MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS RECEIVED

1899-1906. 9 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged in yearly segments. Within each volume, entries are arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the sender's surname and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt.
Index to letters described in entry 7 which gives the name of the sender, the date the letter was written, and the file number. (volume numbers 11-4-47 to 53, 11-5-52, and 11-6-53).
A-4-084-1

5. REGISTERS OF MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS RECEIVED

1899-1907. 17 vols. 4 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt.
A record of each letter received from any source other than the Department of Interior which gives the sender's name, the date written and received, file number, a short summary of the subject, and remarks about any actions taken. Some of the letters registered in these volumes are among the records described in entry 7. (volume numbers 11-6-54 and 11-5-35 to 50).
A-4-084-2

6. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED RELATING TO AGENCIES

1907-1909. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged alphabetically by name of agency and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt.
A record of letters received from various sources relating to the Osage and Quapaw Agencies and Seneca Indian School. The information given for each letter includes sender's name, date written and date answered, file number, and a short summary of the subject. Some of the letters registered prior to July 1, 1907 are among the records described in entry 7 and those after that date are in entry 31. (volume number L3271).
A-4-084-2

7. LETTERS RECEIVED ("MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS").

1900-1902. 27 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned by date of receipt. There are a few letters received between 1903 and 1907.
Original letters and telegrams received from the Union Agency, the Choctaw-Chickasaw Mining Trustees, Revenue Inspectors, Townsite Commissions, surveyors, the Dawes Commission, officials of U.S. Courts, tribal officials, and the general public. The letters relate to the leasing of land, survey and sale of townsites, ownership of improvements on land allotted to Indians, removal of non-Indians from tribal land, coal and asphalt mining, payment of tribal warrants, and payments to individual Indians. There are several hundred questionnaires returned by postmasters of towns in Indian Territory which pertain to population figures.
A-4-084-3

8. PRESS COPIES OF LETTERS SENT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

1899, 1901-1902, 1905-6. 8 vols. 8 in.
Arranged chronologically by date sent with numerous gaps. There is a subject index at the beginning of each volume.
Press copies of letters sent to the Department of Interior or the Bureau of Indian Affairs which relate to all of the various functions performed by the Inspector. Many of the missing volumes are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been microfilmed (see rolls DC22 to DC33).
A-4-084-4

9. ANNUAL NARRATIVE REPORTS

1900 and 1902. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Printed copies of the annual narrative report submitted by the Inspector to the Secretary of Interior. The reports provide detailed information about the year's activities and include narrative reports submitted by the Superintendent of Schools in Indian Territory, Revenue Inspectors, and the Choctaw-Chickasaw Mining Trustees.
A-4-84-6

10. LETTERS SENT BY J. W. ZEVELY

August-September, 1899
Arranged chronologically by date sent.
Press copies of letters sent by Special Inspector J.W. Zevely who was detailed by the Secretary of Interior to investigate strikes against mining companies in the Choctaw Nation and claims for payment made against the tribal governments. The letters relate primarily to the examination of tribal warrants. The volume also contains a list of towns in each tribal nation with populations of less than 150, a list of applications for mineral leases, and affidavits relating to the mining activities of Moulton and Nash.
A-4-84-5

11. LETTERS SENT RELATING TO MINING PERMITS

1901-1904. 1 vol. 86 pages.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. Indexed by name of addressee.
Press copies of letters sent by the Inspector to applicants for mining permits.
A-4-84-6

12. PRESS COPIES OF LETTERS SENT

1901-1907. 1 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. Indexed by name of addressee.
Press copies of letters sent to the Dawes Commission, the Union Agency, tribal officials, the Choctaw-Chickasaw Mining Trustees, Revenue Inspectors, Townsite Commissions, surveyors, and the general public. The letters relate to the leasing of land, mining operations, tribal finances, sale of townsites, and activities of non-Indians in Indian Territory.
A-4-84-6

13. RECORDS RELATING TO PIPELINES

1904-1908. 2 vols. 1 in.
Arranged by name of company responsible for the pipeline.
A handwritten record of damages paid by companies for pipelines run across allotted land. One volume contains a chronological summary of the actions taken on requests for right of way and payments made. The second volume contains only a chronological record of payments made. See also entry 453.
A-4-84-6

14. RECORDS RELATING TO TELEPHONE LINES.

1902-1907. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged by name of company responsible for the line and thereunder numerically by the number assigned to the line by the Inspector. Indexed by name of company.
A record of lines approved for operation by telephone companies in Indian Territory. The information given for each line includes date of approval by the Secretary of Interior, date of construction, number of miles constructed, the tribe owning the land crossed by the line, and the date of payment of annual rent and damages. The volume contains a list of lines operated by the Pioneer Company and exchanges operated by other companies. See John M. Noble, "The Story of the Telephone in Oklahoma" in The Chronicles of Oklahoma (volume 12 Number 3) and Noble, "Early Telephone History in Oklahoma" in (Volume 5 Number 2). (Series includes 2 small black notebooks).
A-4-84-6

15. RECORD OF PAYMENTS BY TELEPHONE COMPANIES.

1903-1906. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged by name of company responsible for the line. Indexed by name of company.
A record of payments made by telephone companies in accordance with an act of Congress of March 3, 1901 (31 Stat. 1073) which required payment of an annual tax and reimbursement for property damages. The information given for each company includes dates of payments, amount paid, reason for payment, and references to file numbers of correspondence relating to the payments. See also entry 453. (volume number L3275).
A-4-84-5

16. CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO TELEPHONE COMPANIES.

1905-1908. 3 ft.
Arranged by name of company and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of receipt.
Original letters received and some copies of letters sent to officials of telephone companies and the general public. The letters pertain to the approval of rights of way, the payment of rents, and the appraisal of damages. There are some schedules of damages which list property owners entitled to payments. The bulk of the correspondence relates to the Pioneer Telephone and Telegraph Company.
A-4-84-5

17.REGISTER OF CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO LUNACY CASES.

1904-1908. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged numerically by case number assigned in chronological order by the date the case was opened. Indexed by name of addressee and subject.
A record of letters received relating to non-Indians living in Indian Territory who were committed to St. Vincent's Asylum in St. Louis, Missouri after being declared insane by U.S. Courts. The information given for each case includes the patient's name, post office address, and the file number and subject of each letter written about the case. Many of the letters registered in this volume are among the records described in entry 18. (volume #L3269).
A-4-84-5

18. LUNACY CASE FILES.

1905-1908. 5 ft.
Arranged numerically by case number assigned chronologically by the date the case was opened.
Correspondence, orders for delivery of patients, copies of court orders, questionnaires and applications submitted by relatives of the insane person, and some statements by doctors. The correspondence pertains to non-Indians who were sent to St. Vincent's Asylum in St. Louis, Missouri which provided care for insane persons under contracts with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The last contract expired on June 30, 1908 and the state of Oklahoma assumed responsibility for the care of insane non-Indians.
A-4-84-5

19. CASE FILES ON INSANE INDIANS.

1905-1908. 3 in.
Arranged by case number (2-238) assigned chronologically by the date the case was opened.
Correspondence, copies of orders of commitment, some statements by doctors, affidavits submitted by guardians, and applications. The correspondence is between the Inspector and the guardians and relatives of insane Indians and pertains to the commitment of the Indians to the asylum at Canton, South Dakota in accordance with an act of Congress of April 28, 1904 (33 Stat. 544).
A-4-84-5

20. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS RELATING TO LUNACY CASES.

1904-1908. 6 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order.
Letters received from relatives of insane Indians and non- Indians requesting information about care and copies of replies by the Inspector or the Union Agency. There are also lists of persons committed, reports and vouchers submitted by St. Vincent's Asylum, and some copies of reports by the Inspector to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs about the care of insane Indians and non-Indians. The bulk of the records pertain to insane non-Indians living in Indian Territory.
A-4-84-5

21. ACCOUNTS.

1899-1900. 6 in.
Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by quarter.
Abstracts of disbursements, weekly and monthly statements of public funds, cash accounts, vouchers, and correspondence relating to accounts. The records include a letter from J. George Wright to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs pertaining to a claim by an Indian for a horse lost at the battle of Wounded Knee.
A-4-84-6

22. PROPERTY RETURNS.

1899-1907. 1 ft.
Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by quarter.
Reports prepared on standard forms (5-155A) of supplies received, issued, and on hand and supporting documents such as abstracts, vouchers, and lists of articles expended. There is also some correspondence between the Inspector and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs relating to exceptions to the returns and clarifications.
A-4-84-6

23. QUARTERLY REPORTS OF CHANGES IN EMPLOYEES.

1899-1900. 40 pages.
Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by quarter.
Copies of reports prepared on standard forms (5-242). The information given for each employee includes name, title of position held, place of birth and residence (state only), dates of service, and salary. See also entry 286.
A-4-84-6


PAPERS FOUND WITH BUT NOT BELONGING TO
THE RECORDS OF THE SOUTHERN SUPERINTENDENCY

23A. RECORDS OF THE COMMON SCHOOL COMMISSIONER OF SEBASTIAN CO., ARK.

1853-1855. neg.
Arranged chronologically.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, affidavits, and other records maintained by Abraham G. Mayers. Mayers left his position as Commissioner to take up his duties as agent of the Pueblo Agency in New Mexico. For later records of his service as Postmaster at Fort Smith, Arkansas, see entry 23B. (formerly PI 163 entry 1213).
A-6-86-2

23B. RECORDS OF THE FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS, POST OFFICE.

1858-1862. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, receipts, affidavits, statements of account current, schedules and registers of arrivals and departures of mail, and other records maintained by Postmaster Abraham G. Mayers, who served under both the United States and the Confederate States. There is also a booklet for 1855-1858 that includes accounts, addresses, and other information. Included also are some records concerning Mayers' activities as editor of the newspaper 35th Parallel. (formerly PI 163 entry 1214).
A-6-86-2

23C. RECORDS OF THE SHERIFF OF SEBASTIAN COUNTY, ARKANSAS.

1857-1862. 2 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order.
Writs, receipts, correspondence, lists of taxable property, and other records maintained by Sheriff William A. Porter who also served as Collector of the Revenue. Included is some private correspondence of Capt. Mark Tatum of Greenwood, Arkansas. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1215).
A-6-86-2

23D. PERSONAL AND MILITARY RECORDS.

1857-1863. .5 in.
Arranged by source.
Private correspondence and accounts of various persons and accounts of the Quartermaster of the Arkansas Militia. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1216).
A-6-86-2


RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILISED TRIBES

 An act of Congress of March 3, 1893 (27 Stat. 645) authorized the establishment of a commission to negotiate agreements with each of the Five Civilized Tribes that would abolish the tribal governments and permit the allotment of land to individual tribal members. Former Senator Henry L. Dawes of Massachusetts was appointed chairman of the commission on November 1, 1893 and it was commonly referred to thereafter as the Dawes Commission. It reported to and received its instructions from the Secretary of Interior. (See Secretary of Interior's general letter of instructions of November 28, 1893 on DC roll 72 frame 354 (Land 41431-1893). See also 54th Cong 1st Session Senate Doc 182 (March 24, 1896) for background on the early work of the commission. A copy is in entry 41 #186.)

 Senator Dawes and the other commissioners visited Indian Territory (basically what is now the eastern half of Oklahoma) many times to meet with tribal leaders but had no success convincing them to negotiate agreements. In 1895 Congress authorized a survey of Indian Territory and in 1896 the Dawes Commission was authorized to add names to existing tribal rolls as a preliminary step to allotment. The Commission received more than 7500 applications for enrollment and traveled throughout Indian Territory conducting hearings.

 Having failed to convince the tribal leaders to negotiate, the Commission was authorized by an act of Congress of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat.495) to proceed with enrollment and allotment without tribal consent. This act, generally know as the Curtis Act, also provided for the termination of the tribal governments. By 1902, each of the tribes had negotiated and ratified an agreement which modified the terms of the Curtis Act and became the basis for enrollment and allotment.

 The headquarters of the Dawes Commission was generally at Muskogee in the Creek Nation and land offices were opened within each tribal nation. Numerous field parties were sent out to survey and appraise land and investigate applications for enrollment. The Commission held hearings to settle contested allotments and prepared patents and deeds for allotted land. The Dawes Commission was abolished by an act of Congress of March 3, 1905 (33 Stat. 1048) and replaced by a single Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes who supervised the large staff involved with the completion of enrollment and allotment. Tams Bixby, who had been appointed to the Commission in 1897 and often served as acting chairman when Senator Dawes was too ill to serve, was appointed as the Commissioner (See Robert L. Williams, "Tams Bixby" in The Chronicles of Oklahoma (Vol 19 Number 3). On July 1, 1907, J. George Wright replaced Bixby as Commissioner and retained the responsibilities of his former position of Indian Inspector for Indian Territory which included supervision of the Union Agency.

 An act of Congress of August 1, 1914 (38 Stat. 595) abolished the position of Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes and made the Superintendent of the newly created Five Civilized Tribes Agency responsible for any unfinished business of the Commissioner. The records of the Dawes Commission and the Commissioner became the property of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency under the terms of the act and were heavily used by the agency staff to manage the affairs of individual Indian allottees.

 Some of the records of the Dawes Commission are still in the custody of the Muskogee Area Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Others have been deposited with the Oklahoma Historical Society in Oklahoma City under an act of Congress of March 27, 1934 (48 Stat. 501)


GENERAL RECORDS

 The Dawes Commission adopted the general filing practices used by field offices of the Bureau Indian Affairs which included maintaining incoming and outgoing correspondence separately. Incoming correspondence was divided into letters received from the Secretary of Interior or Commissioner of Indian Affairs ("Departmental Letters") and letters received from all other sources ("General Letters"). Outgoing corresp6ndence was divided along similar lines and recorded in separate press copy books.

 Most of the Dawes Commission's copies of correspondence received prior to 1901 and copies of letters sent prior to 1906 are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society. Copies of much of the correspondence were maintained at the headquarters of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C. (which are part of Record Group 75) or by the Indian Division of the Office of the Secretary of Interior (which are part of Record Group 48). See entry 306 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for a description of "Docket Books for the Five Civilized Tribes, 1897-1910" which are registers of correspondence relating to enrollment and allotment.

24. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

1907-1914. 4 vols. 6 in.
The index is divided into chronological segments: 1907-08, 1909-10, 1911-12, and 1913-14. Within each segment, entries are arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder chronologically by the date the letter was written. The subject headings used include Accounts, Allotments, Contests, Employees, Enrollment, Instructions, Leases, Oil and Gas, Osages, Removal of Restrictions, and Schools.
A record of each letter received which includes the date it was written, file number, and a short summary of the subject. Many of the letters indexed in these volumes are among the records described in entry 26. See also entry 279.
A-4-88-3

25. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR ("SPECIAL INDEX").

1903-1914. 7 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt. For the period from 1903 to 1906, there are separate sections for letters received from the Department of Interior, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and each of the land offices operated by the Commission. Beginning in 1906, letters received from Interior and the Indian Office are registered jointly in one volume and letters received from the land offices are registered in separate sections of another volume.
A record of letters received which includes the date written and received, name of sender, file number, a short summary of contents, and occasionally remarks about actions taken. Many of the letters received from the Department of Interior or the Indian Office are among the records described in entry 26. Letters received from the land offices are part of entry 31. Letters received from the Department of Interior and the Indian Office from 1897 to 1902 were registered in the volumes described in entry 28. (volume # 12-4-10, 12-4-8, 3-5-5, and 11-6-43 to 46).
A-4-88-3

26. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR ("DEPARTMENTAL LETTERS").

1901-1914. 134 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically within each fiscal year by date of receipt.
Original letters and telegrams received from the Department of Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. There are also some letters received from the Civil Service Commission, the Treasury Department, and other Federal agencies. The letters relate to all phases of the Commission's activities including administration, enrollment, allotment, the leasing and sale of allotted and unallotted land, and the establishment of townsites.
A-4-84-7

27. INSTRUCTIONS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR ("MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUCTIONS").

1900. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt. Indexed by subject. The volume also contains a chronological list of the letters.
Carbon copies of letters received from the Department of Interior relating to enrollment and allotment procedures, the leasing of allotted land and the removal of non-Indians from allotted land. Many of the letters transmit opinions of the Assistant Attorney General on legal issues relating to enrollment and allotment and there are some letters addressed to the Indian Inspector for Indian Territory. Similar volumes covering the period from November 28, 1893 to December 26, 1899 and January 9, 1901 to December 3, 1901 are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been reproduced on microfilm (DC roll 19). (From old box 171761).
A-4-88-7

28. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED.

October, 1897-December, 1913. 25 vols. 6 ft.
The index is divided into yearly segments. Within each segment, entries are arranged alphabetically by the first two letters of the sender's surname. There is a gap from August, 1900 to February, 1901.
The information given for each letter includes name of sender, date written, file number, and a short summary of the contents (1897 to 1907 only). The index includes letters received from the Department of Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs for the period from October, 1897 to January, 1903. The volumes also includes lists of applicants by type of job for the period from 1897 to 1907. Many of the letters indexed in these volumes are among the records described in entry 31. See also entry 279. (Volume #10-3-29, 29-5-25,12-5-3 and 4, 87-10-3, 11-6-47 to 52, 12-3-8 and 9, 12-4-1 to 6, and L1744 to L1747). Microfilmed as M1314.
A-4-88-7

29. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED.

January, 1908-September, 1914. 19 vols. 6 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt.
A record of letters received which gives the name and address of sender, date written and received, file number, a short summary of the contents, and occasionally remarks about actions taken including references to the volume and page number of press copies of letters sent in reply. (Volume # 32-2-18 to 29, 11-4-43 to 46, and 12-5-1 and 2).
A-4-90-3

30. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE UNION AGENCY.

1906-1909. 5 vols. 6 in.
Arranged chronologically by date of receipt.
A record of letters received which includes date written and received, file number, and a short summary of the contents. The letters registered in these volumes were also registered in the volumes described in entry 29. (Volume # L1846 to L1849).
A-5-90-5

31. LETTERS RECEIVED ("GENERAL OFFICE LETTERS").

1900, 1903-1911, 1914. 576 ft.
Arranged numerically by file number assigned chronologically within each fiscal year by date of receipt.
Original letters and telegrams received from the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory, the Union Agency, other Indian agencies, field offices of the Dawes Commission including the land offices maintained for each tribe, officials of tribal governments, and the general public. The letters relate to all phases of the Commission's work including administration, enrollment, allotment, the sale and leasing of land, and the establishment of townsites. There are many letters requesting employment by the Commission or recommending persons for employment.
A-4-90-5

32. LETTERS RECEIVED BY COMMISSIONER BIXBY.

1897-1899, 1901-1906. 6 in.
Arranged alphabetically by name of sender until 1901 and thereafter numerically by file number assigned chronologically by date of receipt.
Original letters and telegrams received by Commissioner Tams Bixby from members of Congress, attorneys, and the general public. The letters relate to applications for enrollment or allotment, the sale and leasing of coal and oil land, applications and recommendations for employment, visits by members of Congress, and Bixby's political and business activities. Many of the letters are marked "Personal and Confidential" and include a few letters from Henry L. Dawes. (from old box 70215).
A-4-102-1

33. LETTERS SENT TO THE SECRETARY OF INTERIOR.

October, 1906-August, 1914. 40 vols. 7 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. Indexed by subject
Press copies of letters sent to the Secretary of Interior through the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The letters relate to enrollment, allotment, land sales, applications for removal of restrictions, townsites, employment, and administrative matters. Press copies of letters sent from July, 1901 to May, 1904 are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been reproduced on microfilm (DC rolls 11-18). Press copies of letters sent to the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs prior to 1901 are among the records described in entry 35.
A-4-102-1

34. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

September, 1907-May, 1911. 3 vols. 3 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order. Indexed by subject.
Carbon copies of letters sent relating to all phases of the Commission's activities. Press copies of many of these letters are among the records described in entry 33. (from old box 416353).
A-4-102-3

35. LETTERS SENT ("MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS").

1895-1897, 1899, 1911-1914. 248 vols. 42 ft.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. For 1897 there are separate volumes for each tribe. Each volume contains an index to addressees.
Press copies of letters sent to the Indian Inspector for Indian Territory, the Union Agency, other Indian agencies, field offices of the Dawes Commission. officials of tribal governments, and the general public. Prior to 1901, the volumes also include copies of letters sent to the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The letters relate to all phases of the Commission's work. The volumes for 1897 contain a few original letters received by the Commission. Press copies of letters sent from September, 1897 to November, 1899 and December, 1899 to May, 1911 are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been reproduced on microfilm (DC rolls 1-9).
A-4-102-3

36. LETTERS SENT BY COMMISSIONER BIXBY.

March 1902-April, 1907. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically by date sent.
Press copies of letters sent by Tams Bixby from Washington, D.C. to Commissioner in Charge T. B. Needles in Muskogee and letters sent by Bixby from Muskogee to the Secretary of Interior, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and members of Congress including Senator Charles Curtis and Henry L. Dawes. Some of the letters are marked "Personal and Confidential" and relate to individuals being recommended for employment, dismissals of employees, and Bixby's political activities. Many of the letters relate to policy and procedures governing enrollment and allotment. It does not appear that these letters are among the records described in entry 33. Similar letters sent from December, 1899 to February, 1902 are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society and have been reproduced on microfilm (DC roll 9=vol 20).
A-4-102-3 (in box with entry 34)

37. ANNUAL NARRATIVE REPORTS

1894-1914. 4 in.
Arranged chronologically. No reports have been located for 1897, and 1899-1903.
Printed copies of the annual reports of the Commission's activities submitted to the Secretary of Interior. The reports provide detailed information about organization, procedures, negotiations with the tribal governments, and implementation of agreements and Congressional legislation. The report for the year ending June 30, 1904 includes the text of many of the acts of Congress which related to the Commission's work.
A-4-104-3

38. GENERAL ORDERS OF THE COMMISSION.

1901-1908. 4 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order by date issued.
Typed or printed copies of order and rules issued by the Commission to employees and the general public relating to office procedures, hours of business, leave, appointments, and procedures governing enrollment and allotment. There are also many printed copies of notices of public sale of land. (from L3273).
A-4-104-4

39. SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE COMMISSION.

July, 1901-September, 1906. 16 pages.
Arranged chronologically by date of issue.
Original typed orders issued by the Commission to enrollment agents in Mississippi and employees of the Commission in Muskogee relating to procedures, assignment of personnel, and employment. (from L3272).
A-4-104-4

39A. RULES AND REGULATIONS.

1900-1914. 4 in.
Arranged by subject.
Originals and copies of letters from the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Dawes Commission and the Indian Inspector providing rules and regulations to be followed in oil, gas, and mineral leasing; telephone and telegraph lines; schools and education; tribal revenue; lease and sale of allotted and; and timber and hay royalties. Many of the letters have been annotated by the Commission staff. (7NC-75-89-0015)
A-4-104-4

40. INDEX TO REFERENCE DOCUMENTS.

n.d. 2 vols. .5 in.
Arranged alphabetically by subject.
Two copies of an index to "Miscellaneous Documents" maintained by the Commission for reference. The index provides the category and file number of each document. The categories used are: A- Cherokee and Delaware, B-Choctaw and Chickasaw, C-Creek, D-enrollment, E-leases, F-reports, and G-Miscellaneous. Some of the documents in categories C and D are among the records described in entry 41. (volume #782C219 and L3015).
A-4-104-4

41. REFERENCE DOCUMENTS ("MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS").

1896-1904. 2 ft.
Arranged in three groups and thereunder numerically by a file number assigned by the Commission. There is a list of file numbers and titles in box 1. There are numerous gaps in the file numbers.
Correspondence, printed Congressional documents, copies of agreements with tribal governments, rules and instructions issued by the Secretary of Interior or the Commission, receipts for rolls and other papers supplied by the tribal governments, copies of documents filed in cases heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, and other Federal courts, lists of persons admitted to tribal citizenship by U.S. courts, copies of census notices, complaints against Commission employees and attorneys, and newspaper clippings. Many of the documents relate to the segregation of land within the Cherokee Nation for the Delaware tribe and include schedules of segregated land, maps annotated with the location of segregated tracts, correspondence relating to the appraised value of improvements on the land, lists of persons claiming the right of ownership of segregated land, and the brief and decision of the U.S. Court of Claims in case number 21139 relating to the validity of the segregation. There are also some transcripts of hearings in citizenship cases, correspondence relating to the legality of the Dawes Commission, and protests submitted by the Keetoowah Society of full-blood Cherokees who opposed allotment (D195-197). There is information relating to Boone Daugherty vs Cherokee Nation, Stephens vs Cherokee Nation (Supreme Court 423), and Cobb vs Cherokee Nation (Supreme Court 436). There are also some briefs relating to Choctaw-Chickasaw Freedmen and Inter-married citizens.
A-4-105-5


RECORDS OF TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS

Section 13 of an act of Congress of April 30, 1908 (35 Stat. 312) required the officials of the tribal governments to deliver all "books, documents, records or any other papers" to the Secretary of Interior. The Dawes Commission used many tribal records to verify eligibility for enrollment (see entry 54) and the Union Agency took possession of many records relating to the collection and distribution of tribal revenue (see entries 519-541). Many of the records of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the tribal governments are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society. See also page 352 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for a description of a few tribal records. See the Samuel Anderson file in entry 552 for information about Creek tribal affairs.

41A. INVENTORIES OF TRIBAL PROPERTY.

1908-1909. 1 in.
Arranged by tribe.
Original inventories of tribal property turned over to the Dawes Commission in accordance with section 13 of the act of May 27, 1908. There is also some correspondence between the Dawes Commission and tribal officials about the status of property. The majority of the inventories relate to office furniture and records and provide only a brief description of each item. (7NC-75-89-0015).
A-4-104-5 (in box with entry 42)

41B. RECORDS RELATING TO SALE OF TRIBAL PROPERTY.

1914-1935. 1 ft.
Arranged by location of property.
Correspondence, plat maps annotated with location of property, copies of deeds, and related documents pertaining to the sale or disposal of tribal property. The correspondence is between officials of the FCT Agency and potential buyers and tribal officials. The are records relating to Tuskahoma Female Academy, Tullahassee Boarding School, the Choctaw Council House, Hargrave College, Bloomfield and Carter Seminary, the McAlester Country Club, and lots and other property in Coalgate, Muskogee, and Tulsa.
A-4-104-5

42. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHIEF OF THE CREEK TRIBE.

1873-77, 1897-99, 1902-4. 4 vols. 4 in.
Arranged chronologically by date sent. There is an index to addressees in each volume.
Press copies of letters sent by the Principal Chief of the Creek Nation to the Union Agency, other Indian agencies, the Creek Legislature, other tribal governments, and the general public. The letters relate to legislation, financial affairs, relations with other tribes, the activities of the Dawes Commission, and tribal citizenship. (volume #L6039-40)
A-4-104-5

43. RECORDS OF THE CHIEF OF THE CREEK NATION.

1902-1907. 4 in.
Arranged by subject.
Correspondence, receipts, vouchers, bank drafts, warrants, and statements of expenditures. The bulk of the correspondence is between the Principal Chief Pleasant Porter and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, tribal officials, and businessmen and relates to tribal legislation, finances, the delivery of deeds to allotted land and townsite lots, and actions by the U.S. courts and tribal attorneys. (old box 70323).
A-4-104-5

44. RECORD OF CREEK VOUCHERS ("AUDITOR'S DAY BOOK").

1877-1879. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged by District and thereunder chronologically by date voucher was issued.
A record of vouchers issued by the Creek tribal government for services of tribal officials, jurors, and witnesses. The information given for each voucher includes date issued, voucher number, payee, amount paid, and date paid. (old box 45797).
A-4-104-6

44A. JOURNALS OF HOUSE OF KINGS, CREEK NATION.

1895-97, March 15-May 18, 1899. 1 vol 1 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Consists of minutes of meetings. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1226)
A-6-86-2

44B. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE CREEK NATION.

1905-1911. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order by date of appropriation act and thereunder by date of transaction. There is an alphabetical name and subject index.
A record of expenditures and appropriations of the National Council. Some copies of acts and resolutions are inserted in the volume. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1227).
A-6-86-2

45. EXCERPTS FROM JOURNALS OF THE CHEROKEE SUPREME COURT.

1876. 1 vol. .5 in.
Arranged by court term and thereunder chronologically by date of action.
Handwritten copies of the text of motions, rulings, opinions, and orders of the Cherokee Supreme Court issued from 1868 to 1876. It appears that the excerpts were selected by J. R. Vann, clerk of the court, and were copied from various journals and dockets. The majority of the cases mentioned relate to probate, title to land, and payment of debts.
A-4-104-6

46. ACTS OF THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL COUNCIL.

April, 1893-August, 1896. 1 vol. 2 in.
Arranged chronologically by the date of the passage of the act.
Indexed by subject.
Copies of the text of acts and resolutions of the Cherokee National Council. The legislation relates to all phases of tribal activity. (form 100414).
A-4-104-6

47. CONSTITUTION AND LAWS OF THE CHOCTAW NATION.

1894, 1899, 1904. 5 vols. 3 in.
Arranged chronologically by date issued. Indexed by subject.
Printed copies in English and Choctaw of "Constitution and Laws of the Choctaw Nation Together With Treaties of 1837, 1855, 1865, and 1866" (1894 edition), "Laws of the Choctaw Nation From 1866 to 1891" (1904 edition), and "Acts and Resolutions of the General Council of the Choctaw Nation Passed at its Regular Session, 1898, and its Special Session, 1899" (1899 edition). (from box 23).
A-4-104-7

47B. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE CHOCTAW NATIONAL TREASURER.

1868-77. 1 vol. 2 in.
Arranged chronologically.
Statements of the National Treasurer in account with the Treasury of the Choctaw Nation and of issues of Choctaw National Warrants. (Formerly PI 163 entry 1225).
A-6-86-2

48. ACTS PASSED BY TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS.

October, 1898-January, 1908. 2 vols. 2 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order by date of passage.
Press copies of acts passed by tribal governments and submitted to the President of the United States for approval in accordance with an act of Congress of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat. 495). The volumes include copies of some acts which were not submitted and a few which were submitted and disapproved.
A-4-104-7

49. RECORDS OF THE CHOCTAW COURT IN SUGARLOAF COUNTY.

1897-1903. vol. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically. Indexed by subject.
Handwritten copies of agreements, mortgage trust deeds, leases for mineral rights, agreements for changes in allotments, and other documents recorded in the official records of the Choctaw Court in Sugarloaf County. The copies are notarized by the clerk of the court. The volume also includes lists of fees collected by the Circuit Court in 1902-03, itemized accounts of expenses incurred by the clerks of the County and Circuit Courts and the sheriff for 1901-03, and lists of witnesses in Circuit Court cases due reimbursement for expenses for 1900. (old #100320).
A-4-104-7


RECORDS RELATING TO ENROLLMENT

 In order to allot land to individual Indians, it was necessary for the Dawes Commission to determine the membership of each tribe. Prior to 1896, tribal governments exercised exclusive jurisdiction over citizenship but the act of Congress of June 10, 1896 (29 Stat. 32) authorized the Dawes Commission to receive applications for citizenship and to add names to the existing tribal rolls. Applicants were required to submit written applications to the Commission's offices at Vinita or to travelling enrollment parties within the ninety days allowed by the act. A copy of the application also had to be sent to the appropriate tribal government. On June 20, 1897, each tribe was asked to provide the Dawes Commission with a copy of its "last authenticated roll" but the tribal governments objected strongly to interference in citizenship matters and provided little cooperation. More than 7,500 applications were received under the 1896 act and the Commission enrolled more than 2,000 people. The act also authorized appeals of the Commission's decisions to the U.S. Courts for the Northern, Central, and Southern Districts of Indian Territory and more than 1,000 appeals were made. The courts upheld most of the Commissions decisions but admitted several hundred persons to citizenship over the objections of the tribal governments.

 The 1896 act only authorized the Dawes Commission to add names to existing rolls but the Curtis Act of June 28, 1898 (30 Stat. 495) gave it the power to prepare entirely new rolls for each tribe which would become the official basis for allotment. An Enrollment Division was established in Muskogee for each tribe and enrollment clerks were assigned to each of the Commission's land offices to receive applications. Enrollment parties traveled throughout Indian Territory accepting applications, holding hearings, and gathering evidence. Many full-blood Indians opposed allotment and refused to apply for enrollment forcing the Commission's staff to seek out individuals who appeared on earlier tribal rolls but who had refused to apply. All decisions of the Commission were sent to the Secretary of Interior for final approval.

 The Commission enrolled individuals under the following categories: Citizens by Blood, Citizens by Marriage, New Born Citizens by Blood (children enrolled under an act of Congress of March 3, 1905), Minor Citizens by Blood (children born after the act of 1905 and enrolled under an act of Congress of April 26, 1906), Freedmen (former slaves of tribal members), New Born Freedmen, and Minor Freedmen. Delaware Indians who had been adopted by the Cherokees were enrolled as a separate group. The rules governing the enrollment of each tribe were contained in the agreements negotiated between the Dawes Commission and the tribal governments.

 The Commission received applications covering more than 250,000 people and eventually enrolled over 101,000 on what are commonly called the "Final Rolls of the Five Civilized Tribes." The rolls were closed as of March 4, 1907 by an act of Congress of April 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 370). The names of 312 people were added to the rolls by an act of Congress of August 1, 1914.

 Some records relating to enrollment are in the custody of the Oklahoma Historical Society. See entries 356-358 for records relating to duplicate or fraudulent enrollment and pages 165-174 of Preliminary Inventory 163 for other enrollment records. The index to the "Final Rolls" has been reproduced as roll 1 of National Archives Microfilm Publication M1186.

 The report of Joseph W. Howell described in entry 57 provides a detailed description of the enrollment process. See also Walt Wilson, "Freedmen in Indian Territory" in the Chronicles of Oklahoma (Volume 49, Number 2) and Kent Carter "Federal Indian Policy: The Dawes Commission, 1887-1898" in Prologue (Volume 22, Number 4).


RECORDS RELATING TO ALL TRIBES

  The records described below appear to have been consolidated in the Commission's headquarters after individual enrollment divisions were abolished.

49A. RECORD OF APPLICATIONS UNDER THE ACT OF 1896

1896-1897. 5 vols. 1 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by application number. Each volume includes an index to applicants.
A record of actions taken by the Dawes Commission under the Act of June 19, 1896. The information generally given includes applicant's name, case number, references to related cases, actions taken by the Commission, and references to appeals. These records have been reproduced as rolls 1-5 of National Archives Microfilm Publication M1650.
A-20-100-1

49B. APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLLMENT UNDER THE ACT OF 1896.

1896-1897. 64 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by application number.
Original applications and petitions for enrollment under the act of June 10, 1896, with supporting affidavits, depositions, and memorials. The records generally include the demurer and answer of the tribe, receipts by tribal officials for documents, and notices of appeal made to the U.S. Court in Indian Territory. There are some applications from former slaves and many applicants claim through Ned Sizemore. These records have been reproduced as National Archives Microfilm Publication M1650.
A-20-100-1 (Used to be entry 66A).

50. INDEX TO ENROLLMENT CARDS.

1899-1907. 24 vols. 3 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder by enrollment category. Names within each volume are arranged alphabetically by the first letter and first vowel. Indexes primarily to the names of persons enrolled on "Straight" cards described in entry 52. The only information given is the applicants name, card number, and occasionally roll number. One volume appears to be a partial index to persons listed on Cherokee "Doubtful" and "Rejected" cards (microfilmed as 7RA24) and one volume is a partial index to persons listed on Choctaw "Doubtful" and "Rejected" cards microfilmed as 7RA147). (Volume #L3011-12, 87-7-4, and 29-4-13).
A-5-2-1

51. INDEX AND FINAL ROLLS.

1914. 8 vols. 1 ft.
The index and final rolls are contained in separate volumes. Names in the index are arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, and thereunder in roughly alphabetical order by the first letter and first vowel. Names in the final roll are arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, and thereunder numerically by Dawes roll number.
One complete set and several partial sets of printed versions of the index and Final Rolls compiled by the Dawes Commission. The index provides only the enrollee's name and enrollment number. The roll provides the enrollee's name, enrollment number, age, sex, degree of Indian blood, and card number (see entry 52). The index and Final Roll have been reproduced as roll 1 of National Archives Microfilm Publication M1186.
A-5-2-5

52. ENROLLMENT CARDS ("CENSUS CARDS")

1899-1907. 240 ft.
Arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, thereunder by type (Straight, Doubtful, Rejected), and thereunder numerically.
Original 14 x 7 inch printed cards annotated with information about persons applying for enrollment under the act of 1898. Cards were prepared for each "family group" and were used by the travelling enrollment parties to record information about the applicants and actions taken by the Commission and the Secretary of Interior. The information generally given for each applicant includes name, enrollment number (if approved for enrollment), age, sex, degree of Indian blood, post office address, relationship to the head of the family group, references to enrollment on earlier tribal rolls, and parent's names. The cards often include annotations about the applicant's birth or death, changes in marital status, references to related enrollment cards, and actions taken. The reverse of the cards relating to applicants as Freedmen contain the name of the person who owned the applicant as a slave and the owner of the applicant's parents. See entry 53A for applications related to these cards. The cards have been reproduced as National Archives Microfilm Publication M1186.
A-5-2-6

53. DUPLICATE ENROLLMENT CARDS.

1918-1919. 115 vols. 11 ft.
Arranged in the same order as entry 52. No paper copies have been found for Creek, Seminole, or Cherokee by Blood cards. Bound paper copies of most of the cards described entry 52. The paper copies were prepared to reduce the use of the original cards and contain all the information from them was transcribed onto the paper copy.
A-5-10-1

53A. APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLLMENT.

1898-1914. 525 ft.
Arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, thereunder by type (Straight, Doubtful, or Rejected), and thereunder numerically by the same card number used in entry 52.
Original applications for enrollment under the act of June 28, 1898, and occasionally supporting documents such as birth and death affidavits, marriage licenses, transcripts of testimony taken by the Commission, correspondence relating to the status of the application, and decisions and orders of the Commission. Correspondence of the Commission sometimes uses numbers to designate an enrollment category (7=Choctaw by Blood, 17=Choctaw Freedman, 9=Chickasaw by Blood, and 19=Chickasaw Freedmen). Thus 17-101 designates Choctaw Freedman card number 101. These records have been reproduced as National Archives Microfilm Publication M1301. (7KR-75-80-0001).
A-16-40-1 and A-17-50-1

54. TRIBAL ROLLS.

1852-1964. 233 vols.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder chronologically. See Appendix III for a list of the rolls.
Original manuscript census and payment rolls, handwritten and typed copies of rolls, and some indexes to rolls prepared by the Dawes Commission. The rolls were obtained from the tribal governments in accordance with an act of Congress of June 10, 1896 and regulations issued by the Secretary of Interior on June 20, 1897. The information given in each rolls varies but generally includes only the Indian's name, a roll number for that specific roll, and amount received (where applicable). Many of the rolls were annotated by the staff of the Dawes Commission with enrollment numbers or census card numbers. The report described in entry 57 provides detailed information about how the Commission acquired the rolls. (75A1411)
A-5-16-7

55. LETTERS SENT TRANSMITTING ENROLLMENT SCHEDULES.

1901-1907. 30 vols. 2 ft.
Arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, and thereunder chronologically. Press copies of letters sent to the Secretary of Interior through the Commissioner of Indian Affairs transmitting schedules of names of persons recommended for enrollment and press copies of the schedules. The information given in the schedule includes the enrollee's name, enrollment number, tribal district of residence, and the tribal roll used to verify eligibility (where applicable). There are occasionally remarks about relationships to other enrollees.
A-5-20-4

56. ENROLLMENT SCHEDULES.

1900-1907. 6 vols. 3 ft.
Arranged by tribe, thereunder by enrollment category, and thereunder by roll number. Carbon copies of typed schedules of names of persons recommended for enrollment. The schedules were submitted in triplicate to the Secretary of Interior through the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with one copy being returned to the Commission for reference. The information given for each enrollee includes name, age, sex, degree of Indian blood, and census card number. The schedules for the Seminoles also include the band name and a reference to an 1897 Seminole census roll. The original copy of the schedules has been reproduced as National Archives Microfilm Publication T529. (volume #01817, L2722-3, and 6-6-3).
A-5-20-5

57. REPORT ON ENROLLMENT

1909. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copy of a report prepared by Joseph W. Howell on the of the Five Civilized Tribes which was submitted to the Secretary of Interior on March 3, 1909. The report provides extensive details about enrollment procedures, controversial decisions, legal opinions issued by government attorneys, and the difficulties of obtaining records from tribal governments. The report includes several lists of rolls used by the Dawes Commission. The report has been reproduced on microfilm as 7RA92.
A-5-22-3

58. LIST OF CLAIMANTS.

ca. 1907. 1 vol. 3 in.
Names within the list are arranged alphabetically by surname.
A typed "Departmental List of Persons Who Claim to be Entitled to Enrollment as Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes. The list contains the names of 741 persons and includes the tribal affiliation claimed by each and a summary of the facts in each case.
A-5-22-3

58A. CASE FILES OF W. C. POLLOCK ON CLAIMANTS.

1910-1911. 4 ft.
Arranged by tribe and thereunder numerically by case number (Cherokee 1-193, Choctaw 1-359, Chickasaw 1-16, Creek 1-76, and Seminole 1-20). No index to claimants has been located.
Carbon copies of transcripts of testimony taken at hearings conducted by Judge W. C. Pollock (Assistant Attorney for the Interior Department) or the various district agents of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency. The proceedings were conducted primarily at Muskogee to gather facts for a report to Congress on persons whose names should be added to the final rolls because their applications did not reach the Department of Interior until after the rolls closed, minor and orphan children, incompetents, or Indians who were incarcerated at the time of enrollment. Some of the files include correspondence between the Dawes Commission and the applicants or officials of the Department of Interior. Many cases contain only a reference to the enrollment cards described in entry 52. or a one page summary of the case. Some of the claimants were eventually added to the rolls by an act of Congress of August 1, 1914. These appear to be duplicate copies of records sent to the Secretary of Interior in 1915 (many of the records are stamped received by the Office of Indian Affairs; March 31, 1915; #37533). Pollock submitted his final report in 1912 (17711-12-053 Five Civilized Tribes in entry 121 of PI 163). See also entry 607 of PI 163.
A-05-022-1

59. INDEX TO CITIZENSHIP DOCKET.

n.d. 1 vol. 5 in.
Arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the claimant's surname. an index to what is probably a Cherokee citizenship docket which provides only a case number for each claimant under the heading " Nation Number." The docket has not been located. (Volume #L3260).
A-5-22-3

60. PAYROLL OF WITNESSES.

1902-1908. 20 vols. 3 in.
Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder by quarter. Signed triplicate copies of "Payrolls of Witnesses Before the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes." The information given for each witness includes name, place of residence, dates for which paid, number of days paid, miles traveled, total amount paid, date paid, and the signatures of the payee and witnesses. The funds were paid by the Superintendent of the Union Agency to persons testifying before the Dawes Commission on behalf of the tribal governments in proceedings relating to enrollment.
A-35-002-8

60AA. DOCKET OF CASES APPEALED.

1896-1899. 1 vol. 1 in.
Arranged numerically by case number (1-336). Indexed by name of applicant.
A record of actions taken by the U.S. Court for the Northern District of Indian Territory on appeals from decisions of the Dawes Commission on applications under the act of 1896. The information given for each case includes the names of the parties and their attorneys, a summary of the proceedings and motions filed, and the decision of the court. (Volume #100415).
A-5-20-6

60A. CITIZENSHIP CASE FILES OF THE U.S. COURT IN INDIAN TERRITORY

1896-1897. 14 ft.
Arranged by case number (1-335) with four miscellaneous petitions. A list of cases in box 1.
Original and copies of papers, briefs, memorandums, exhibits, applications, clippings, correspondence, decisions, histories, letters, opinions, orders, proceedings, rolls, and telegrams pertaining to appeals of requests for enrollment as Cherokees and Creeks under the act of 1896.
These cases were heard by the U.S. Court in Indian Territory-Northern District at Muskogee. The records provide information on tribal politics and genealogy. (7NC-75-89-0015).
A-5-20-6


Back to CIR. ... Go to: Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-VIII ... Alphabetical index (A-I)

Go to Record Entries: 1-60a ... 61-128 ... 129-207a ... 208-288a ... 289-359 ... 360-442a ... 443-506 ... 507-579 ... 580-649