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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


Creek removal records

The Creek Indians lived in villages. These records are usually arranged by name of village and thereunder by name of Indian.

285. CENSUS ROLL.

1833. 1 vol. 1 in.
This roll was completed by Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott
in accordance with article 2 of the treaty of March 24, 1832. Given are the names of heads of families and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The volume is divided into two parts: information for the families living in Upper Towns and Lower Towns, respectively. Each part is arranged by name of town and thereunder by name of head of family. The entries for each town are numbered in order. These entry numbers were used for purposes of identification in later records. Indexed by name of town. The index to Creek reserves (entry 286) can be used to find the town in which a particular Indian is listed. These records have been microfilmed by the National Archives as T275, roll 1 and online transcription

285A. INDEXES TO CREEK RESERVES (ABERT & BRIGHT).

2 vols.
Volume 1 was compiled by Bright and volume 2 by Abert (Entry 287). They index, by name, the Creeks. Also included is a short numerical code, apparently corresponding to volume and page numbers, and a location providing section, township, and range. These serve as indexes to the volumes in entry 286A. (new entry)

286. INDEX TO CREEK RESERVES.

n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.
An alphabetical listing of the Creek Indians entered on the location registers prepared by Albert and Bright (entry 287). It serves as an index to the census roll described in entry 285.

286A. REGISTER OF CREEK RESERVATIONS UNDER THE TREATY OF MARCH 24, 1832

2 vols.
Arrangement is alphabetical by the first letter of the surname. Each entry covers a two page span and includes the following categories of information: number of entry, reservee's name, Creek town, location book number and page, location, locating agent, name of purchaser, date of approval, and date of patent. (new entry)

287. LAND LOCATION REGISTERS.

ca. 1834-86. 5 vols. 6 in.
Under the provisions of article 2 of the treaty of 1832, each head of a Creek family was entitled to a reservation of land in the East. John J. Abert and James Bright located these reservations in 1833-34. Given for each reservee are his name and a description of land; and sometimes other information is included. If the land was sold, the name of the purchaser, the amount of sale, and information concerning administrative handling of the contract are also given. There are two copies of a register for Abert's locations and two copies of a register for Bright's locations. There is also a preliminary version of the Bright register. In one copy, when applicable, the date of issuance of a patent by the General Land Office is given. There are notations dated as late as 1886. Arranged by town and thereunder by name of Indian in the same order as the census roll described in entry 285. For an index to names of Indians, see entry 286.

288. LOCATION REGISTERS AND CERTIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTS.

ca. 1834-36. 2 vols. 3 in.
Labeled, respectively, as registers of certifying agents Robert McHenry and James F. Sanford. Both names, however, appear in both volumes. Each volume consists of location registers for certain areas, similar to those described in entry 287, giving both the location of land and information concerning sales. One includes evaluations of the quality of the land. There are also schedules of approved contracts in each volume. These volumes contain many corrections and deletions.

289. ABSTRACT OF CREEK CONTRACTS.

Jan. 22, 1836. 2 vols. 1 in.
Two copies of a report, in tabular form, that was submitted by John B.
Hogan, Superintendent of Creek Emigration, acting under special instructions to investigate fraudulent land sales. Given for individual cases are census number (see entry 285) and name of reservee, location of land, name of registered purchaser, price of sale, judgment on validity of contract, and other information. Some notations were made later. Arranged by town.

290. REPORT CONCERNING CREEK CONTRACTS.

1836. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Submitted by investigating agents John B. Hogan, James W. Burney,
and George D. Anderson on June 10, 1836, and approved by the President on July 7, 1836. Given are judgments on the validity of certain con tracts for the sale of Creek reservations that were certified by Leonard Tarrant. Later notations were made in the Bureau. Arranged by town.

Records of the Commission of Crawford and Belch

In 1836 the President appointed Thomas Hartley Crawford and Alfred Belch to investigate reports of frauds in the sale of Creek lands and the causes of recent hostilities of the Creek Indians.

291. JOURNAL.

1836-38. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Contains proceedings of the Commission, consisting chiefly of copies of correspondence and other documents. Arranged chronologically.

292. DOCKET BOOKS.

1836-38. 5 vols. 5 in.
A record of cases of alleged fraud in the transfer of Creek reservations presented to the Commission. Given for individual claims are date of filing, names of contestants, nature of claim, notations on actions taken, and other information. Later notations were made in the Bureau. Arranged in three groups: (1) cases in which more information was needed; (2) cases in which the Indian reservee was a contestant; and (3) cases in which the reservee had died. Within these groups, the cases are arranged chronologically by filing date of claim and numbered consecutively. In three of the volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of contestants. For decisions, see entry 293. Papers submitted concerning the cases are now filed with the reserve papers described in entry 529.

293. REPORTS.

1836-38. 3 vols. and unbound papers. 5 in.
Summaries of the evidence presented and the decisions of the Commissioners in fraud cases. There are cross-references to the docket books (entry 292). Later notations were made in the Bureau or the War Department. There are one general report and other reports for special groups of claims. Arranged by name of town, usually in alphabetical order.

294. SCHEDULES OF REVISIONS BY THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

1839. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Copies of schedules approved by the President. Arranged in groups of related cases and thereunder by town. There are later notations, dated for the most part in 1840, relating to administrative actions.

Other Creek removal records

295. ABSTRACTS OF APPROVAL CONTRACTS FOR SALE OF RESERVATIONS.

1839-142. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Schedules, approved by the President, of contracts that had been approved by certifying agents and Commissioners. The dates given above are those of the schedules; the contracts were approved as early as 1834. Arranged chronologically by date of schedule; the individual schedules are arranged alphabetically by name of town.

296. REPORTS CONCERNING LAND OF DECEASED RESERVEES.

1841. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Five reports submitted to the Secretary of War by John Wyse and John J. Abert concerning the land of deceased reservees. These reports formed a separate group of claims presented to Crawford and Belch (see entry 292) Some notations were made later.

297. REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER JOHN W. EDMONDS.

Feb. 22, 1841. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Contains decisions on cases involving the validity of contracts made with J. C. Watson and Company for sale of Creek reservations. Arranged by town. Included in the volume are also some related schedules concerning settled and uncontested cases and also cases admitted for adjudication after the prescribed time.

298. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS CONCERNING CONTRACTS.

ca. 1833-57. 9 in.
Schedules, statements, abstracts, lists, and other records relating to the contracts for sales of reservations and to some related subjects. Many of these records were prepared by locating and certifying agents and Commissioners. Arranged in rough chronological order.

299. EMIGRATION LISTS.

1836-38. 8 vols. and unbound papers. 5 in.
Muster rolls of Creek Indians about to emigrate and Indians who had emigrated. There are also lists of Indians entitled to subsistence and some receipt rolls for subsistence goods. One roll includes some names of Seminole Indians. Arranged for the most part chronologically.

300. MISCELLANEOUS CREEK REMOVAL RECORDS.

ca. 1827-59. 1 ft.
Correspondence, depositions, contracts for sale of land, memoranda, drafts of reports, statements, and other records relating particularly to land fraud cases. Included are some records of investigating officers -- particularly John Wyse, secretary to Special Commissioner John W. Edmonds (see entries 296 and 297). Arranged by subject or type of document.

Other removal records

301. MISCELLANEOUS MUSTER ROLLS.

1832-46. 5 vols. and unbound papers. 2 in.
Rolls of Apalachicola and Seminole of Florida, Kickapoo, New York, Ottawa, Potowatomi, Quapaw, and Wyandot Indians. Arranged alphabetically by name of tribe or state.


RECORDS OF THE LAND DIVISION

 The Land Division was established in 1846 at the time divisions were first organized within the Bureau of Indian Affairs. It was known at first as the Land Statistics, Reservations and Grants Division; and until 1907 it was sometimes called the Land and Law Division. In this inventory it will be consistently designated as the Land Division.

 The regulations adopted in 1846 provided that the Land Division would "embrace all business connected with the location and survey of lands set apart for the various tribes; the examinations of claims arising out of Reservations and grants to individual Indians; the assignment or conveyance thereof; and the correspondence which appropriately relates thereto." These duties remained major areas of concern, but they were soon expanded to include other activities.

 To induce Indians to give up their land had been a major goal of Indian policy since colonial times. Most of the "claims arising out of Reservations and grants" were the outgrowth of treaties by which Indians gave up much of their land in exchange for tribal reserves and, frequently, for grants to individual Indians as well as monetary and other benefits. A significant part of the records of the Bureau relates to the Indians' cession of their land east of the Mississippi River and their removal to the West. Although most of the removal activities were completed before the establishment of the Land Division, many of the records were maintained in that Division. These records relating to Indian removal have been regarded as a distinct subgroup of the records of the Bureau and are described in a separate section of the inventory (entries 198-301).

 During the third quarter of the 19th century much of the work of the Land Division was concerned with the sale, under the provisions of treaties, of parts of reservations ceded by the Indians and, in some cases, of entire reservations of tribes who had agreed to move to Indian Territory. Since the proceeds from these sales were ordinarily to be used for the benefit of the Indians, with the Secretary of the Interior acting as trustee of the funds, the lands offered for sale were known as "trust lands." These lands were usually sold in small tracts by the sealed bid method; sometimes, however, arrangements were made to sell large areas to one purchaser -- most often a railroad company. Other lands were sold to settle tribal debts.

 Allotment work became another important activity of the Land Division. During the last half of the 19th century the division of tribal lands into tracts owned by individual Indians became more common. After the General Allotment Act of 1887 (24 Stat. 388) was passed, it became a basic policy to provide every Indian with his own allotment. During a "trust period" (originally for 25 years but frequently extended) allotments were to be held in trust with the United States acting as guardian. During this period the Indian could not sell his land without Government approval. After the expiration of the trust period, the Indian was to receive a fee patent and was to have full control of the land. After 1900 the Land Division also handled the issuance of certificates of competency. These certificates testified to the ability of individual Indians to conduct their own affairs and authorized them to sell their land. The surveying of Indian lands gradually became one of the allotting activities.

 The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 984) -- sometimes known as the Wheeler-Howard Act -- prohibited further allotments to Indians and suspended sales of land.

 The Land Division was concerned more with the ownership of land than with the use of it, but it was in charge of the leasing of Indian land to non-Indians. The leases, which became more common at the turn of the century, allowed the use of reservations and individual allotments for farming, grazing, lumbering, mining, and, later, for development of oil - and gas - bearing areas.

 The claims handled by the Land Division gradually expanded in scope. Those referred to in the 1846 regulations related mainly to disputes over the ownership of land granted to tribes and to individuals. There are more records relating to this type of claim among the Indian removal records than among the records of the Land Division itself. There were also claims, notably the Choctaw Net Proceeds Case, concerning the proceeds from the sale of land. Later the Division handled some claims for losses of property by both Indians and no Indians. In 1893 the Depredation Division of the Bureau, which handled depredation claims, was consolidated with the Land Division. The Land Division was also concerned with claims for military bounty lands and even for claims for pay, bounties, and pensions resulting from military service by Indians during the Civil War. These claims were probably handled by the Land Division because it had gradually assumed general charge of the legal work of the Bureau. It also handled such matters as contracts of attorneys who represented Indians and attorneys' claims for fees.

 Another area of activity of the Land Division not so closely connected with land matters was that of tribal enrollment and citizenship. Usually, however, the chief material benefits of membership in a tribe were entitlement to land and to per capita payments (many of which were payments for cessions of land). For many years the Land Division was concerned with deposits of tribal funds, bonding of banks, and related activities.

 Between 1907 and 1913 there was a multitude of changes in the organization and activities of the Land Division as a result of a general reorganization of the Bureau. Until this period there were no formal subdivisions within the Land Division, although specific activities were frequently assigned to a particular clerk. The Division was now divided into sections, the names and duties of which were changed frequently.

 The Law Clerk was separated from the Land Division in 1907 to set up what became the Law Division. In 1907 a Division of Field Work (later the Cooperation Division) was established to take charge of irrigation and, later on, of forestry activities. In 1908 these Division activities were transferred to a Cooperation Section in the Office of the Chief Clerk. In 1909 the Uses Section of the Land Division assumed duties relating to irrigation matters. In 1910 an Irrigation Section and a Forestry Section were established in the Land Division. Later in the same year these two Sections were consolidated to form the Field Section. In 1912 the Field Section was divided into a Forestry Section and an Irrigation Section, but they were not part of the Land Division.

 The handling of the affairs of the Five Civilized Tribes was also shunted about during this period. In 1907 an Indian Territory Division was established with personnel transferred from the Land Division. In the following year, however, the Indian Territory Division was abolished and its activities were transferred to the Land Division. For the next several years responsibility for the Five Tribes alternated between the Land Division and the Office of the Chief Clerk. After 1913 there was a permanent Five Tribes Section in the Land Division.

 The other permanent sections that survived the transitory period were the Allotments, Sales, Contracts (known briefly as Uses and as Tribal Lands), and Records Sections. The most important short-lived sections were a Population Section (1909-11) and an Heirship Section (1913). The activities of the Population Section (relating chiefly to statistics, census rolls, trust funds, and per capita payments) were divided among other units of the Bureau. In 1913 all heirship matters were transferred to the Law Division.

 There was a considerable shifting of specific duties among the various sections, but the general scope of their duties is indicated by their names. The Allotments Section was concerned with allotments and such related activities as surveys, appraisements, and acquisition of land for Indians without reservations. The Sales Section supervised sales of land, issuance of patents and certificates of competency, and partition of estates. The Contracts Section had charge of matters relating to leases, rights-of-way, contracts of attorneys, bonding of banks, and enrollment. Later a separate Oil and Gas Section was established to handle oil and gas leases. The Records Section had charge of records, particularly those relating to land titles.

 After the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 was passed, the names and duties of some of the sections were changed. The Allotments Section became the Acquisitions Section, with the major duty of acquiring land for the use of Indians; the Sales Section became the Adjustments Section; and the Contracts Section became the Claims Section. The Five Tribes Section was consolidated with the Claims Section.

 In 1940 the Land Division became a part of the new Indian Resources Branch. Later on their names were changed, respectively to Branch of Land (now known as the Branch of Realty) and Division of Resources. The series entries for the records of the Land Division have been arranged according to functions and activities of the Division rather than according to the organization that developed after 1907. Most of the series fall into four large groups relating, respectively, to surveying and allotting, sales and leases of land, enrollment, and claims·

 The records of the Land Division now in the National Archives are fragmentary chiefly because (1) most of the correspondence of the Bureau relating to land matters is included with the general records of the Bureau and (2) many of the records of the Division -- particularly those relating to title to land -- have been retained by the Bureau. The tract books, allotment schedules, and other similar records that have been transferred to the National Archives are for the most part only those for which the Bureau has duplicate or revised copies.

 Other records relating to land matters are among the records of the Bureau -- particularly with the general records, the Indian removal records, and the records of various field offices. There are also the records of the Depredation Division (which was consolidated with the Land Division) and the records of the Law and Probate Divisions, the Forestry Division, and the Irrigation Division (Divisions that assumed functions at one time exercised by the Land Division). Among the records of the Finance Division are records relating to Indian trust funds, annuity payments, and claims -- all of which were closely related to activities of the Land Division. There are records concerning enrollment of Indians among the records of the Civilization and Finance Divisions.

 Special mention should be made of the records of the former General Land Office, which are now among the records of the Bureau of Land Management (in Record Group 49). There was close cooperation between the Office and the Bureau, particularly concerning the surveying and classifying of land, the issuance of patents, and the providing of areas of the public domain for the use of Indians.


General records

302. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED

1855-80. 9 vols. 2 ft.
In these were registered chronologically the letters received in the Bureau that were referred to the Land Division for examination and action. The contents of the volumes changed somewhat over the years. In the first volume, entries for individual letters give file mark and jurisdiction, date of receipt in the Division, name of person from whom received, name of clerk to whom referred, and remarks concerning action taken. In the other volumes, the date of the letter and the date of its receipt in the Bureau are also given; and, in the last two volumes, the subject matter of the letter is indicated. Entries are arranged chronologically by date of receipt of letter in the Division. There are a few entries for letters received before 1855. With the exception of letters filed in segregated series, hereinafter described, the letters registered are usually with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 79) and not with the records of the Land Division. The registers for letters received after 1880 were destroyed by the Bureau. For general registers of letters received by the Bureau, see entries 75, 88, and 89.

303. INDEXES TO LETTERS RECEIVED

1881-96. 16 vols. 3 ft.
Indexes to letters received by the Bureau and referred to the Land Division for examination and action. Entries for individual letters from a particular person or relating to a given subject usually give file number, date of letter, name of sender, subject matter, and references to registers. The registers for this period., however were destroyed by the Bureau. There are some cross-references. References to letters relating to the affairs of a particular agency are not so extensive as those in the general indexes of the Bureau (entry 87). The volumes are for varying periods of time, usually about a year. Each volume is divided into alphabetical sections by the first two or three letters of the subject heading. Within each section the entries are in rough chronological order. The correspondence that is indexed is ordinarily with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

304. DIGESTS OF LETTERS SENT

ca. 1870-86. 5 vols. 10 in.
Abstracts of the Land Division letter books (see entry 96), which , were prepared by Robert F. Thompson, a clerk in the Bureau for many years. Most individual entries give name of addressee, date, page reference, and abstract of contents of letters relating to a specific subject. The first volume, labeled as being for the 1870-80 period, includes earlier and later references. In it are cited incoming correspondence, statutes, and other sources as veil as the letter books. Entries in this volume are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of subject. Each of the other volumes covers a stated number of letter books for the 1878-86 period and was prepared some time after the last letter book had been closed. Entries in these volumes are arranged alphabetically by subject. For indexes to incoming letters handled by the Land Division, see entry 303.

305. ABSTRACTS OF IMPORTANT CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION.

1870-ca. 1905. 2 vols. 5 in.
Cover Bureau correspondence handled by the Land Division and some other sources of information relating to subjects considered of particular importance. For all entries the subject matter of the letter and a brief of the contents are given. For individual letters received are given the name of the person from whom it was received, date of letter, and file designation. For individual letters sent are given the name of addressee, date of letter, and citation in the press copy books (entry 96). Although both volumes are divided into alphabetical sections according to subject, they are somewhat different. The first volume was used primarily during the period 1870-81, but there are earlier and later references. There are separate sections in the volume for records in the Special Cases (entry 102) and some other segregated series and, within the sections, the entries are in rough chronological order. The second volume was probably begun in 1882. Included, in addition to abstracts of correspondence of the Bureau, are references to congressional documents, statutes, opinions of the Attorney General, and court decisions. In the volume are citations for as early as 1800 and as late as 1905. There is no apparent pattern to the order of the entries within the alphabetical sections.

306. DOCKET BOOKS FOR THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES

1897-1910. 41 vols. 3 ft.
Docket books for correspondence of the Bureau relating to land matters and enrollment of the Five Civilized Tribes. There are volumes for correspondence relating to particular subjects, such as deeds, townsites, tribal acts, legal contests, removal of restrictions on alienation of land, and enrollment. There are also separate volumes for correspondence with the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes and with the Inspector for Indian Territory and volumes for miscellaneous materials. Individual entries consist for the most part of an abstract of the incoming letter and a notation of subsequent action, including references to letters of reply. There are a few notations dated later than 1910. Arranged in part by subject and in part chronologically. The arrangement of the entries in individual volumes varies. Most of the volumes are divided into broad subject areas and are arranged thereunder chronologically. In some volumes, entries are arranged chronologically by date of receipt of incoming letter; in others they are arranged alphabetically by subject. There is usually an alphabetical index to names and subjects.

307. LIST OF LAND AUTHORITIES

1896-1907. 2 vols. 1 in.
A list of the numbers of those "authorities" described in entry 110 that were referred to the Land Division. Also given are volume and page numbers, apparently for registers of incoming correspondence that were destroyed. Entries are arranged numerically by authority number.

308. LISTS OF RECORDS CONCERNING CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW

ca. 1882. 1 vol. 1 in.
A shelf list of records, 1797-1882, as they were maintained in the au about 1882. Most of the records listed relate to claims and other matters arising from the Choctaw Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830 and the Chickasaw treaties of 1832 and 1834. There is one list for the records relating to the Choctaw; another list is for those relating to the Chickasaw. Entries on each list are arranged by number assigned to the package or volume of records. There is a brief index. Many of these records are now with the records relating to Indian removal rather than with the main body of records of the Land Division in the National Archives.

309. LIST OF IRREGULARLY SHAPED PAPERS

1892-1907. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
A shelf list of the records described in entry 310 as they were maintained in the Bureau. This list was apparently begun in 1892 and additions to it were made later. Individual entries give the subject matter of the records in the separate bundles and, frequently, dates and file numbers. There is an alphabetical index to subjects -- The list is no longer accurate -- there have been so many additions to and removals from the series. It is of some use, however, in finding records relating to particular subjects. The records listed are maintained in the National Archives in roughly the same order as in the list.

310. IRREGULARLY SHAPED PAPERS

1849-1907. 17 ft.
These records consist chiefly of incoming correspondence and enclosures that were kept separately from the main correspondence series (entries 79 and 91) and the Special Cases (entry 102) because of unusual size or bulk. Included are some copies of outgoing correspondence, reports, proceedings, testimony, journals, census rolls, schedules, plats, field notes of surveys, patent applications-, vouchers, receipts, ledgers, and newspaper clippings. These records relate to such matters as appraisals and allotments of land, boundaries, leases, railroad rights-of-way, enrollment of Indians, proceedings of special commissions, timber operations, and irrigation projects. Arranged, according to subject matter, into bundles that may consist of one item or of many items. In many cases all the records in a bundle were received by the Bureau with one transmitted, letter, which signifies that the bundle is one file unit of incoming correspondence. The arrangement within the bundles varies. For a list of these records, see entry 309.

310A. STATEMENT SHOWING LAND GRANTS MADE BY CONGRESS TO AID IN THE CONSTRUCITON OF RAILROADS, WAGON ROADS, CANALS, AND INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS (November 27, 1907).

1 vol.
This is a publication of the General Land Office of the Department of the Interior. Included are land grants, forfeited railroad grants, wagon roads, canal grants, river improvement grants, and an index to the volume. Entries include various information, based on the kind, but samples of information found in them include date of grant, route of road, extent of grant in place, extent of indemnity limits, grantee, grantee of state, subdivisions of grant and present owners, and additional legislation affecting but not increasing grant. (new entry)

Surveying and Allotting Records

311. LIST OF FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS OF INDIAN LANDS AND RESERVATIONS

n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.
Individual entries give name of reservation or other area surveyed and usually include the date of survey and the name of the surveyor for many of the field notes described in entry 313.  There are also references to related records, mainly incoming correspondence and maps, and other notations. Volume references are given, but they do not coincide with the present numbering of the volumes. References to the Ancient and Miscellaneous Surveys (entry 315) are included. Copies of correspondence and lists of contents of some of the volumes have been inserted. There are references to records dated from 1796 to 1911. There are also some notes relating to Geological Survey field notes. Entries are arranged alphabetically by name of State.

312. GUIDE TO FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS OF INDIAN LANDS AND RESERVATIONS

ca. 1914-19. 1 vol. 2 in.
Consists of lists of the areas of land surveyed and described in each of volumes 1-165 of the records described in entry 313; with a few notations for higher numbered volumes. The information is entered in the guide (apparently compiled during the period 1914-19) in the same order as the volumes are numbered and arranged. Also included is an alphabetical index, chiefly to names of reservations or other geographic locations, giving volume references (and, sometimes, page references) in the field notes. This index is for all the volumes, not only the first 165.

313. BOUND FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS OF INDIAN LANDS AND RESERVATIONS.

1832-1919. 287 vols. 45 ft.
Surveyors' records of the results of surveys - mainly cadastral but some astronomical ones. Most of the surveys were conducted under the supervision of the General Land Office. In addition to the notes themselves, some of the volumes include copies of correspondence and other documents. Arranged numerically by number assigned to the volume; but some numbers are missing and there are some unnumbered volumes. The numbers were assigned apparently after the volumes had already been arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of State or Territory. The volumes for each reservation are usually together. In the higher numbered volumes (chiefly for more recent surveys) the geographical arrangement is no longer followed. For finding aids for these records, see entries 311 and 312. For other field notes, see entries 314, 315, and 317-321. Additional field notes have been retained by the Bureau, and there are others among the records of the former General Land Office (in Record Group 49).

314. UNBOUND FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS OF INDIAN LANDS AND RESERVATIONS.

1910-40. 6 ft.
These notes are essentially a continuation of the series of records described in entry 313, although there is some overlapping of dates. Arranged by State, thereunder by reservation, and thereunder by location of land.

314A. APPRAISAL REPORTS.

1960-1974.
Reports are arranged alphabetically by agency, area, or reservation. They were compiled for the Branch of Real Estate Services of the Land Division of the BIA. These land appraisals contain such information as legal descriptions, location, land value, mineral rights, flood history, history of the property, assessed valuation and taxes, description of the land, improvements, highest and best use, and fair market value. (new entry)

315. FIELD NOTES OF ANCIENT AND MISCELLANEOUS SURVEYS.

1797-1887. 10 in.
These records were once bound as volumes 299-302 of the field notes described in entry 313. They consist of notes of early surveys and also of some more recent ones that were not voluminous enough for a separate volume. Many of the notes are enclosures to incoming letters. They have been kept in the same order as that in which they were formerly bound, but no pattern for this order has been discerned. A list of the notes, with references to related correspondence, is included with the records.

316. INDEXES TO FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS AND RESURVEYS OF BAD RIVER RESERVATION IN WISCONSIN.

1915-17. 2 vols. 1 in.
Incomplete indexes to names of settlers. They were prepared to accompany the field notes described in entry 317. Entries indicate the tracts held by individual settlers. There is some duplication between the two volumes; each, however, contains names not found in the other. In one volume there are entries under each letter of the alphabet. Although the second volume includes entries under only the letters A-M, it is a more complete index for those letters.

317. FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS AND RESURVEYS OF BAD RIVER RESERVATION IN WISCONSIN (Chippewa Indians).

1915-17. 29 vols. 9 in.
Surveyors' notes, including some plats. Tracts of individual settlers are sometimes indicated. There are also some loose notes, blueprints, and other documents. Arranged by township. For indexes, see entry 316.

318. PHOTOGRAPHS AND FIELD NOTES OF SURVEYS OF THE NAVAJO RESERVATION.

1903. 1 in.
Mounted photographs and field notes of surveys relating to proposed irrigation work along the San Juan River. These records are enclosures to a report that was submitted by Superintendent of Irrigation George Butler. The report (file no. "31060-03") is among the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). A map submitted with the report is among the cartographic records of the Bureau. Arranged by enclosure number.

319. FIELD NOTES OF SURVEY OF THE THURSTON LAKE STORAGE RESERVOIR.

1900. 1 vol. 1 in.
Consist of tables giving measurements of the reservoir as well as dams, canals, and other features in the reservoir area located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming (Shoshoni and Arapaho Indians).

320. SURVEYOR'S REPORT CONCERNING WYANDOT LANDS IN KANSAS.

1858. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Consists of field notes with facing plats of a survey of allotments made under a treaty of 1855 and conducted by John H. Millar. Included are copies of Millar's instructions, contract, oath of office, and other records. Entries are arranged by location of land.

321. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS CONCERNING SURVEYS.

1838-88. 1 in.
Included are correspondence, memoranda, reports, and field notes. Some of these records were withdrawn from the general incoming correspondence series (entries 79 and 91); others are copies. Most of the records are dated after 1853. Arranged chronologically.

322. MAPS OF STATES SHOWING INDIAN CESSIONS AND MILITARY LANDMARKS.

n.d. 1/4 in.
Printed maps of States, with penciled notations showing Indian land cessions. Included are a few maps showing military establishments, battle sites, and other places of interest. On some of the maps no notations were made. The maps were printed in 1839, 1841, and 1855; there is no indication, however, of the dates when the notations were made. Arranged in two sets: one for maps showing land cessions and one for maps showing military landmarks. The maps in each set are arranged by geographical location of State.

323. MAP OF PART OF INDIAN TERRITORY.

n.d. Negligible.
A hand-drawn map of the part of Indian Territory located between the Canadian River and the North Fork of the Canadian River and extending east and west from the 96th meridian.

324. MAPS OF INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

1911-16. 1/2 in.
Printed maps prepared by the Bureau. The map of Rosebud Reservation is annotated. Arranged alphabetically by name of reservation.

325. REFERENCE BOOK FOR INDIAN RESERVATIONS IN WESTERN STATES.

n.d. 1 vol. 3 in.
A complete entry for a reservation consists of a map or plat, a brief sketch of the history of the reservation, and abstracts of incoming and outgoing correspondence of the Bureau for the years 1855-75 relating to the reservation. All these features are not included for every reservation. There are a few notations of later date. Entries are arranged by State in the following order: Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, and Colorado. At the end of these entries there are additional ones (chiefly maps and plats) for California Mission reservations. There is an alphabetical index to names of reservations.

326. "SKETCHES OF AGENCIES."

ca. 1868-70. 1 vol. 2 in.
Drawings of agency grounds and buildings, and printed and hand-drawn maps and plats of reservation areas. Arranged alphabetically by name of agency.

327. SUMMARY DESCRIPTIONS OF INDIAN AGENCIES AND SCHOOLS.

1904-6. 10 in.
Consist of data sheets, with maps and clippings from annual reports and other publications. Information is given concerning location, transportation and communication facilities, population, military posts, physical features, agriculture, school facilities, buildings, employees, and other pertinent subjects. Included is some information relating to Indians not under an agency and to Bureau field offices (such as warehouses) not in charge of any Indians. Arranged alphabetically by name of State and thereunder by name of agency or school.

328. LIST OF PASTURES ON OSAGE AND KAW RESERVATIONS IN OKLAHOMA.

1900. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
A list prepared by Engineer Charles F. Leech. For individual tracts are given name of occupant, his status as tribal citizen or lessee, acreages of various types, quality rating, and sometimes other pertinent information. Entries in the list are arranged by number assigned to tract by location on a map submitted with the list. This map is among the cartographic records of the Bureau maintained separately from the textual records (Map No. 1721, entry 163).

329. LETTERS RECEIVED RELATING TO ALLOTMENTS AND CERTIFICATES.

1871-87. 2 in.
Mainly letters transmitting receipts for certificates of allotment. These letters have been segregated from the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entries 79 and 91). In some cases there is only a cross-reference or transmittal letter, but often included are the receipts themselves. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt.

330. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED RELATING TO ALLOTMENTS.

1907-9. 1 vol. 2 in.
Given are file references for incoming letters concerning allotments, patents, surveys, and related subjects. Arranged in alphabetical sections by name of person or by subject.

331. INSTRUCTIONS TO ALLOTTING AGENTS.

1892-1909. 1 vol. 2 in.
Copies of letters sent by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to allotting agents giving them instructions for specific assignments. There is an alphabetical index by name of agent or reservation or by subject.

332. RECORD OF APPLICATIONS FOR ALLOTMENTS.

1908-18. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given for individual applications are name of applicant, file reference, decision on entitlement, and sometimes an application number. The dates given above are those of the references rather than of the compilation of the volume. Entries are arranged by name of tribe in no discernible order, but there is an alphabetical index to names of tribes. The entries for each tribe are arranged in rough chronological order.

333. APPLICATIONS BY MOHAVE INDIANS FOR ALLOTMENTS OUTSIDE A RESERVATION.

1908-10. 5 in.
Copies of General Land Office forms submitted by those Mohave Indians living in Arizona and California who applied for an allotment from the public lands on the ground that no reservation had been provided for them by treaty, act of Congress, or Executive order. Arranged by number assigned in rough chronological order by date of application.

334. RECORDS CONCERNING CHEMEHUEVI ALLOTMENTS IN CALIFORNIA.

1910. 1/2 in.
Applications for allotments, arranged chronologically; a schedule of allotments, arranged by location of land; and plats, arranged by location of land. These records were submitted by Special Allotting Agent William Williams in connection with nonreservation allotments made by him to individual Chemehuevi Indians.

335. REGISTERS OF CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING CERTAIN PERSONS.

1915-22. 8 vols. 6 in.
Entries give file references for incoming letters in the general classified correspondence (entry 121) relating to certain persons and concerning chiefly allotments and heirship cases. There are some entries relating to other subjects. Some indication of the handling of the letter within the Bureau is usually given. The first volume, covering the period March 15-September 14, 1915, is arranged chronologically. Thereafter there is a volume for each year from 1915 through 1921. There are some entries for 1922 in the 1921 volume. Entries in each of these volumes are arranged, in alphabetical sections, by initial letter of surname of person; thereunder the arrangement is chronological, usually by date of filing.

336. LETTERS SENT RELATING TO LAND ALLOTMENTS.

1920-26. 2 ft.
Copies of letters sent by the Bureau and usually signed by the Chief Clerk. Included are copies of enclosures and related documents, particularly copies of letters sent by the Office of the Secretary of the Interior. Arranged for the most part in rough chronological order. Documents relating to a particular subject, however, are often grouped together.

337. GUIDE TO ALLOTMENT VOLUMES.

ca. 1910-27. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
For the reservations in each State are given the approximate locations by direction from principal meridians and references to pertinent tract books, indexes, and schedules. There are also notations concerning the types of patents held and remarks concerning the holding of the land (mainly the extension of trust periods). The dates given above are those of notations made in the volume; the original date of compilation has not been determined. Entries are arranged alphabetically by name of State. Many of the volumes cited have been retained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. For those volumes in the National Archives, see entries 339, 340, and 343.

338. REFERENCE BOOK FOR ALLOTMENT VOLUMES.

n.d. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Consists primarily of cross-references, but included is other information concerning land allotments. Many of the volumes cited have been retained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Entries in the volume are arranged alphabetically, for the most part by name of reservation.

339. INDEXES TO ALLOTMENTS.

n.d. 8 vols. 6 in.
Given for individual allotments are name of allottee, usually the allotment schedule number, and references to tract books. There are volumes for the Cheyenne River, Leech Lake Agency (3), Round Valley, Shoshone, Turtle Mountain, and Yankton Reservations. Entries in each volume are arranged, in alphabetical sections, by name of allottee. In some of the volumes the entries in sections are divided into Indian names and English names or are arranged by geographical locations. Some of the tract books to which there are references are among the records described in entry 340; other tract books and the allotment schedules have been retained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

340. TRACT BOOKS.

ca. 1857-1912. 51 vols. 10 ft.
These volumes show allotments made on Indian reservations under various lavs and treaties. The contents of the volumes vary somewhat. Some information is given for each subdivision - at least the location. Given for individual allotted tracts are the English and/or Indian name of the allottee, information concerning the approval and issuance of the patent, and sometimes the valuation of the land. There are a few notations dated as late as 1920. Arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of reservation or tribe. For some reservations there are several volumes. Within each volume the entries are arranged by tract of land. For finding aids, see entries 337 and 338. For other tract books, see the records relating to trust lands.

341. PLATBOOKS.

1858-1923. 23 vols. and unbound papers. 3 ft.
Platbooks mainly concerning reservations, but including some concerning oil lands and coal lands. Most of the plats show individual allotments. The volumes vary in their contents. Sometimes included are blueprints, overlays, photostats of General Land Office records, or penciled plats. Arranged by name of reservation, generally in alphabetical order but with some variation to accommodate the different sizes of volumes. Entries in each volume are arranged by location of land. For other plats, see entries 334, 342, 347, 396, and 642. See also tract books (entry 340) and allotment schedules (entry 343). Many platbooks have been retained by the Bureau.

342. PLATS OF INDIAN TERRITORY.

1897-1900. 14 vols. 1 ft.
Printed plats of the lands of the Five Civilized Tribes, compiled by the Geological Survey. Individual tracts are not shown. Some corrections, dated 1900 or 1901, were made in red ink. Two volumes of the set are missing. Arranged by name of tribe and thereunder by location of land. For other plats, see entry 341.

343. ALLOTMENT SCHEDULES.

1856-1935. 46 vols. and unbound papers. 5 ft.
Chiefly schedules showing the land allotments of individual Indians, but including some schedules of land set aside for special purposes, such as schools, missions, agency buildings, and cemeteries. Included also are some unapproved schedules of selections. With some of the schedules there are plats, affidavits, and correspondence. Entries for individual allotments usually give name of allottee, some personal information (such as age, sex, and position in family), and location and acreage of the allotment. Information is sometimes given concerning the issuance of the patent. Arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of tribe, reservation, or geographic location; but there are some modifications to accommodate varying sizes of volumes. Some of the volumes also include schedules for more than one tribe. The individual schedules are usually arranged by allotment number. These numbers were sometimes assigned in alphabetical order by name of allottee or in chronological order, but usually there is no discernible pattern to their sequence. Some of the volumes include alphabetical indexes to names of allottees. For separate allotment schedules and lists of selections, see entries 334, 344-348, 389, and 444. For tract books showing individual allotments but arranged by location of land, see entry 340. For platbooks, see entry 341.

344. SCHEDULE OF SURVEY OF ALLOTMENTS IN THE REDDING, CALIF., LAND DISTRICT.

1903. 1/4 in.
Prepared by Special Allotting Agent William E. Casson as part of an investigation for the purpose of making adjustments in the non-reservation allotments to individual Indians in the district. Entries for individual allotments give allotment number; name of allottee; location of land; information concerning the character of the land, improvements, and settlement; tribal affiliation of allottee; recommendation; and other pertinent information. Entries are arranged by allotment number.

345. ALLOTMENT SCHEDULE SHOWING VALUE OF TIMBER ON WHITE EARTH RESERVATION IN MINNESOTA.

1907-33. 3/4 in.
Records additional allotments to individual Chippewa Indians under the provisions of an act of April 28, 1904 (33 Stat. 539). Individual entries show original and additional allotment numbers, location, acreage, date of approval of allotment, volume and value of pine timber, value of the allotment excluding and including the timber on the date of the act, and value of the timber and allotment on the date of approval. The dates given above are those of approval of allotments rather than of the compilation of the schedule. Entries are arranged by additional allotment number. There are other White Earth allotment schedules among the records described in entry 343.

346. NUMERICAL LIST OF ALLOTMENTS FOR THE WHITE EARTH RESERVATION IN MINNESOTA.

ca. 1911. 1 Vol. 3/4 in.
A list of individual allotments giving original and additional allotment numbers, degree of allottee's Indian blood, and date of his death (if applicable). No names of allottees or descriptions of land are given. Arranged by original allotment number. For White Earth allotment schedules, see entries 343 and 345.

347. SCHEDULE AND PLATS OF UNAPPROVED ALLOTMENTS FOR THE MOQUI RESERVATION IN ARIZONA.

1911. 1 vol. 2 in.
A schedule and plats for tentative allotments made by Special Allotting Agent Matthew M. Murphy to individual Hopi (Moqui) Indians on the reservation but not approved by the Bureau. The entries in the schedule for individual allotments give allotment number; name of allottee and his sex, age, and position in family; location and acreage of land; and sometimes other information. Arranged by allotment number. The plats are arranged by location of land.

348. SCHEDULES OF ALLOTMENTS AND APPRAISEMENTS FOR NEW YORK INDIAN LANDS IN KANSAS.

1860, 1873. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Two copies (in somewhat different form) of a schedule of allotments made in 1860, arranged by location of land and numbered in order; and an 1873 appraisement, arranged by location of land.

349. SCHEDULES RELATING TO HOMESTEAD ENTRIES BY WINNEBAGO OF WISCONSIN.

1873-95. 1 vol. 1 in.
Transcripts of tract books; schedules of entries arranged alphabetically by name of entryman; and supplementary schedules, including a loose copy. They were prepared in connection with an investigation conducted by M. A. Mess of the General Land Office. The several schedules give information concerning the location and entry of the tracts of individual Winnebago, later actions, and other pertinent matters.

350. SCHEDULES OF INDIAN HOMESTEADS ON WHICH TRUST PERIOD WAS DUE TO EXPIRE.

ca. 1915-17. 1 vol. 3 in.
Comprise a record of homesteads of Indians not living on a reservation on which the trust period was due to expire in 1916 or 1917. Given for individual homesteads are name of State or Territory, name of land office, location and acreage of land, name of allottee, and information concerning the patent; and often included are the Gate of expiration of the trust period, references to records, and other information. Entries are arranged by the year in which the trust period was due to expire and thereunder in order of entry in another volume not located among the records of the Bureau now in the National Archives.

351. SCHEDULES CONCERNING SURVEYING AND ALLOTTING.

1907-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Chiefly two types of schedules. One type is a record of payments made -- mainly to agents -- showing for individual payments the name of the person to whom payment was made, date, authority number, amount appropriated, amount authorized, and balance remaining. The other type is an abstract of weekly reports by allotting agents, giving a statistical account of their accomplishments and expenditures. Included are some other schedules (largely fragmentary) concerning allotments approved, patents issued, family history cards, and other subjects. Also included are some file references to records. Arranged by type of schedule and thereunder for the most part by name of reservation. For a later reference volume concerning expenditures for surveying and allotting, see entry 352.

352. LEDGER OF EXPENDITURES FOR SURVEYING AND ALLOTTING.

1912-14. 1 vol. 1 in.
A record of expenditures on individual reservations and also by some individual employees under surveying and allotting appropriations. Entries give reason for expenditure, amount, date, and references to pertinent correspondence. Arranged by account (chiefly for individual reservation); the accounts are for the most part in rough alphabetical order. There is an alphabetical index by name of person or reservation or by subject. For an earlier reference volume concerning expenditures for surveying and allotting, see entry 351.

353. REFERENCE BOOK CONCERNING ALLOTMENTS.

n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given are references to records of the Bureau and to laws, treaties, and other sources of information concerning various matters relating to allotments. There are references to sources dated from 1838 to 1916. Arranged, in alphabetical sections, by subject.

354. NOTES CONCERNING ALLOTMENTS ON RESERVATIONS.

1921. 1 in.
Drafts of compilations of information concerning the status of patents on several reservations. Information is given concerning applicable laws, treaties, Executive orders, and proclamations. There are also references to pertinent records of the Bureau and to congressional documents. Most of the notes concern the Cheyenne River, Fond du Lac, Fort Hall, Lac du Flambeau, Salt River, Shoshone (Wind River), Tongue River, Turtle Mountain, and Winnebago Reservations. Included also are some notes concerning powersites and irrigation on the Flat-head and Walker River Reservations. Arranged alphabetically by name of reservation.

355. COPIES OF DOCUMENTS RELATING TO ALLOTMENTS.

1875-1927. 3 in.
Photostatic copies of correspondence, lists, court opinions, appeals, congressional documents, Executive orders, deeds, and other documents. They relate mainly to disputes concerning allotments and often involving legal action.