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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


RECORDS RELATING TO CLAIMS

Records Concerning Indian Land Reserves

522. INDEX TO REGISTERS OF RESERVES.

n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.
An index to names of Indians who were allotted reserves of land under various treaties and acts of Congress and concerning which there are entries in the registers of Reserve Files A-D. Each index entry gives name of reservee, date and designation (name of tribe or site of negotiations) of the treaty under which the land was reserved, and a page reference in the appropriate register. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of reservee. Within each alphabetical section the entries for each of the four registers are separate. For the register of Reserve File A, see entry 523. There are no registers of Reserve Files B and D among the records of the Bureau now in the National Archives; and the pagination of the copy of the register of Reserve File C (entry 526) does not correspond with that given in the index. The Bureau has retained a set of registers, but electrostatic copies of those for Reserve Files B and D are available for use in the National Archives. The index can be used, without reference to the registers, to determine the approximate location of records referring to particular persons among the reserve files (entries 524, 525, 527, and 528).

523. REGISTER OF CASES IN RESERVE FILE A.

1 vol. 2 in.
This register was prepared in the General Land Office and was transmitted to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in November 1837 as part of the transfer of records relating to Indian reserves from the General Land Office to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Each entry gives case number, name of reservee, date and designation of treaty under which the land was reserved, description of the tract, and notations of later actions (usually the disposal of the land by the reservee or, less frequently, the issuance of a patent to the reservee). Many of these notations were made after the volume had been transferred to the Bureau. The entries are arranged chronologically according to the date of the treaty under which the land was reserved; there is no discernible order to the arrangement of the entries under each treaty. The entries are numbered in order; and there are subnumbers for entries under the 1830 Choctaw Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. Included is a list of additional cases under article 14 of the Choctaw Treaty of 1830, reported by the General Land Office in 1855 as having been patented. There is an alphabetical index to names of reservees. For a description of the records in Reserve File A, see entry 524.

524. RESERVE FILE A.

ca. 1825-1907. 8 ft.
Correspondence, reports, legal documents, maps, plats, and other types of documents concerning land reserved for individual Indians under the terms of treaties negotiated between 1805 and 1830. The Bureau withdrew most of these records from the main series of general incoming correspondence (entries 79 and 91). There are also records that were transferred from the General Land Office to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1837. Until the passage of the law in 1832 establishing the office of Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the General Land Office was responsible for the supervision of Indian reserves. The Choctaw treaty of 1830 was the last treaty whose reserve provisions were originally administered by the General Land Office. Most of the records in this series, however, were accumulated by the Bureau after the transfer of the records from the General Land Office; and there are still some records relating to Reserve File A among the records of the General Land Office. Records in this series are arranged numerically by case number assigned in the order in which the case was entered in the register described in entry 523. The cases arising from one treaty are grouped together and arranged chronologically by date of the treaty. Each "case" consists of records resulting from a reserve claim of an individual Indian. Although there are some records relating to the establishment and location of the claim, most of the records relate to later actions concerning the reserve (often the transfer of it to another person or the solution of problems arising from inheritance).

524A. REGISTER OF CASES IN RESERVE FILE B

ca. 1831-61. 3 vols.
Arrangement is in rough chronological order. There is a name index at the beginning of each volume which is alphabetical by first letter of surname. One volume, erroneously labeled "Index to Special Reserves B", is an electrostatic copy of the volume labeled M8-A. Each entry lists treaty by law, date, and nation; name of reservee; tract (sometimes called situation or location); and additional remarks most frequently relating to the issuance of patents . The two original volumes are labeled "incomplete" and must be used in conjunction with one another. The "remarks" section of the latter entries are filled in only sporadically. (new entry)

525. RESERVE FILE B.

1832-1907. 2 ft.
Correspondence, reports, legal documents, maps, and other types of records concerning lands reserved for individual Indians under the terms of treaties negotiated between 1831 and 1860. These treaties were administered from the first by the Bureau of Indian Affairs -- unlike earlier treaties that originally were administered by the General Land Office. The records concerning the earlier treaties are designated as Reserve File A (entry 524). The Bureau withdrew most of the records from the main series of general incoming correspondence (entries 79 and 91). The records relate to the establishment and location of claims and to later problems arising mainly from transfer or inheritance. Arranged in cases consisting of the records relating to particular reserves. The cases are arranged numerically by numbers assigned in the order in which the cases were registered. The cases arising from a particular treaty are grouped together chronologically by the date of the treaty. The register has been retained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, but an electrostatic copy is available in the National Archives.

526. REGISTER OF CASES IN RESERVE FILE C.

1 vol. 1 in.
A copy, made in 1909, of the original register. Each entry gives name of reservee, location of land, and a notation of later action taken by the Bureau or the reservee (usually the disposal of the land). There is an alphabetical index to surnames of reservees. The entries are arranged numerically by case number, but there is no apparent logic in the pattern of numbering. The pagination of this copy does not correspond with the page references given in the index to registers of reserves (entry 522). Another copy of the register is maintained in the Bureau of Indian Affairs. For the reserve papers, see entry 527.

527. RESERVE FILE C.

ca. 1831-89. 2 ft.
Correspondence, reports, legal documents, maps, plats, and other types of records relating to land reserved for individual Indians under article 19 of the 1830 Choctaw Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. These records relate to the establishment of claims and to later actions concerning mainly the disposal and the inheritance of claims. The Bureau withdrew most of the records from the main series of general incoming correspondence (entries 79 and 91). The records are arranged in cases relating to individual reserves, and the cases are arranged in order of registration (see entry 526). For records relating to other reserves under the treaty of 1830, see entries 524 and 529.

527A. REGISTER OF CASES IN RESERVE FILE D

ca. 1830-1870. 2 vols. & unbound papers.
Arrangement is in rough chronological order. There is a name index at the beginning of each volume which is alphabetical by first letter of surname. One volume, erroneously labeled "Index to Special Reserves D", is an electrostatic copy of the volume labeled M8-E. Each entry lists laws, treaty, Indian tribe, name of reservee, location, and general remarks most frequently relating to the issuance of patents. Loose records that were formerly inserted within these volumes, most of which pertain to the Bitter Root Valley Flathead Indians, are now housed in a custom-made box. (new entry)

528. RESERVE FILE D.

1845-1907. 3 in.
Correspondence, reports, legal documents, plats, and other types of records relating to land reserved for individual Indians under the terms of treaties negotiated between 1825 and 1869 and certain acts of Congress. Host of the records concern reserves under treaties later than those in Reserve File B (entry 525). The records relate both to the establishment of claims and to later actions chiefly regarding the sale and inheritance of claims. The Bureau withdrew most of the records from the main series of general incoming correspondence (entries 79 and 91). Arranged in cases relating to individual reserves. The cases are grouped according to the treaty or act under which the reserves were set aside, but there is no particular order to their arrangement. The register for Reserve File D is still retained by the Bureau, but an electrostatic copy is available in the National Archives.

528A.REGISTER OF MISCELLANEOUS RESERVE PAPERS

1901, 1903, 1905
records the names of grantors and grantees, tribes, and dates records were filed. Index in front. Refers to the documents in Entry 529. (new entry)

529. MISCELLANEOUS RESERVE PAPERS.

1825-1907. 31 ft.
Correspondence, reports, legal documents, and other types of records relating to land reserved for Indians (both individuals and groups) and to Indian reserves in general. Arranged alphabetically for the most part by name or geographical location of tribe. There is also a group of records designated as "Miscellaneous Reserves." The arrangement of the records in the various subseries varies. Most of them are arranged numerically by case number (as for Reserve Files A-D) or by year and thereunder by file number as is the general in coming correspondence series (entries 79 and 91). Some of the subseries are virtually continuations of the Reserve subheadings of the series of incoming correspondence for the period 1824-80 (entry 79). Beginning about 1851 records designated as "Reserves" in the registers and endorsements are often filed with the miscellaneous reserve papers.

529A. RECORDS RELATING TO CLAIMS OF THE CHRISTIAN INDIANS IN KANSAS TERRITORY

1852-57.
These records are relative to claims of Delaware Indians of the Moravian sect to Delaware lands in Kansas Territory. Included are censuses, letters, memoranda, records of expenses, lists of goods purchased by agents, and a map. (new entry)

Records Relating to the Choctaw Net Proceeds Case

 There were many longstanding claims of individual Choctaw Indians, arising from their removal to Indian Territory under the provisions of the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. The term "net proceeds" refers to money remaining from the sale of the ceded land in the East after necessary expenses had been deducted. The Choctaw, in addition to claims for the value of their former land, had claims for value of improvements, expenses of emigration, and other losses. For many years no payment was made to the Choctaw by the United States. The treaty of 1855 provided for the arbitration -- by the United States Senate -- of all claims arising under the 1830 treaty. The adjudication of individual claims was to be handled by the Choctaw government. In 1859 the Senate made a general award of $2,981,247.30, based on the net proceeds alone. The only payment actually made by the United States, however, was for $250,000 in 1861.

 In 1875, although Congress still had not appropriated the money, the Choctaw government began proceedings to adjudicate individual claims. By this time, since most of the original claimants were dead, the proceedings concerned their heirs. During 1875 and 1876 courts of claims in each of the three Choctaw judicial districts received claims and rendered decisions. The decisions were reviewed by a Board of Chief Commissioners, composed of the Chief Commissioner of each of the district courts. In 1881 the United States Court of Claims awarded $408,120.32 to the Choctaw for the net proceeds and other claims against the United States. The Supreme Court reversed this judgment and confirmed the larger Senate award made in 1859. In 1888 Congress appropriated $2,731,247.30, the amount of the Senate award less the $250,000 paid in 1861. The Choctaw Council created the Net Proceed Commission with responsibility for issuing certificates to claimants on the basis of the findings of the courts of claims and the Board of Chief Commissioners in 1875 and 1876. Payment was made to settle individual claims in 1889, but much of the money was used to settle attorney's fees and other expenses. In 1897-98 another commission, appointed by the Choctaw Council, undertook the settlement of the remaining unpaid claims.

 The records described in entries 530-543 consist mainly of those accumulated by the courts and commissions of 1875-76, 1889, and 1897-98 that were transmitted to the Bureau in Washington.

530. EVIDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS CONCERNING INDIVIDUAL CLAIMS

1875-89. 3 ft.
Applications, affidavits, testimony, contracts, powers of attorney, receipts, and other types of records concerning the claims of individual Choctaw. Some of the documents are written in the Choctaw language. The powers of attorney and contracts relate chiefly to the distribution of awards in 1889 rather than to the adjudication of the claims. The records relating to each claim are together in envelopes. Endorsements on the envelopes indicate the findings of the courts of claims and the Board of Chief Commissioners in 1875 and 1876. The records are arranged in rough numerical order by the 1875-76 docket numbers. The claims adjudicated by the several districts have been intermingled, and there are often several envelopes bearing the same number.

531. JOURNAL OF COURT OF CLAIMS OF FIRST (MOSHULATUBBEE) DISTRICT.

1875-76. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
A brief record of proceedings of the court. Arranged chronologically.

532. DOCKET BOOKS FOR FIRST (MOSHULATUBBEE) DISTRICT COURT OF CLAIMS.

1875-76. 2 vols. 1 in.
Registers of claims filed with the court. Each entry gives claim number, names of present claimant and original claimant, date of filing, name of claimant's attorney, nature and amount of claim, and notations concerning the actions taken by the court and by the Board of Chief Commissioners. Some of the entries have been marked, in pencil, "paid." There are missing pages in the first volume. There are a few loose pages from a third volume. There are two sets of claims: (1) claims filed under an 1872 act of the Choctaw Council and (2) claims filed under an 1876 act. Claims in each set are arranged numerically by number assigned in order as the claim was filed.

533. DOCKET BOOK FOR SECOND (APUKSHUNNUBBEE) DISTRICT COURT OF CLAIMS.

1875-76. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
A register of claims filed with the court. Each entry gives claim number, names of present claimant and original claimant, date of filing, name of claimant's attorney, nature and amount of claim, and notations concerning the action of the court and that of the Board of Chief Commissioners. Some of the entries have been marked, in pencil, "paid." Arranged numerically by claim number. There is an alphabetical index to names of original claimants.

534. REGISTER OF CLAIMANTS OF THIRD (PUSHMATAHA) DISTRICT COURT OF CLAIMS.

1875-76. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Individual entries for the first 159 claims in this register give claim number, names of original claimant and present claimant, amount claimed, amount allowed, notations of the decisions of the court and of the Board of Chief Commissioners, and other pertinent information. Individual entries for the remaining claims give claim number, names of original claimant and present claimant, nature and amount of claim, amount allowed, name of claimant's attorney, acreage of land (when applicable), names of witnesses, date of filing and date of award, and other pertinent information. Some of the entries have been marked, in pencil, "paid." The entries are arranged by claim number, which was assigned in rough chronological order by date of filing. There is an alphabetical index to names of claimants, but parts of it are missing. There are also pages missing in the register.

535. MINUTES OF BOARD OF CHIEF COMMISSIONERS.

Sept.-Oct. 1876. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Minutes giving an account of some of the proceedings of the Board in reviewing the findings of the district courts. The cases were reviewed by district and generally in numerical order. This volume contains the minutes for reviews of the cases of the First District and some of the cases of the Second District. No later minutes have been located among the records.

536. REGISTERS OF CLAIMS AWARDED BY DISTRICT COURTS AND CONFIRMED BY THE BOARD OF CHIEF COMMISSIONERS.

1876-77. 2 vols. 2 in.
Given for each claim are its number, names of present claimant and original claimant, nature of claim, and amount awarded. Arranged by district and thereunder by claim number. The information for the First District cases is for the most part duplicated in the volume described in entry 537.

537. REGISTER OF CLAIMS AWARDED IN THE FIRST DISTRICT COURT AND CONFIRMED BY THE BOARD OF CHIEF COMMISSIONERS.

1876. 1 vol. 1 in.
This register was maintained by the Board. Each entry gives claim number, names of present claimant and original claimant, nature of claim, and the finding of the Board. Each entry -- in the first part of the volume -- also gives the amount awarded by the district court. Some of the entries are marked, in pencil, "paid." The entries are arranged for the most part by claim number. The claims under the 1876 act of the Choctaw Council are entered in the middle of the volume; the claims under the 1872 act are entered at the beginning of the volume and are then continued towards the back of the volume. This arrangement reflects the order in which the claims were considered by the Board. With some exceptions, therefore, the entries are also arranged chronologically by date of the Board's decision. For similar registers for all districts, see entry 536. For journal and docket books of the district court, see entries 531 and 532.

538. DOCKET BOOK OF NET PROCEED COMMISSION.

1889. 2 vols. 3 in.
Given for each claim are docket number, names of present claimant and original claimant, names of claimant's attorney and witness, nature and amount of claim, and sometimes date when the claim was filed and an indication of the action taken. Some entries are marked "paid." Entries are arranged for the most part numerically by docket number. For information concerning the action taken on claims, see entry 540.

539. JOURNAL OF NET PROCEED COMMISSION.

Apr.-Oct. 1889. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Gives a brief account of meetings, listing the cases that were considered. For the specific action taken on each case, see entry 540. In the journal there are page references to the proceedings described in entry 540. Arranged chronologically. No journal has been located for the meetings of the Commission during March 1889.

540. PROCEEDINGS OF NET PROCEED COMMISSION.

Mar.-Oct. 1889. 2 vols. 3 in.
Given is the action taken on each case considered on a certain day. These volumes supplement the information in the journal described in entry 539. Included are some lists of claims and some brief minutes of the 1897-98 Commission. Arranged chronologically.

541. CERTIFICATES OF PAYMENT.

1889. 9 in.
Canceled (paid) certificates that were issued in settlement of claims by Robert L. Owen, fiscal agent of the Choctaw Nation, and that were countersigned by the Commissioners. Most of these certificates were issued to attorneys rather than to the claimants themselves. The certificates were numbered in order as issued. Arranged in rough numerical order by these assigned numbers. Many numbers are either missing or were not used.

542. RECEIPTS FOR CERTIFICATES OF PAYMENT.

1889. 8 vols. 7 in.
Receipts for the certificates described in entry 541. Their numbers correspond with those of the certificates, and they are arranged by these numbers. Some numbers are either missing or were not used.

543. LISTS OF CLAIMS.

1897-98. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Lists of unpaid and unsettled claims and of claims that were to be checked to determine if payment had been made. They were probably compiled by the Commission of 1897-98. There are notations for those claims that were paid. Arranged by type of list and thereunder by district.

Records concerning military bounty lands

544. INDEX TO ABSTRACT LIST OF INDIAN APPLICANTS FOR MILITARY BOUNTY LANDS.

1855-75. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
 An index to names of applicants listed in the first volume of records described in entry 545 and to names listed on a few pages towards the end of the second volume of records described in the same entry. Given for individual applications (chiefly those submitted in the 1855-58 period) are name of applicant, tribe, notation as to whether a warrant was issued, and page reference. Arranged alphabetically by surname of applicant and thereunder by volume and page numbers.

545. ABSTRACT LIST OF INDIAN APPLICANTS FOR MILITARY BOUNTY LANDS.

1855-82. 2 vols. 3 in.
An abstract list for applications filed under a provision of an act of Congress of March 3, 1855 (10 Stat. 702), extending the bounty land laws to Indians. The applications were submitted by Indians claiming entitlement on the basis of their own military service and by persons claiming to be heirs of qualified Indians. Entries for individual applications give name of applicant, age, tribe, war in which service was claimed, name of commanding officer, date of final certificate to application, name of agent by whom sent, date of receipt in the Bureau, date of referral to the Pension Office, and, when applicable, date of issue of warrant, warrant number, information concerning the transfer of the warrant, and other notations, Arranged in rough chronological order by date of receipt of application in the Bureau or by date of its referral to the Pension Office. For index, see entry 544. There are other records relating to bounty land claims in the "Miscellaneous Reserves" heading of the records described in entry 529.

546. SCHEDULES OF BOUNTY LAND WARRANTS SENT.

1856-62. 1 vol. 1 in.
Schedules for warrants sent to agents and superintendents, usually for a particular group of Indians. Individual entries give list number, number of warrants sent, date sent, and date of acknowledgment of receipt. Arranged by name of agent or superintendent and thereunder chronologically by date sent. Included are a table of contents, a copy of the usual form of a warrant, and some notes concerning daily work and other matters.

547. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE PENSION OFFICE CONCERNING BOUNTY LAND CLAIMS.

June-Sept. 1870. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of letters relating chiefly to applications for military bounty lands by Creek Indians. Included in the volume are a list of applications and lists of suspended Creek claims, 1872-73. The letters are arranged chronologically and indexed by name of claimant.

Records Relating to Claims Arising From Military Service of Indians During the Civil War

548. LISTS OF CLAIMANTS.

1865-72. 1 vol. 1 in.
Lists of claimants for bounties, for arrears of pay, and for pensions arising from service during the Civil War. Included also are some copies of powers of attorney. Given are name of claimant, name of soldier on whose service the claim was based, organization of soldier, and other information. The entries are arranged in part by date of filing of claim, in part by type of claim, and in part by geographical location. For other lists of claimants, see entry 553.

549. REGISTER OF ADMITTED PENSION CLAIMS.

1866-69. 1 vol. 1 in.
A register for claims of heirs of Indians killed in service during the Civil War and for claims of invalid Indians. Each entry gives name, rank, and organization of soldier; name of heir, if applicable; address of heir or invalid; relation of heir to soldier; name of attorney or agent; date of certificate of approval of claim; date of first pension payment (usually retroactive); and other pertinent information. Entries are arranged alphabetically by surname of soldier and thereunder chronologically by date of certificate.

550. REGISTER OF PENSION CLAIMS.

1873-75. 1 vol. 3 in.
A register for claims arising from deaths or injuries that resulted from service during the Civil War. Entries for individual claims give name of claimant (the soldier himself or, more frequently, his heirs), name of soldier and his rank and organization, name of responsible Indian agent, tribe of soldier, date of entering service, date of discharge or death, date of filing claim, and other information concerning the claim and action taken. There are a few notations for years before and after those given above. Entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of claimant and thereunder chronologically by date of filing of claim.

551. REGISTER OF CLAIMS FOR BOUNTIES AND BACK PAY.

1869-90. 1 vol. 3 in.
A register for claims resulting from service during the Civil War. Entries for individual claims give date of filing, name of claimant, his rank and organization, name of claimant's agent, and information concerning the nature of the claim, evidence submitted, and action taken. Entries for the later years, especially after 1879, are usually based on some action other than the filing of a claim (often a letter received from or sent to the Second Auditor). Usually omitted from these later entries are date of filing and name of agent. Entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of claimant and thereunder chronologically by date of filing of claim or of other action.

552. LEDGER FOR ACCOUNTS OF E. B. STOVER

1869-70. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Stover was legal guardian for several minor heirs of deceased members of the 9th Kansas Cavalry. The entries are arranged by account for each estate. There is an alphabetical index to names of deceased Indian soldiers.

553. RECORDS CONCERNING JOHN W. WRIGHT AND INDIAN HOME GUARD CLAIMS.

1865-75. 1 ft.
Included are incoming correspondence withdrawn from the general series (entry 79), drafts and copies of outgoing correspondence, correspondence and other records of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior and of the Commissioner of Pensions that were referred to the Bureau, correspondence and other records of John W. Wright, reports, affidavits, applications, powers of attorney, letters of administration, and Treasury Department forms, lists, and schedules. These records re late mainly to the activities of John W. Wright as attorney and agent for Indians in presenting claims for bounties, pensions, and arrears of pay arising from service in the Indian Home Guard during the Civil War and also as special agent for the Department of the Interior in making payments to successful claimants. They were accumulated as a result of an investigation of certain charges brought against Wright.

Records Relating to Claims of White Settlers Evicted From the Crow Creek and Winnebago Reservations

By an Executive order of February 27, 1885, parts of the Crow Creek (Sioux) and old Winnebago Reservations in South Dakota were opened for public entry. On April 17, 1885, the order was revoked, and settlers who had moved in were evicted. The evicted settlers then filed claims against the United States for the losses they had suffered. In 1890 Special Agent Henry R. Pease began an investigation of the claims, as provided by an act of Congress of October 1, 1890 (26 Stat. 659). He made his final report on December 15, 1882. Most of the records described in entries 554-558 were created as a result of his investigation, although there are records -- used by Pease -- dating as early as 1885. There are also records relating to claims filed under an act of Congress of March 2, 1895 (28 Stat. 899). By 1900 most of the claims had been settled.

554. SCHEDULES OF CLAIMS.

ca. 1894-1900. 1 vol. and unbound papers. 1 in.
Two schedules (compiled in the Bureau) of claims that were filed under the act of 1890 and were investigated by Pease. Each entry gives claim number, name of claimant, date of settlement on land, date of vacating, location of land, amount claimed, amount allowed by the agent, amount allowed by the Bureau, and other information (usually consisting of explanations of complete or partial disallowances). Many of the entries in one of the schedules are stamped with the date of settlement of the claim. The settlement dates are for the 1894-1900 period; the actual dates of compilation of the schedules have not been determined. A general claim number is indicated for some of the claims (see entry 112). These two schedules include the same claims, which are arranged in the same order; the notations, however, are somewhat different. The bound schedule is mislabeled as an "Index to Sioux Ceded Allotments." Entries in each schedule are arranged alphabetically by surname of claimant and thereunder numerically by claim number.

555. REPORT OF AGENT PEASE.

1890-93. 3 ft.
A report of Special Agent Pease, dated December 15, 1892, concerning his investigation of the claims under the act of 1890. Included with the report is the evidence he had accumulated. The report is registered as file number "1292-93" of the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). Most of the evidence relates to individual claims and is designated as enclosures of the report, although some of it was sent in after the report was submitted. Included also are a few general depositions and a map. The records relating to each claim usually consist of depositions of the claimant and witnesses and a report by the agent of his findings. Documents dated as early as 1885 are enclosed as supporting evidence. The evidence is arranged numerically by claim number, which was usually assigned in the order in which the claims were filed.

556. SCHEDULE OF ADDITIONAL CLAIMANTS.

1895. 1/4 in.
A schedule of claimants under the 1895 act. Each entry gives claim number, name of claimant, date of settlement, date of vacating, location of land, amount claimed, amount allowed, and remarks (explanations of decisions). The date of settlement (usually in 1896) is indicated for some of the claims. A general claim number (see entry 112) is indicated for some of the claims. Arranged numerically by claim number, which was assigned in alphabetical order by initial letter of surname of claimant.

557. AFFIDAVITS.

1895. 2 in.
Affidavits of claimants and witnesses, with supporting documents submitted under the act of March 2, 1895. These affidavits are all designated as enclosures of "Authority 46498" (see entry 110), which was the Secretary of the Interior's authorization for the payment of approved claims. Earlier, however, before they were submitted to the Secretary, the affidavits had been received as enclosures to letters in the main series of incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). Usually only a covering sheet remains with this correspondence. On the endorsement to each affidavit there is indicated the amount allowed by the Secretary. The affidavits are arranged numerically by claim number, which was assigned in alphabetical order by initial letter of claimant's surname.

558. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS.

ca. 1893-95. 1 in.
A list of claimants under the 1890 act; a copy of a letter of January 25, 1894, with enclosures, from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior; an incoming letter enclosing powers of attorney; and notes concerning individual claims under the 1890 act. The notes are arranged numerically by claim number.

Records Relating to Sioux Property and Allotment Claims

The provenance of the records described in entries 559-565 is confused. Notations on the records relating to Special Agent E. B. Reynolds' investigation of Sioux pony claims in 1891-92 (entry 560) indicate that they were originally handled by the Accounts Division. The records relating to Special Agent James A. Cooper's investigation of property claims in the same years (entry 561) are designated as being transferred from the Land Division to the Accounts Division in 1892. The investigations conducted under the provisions of the act of 1928 (see entry 564) were supervised by the Claims Section of the Land Division. The 1891-92 records were used in connection with this work, and they probably remained in the custody of the Land Division until they were transferred to the National Archives. Most of the records relating to both the 1891-92 investigations, and the investigations conducted under the act of 1928 were lent by the National Archives to the Bureau of Indian Affairs during the period 1940-46 in connection with the settlement of the claims under the 1928 act. Some of these records were returned to the National Archives in 1946, but others were retained until much later. Most of the correspondence of the Bureau relating to the settlement of the claims until 1945 is designated as being handled by the Claims Section of the Land Division. Thereafter the correspondence is designated as being handled by the Probate Division. By this time the work was mainly that of identifying heirs.

In 1946 the records were in the custody of A. F. Rollins, an attorney in the Bureau. At that time he was in the Probate Division, and he indicated that some of the records were being retained in connection with the work of that Division. When the records were returned to the National Archives, they included documents (entry 565) that had been added after the records were lent by the National Archives to the Bureau -- probably added, for the most part, while the Land Division was conducting the work relating to the claims. Although the Probate Division actually used the records last and did make some additions to them, they were accessioned by the National Archives as records of the Land Division. Almost none of them relate to activities supervised by the Probate Division. All of these records have been described together and have been considered as records of the Land Division. At least some of them, however, should probably be considered as records of other divisions.

559. ROLL OF SIOUX PONY CLAIMANTS.

1892. 1 vol. 1 in.
A roll for claims submitted by Sioux Indians for ponies seized by the military at the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Agencies in 1876. It was prepared in the Bureau from information furnished by Special Agent E. B. Reynolds. Entries for individuals give claim number, claimant number, name of claimant, his age, his sex, and number of ponies, on which claim was allowed. Also given (when applicable) are names of heirs of deceased claimants, their relationship, percentage of inheritance, age, and sex. Arranged alphabetically by name of agency at which claim was submitted, sometimes thereunder by name of band, and thereunder numerically by claim number. For affidavits and other records concerning claims, see entry 560. There is an alphabetical index to names of claimants among the records described in entry 565.

559A. NAME INDEX TO SIOUX LAND CLAIM ACTS OF 1890-91

n.d.
This card index is arranged alphabetically by name of claimant into two sequences. The second sequence, much smaller than the first, indexes those Sioux whose cases are listed in the Central Classified Files. The first lists the claimant's name along with a file citation. Some of these citations contain a two letter code plus a number - the letter referring to Sioux subdivisions such as "CR" for Crow Creek or "LB" for Lower Brule. The body of records these codes refer to is unknown. Other cards contain a reference to "L.B. 543" which refers to an individual file in Entry 96, LETTERS SENT, 1870-1908, Land Division, Volume 272, June 14, 1902. A smaller number of cards from this sequence refer only to the Standing Rock list of ponies captured in 11-1-76 or give information on whether the Sioux was considered hostile. (new entry)

559B. NAME INDEX TO GHOST DANCE CLAIM

n.d.
This card index is arranged alphabetically by name of claimant. The cards contain no further information than the Ghost Dance claim number. The body of records which these cards index is unknown. However, records on the Ghost Dance appear as Special Case #188 in Entry 102, SPECIAL CASES, 1821-1907. (new entry)

560. AFFIDAVITS AND OTHER RECORDS RELATING TO SIOUX PONY CLAIMS.

1891-92. 6 in.
Enclosures to reports submitted by Special Agent E. B. Reynolds, who investigated the claims of Sioux Indians for seizures of their ponies by the military at the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Agencies in 1876. On January 19, 1891, Congress appropriated $200,000 to settle these claims (26 Stat. 720). Most of these records were received by the Bureau as enclosures to Reynolds' report of August 24, 1891 ("31497-91"). Many of them were returned to Reynolds for revision. He again transmitted the records, with come additions, with his letter of August 4, 1892 ("28740-92"). These records consist mainly of sworn statements of claimants and witnesses concerning individual claims, but included are general affidavits, lists of claimants, and other kinds of records. Some copies of 1893 annuity payment rolls and a few other documents of later date have been added to the records submitted by Reynolds. Most of the records are arranged by the 1892 enclosure numbers. Those records that were not returned to the agent are arranged by the 1891 enclosure numbers. A considerable number of affidavits are missing. The transmittal letters as well as other incoming letters relating to the claims are with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). For a roll of claimants, see entry 559. There is an alphabetical index to names of claimants among the records described in entry 565. For later records relating to claims for ponies, see entry 564.

561. RECORDS RELATING TO SIOUX PROPERTY CLAIMS.

1891-92. 4 ft.
Depositions, transcripts of testimony, and recommendations of the investigating agent concerning claims of friendly Sioux Indians and legal residents within the limits of Sioux agencies for damages suffered during the winter of 1890-91 from the depredations of hostile Sioux and others. On March 3, 1891, Congress appropriated $100,000 to settle these claims (26 Stat. 1002). The investigation of the claims was conducted by Special Agent James A. Cooper. These records are enclosures to his report of February 25, 1892 ("7805-92"), which is with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). Claims were submitted at the Pine Ridge, Cheyenne River, Rosebud, Standing Rock, and Tongue River Agencies. The claims submitted at each agency are numbered in order. The claims submitted at the Pine Ridge Agency (comprising the largest number) are filed separately in numerical order. The claims submitted at the other agencies are intermingled; all the Claims No. 1 are together followed by the Claims No. 2, and so forth. There is an abstract of the claims with Cooper's general report cited above. For later records concerning Sioux property claims, see entry 564.

562. SCHEDULE OF SANTEE SIOUX CLAIMANTS.

ca. 1916-23. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given for individual claimants are name, relationship to head of family, age, sex, degree of Indian blood, and other pertinent information. Arranged, by family group, in alphabetical order by initial letter of surname of head of family.

563. INDEX TO SIOUX ALLOTMENT AND PROPERTY CLAIMS.

1928-36. 13 ft.
An index on 3" x 5" cards for claims filed under the act of Congress of May 3; 1928. The index is incomplete, particularly for property claims. Individual cards give names of original and present claimant, date of decision, usually an explanation of the decision, and symbols indicating the type of claim, agency at which the claim was filed, claim number, and status of the original claimant (living or dead, adult or minor). Arranged alphabetically by surnames of both original and present claimants. For applications and other records concerning claims, see entry 564.

564. RECORDS RELATING TO SIOUX ALLOTMENT AND PROPERTY CLAIMS.

1928-ca. 1938. 22 ft.
Chiefly application forms, but also including affidavits of witnesses, correspondence, reports, memoranda, lists, indexes and other kinds of records relating to claims against the United States, which were submitted by Sioux Indians under the provisions of an act of Congress of May 3, 1928 (45 Stat. 484). This act provided for the investigation, under the supervision of the Secretary of the Interior, of claims of Sioux Indians. There were two main classes of claims: (1) claims for lost or short allotments resulting from the failure of the United States to provide the correct allotment to which an Indian was entitled; and (2) claims for loss of personal property and improvements during the period 1874-1901, including claims for seizure of ponies, losses of improvements due to removals, losses caused by certain military actions, and property destroyed during a smallpox epidemic. The claims, usually submitted by the heirs of the persons who had actually suffered the loss, were first investigated by the regular agency superintendents and later by a special field agent, Herbert H. Fiske. Congress later appropriated funds to pay the claims that were allowed. Most of the claims were rejected. The records are arranged by agency at which the claim was submitted and thereunder by type of claim. The allotment claims are usually subdivided according to the status of the original claimant (living or dead, adult or minor). The records within the several subgroups are arranged in various ways -- for the most part alphabetically by name of claimant (usually the original claimant) but sometimes chronologically, sometimes numerically by claim number, or sometimes by geographical location. Lists and indexes for sets of claims usually precede the application forms. Transmittal letters, affidavits of witnesses, and other kinds of records may be filed separately from the application forms of claimants. For a general index, see entry 563. For other records concerning the investigation and settlement of the claims that are among the central classified files of the Bureau ("4994-26-260 General Service" and "7113-39-260 General Service"), see entry 121.

565. MISCELLANEOUS PRINTED MATERIAL.

1937-46. 2 in.
A table of payments of Sioux pony claims as adjusted in 1944 (particularly important because it contains an alphabetical index to names of claimants for the records described in entry 560), congressional reports, attorneys' briefs, circulars, orders, and other procedural material. There are also some typed copies of earlier records.  This material was apparently maintained by A. F. Rollins, an attorney in the Bureau, who was concerned with the settlement of the claims submitted under the act of 1928 (see entry 564). Some of the procedural material has no direct relation to the Sioux claims and was presumably kept by Mr. Rollins for his personal information.

Miscellaneous Records Concerning Claims and Legal Disputes

566. RECORDS RELATING TO THE SALLY LADIGA CASE.

1836-57. 1/2 in.
Included are letters withdrawn from the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 79), correspondence of Richard D. Rowland and a patent issued to him, and transcripts of legal proceedings. These records relate to a legal dispute between Sally Ladiga, a Creek Indian, and Richard D. Rowland -- and their heirs -- for possession of a tract of land, in Alabama. Arranged chronologically.

567.REPORTS CONCERNING PRIVATE CLAIMS AFFECTING LANDS OF EASTERN CHEROKEE.

1916. 1/4 in.
Two reports by Special Supervisor Caius E. Triplett concerning his investigation of land claims of individual Indians in several counties in North Carolina against the Eastern Band as a corporation. Included are three blueprint maps of the area showing land holdings and a proposed railroad extension.

568. RECORDS RELATING TO AN INDIAN CLAIM TO CHICAGO LAKE FRONT.

1919. 2 in.
Letters and enclosed copies of maps, an abstract of titles, treaties, a 1908 pamphlet, excerpts of publications, some copies of records of the General Land Office, newspapers, and other items received from William E. Johnson of Chicago. Johnson, in pressing a claim to the land in the Chicago lake front area, claimed to be the representative of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. The date given above is the date when the records were received in the Bureau. There are some copies of documents dated as early as 1795. The records are arranged in the order in which they were submitted by Johnson.

569. LETTERS RECEIVED RELATING TO INTRUDERS ON THE LAND OF THE ME-SHIN-GO-ME-SIA BAND OF MIAMI (INDIANA).

1871-72. Negligible.
These letters were withdrawn by the Bureau from the general incoming correspondence relating to the Central Superintendency (see entry 79). They relate mainly to complaints of the Indians. Arranged by year and thereunder alphabetically by name of writer. There are other records relating to the land of this band of Indians among the Irregularly Shaped Papers (entry 310).

570. RECORDS CONCERNING PAPAGO LAND CASE.

1918-20. 2 ft.
A report of May 21, 1919, with exhibits submitted by Special Supervisor William L. Bowie, and correspondence, notes, clippings, maps, photographs, copies of records, and other material accumulated by Bowie and transmitted to the Bureau. Mr. Bowie, in connection with a suit brought by the Papago of the Pueblo of Santa Rosa against the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of the General Land Office, was assigned to investigate the title of Papago Indians to lands in southern Arizona. The report and exhibits are in numbered binders. Included are a table of contents and an alphabetical subject index.

Enrollment Records

571. INDEX TO REGISTER OF FAMILIES IN THE NEZ PERCE AGENCY.

1 vol. 1/2 in.
An alphabetical index to names of Indians in one of the registers described in entry 572. For the other agencies, the index is included in the same volume as the register.

572. REGISTERS OF INDIAN FAMILIES.

1884-1909. 11 vols. 2 ft.
Compiled by allotting agents. The form of the volumes varies but, in general, for each head of a family there is given information concerning him and his grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, brothers, sisters, and children. Sometimes included are his age, marital status, tribal affiliation, land allotment, and other pertinent information. There are volumes, in the order listed, for the Indians of the Turtle Mountain (Chippewa), Colville (Spokane), Klamath, Makah, Nez Perce, Coeur d'Alene, Wittenburg, Omaha, and Winnebago Agencies or Reservations. Entries in most of the volumes are arranged by allotment number, which was usually assigned in alphabetical order by initial letter of surname of head of family. Included in the volumes are alphabetical name indexes and sometimes also numerical indexes by allotment number. The alphabetical name index for the Nez Perce Agency is in a separate volume (entry 571).

573. ENROLLMENT SCHEDULE FOR BLACKFEET CHILDREN.

1932. 1/4 in.
A schedule for enrollment of children bom since December 30, 1919, which was prepared under provisions of an act of Congress of March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1495). The schedule was accepted by the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council and was approved by the First Assistant Secretary of the Interior. Entries for individual children give name, age, date of birth, degree of Indian blood, place of birth, names of father and mother, and allotment number or race. Arranged alphabetically by child's surname.

Records Relating to Enrollment of California Indians

An act of Congress of May 18, 1928 (45 Stat. 602), authorized the Attorney General of California to bring suit in the United States Court of Claims on behalf of the Indians of California for compensation for lands taken from them by the United States. For this purpose the Indians of California were defined as those living in the State on, June 1, 1852, and their descendants living in the State on May 18, 1928. The Secretary of the Interior was directed to have compiled a roll of Indians who qualified and also a roll of other Indians living in California. Applications for enrollment were to be accepted for 2 years from the date of the act; and the Secretary of the Interior was allowed 3 years from the date of the act in which to alter or revise the roll. These limits were later extended to 4 and 5 years, respectively (46 Stat. 259). Thereafter no more names were to be added.

Charles L. Ellis, Superintendent of the Mission Agency, was given the general supervision of the enrollment. Although several examiners of inheritance and special allotting agents were detailed to the work, Examiner Fred A. Baker finally assumed most of the responsibility and actually prepared the rolls. The records described in entries 574-576 were submitted to the Bureau by Baker. Other records relating to the enrollment are in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121, "11626-29-053, General Service").

574. NUMERICAL LIST OF APPLICATIONS.

1928-32. 7 in.
Given for each application are its number, name of applicant and his address, and an indication of action taken. Included also is a supplemental list. Arranged by application number. For applications, see entry 576.

575. "INDEXES" TO REJECTED APPLICATIONS.

1928-32. 3/4 in.
Each entry gives application number, roll number, name of applicant and his address, and reason for rejection of application. In addition to the main index, there are a supplemental index of rejected applications and a supplemental index of rejected applications on which an appeal had been filed. Included also are some copies of decisions. For applications, see entry 576. There is a roll of rejected applicants among the records described in entry 906.

576. APPLICATIONS.

1928-32. 20 ft.
Forms completed by the applicants for themselves and minor children. Given for each person are his name, position in family, age, sex, birth date, and degree of Indian blood claimed. There is also information concerning residence, marital status, land allotments, ancestry, and other subjects. Included with each application is an affidavit signed by two witnesses. The action taken on the application is indicated. With some of the applications -- usually rejected ones -- there are letters, notifications of rejections, depositions, transcripts of testimony, or other records. There are also some group applications for the Indians of a particular Indian agency. Arranged numerically by application number. For lists of and indexes to applications, see entries 574 and 575. The completed rolls are among the records described in entry 906.