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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


Records of the Hope Indian School

See the records of the Springfield Indian School.

Records of the Springfield Indian School

The Springfield School was established as an independent boarding school for girls in 1902. (From 1895 until 1902, as the Hope School, it had been attached to the Santee Agency; and before 1895 it had been a contract mission school.) In 1919 it was again named the Hope School. The school was discontinued on June 30, 1920. It was reopened from 1921 until 1923; but for this period there are no records of the school in the National Archives.

1363. REGISTER OF PUPILS.

1901-10, 1 vol. 1 in.
There are two sections in the register. One section, designated as "Descriptive Record of Students as Enrolled," corresponds with the record used in most of the Indian schools. Entries are arranged chronologically by date of pupil's enrollment. The other section, designated as "Individual Record," contains comments concerning the character, ability, and health of girl pupils and information concerning their lives after leaving the school. The early entries in this section are arranged alphabetically by surname of pupil and thereafter they are arranged in the same order as the entries in the first section of the volume. There is an alphabetical name index.

1364. ATTENDANCE RECORDS.

1909-14. 2 vols. 3/4 in.
These records were maintained by Josephine Hilton, a teacher. There is a daily record of the presence or absence of each pupil. For 1909 there is a record for only part of 1 month. For the school year 1910-11 there is also a section consisting of summaries and academic ratings for pupils.

1365. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1902-16. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, position, salary, former occupation, sex, age, race, marital status, birthplace, residence, place of employment, dates of service, and other pertinent information. The rosters cover varying periods of time, frequently a fiscal year. Arranged chronologically. See also the rosters of school employees that were maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 979).

1366. DESCRIPTIONS OF BUILDINGS.

1918. 3/4 in.
Prepared on standard forms. There is a separate sheet for each building. Included with the description are a valuation of the building and a record of money spent on it. Also included is a photograph of the building. There is also a separate general statement.

1367. RECORD OF ISSUES TO EMPLOYEES AND LEDGERS OF STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS.

1916-20. 2 vols. 3 in.
For 1916-17 there is a record of goods issued to employees, arranged by title of employee's position. For 1917-20 there are ledgers for deposits and withdrawals from accounts maintained for personal funds of individual students. Some sales slips from local stores are inserted. The accounts are arranged by fiscal year and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of first transaction. The entries for individual accounts are arranged chronologically. There are alphabetical name indexes for some years.

1368. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1907-17. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and amount received or disbursed under different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

1369. LEDGERS AND REGISTERS.

1917-20. 2 in.
An appropriation ledger, a register of storehouse issues, a register of disbursement vouchers, a register of collection vouchers, a register of miscellaneous transactions, recapitulations of registers, a check register, a cash register, and cost ledgers. In two binders.

1370. MESS ACCOUNTS.

1904-20. 1 vol. 1 in.
Accounts for the employees' mess. For each month there is an account of disbursements for supplies and receipts from payments for meals. Included are some minutes of meetings. The accounts are arranged chronologically.

Records of the Wittenberg Indian School

The Wittenberg School at Wittenberg, Wisc., which had been a Lutheran mission school since 1887, was established as a Government nonreservation boarding school in 1895. From 1899 through 1910 the school superintendent also acted as agent for the Winnebago Indians living in Wisconsin; and included with the records of the school is one volume (entry 1376) that relates to agency business. The school was discontinued in 1917.

1371. LETTERS SENT.

1909-10. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. Arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. No other volumes of letters sent have been found.

1372. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1895-1909. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, sex, race, age, marital status, position, salary, former occupation, birthplace, residence, place of employment, tribes for whom employed, dates of service, and other pertinent information. The rosters cover varying periods of time, but chiefly fiscal years. Arranged chronologically, except that for the later years there is also a breakdown by kind of position held by employee. See also the rosters of school employees that were maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 979).

1373. DESCRIPTIONS OF BUILDINGS.

1915. 3/4 in.
Prepared on standard forms. There is a separate sheet for each building. Included with the description are a valuation of the building and a record of money spent on it.

1374. CASHBOOKS.

1896-1909. 2 vols. 3 in.
Contain statements of receipts of cash and property and of issues and expenditures. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; the entries for each are arranged chronologically.

1375. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1907-17. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and amount received or disbursed under the different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

1376. RECORD OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS OF THE WINNEBAGO OF WISCONSIN.

1891-1903. 1 vol. 1 in.
There are two rolls -- one for births and one for deaths. Entries for individual newborn children give roll number, parents' family register number, name of child and names of parents, date of birth, sex, ages of parents, and degree of Indian blood and tribal allegiance of parents. Entries for individual deceased persons give roll number, name, age, sex, date of death, marital status, and information concerning a living relative. The individual entries on each roll are in rough chronological order and are numbered consecutively. The dates given above are those for the births and deaths recorded, not of compilation of the rolls. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

Records of Other Field Offices

1377. CORRESPONDENCE OF SPECIAL AGENT ALFRED B. MEACHAM.

1878-79. 1 in.
Chiefly letters and telegrams received and copies of those sent by Meacham and his clerk, Israel G. Vore. Arranged chronologically. Meacham was in charge of making annuity payments to several tribes in Indian Territory. Included is an 1882 letter concerning his accounts as chairman of the Modoc Commission. Meacham was also superintendent of the Oregon Superintendency from 1869 to 1872.

1378. CASHBOOK OF J. E. BRECHT, INDUSTRIAL TEACHER AND SPECIAL DISBURSING AGENT FOR THE SEMINOLE INDIANS IN FLORIDA.

1892-99. 1 vol. 2 in.
Contains statements of receipts and disbursements of funds. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; the entries for each are arranged chronologically. Entries for receipts include notations concerning work performed by employees, appointments, sales of property, and receipt of bids.

1379. CORRESPONDENCE OF HERBERT J. HAGERMAN, SPECIAL COMMISSIONER TO THE NAVAJO INDIANS.

1923-32. 4 ft.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent. Included are some photographs, leases and other legal documents, reports, minutes, and blueprints. Arranged in part by name or office of correspondent and in part by subject and thereunder chronologically. There are papers of Hagerman, chiefly for the period of his service as Special Commissioner, in Record Group 316, Private Papers Given to the National Archives.

Cartographic Records Maintained Separately From the Textual Records

1380. MAP OF THE UTE MOUNTAIN JURISDICTION OF THE CONSOLIDATED UTE RESERVATION IN COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO.

1935. 1 item.
A published map showing drainage features, boundaries, elevations, a reservoir, roads and trails, wells, communication lines, buildings by type or use, and patented and entered lands.

RECORDS OF THE BOARD OF INDIAN COMMISSIONERS

By an act of Congress of April 10, 1869 (16 Stat. 40), the President was authorized, at his discretion, "to organize a board of commissioners, to consist of not more than ten persons, to be selected by him from men eminent for their intelligence and philanthropy, to serve without pecuniary compensation ..." He could assign to the Board joint control with the Secretary of the Interior over the disbursement of any part of the appropriations that were made available for the Indian Service by the act. The President established the Board of Indian Commissioners by an Executive order of June 3, 1869. Under provisions of this order the Board was given the right to inspect the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, to visit and inspect superintendencies and agencies, to be present when goods were purchased for the Indian Service and to inspect the goods, and to make recommendations on matters pertaining to the administration of Indian affairs.

The Board's inspection of purchases was made mandatory by an act of July 15, 1870 (16 Stat. 360). Between 1870 and 1882 the Board was also responsible for auditing the accounts of the Bureau.

An act of May 17, 1882 (22 Stat. 70), provided that "hereafter the commission shall only have the power to visit and inspect agencies and other branches of the Indian service, and to inspect goods purchased for said service, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs shall consult with the commission in the purchase of supplies."

The extent of the Board's authority was the subject of a continuing controversy. In practice, the Board remained subordinate to the Secretary of the Interior and the Bureau of Indian Affairs in controlling the administration of Indian affairs. In its later years the Board limited its activities chiefly to inspections and surveys and to making recommendations. It was abolished by an Executive order of May 25, 1933.

One of the members of the Board served as Chairman. The Board employed a Secretary, who sometimes was also a member of the Board, and a small clerical staff. Since the Board members served on a part-time basis, the Secretary provided the continuity in the Board's work. He conducted most of the correspondence, and he maintained the records of the Board.

Marshall Moody's "A History of the Board of Indian Commissioners and Its Relationship to the Administration of Indian Affairs, 1869-1900" (unpublished M.A. thesis, American University, 1951) is based largely on the records of the Board. A copy is available in the National Archives.

1381. MINUTES OF BOARD MEETINGS.

1869-1915. 1 vol. 2 in.
These minutes were handwritten until 1910 and thereafter they were typed. Arranged chronologically. There is a brief index.

1382. MINUTES OF BOARD MEETINGS.

1869-1933. 3 vols. 6 in.
Chiefly processed copies, but including some typed copies. Arranged chronologically. The second volume includes an alphabetical subject index. In the back of the third volume are a copy of the Executive order abolishing the Board and lists of members, Secretaries, and Chairmen of the Board.

1382A. ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE BOARD OF INDIAN COMMISSIONERS

1925-32.
Arranged in chronological order. Represented here are the 56th through the 63rd volumes in a series. The reports were addressed to the Secretary of the Interior and all are under 50 pages. Each annual report briefly covers a wide range of topics. Some are related to agency-wide issues while others focus on a specific tribe or reservation. There are numerous abridged reports prepared by members of the Board as a result of field trips to reservations around the country. Copies of each report are included. (new entry)

1383. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1870-72. 5 vols. 1 ft.
These original letters are pasted into volumes. There are letters from members of the Board, the Secretary of the Interior, officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, representatives of religious organizations, businessmen, and others. The letters relate to a wide variety of subjects concerning the activities of the Board and Indian affairs in general. Letters in the first volume are arranged in rough chronological order by date of letter. The other volumes contain the letters received during a certain period of time; letters in these volumes are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer and thereunder chronologically. The fourth and fifth volumes form one alphabetical set. In the individual volumes there are alphabetical indexes to the names of letter writers. For other letters received during the years 1869-72 and for letters received during later years, see entry 1384. For letters sent by the Board, see entry 1385.

1384. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1869-99. 11 in.
Letters from members of the Board, the Secretary of the Interior, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, field officials of the Bureau, Members of Congress, other officials, representatives of societies, and others. The letters relate to meetings of the Board, purchases for the Indian Service, legislation, inspection trips, conditions among the Indians, land allotments, other aspects of Indian administration, missionary activities, appointments to the Board, and other subjects. Included are some memoranda, reports, and copies of letters sent. The letters received are arranged chronologically by date of letter; in a few cases the letters relating to a specific subject have been brought together. Most of the letters received during the years 1870-72 were pasted into volumes (entry 1383). For letters received after 1899, see entry 1386. For letters sent, see entry 1385.

1385. LETTERS SENT.

1870-91, 1893-1909. 14 vols. 2 ft.
Press copies and carbon copies of letters sent chiefly by the Secretary of the Board or an assistant, but including some letters sent by the Chairman. Occasionally letters received for the years 1903-9 have been inserted in the volumes. There are letters to members of the Board, the Secretary of the Interior, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, field officials of the Bureau, Treasury Department officials, Members of Congress, other officials, representatives of religious organizations, newspaper editors, and others. They relate to inspection trips by Board members, accounts examined by the Board, Indian policy and administration in general, missionary activities, requests for information, administrative matters, and many other subjects. Arranged for the most part chronologically. During the years 1873-76 letters concerning the examination of accounts were kept in separate volumes from the other letters. In most of the volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. In some of the volumes there are notations on letters of page numbers of other letters to the same addressee. There are no letters for the periods March-June 1877 and April-November 1878. After 1909, copies of letters sent were no longer kept in press copy books but were interfiled with the letters received (see entry 1386). For the letters received during the years in which the press copy books of letters sent were maintained, see entries 1383, 1384, and 1386.

1386. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE.

1899-1918. 6 ft.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent -- with some memoranda, reports, circulars, minutes, clippings, and other records -- relating to many aspects of the activities of the Board and Indian affairs in general. The records are divided into the following sections principally according to name of correspondent but sometimes according to subject:

Board Members and Employees, 1899-1918
Members of Congress, 1904-13
Tribes and Jurisdictions, 1900-18
Field Officials, 1901-12
Washington Officials, 1900-15 [with some 1873-74 letters from the President]
Societies, 1901-13
Officials, 1913-15
Officials, 1915-18
Miscellaneous Persons, 1909-15
Miscellaneous Persons, 1915-18

Within each section the records are arranged alphabetically by name (sometimes initial only) of correspondent or by subject and thereunder for the most part chronologically. Since a letter may be filed either by name of correspondent or by subject, it is sometimes necessary to look in more than one section for a particular letter.

There are comparatively few letters before 1909. Until that year copies of letters sent were kept in press copy books (entry 1385). For earlier letters received, see entries 1383 and 1384. For later correspondence, see entry 1387. There is also correspondence among the records described in entries 1390, 1395, 1398, and 1399.

1387. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE.

1919-33. 9 ft.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent, but including some memoranda, reports, processed procedural material, clippings, and other records. Arranged by subject or by name of correspondent according to a decimal classification system. The major classifications and a few of the more important subheadings are as follows:

000.Board
  010. Members [mainly correspondence with individual members]
 040. Operations [mainly correspondence concerning meetings and recommendations]
 005. Reports [correspondence concerning reports; few reports themselves]
100.General
 111.1 Secretary's Office
 111.2 Indian Office
200.Personnel [correspondence with individual persons and organizations]
300.Tribes, Schools, and Reservations
400.Administration
500.Industrial, Lands, Buildings, Roads
600.Legislation, Morals, Religion
700.Education, Health
800.Supplies, Equipment, Finance
900.Miscellaneous

Most of the records are in the 010, 200, and 300 classifications and are arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent or by subject; thereunder they are arranged chronologically. The records in other classifications are arranged for the most part chronologically.

Since a letter may be filed either by name of correspondent or by subject, it is sometimes necessary to look in more than one classification for a particular letter. There are, however, many cross-references; and several copies of letters sent were often made and filed in various places. There are some records missing. For earlier correspondence, see entry 1386. There is other correspondence with the reference material (entry 1395) and with the records described in entries 1389-1394 and 1400.

1388. SPECIAL REPORTS.

1915-33. 10 vols. 2 ft.
Chiefly carbon copies of reports submitted by members and employees of the Board. Many of the reports contain general observations and recommendations based on visits to reservations and field units of the Bureau; but some of them relate to specific subjects. Included with some of the reports are photographs, maps, and other illustrations. The reports are arranged in rough chronological order. There is a table of contents in each volume. For unbound 1933 reports, see entry 1389.

1389. SPECIAL REPORTS.

1933. 2 in.
Copies of reports -- submitted by members of the Board -- concerning findings on field investigations. Included is some correspondence concerning the transmittal of reports. Arranged alphabetically by name of jurisdiction or tribe or by subject. For the main series of special reports, see entry 1388.

1390. MEMORANDA AND CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING BOARD RECOMMENDATIONS.

1916-33. 4 in.
Chiefly memoranda prepared for use during annual meetings of the Board. They concern recommendations made by the Board in its annual and special reports and the extent to which those recommendations had been carried out. There are some memoranda concerning reports as early as 1912. Included are letters received from and copies of letters sent to Washington and field officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The records are arranged for the most part chronologically. See also the 040 and 055 classifications of the general correspondence of the Board, 1919-33 (entry 1387).

1391. RECORDS CONCERNING INVESTIGATION OF ADMINISTRATION OF AFFAIRS OF THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES IN OKLAHOMA.

1925-26. 2 vols. and unbound records. 5 in.
Reports, letters received, copies of letters sent, memoranda, transcripts of hearings, minutes, and other records concerning an investigation conducted by a committee of the Board concerning, particularly, charges against the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and the Superintendent for the Five Civilized Tribes. Arranged in rough chronological order. There are copies of the two principal reports with the special reports described in entry 1388.

1392. RECORDS CONCERNING SCHOOL SURVEY.

1922. 6 in.
Replies by superintendents, principals, and teachers to a request for information sent by the Board -- with samples of children's work, copies of letters sent, and abstracts of replies. Except for some records of a general nature at the beginning of the series, the records are arranged alphabetically by name of jurisdiction. For records concerning other school surveys, see the reference material (entry 1395) and the records of the Education Division of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (especially entries 724 and 757).

1393. RECORDS CONCERNING LAW AND ORDER SURVEY.

1929-30. 4 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, synopses, drafts of bills, and other records relating to a survey made among field officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The information was needed for the preparation of recommendations for legislation. Opinions were sought particularly concerning the relative merits of the application of State or Federal laws on Indian reservations and concerning enforcement by State or Federal authority. Arranged in part chronologically, in part alphabetically by name of jurisdiction, and in part alphabetically by name of official.

1394. REPORTS OF PUEBLO LANDS BOARD.

1925-31. 7 vols. and unbound papers. 4 ft.
Copies of reports prepared by the Pueblo Lands Board -- with exhibits (chiefly maps) and correspondence concerning transmittal of reports. The Pueblo Lands Board was established in conformance with an act of Congress of June 7, 1924 (43 Stat. 636), to investigate the ownership of lands within the external boundaries of lands granted or confirmed to the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. The act required the Pueblo Lands Board to submit a set of its reports to the Board of Indian Commissioners. For each pueblo there are usually a set of four reports and one or two supplemental reports. Arranged alphabetically by name of pueblo and thereunder for the most part by report number or chronologically. The seven volumes are shelved separately.

1395. REFERENCE MATERIAL.

ca. 1875-1933. 4 ft.
Included are reports, memoranda, correspondence, bulletins, circulars, periodicals, clippings, press releases, copies of bills and other congressional documents, and other printed material from both Government and private sources. Much of the correspondence was originally in the general correspondence of the Board (entries 1386 and 1387). The material is arranged by subject and thereunder for the most part in rough chronological order. The material relates to the following subjects: Accounting, Act (Indian), Alienation of Land, Allotments, American Indian Bulletin, American Indian Defense Association, American Indian League, Art Board Bulletins, Citizenship, Committee of 100, Courts and Judges, Eastern Association, Eastern Indian Survey, Education, Farming, Forests, Friends (Quakers), Funds, General, General Education Board, General Federation of Women's Clubs, Health, Historical, Indian Service, Irrigation, Leaders, Marriage Legislation, Memoranda, Missions, Missionary Study, Moral Conditions, Non-Reservation Schools, Peyote, Population, Reports, Returned Students, Schools (Sectarian), Soldiers, Status (Legal), Supplies, Taxation Report Data, and Warehouses.

1396. NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS.

1871-84. 5 vols. 7 in.
These clippings concern Indian matters and are pasted into scrapbooks. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1397. NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS.

1924-33.6 vols.1 ft.
Mounted clippings relating to various aspects of the activities of the Board and to Indian affairs in general. Arranged by subject and thereunder in rough chronological order.

1398. RECORDS CONCERNING THE WORK OF THE PURCHASING COMMITTEE.

1910-15. 1/2 in.
The Committee handled the duties of the Board concerning the purchase of supplies for the Indian Service. These records consist of letters received, copies of letters sent, reports, memoranda, and other records.  Arranged chronologically.

1399. CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING EXCEPTIONS TO ACCOUNTS.

1911-19. 5 in.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent -- with some memoranda, vouchers, printed regulations, and other records. The correspondence is divided into correspondence of a general nature and correspondence relating specifically to the accounts of F. H. Abbott as Secretary of the Board. Within each group the letters are arranged alphabetically by name or office of correspondent and thereunder for the most part chronologically. For later records concerning accounts, see entry 1400.

1400. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS.

1919-33. 2 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, financial statements, certificates, vouchers, journal vouchers, ledgers, payrolls, requisitions, trial balance sheets, estimates and justifications, reports, memoranda, inventories of property, and other records relating to accounts, appropriations, personnel matters, and other subjects. Arranged alphabetically by subject, thereunder by subheadings, and thereunder for the most part chronologically. There are some headings for offices with which there was correspondence. Most of the records are for the years 1932 and 1933.

RECORDS OF THE INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board was established in the Department of the Interior in 1936, and it is still in operation. Its purpose is to promote the development of Indian arts and crafts and the expansion of markets for them. Members of the Board serve on a part-time basis without compensation. A Business Manager (originally a General Manager) directs the Board's actual operations.

There is only one series of records of the Board now in the National Archives. This series relates to a 1941 exhibit of Indian art at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. The exhibit was prepared under the direction of the Board.

1401. RECORDS RELATING TO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART EXHIBIT.

1939-41. 2 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, drawings, photographs, identification placards, lists, and other records relating to the collection of exhibits, the organization of the display, publicity, administrative matters, and other subjects. Arranged mainly by subject but in part by type of record.

1402. BRANCH OF RELOCATION SERVICES INTERNAL MEMORANDA

1957-61.
Arranged in chronological order. There are no records for 1959 present. The memos originated in the Branch of Relocation Services which was charged with facilitating the relocation of Indians to urban areas. The memos were most often addressed to Field Relocation Officers and Area Directors. Some were of a purely administrative nature. However, many deal with program activities such as assessments of job markets in various cities, the logistics involved in the physical relocation process, and reports on evaluations of programs such as Adult Vocational Training. (new entry)

1403. WEEKLY REPORTS OF RELOCATIONS AND APPLICATIONS IN PROCESS

1958-61.
Arranged in alphabetical order by name of area office or field relocation office. Most records are for Fiscal Year 1961 except for Navajo (FY 1960), Muskogee Area Office (FY 1960 only), Western Washington (FY 1960 only), and Wisconsin Within State (FY 1958-FY 1960). There is no narrative, the reports consist of solely of Form 5-414. The individual data reported on this form are: date, name, tribal affiliation, agency of origin, file number, type of service (code), and unit identity. There are also aggregate statistics listing cumulative totals from previous week, total for current week, and a running total for the fiscal year. Starting in early 1961, the aggregate statistics were complicated by a change in Form 5-414 that required much greater detail. Reports for 1960 also list applications in process. (new entry)

1404. OFFICE FILES

1949-61.
Arranged into several sub-series. The first, comprising boxes 1-11, is arranged numerically by new decimal code number. The remaining sub-series (boxes 12-15; 16-18; 19-21; and 22-24) are unarranged with file folder lists for each. These are somewhat confusing in that the old decimal file numbers are not always crossed out and new decimal number are not always annotated. Consists of extensive correspondence, memos, reports, and press clippings covering all facets of the relocation program. A significant amount of the records deal with relations with non-governmental organizations and the press, showing the high profile nature of the program. The correspondence with organizations concerns advice, assistance, and sometimes criticism of the program. Correspondence with the press and media relate to coverage of the relocation process, including television documentaries. Many memos relate to the coordination of efforts between the central office and the field relocation offices. At the end are unnumbered files consisting of visual aid projects on such topics as "How to Apply for a Job", "Your Food Dollar", and "Your Child in Public School". These were intended for instructional purposes in preparing Indians still on reservations or those newly arrived in cities for their new lives in urban areas. (new entry)

1405. NARRATIVE REPORTS

1952-54 and 1957-60.
Arranged in chronological order by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by area office or field placement office. The monthly reports are generally divided into sections on: 1) staff visits; 2) contacts with employment agencies, employers, or labor organizations; 3) contacts with organizations and community leaders; 4) contacts with Indians; 5) problems encountered; and 6) major accomplishments. However, the reports are not standardized across time and areas. They are supplemented by statistical reports, press clippings, brochures, proceedings of conferences, and some annual reports. Included are memos on staff visits to reservations for the purpose of facilitating the process. There is extensive correspondence and memoranda on the placement process and issues related to relocation. Adult Vocational Training Services and contacts with employers are major topics. For 1958-60, there are also lists of scheduled and unscheduled relocations and statistical activity summaries. On occasion, personal testimonies by the Indians themselves are included. The reports for the Los Angeles office include 1955-56. (new entry)

1406. PLACEMENT AND STATISTICAL REPORTS

1949-54.
Arranged in chronological order by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by area office or field placement office. For Fiscal Years 1950 & 1951, and to a lesser extent for FY 1952, the reports are extracted from the Central Classified Files, especially the (032) file series. Form 5-411 the "Monthly Statistical Placement Form" is the most common report format. This form categorized job placement into a list of industries and further broke down placement by whether the information was (I) secured from state employment services, (II) secured from other sources, or (III) whether placement office participated directly. The report also distinguished between total number of placements and those considered permanent. The form varied across time and across area. The reports for FY's 1950-51 are more likely to contain additional narrative information. The latter reports also include the "Report of Assistance Expenditures - Placement". The correspondence is generally associated with the forwarding and revising of reports. There is also some general information on the relocation program and other administrative records. This series supplements the narrative reports in Entry 1376B. (new entry)

1407. TRAINING COST STUDY FORMS

1958.
Arranged into numerous sub-series, generally by area office or field relocation office. Consists almost exclusively of Form 5-647 "Adult Vocational Training Record" in card format. Each card contained information on a single individual listing name, an alphanumeric identification code, address, agency, tribe, date entered, date completed, course objective, date discontinued - reason, and six month employment history. On the reverse was a Grant Record that documented the cost of origin/destination services for the trainee such as subsistence enroute, tuition, and shipment of household goods. Trainees who completed the program were listed on white cards - yellow cards represented those who were discontinued. The series was collected in accordance with a memorandum from the Commissioner ordering a "Cost Study for Adult Vocational Training Services." (new entry)

1408. RELOCATEE CARDS

ca. 1958-59.
Arranged in alphabetical order by surname. Cards are typewritten and in the 3" X 5" format. In addition to the names, there are generally two alphanumeric or numbered codes. These apparently represent the city relocated to and the agency from whence they came. A date is usually at the right hand corner (probably indicating when the card was completed). Occasionally, "Drop In" is typed at the top center of the card. Those cards bearing colored tabs had additional information added to them by hand at a later date. Cards for Nelson Lewis through Raymond Longbone are misfiled under "Q". (new entry)

1409. CORRESPONDENCE AND REPORTS RELATING TO EMPLOYMENT OF INDIANS

1940-44.
Essentially unarranged. Consists of correspondence, memoranda, and reports regarding the Indian employment issue. According to a note at the front, the series was originally part of the papers of Frederick H. Daiker, an Assistant to the Commissioner. Daiker transferred it to Charles Miller in July 1957 as a reference tool. It covers some of the Bureau's early employment and relocation efforts. The topics are varied. Among the ones with substantial amounts of records are: the agricultural labor situation in Arizona, the use of Japanese evacuees as farm laborers, Indian women workers, a study conducted by Kathryn Mahn in 1942 that surveyed reservations, and a 1944 study by Daiker on seasonal and permanent employment. (new entry)

1410. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE REPORTS RELATING TO RELOCATEES

1951-56.
Arranged in chronological order. These reports, part of the Branch's (721.166.71) files, document the effort to provide financial assistance to Indians to facilitate the relocation process. Consists mainly of correspondence between Branch headquarters staff, field placement officers, area directors, and reservation relocation officers (charged with preparing relocatees for leaving the reservation). Some of the information provided is specific to individual Indians but most covers policy and procedures on financial assistance at the general level. (new entry)

1411. VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR TERMINAL TRIBES AND APPRENTICESHIP POLICY MATERIAL

1954-58.
Essentially unarranged. Records focus on tribes whose relationship with the federal government was proposed for termination. The tribes covered are: the Alabama and Coushatta of Texas, the Klamaths, the Menominees, and the Pauites and Uintah & Ouray of Utah. An Adult Education and Training Program was authorized by Congress for these tribes. There is extensive correspondence and memoranda regarding the complicated legal issues of how much support for adult education and vocational training should the tribes receive and what would be the criteria for deciding. There are also reports on fact-finding trips to reservations by BIA staff and policy statements on the program. Separate files specific to agencies or tribes that have information on individual Indians are included. There are also results from a survey of apprenticeship ordered by a 1958 memorandum from Charles Miller. (new entry)

1412. AUDIT REPORTS ON FIELD OFFICES

1957-59.
Arranged into two sub-series. The first, administrative inspections of field relocation offices, consists of two reports: one for Cincinnati and one for Joliet, IL. These were conducted by Administrative Officers who noted deficiencies and problems, inventoried supplies, and compiled a detailed summary of the office's accomplishments and costs. These audits are in the form of narrative reports and were given file code (721.208.3). The second sub-series consists of audits of field relocation offices in Cincinnati, Joliet, Saint Louis, and Waukegan, IL by BIA auditors. They focus on obligations and disbursements of funds for relocation programs. Deficiencies were noted and correspondence with the field relocation officers is included which sometimes takes exception to the findings of the audit. This sub-series was given the file code (721.208.1). (new entry)

1413. MINNEAPOLIS AND TUCSON STUDY REPORTS

1955-57.
Unarranged. Consists primarily of reports by Kent Fitzgerald, Relocation Representative, who was detailed to different cities to conduct studies on the progress of the relocation program. He prepared a "Survey of Situation of Indians of Minneapolis, Jan. 20-Mar. 30, 1956". This study contained recommendations and had as its conclusion that improving the socioeconomic conditions on reservations was critical to improving the Indians' chances of success in the city. There is also a November 1956 report entitled "The Minnesota Indian in Minneapolis - A Report of the Indian Committee" by the Community Welfare Council of Minneapolis covering some of the same subject matter. Fitzgerald prepared a report of similar length and breadth on the Papago Indians living in Tucson, AZ. A small report by Jack Womeldorf, Relocation Officer for the Intermountain School in Utah, regarding his detail to several agencies (San Francisco FRO and Navajo sub-agencies) is also included. All the reports were given the file code (721.508). (new entry)

1414. FINANCIAL PROGRAM

1953-54 and 1956-59.
Arranged in rough chronological order. Consists of all manner of financial records relating to the funding the relocation process. The bulk of the series consists of Fiscal Year 1959 Financial Program Files (code 721.21) for all area offices, the central office, and field relocation offices. These contain correspondence between central office staff, staff in the field, and the Chief of the Branch of Budget and Finance. There are detailed sheets listing financial needs and revisions. Also included are: a 1959 Preliminary Budget; a proposal for establishing agent cashiers at field relocation offices; financial program records broken down by cost account symbol; a summary financial program for the Branch of Industrial Development for FY 1959; a 1959 appropriation summary and outline of branch functions; and files on A.V.T.S. Financial Program for FY 1959. (new entry)


END.