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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


Records of the White Earth Agency

The White Earth Agency was the successor to the Chippewa Agency, which was established in 1851. The Chippewa Agency had been responsible for the Chippewa Indians living in Minnesota. It was moved to the White Earth Reservation in 1872. In 1873 a separate agency was established for the Red Lake Chippewa; and in 1874 a separate agency was established at Leech Lake for the Pillager and Lake Winnebigoshish Chippewa living in that area and the Chippewa of the Mississippi living at White Oak Point. The Chippewa Agency at White Earth then had charge of the other Chippewa of the Mississippi (including those living at Mille Lacs), the Otter Tail Pillagers, and the Pembina Chippewa. Beginning in 1878 the name "White Earth Agency" was used instead of "Chippewa Agency." In 1879 the Red Lake and Leech Lake Agencies were consolidated into the White Earth Agency. The White Earth Agency was not subordinate to any superintendency.

In 1899 a separate agency was again established at Leech Lake. It was responsible for the Leech Lake, Cass Lake, Lake Winnebigoshish, White Oak Point, and Red Lake Chippewa (except those who had moved to the White Earth Reservation). The White Earth Agency was responsible for White Earth, Gull Lake, Removal and Non-removal Mille Lac, Removal White Oak Point, Pembina, Removal Fond du Lac, Otter Tail, Removal Leech Lake, and Removal Cass and Winnebigoshish Chippewa. Most of these Indians lived on the White Earth Reservation. The term "Removal" denotes Indians who had moved from ceded reservations to White Earth, mainly under the direction of the Chippewa Commission. In 1922 the White Earth Agency was abolished, and the Indians were assigned to the new Consolidated Chippewa Agency.

With the records of the White Earth Agency there are also records of the Chippewa Commission, Special Agent John H. Hinton, examiners of inheritance, and some of the schools under the supervision of the agency.

For records of field employees of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency who were stationed on the White Earth Reservation, see entries 1061-1063.

1244. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1878-79. 1 vol. 3 in.
Original letters. Arranged chronologically. For later letters, see entries 1246 and 1247. For letters sent to the Commissioner, see entries 1246, 1248, 1250-1252, and 1254.

1245. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1892-1908, 1913-20. 4 vols. 5 in.
The information given in the entries for individual letters ranges from the letter number and subject only to considerable detail concerning dates, subject, and action taken. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt of letter. There is an alphabetical subject index in two of the volumes. For the period 1908-13 there are registers in the volumes of copies of letters received (see entry 1247). For original letters received, see entry 1246.

1246. CORRESPONDENCE.

1885-1922. 19 ft.
Chiefly letters received and, particularly after 1914, copies of letters sent. Included with the correspondence are some annuity payment rolls, affidavits, receipts, application forms of different types, lists, minutes, and other records. There are a few letters dated earlier than 1885. Arranged in part by subject (such as land, logging, heirship, annuity payments, or education) and thereunder in rough chronological order, and in part chronologically by time periods of varying length and thereunder alphabetically by initial letter of surname of correspondent. Some correspondence of Superintendent John H. Hinton during his earlier service as special agent is with these records, and some of his correspondence is separate (entry 1293). For other correspondence of the White Earth Agency, see entries 1244 and 1247-1255.

1247. COPIES OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1908-14. 15 vols. 1 ft.
Press copies of letters from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and other officials in the Bureau and including some from the office of the Secretary of the Interior. Included are letters to Indians and others, which were routed through the agency office and relate mainly to applications for land patents. The last two volumes are almost illegible. Arranged chronologically. There is a chronological register or an alphabetical subject index in all the volumes except the last one. For original letters received from the Bureau, see entries 1244 and 1246. For copies of letters sent to the Bureau, see entries 1246, 1248, 1250-1252, and 1254.

1248. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1885-1914. 37 vols. 4 ft.
Press copies. Included are some letters sent to other Washington officials. There are some volumes missing. Some volumes are almost illegible. Arranged chronologically. In many of the volumes there is an alphabetical subject index. For other letters sent to the Commissioner, see entries 1246, 1250-1252, and 1254. For letters received from the Commissioner, see entries 1244, 1246, and 1247.

1249. LETTERS SENT TO THE U.S. DISTRICT ATTORNEY AT ST. PAUL.

1907-8. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. They relate chiefly to legal cases concerning transfers of land and removal of timber. Included are copies of statements of facts in the cases and some other related documents. Arranged chronologically.

1250. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS CONCERNING SALES OF INHERITED LAND.

1905-7. 1 vol. 2 in.
Press copies. Arranged chronologically.

1251. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS TRANSMITTING APPLICATIONS OF INDIAN ALLOTTEES FOR FEE SIMPLE PATENTS.

1908-10. 2 vols. 3 in.
Press copies. With the letters are copies of the applications, affidavits, and other supporting documents. Arranged chronologically by date of letter. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of allottees. There are earlier and later letters transmitting applications and other letters concerning patents with the letters sent concerning land (entry 1252).

1252. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING LAND.

1907-14. 17 vols. 2 ft.
Press copies of letters and enclosures sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Indian allottees and heirs, local officials, and others. They relate to the issuance of patents, changes in allotments, inheritance of land, land sales, Indians without allotments, timber cutting, and other subjects. One volume is almost illegible. During 1907 and the early part of 1908 these volumes were used chiefly for letters to the Commissioner transmitting applications for fee simple patents. During the period 1908-10 these letters were copied in separate volumes (entry 1251). Arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to names of addressees, and sometimes to subjects, in all the volumes except the last one. Before 1907 most letters sent concerning land were copied in the main series of letters sent to the Commissioner (entry 1243) and in the miscellaneous letters sent (entry 1255). For other letters sent concerning land, see entries 1246, 1249-1251, and 1253. For letters received, see entries 1246 and 1247.

1253. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING HEIRSHIPS.

1914. 1 vol. 1 in.
A few press copies of letters, most of which are illegible. They are probably arranged chronologically. See also the letters sent concerning land (entry 1252).

1254. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING EDUCATION.

1907-8. 4 vols. 5 in.
Press copies of letters sent to school superintendents and principals, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, businessmen, parents, and others. They relate to general school policies and progress, individual pupils, employees, supplies, buildings, and other subjects. Arranged chronologically. In the individual volumes there are alphabetical indexes to names of addressees. Letters sent, for other periods, concerning education are with the main series of letters sent to the Commissioner (entry 1248), the miscellaneous letters sent (entry 1255), and the general correspondence (entry 1246). For letters received, see entries 1246 and 1247.

1255. MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS SENT.

1878-80, 1883-85, 1891-1914. 90 vols. 9 ft.
Press copies of letters sent to school superintendents, other agency employees, officials of other jurisdictions, Indians, lumber companies, bankers, other businessmen, and others, and occasionally to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs or other Washington officials. They relate to annuity and other payments to Indians, land, education, health, law and order, logging, enrollment, employees, supplies, buildings, accounts, and many other subjects. Arranged for the most part chronologically. For the period 1893-1900 two volumes were in use at one time. For 1893-98 one volume contains chiefly letters to agency employees. For 1898-1900 an attempt was made to place all letters relating to logging in one volume. There is one volume (December 1903-January 1904) with only a few letters -- all relating to education. In many of the volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. For most of the letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, see entry 1248. For letters sent to the U.S. District Attorney at St. Paul, 1907-8, see entry 1249. For some periods there are separate letter books for letters relating to particular subjects (entries 1250-1254). For letters received and later letters sent, see entry 1246.

1256. STUBS OF CERTIFICATES TO ACCOMPANY APPLICATIONS FOR LAND CERTIFICATES.

1875-88. 1 vol. 3 in.
Stubs for forms sent by the agent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs certifying that an applicant was a member of the tribe of Chippewa of the Mississippi and had made the improvements necessary to entitle him to a certificate for a tract of land, in conformance with the provisions of article 7 of the treaty of March 19, 1867. Shown on the stubs are the certificate number, name of Indian, location and amount of land, name of agent, and date that the certificate was sent to the Commissioner. Arranged chronologically by date the certificate was sent. Few of the certificates were used; and there are many blank certificates and stubs in the volume.

1257. APPLICATIONS FOR ALLOTMENTS.

1892-98. 5 in.
Forms submitted by Chippewa Indians who wished to be allotted a particular tract of land. Arranged by name of band and thereunder in rough chronological order.

1258. ALLOTMENT SCHEDULES.

ca. 1901-15. 3 in.
Schedules of land allotted to individual Indians and of some land set aside for special purposes. Arranged in rough chronological order. Some of the schedules are not dated. The individual schedules are arranged for the most part by allotment number. For other White Earth schedules, see the records of the Chippewa Commission (entry 1307) and records of the Land Division of the Bureau (entries 343, 345, and 346).

1259. INDEXES TO NAMES OF ALLOTTEES.

ca. 1906. 4 in.
Three alphabetical indexes -- arranged by surname or Indian name of allottee -- that give various allotment numbers. Two of the indexes are not dated; the third index is for the year 1906.

1260. RECORDS RELATING TO INVESTIGATION OF ALLOTMENTS.

1909. 4 in.
Copies of abstracts of testimony, lists of Indians, abstracts of lands sold, and other records prepared by Inspector E. B. Linnen and Special Agent Warren K. Moorehead to accompany a report of September 30, 1909, to the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Arranged by type of record.

1261. LOGGING CONTRACTS.

1890-1908. 3 in.
Approved contracts between Indians and timber contractors for the Indians to furnish timber to the contractors. Included are some contracts for advances of funds, some powers of attorney, and other related documents. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1262. TIMBER CONTRACTS.

Feb. 1914. 3 in.
Approved contracts between Indian allottees and the Nichols-Chisholm Lumber Company for the sale of timber on allotments. Arranged by location of land. For certificates of completion of contracts, see entry 1263.

1263. CERTIFICATES OF COMPLETION OF TIMBER CONTRACTS.

ca. 1914-17. 1 in.
Certificates, not signed, for sales of timber from allotments to the Nichols-Chisholm Lumber Company. Arranged roughly by location of land. For contracts, see entry 1262.

1264. "PENCIL ROLLS" FOR ANNUITY PAYMENTS.

1881-99. 1 ft.
Preliminary rolls and checklists for use in making annuity payments. Most of the rolls are for an annual payment to members of one band. Arranged chronologically. There is little discernible order to the listing of names on the individual rolls; persons living under one chief are often listed together and thereunder members of one family are also usually listed together. Few of these rolls are duplicated among the annuity payment rolls described in entry 1265.

1265. ANNUITY PAYMENT ROLLS.

1880-1907. 2 ft.
Agency copies of rolls and rolls sent to Washington and returned to the agency. Most of them are for back payments. Arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of band and thereunder chronologically. There are some unidentified rolls. There is usually no discernible order to the listing of names on individual rolls; members of one family are usually entered together and the entries are numbered. Not all of these rolls are duplicated among the annuity payment rolls maintained by the Washington office of the Bureau (entry 906).

1266. RECEIPT ROLLS FOR GOODS ISSUED TO INDIANS.

1874-85. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual issues give date, name of Indian and his mark, and the amount of different kinds of goods. Arranged mainly by name of tribe or band and thereunder chronologically.

1267. ISSUE BOOKS.

1881-95. 2 vols. 4 in.
Records of goods issued to Indians. Entries for individual issues give date, name of Indian and sometimes name of tribe, and the amount of different kinds of goods. Arranged chronologically.

1268. APPLICATIONS FOR LUMBER.

1901-2. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of the answers to questions -- probably asked orally -- that were given by Indians who wanted lumber. On the applications there are also notations of the decisions of the agent. Arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to names of Indians.

1269. REPORTS OF FIELD MATRONS.

1910-15. 1/4 in.
Prepared on forms and submitted monthly or quarterly. Arranged chronologically.

1270. MEDICAL REPORTS.

1895-96, 1910-16. 1 in.
Monthly and quarterly sanitary reports of diseases and injuries (1895-96) and a few semiannual reports (1910-16) submitted by agency and school physicians. Arranged chronologically.

1271. DEATH CERTIFICATES.

1903-7. 1 in.
Agency forms; arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or Indian name of the deceased. There are also two State of Minnesota forms, dated 1915; and some 1921-22 stubs for burial permits; arranged chronologically.

1272. POLICE AND COURT RECORDS.

1902-7. 2 vols. 3 in.
Records of arrests, charges, civil suits, court findings, sentences, and other police and court actions. Arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical name index in the first volume. In the back of the second volume there is a list of fines paid, 1904-5.

1273. POLICE RECORDS.

1908-14. 1 vol. 1 in.
Records of arrests, charges, and actions concerning prisoners (usually discharge from jail). There are no records of court proceedings as in the earlier police records (entry 1272); there are, however, some entries concerning police force personnel actions. Arranged by name of individual Indian in chronological order by date of first entry. The entries for each individual are arranged chronologically. There are a few pre-1908 entries. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

1274. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1883-1909. 2 vols. 4 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, sex, race, age, marital status, position, previous occupation, birthplace, residence, place of employment, tribes for whom employed, dates of service, salary, and other information. The rosters cover different periods of time. They are arranged chronologically, with subdivisions by name of reservation on which employee worked and by type of position. For rosters of White Earth Boarding School employees, 1908-17, see entry 1292. See also the rosters of employees that were maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 978).

1275. CASEBOOKS.

1875-78, 1881-1907. 9 vols. 1 ft.
Statements of receipts and disbursements of funds. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; and the entries for each are arranged chronologically. There is a separate volume for timber transactions, 1898-99.

1276. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1907-11. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements of funds give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and amount received or disbursed under different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

1277. SCHOOL REPORTS.

1898-1916. 2 ft.
These reports were prepared on forms. They were submitted monthly and quarterly by officials and teachers of Indian schools. The quarterly reports contain information concerning individual pupils. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1278. APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLMENT IN NONRESERVATION SCHOOLS.

1907-18. 1 ft.
Copies of forms retained by the agency, sometimes in rough form; the originals were sent to the several schools. They contain information concerning the parents and past schooling of the applicants. With some of the forms there are medical reports, certificates of transfer, correspondence, or other records. Arranged for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of surname of applicant.

1279. SCHOOL CENSUS REPORTS.

ca. 1914-18. 2 in.
Prepared on forms that were to be completed annually by the agency superintendent. They give information concerning both children in school and those not in school. Arranged for the most part chronologically by date of preparation and thereunder by different groups of children.

1280. REPORTS OF ATTENDANCE OF INDIAN PUPILS IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

1914-18. 2 in.
Mainly prepared on standard forms submitted monthly, quarterly, and annually by public school officials and teachers. They give information concerning individual pupils. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1281. QUESTIONNAIRES CONCERNING FORMER STUDENTS.

ca. 1914-15. 2 in.
Give information concerning the later life of Indians who had attended Indian schools. Most of them seem to have been completed by the Indians themselves. Few of them are dated. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of Indian.

1282. QUESTIONNAIRES CONCERNING SCHOOL FACILITIES.

1914-15. 1 in.
Three sets of completed mimeographed forms that had been sent by the agency superintendent for completion by parents. They give information concerning the schools available for individual Indian children. Arranged chronologically.

1283. MISCELLANEOUS SCHOOL FORMS.

1886-1918. 1 in.
"Descriptive statements of children," "statements of arrival and departure of pupils," reports concerning children eligible for transfer to nonreservation schools, enrollment cards, reports on homes visited by teachers, and other records. There are usually only a few forms of each type. Arranged by type of form and thereunder chronologically.

1284. LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE WILD RICE RIVER BOARDING SCHOOL.

1905-15. 1 in.
Included are some copies of letters sent and some menus. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1285. LETTER BOOK OF NICODEMUS B. HURR.

1909-10. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies, chiefly of personal letters of Mr. Hurr, who was principal of the Pine Point School. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the White Earth Boarding School

1286. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1914-18. 1 in.
Arranged in rough chronological order.

1287. LETTERS SENT.

1901-11, 1914-16. 9 vols. 9 in.
Press copies. Included in one volume is a study program. Arranged for the most part chronologically. In two of the volumes there is a brief alphabetical subject index.

1288. LETTERS SENT.

Feb.-July 1917. 1 in.
Carbon copies. Arranged chronologically.

1289. CLASS SCHEDULES AND STUDY PROGRAMS.

1910-18. 1 vol. and unbound papers. 4 in.
Weekly, monthly, and annual study outlines, programs, and calendars. Included are some detail assignment lists and menus. Arranged in rough chronological order. Some of the records are not dated. Some records are not identified as White Earth School records and may be those of other schools.

1290. REGISTER OF PUPILS.

1901-3. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual pupils may give date of entrance, name, age, degree of Indian blood, state of health, residence, name of parent, and sometimes other information. Some of these items are frequently omitted, however, especially during fiscal year 1903. Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder divided into entries for boys and for girls; entries for each are arranged alphabetically by surname. There is an alphabetical name index.

1291. ATTENDANCE BOOKS.

1912-18. 3 vols. 1 in.
Contain attendance records for each pupil. Included for some periods are recapitulations and information concerning grades, promotions, and other matters. Arranged for the most part chronologically.

1292. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1908-17. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, sex, race, age, marital status, position, previous occupation, birthplace, residence, dates of service, salary, and other information. The rosters cover varying periods of time and are arranged chronologically. See also the rosters of employees of the White Earth Agency, 1883-1909 (entry 1274), and the rosters maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 979).

Records of Special Agent John H. Hinton

1293. CORRESPONDENCE.

1910-14. 3 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent. Most of the correspondence is with the agency superintendent. Hinton was appointed to assist in the investigation of fraudulent alienation of Indian allotments, but some of the correspondence concerns other subjects. The correspondence is arranged in rough chronological order. Hinton later became agency superintendent. With the regular agency correspondence there is correspondence for the period when he was special agent (entry 1246).

Records of Examiners of Inheritance

1294. CORRESPONDENCE OF EXAMINERS OF INHERITANCE.

1915-21. 1 ft.
Mainly carbon copies of letters sent, but including some letters received. (The examiners stationed at White Earth sometimes handled heirship cases at other agencies, particularly Leech Lake.) The correspondence is arranged for the most part by year and thereunder alphabetically by initial letter of surname or official position of correspondent.

1295. HEIRSHIP DOCKET BOOKS.

1911-21. 3 vols. 4 in.
Entries give dates of actions taken concerning the determination of heirs of deceased Indians. Arranged by name of Indian in rough chronological order by date of first action. The entries for each case are arranged chronologically. There are alphabetical name indexes in the individual volumes.

1296. WORK MATERIAL OF EXAMINERS OF INHERITANCE.

ca. 1915-20. 2 in.
Transcripts of testimony, affidavits, schedules, data sheets, and other records concerning individual cases. Many are carbon copies. Arranged in rough chronological order.

Records of the Chippewa Commission

The Chippewa Commission was established in 1889 to carry out provisions of an act of Congress of January 14, 1889 (25 Stat. 642). This act required the President to appoint a commission of three members to negotiate with the Chippewa bands or tribes in Minnesota for the cession and relinquishment of all their reservations, except White Earth and Red Lake, and for the reduction of these two reservations to the area actually needed by the Indians. The individual Indians could choose between receiving an allotment in severalty on their old reservation or moving to White Earth. The Commission was also to direct the removals and the making of the necessary allotments. It was also required to compile a census of the Indians. The Indians agreed to the cessions, but most of them decided to remain on their old land. In 1896 the Commission was reduced to one member; and it was discontinued in 1900. The last Commissioner transferred the records of the Commission to the White Earth Agency.

1297. CORRESPONDENCE.

1889-1900. 5 in.
Chiefly letters received, but including carbon copies of letters sent. The correspondence is with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Secretary of the Interior, members of the Commission, Indians, and others. It concerns removal of Indians, enrollment, land allotments, administrative matters, and other subjects. Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are separate documents -- flat and folded. Sometimes correspondence with a particular person is fastened together. For other letters sent by the Commission, see entries 1298-1301.

1298. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHAIRMAN.

1893-1900. 7 vols. 8 in.
Press copies, chiefly of letters sent by the Chairman of the Commission and, after June 10, 1896, by the single Commissioner. Arranged chronologically. In the first two volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. For other letters sent by the Commission, see entries 1297 and 1299-1301. For letters received, see entry 1297.

1299. LETTERS SENT BY THE DISBURSING OFFICER.

1891-97. 5 vols. 5 in.
Chiefly press copies of letters sent by the Commissioner who served as Special Disbursing Officer for the Commission, but including some press copies of letters sent by other Commissioners and the clerk. For the years 1891-94 the letters are arranged chronologically. For the years 1894-97 there are separate volumes for letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and for letters sent to others; but many of the letters are in the wrong volume. One volume contains only a few letters, copied out of order. For other letters sent by the Commission, see entries 1297, 1298, 1300, and 1301. For letters received, see entry 1297.

1300. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHAIRMAN TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

May-Dec. 1892. 1/2 in.
Carbon copies. Arranged chronologically. For other letters sent, see entries 1297-1299 and 1301.

1301. LETTERS SENT FROM LEECH LAKE.

1894-96. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies of letters that were sent chiefly by the allotting agent employed by the Commission, but including some letters that were sent by Commissioners. Arranged chronologically. For other letters sent by the Commission, see entries 1297-1300. For letters received, see entry 1297.

1302. ENROLLMENT RECORDS.

1891-99. 1 in.
Affidavits, petitions, transcripts of testimony, and correspondence concerning individual applications for enrollment as Chippewa Indians. Arranged alphabetically by surname of applicant.

1303. PROCEEDINGS IN ENROLMENT CASES.

1897-99. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies of transcripts of testimony and of decisions of the Commissioner. Arranged chronologically.

1304. CENSUS ROLLS.

1889-97. 8 in.
Copies of rolls submitted to the Bureau, preliminary rolls, lists of omitted names, supplementary rolls, lists of deductions, and copies of older rolls used by the Commission. Some of the rolls are copies prepared for the use of other officials. Most of the rolls are for individual bands. Some of the rolls are unidentified. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of compilation. There are other copies of some of the rolls among the Irregularly Shaped Papers of the central office records of the Bureau (entry 310).

1305. REGISTER OF ARRIVALS OF INDIANS.

1891-99. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual Indians who were moved to the White Earth Reservation give date, name, position in family, age, name of chief in whose band the Indian was formerly enrolled, place where he had been located, and sometimes other information -- particularly variations in name. Arranged by name of reservation from which Indian was removed and thereunder chronologically. Family groups are listed together, and individual entries are numbered in order. There is an alphabetical index to names of reservations.

1306. RECORD OF ISSUES.

1891-99. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given for issues of goods to Indians are date, kind and amount of goods, voucher number, and quarter of year. Arranged by name of Indian in rough chronological order by date of first issue. The entries for issues to each Indian are arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to names of Indians.

1307. ALLOTMENT SCHEDULES.

1892-99. 3 in.
Schedules of land allotted to individual Indians who belonged to particular bands. Included are some plats and an appraisement schedule. Arranged for the most part chronologically by date of compilation. Some of the rolls are undated. The individual rolls are arranged by allotment number. See also the allotment schedules among the records of the White Earth Agency (entry 1258), the Leech Lake Agency (entry 1085), and the Land Division of the Bureau (entries 343, 345, and 346).

1308. TRACT BOOK.

1898. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual tracts of land allotted to Indians give date of allotment, name of allottee, and location of land. Arranged by township. There is an alphabetical index to names of allottees.

1309. LAST WILLS AND TESTAMENTS OF INDIANS.

1896-1900. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies. Included is a schedule of homes built for Indians who had been moved. The last wills and testaments are arranged chronologically by date of recording. There is an alphabetical name index.

1310. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1892-99. 1 vol. 2 in.
There is a roster for each quarter. Entries for individual employees give name, sex, race, marital status, position, previous occupation, birthplace, residence, salary, dates of service, and other information. Arranged chronologically.

1311. ACCOUNT BOOK.

1891-1900. 1 vol. 1 in.
Statements of the United States in account with the Commissioner acting as disbursing officer. Arranged chronologically.

1312. CASHBOOK.

1894-1900. 1 vol. 2 in.
Statements of receipts and disbursements of funds. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages, and the entries for each are arranged chronologically.

Records of the Wichita Agency

See the records of the Southern Superintendency.

Records of the Winnebago Agency

See the records of the Northern Superintendency.

Records of the Wisconsin Superintendency

The Wisconsin Superintendency was established in 1836 with the creation of Wisconsin Territory from the western part of Michigan Territory. Wisconsin originally included the present States of Iowa and Minnesota and much of the Dakotas. With the creation of Iowa Territory in 1838, Wisconsin was reduced to the boundaries of the present State and that part of Minnesota east of the Mississippi River. Sauk and Fox, Sioux, Winnebago, Chippewa, Menominee, Oneida, Stockbridge, Munsee, Iowa, and other Indians lived in Wisconsin Territory.

The Territorial Governor served as ex officio superintendent throughout the existence of the superintendency. At first his headquarters was at Elk Grove; but in October 1836 he moved to Belmont and in 1837 to Mineral Point. These three towns are in the southwestern part of the present State of Wisconsin. Beginning in 1841 the superintendency headquarters was at Madison.

The Prairie du Chien Agency (Winnebago and Sauk and Fox Indians), St. Peters Agency, (Sioux of the Mississippi), and Green Bay Agency (Menominee and other Indians) and the Sioux, Ioway, Fort Winnebago, and Crow Wing (Chippewa of the Mississippi) Subagencies were originally assigned to the Wisconsin Superintendency. The Green Bay Agency and the Fort Winnebago Subagency previously had been assigned to the Michigan Superintendency and the other agencies and subagencies had been assigned to the St. Louis Superintendency.

In November 1836 the superintendent established a subagency at La Pointe for the Chippewa of Lake Superior living in Wisconsin (they were previously assigned to the Sault Ste. Marie and Mackinac Agencies in Michigan). The subagent was not formally commissioned, however, until the following year.

The Green Bay Agency was abolished on December 31, 1836; and the commanding officer at Fort Howard was designated to take charge of the agency's affairs. The following spring, however, a subagency was established at Green Bay.

Several changes were made in 1837. A separate Sac and Fox Agency was established. Prairie du Chien was reduced to a subagency, and the Fort Winnebago Subagency was consolidated with it. The Ioway Subagency was replaced by the Great Nemaha Subagency, which was assigned to the St. Louis Superintendency. The Sioux Subagency was abolished, and the Upper Missouri Agency was moved to the former location of the subagency. Both the Upper Missouri Agency and the Council Bluffs Subagency -- established for the United Band of Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi -- were located in Wisconsin Territory but were assigned to the St. Louis Superintendency.

Following the establishment of the Iowa Territory in 1838, the Sac and Fox Agency and St. Peters Agency were transferred to the Iowa Superintendency. At the end of 1840 the Prairie du Chien Subagency was moved to the Turkey River in Iowa; it was transferred to the Iowa Superintendency the following year.

The Crow Wing Subagency was discontinued in 1839, and the Indians were assigned to the La Pointe Subagency. By l84l, therefore, the Wisconsin Superintendency had charge of only the Green Bay Subagency for the Menominee, Oneida, Stockbridge, and Munsee Indians and the La Pointe Subagency for the Chippewa Indians in Wisconsin.

The Wisconsin Superintendency was abolished in 1848, when Wisconsin became a State. Thereafter the two subagents reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

See also the separate records of the Green Bay Subagency and the records of the Northern Superintendency.

1313. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1836-48. 7 in.
Chiefly letters received, but including some copies of letters sent, contracts, accounts, and other records. Arranged for the most part chronologically by date of letter. Some of the records -- other than letters received -- are at the end of the letters for a year. For the main series of letters sent, see entries 1315 and 1316.

1314. REPORTS OF AGENTS.

1836-46. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies. A few of the original reports are with the letters received (entry 1313). Arranged chronologically. For copies of letters sent to agents, see entry 1316.

1315. LETTERS SENT TO WASHINGTON OFFICIALS.

1836-48. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies of letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and other officials in Washington. Arranged chronologically. Included with the letters received (entry 1313) are also some copies of letters sent.

1316. LETTERS SENT TO AGENTS AND OTHERS.

1836-48. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies of letters sent to agents and subagents in the superintendency and to other superintendents, disbursing agents, Army officers, and others. Arranged chronologically. Other copies of , letters sent are with the letters received (entry 1313). See also the reports of agents (entry 1314).

1317. INDIAN TALKS AND COMMUNICATIONS.

1836-45. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies of council proceedings (particularly of the speeches made by Indians) and of letters, petitions, memorials, and other documents received from Indians. Arranged chronologically.

1318. ESTIMATES.

1836-46. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies, chiefly of annual estimates. There is not an estimate for every year. Arranged chronologically.

1319. CONTRACTS.

1838-41. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of contracts. Included are copies of bonds, specifications, and other related documents. The contracts are mainly for surveys, the construction Of buildings, and the breaking and fencing of land. They pertain chiefly to the Prairie du Chien Agency.  Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Wyoming Superintendency

The Wyoming Superintendency was established in 1868 with the organization of Wyoming Territory. Territorial officials, however, were not appointed until April 1869. The Territorial Governor at Cheyenne served as ex officio superintendent. During the period of the Wyoming Superintendency there was only one agency in Wyoming -- the Shoshone and Bannock Agency. It was a continuation of the Fort Bridger Agency, which had been assigned to the Utah Superintendency. It was responsible for the Eastern bands of Shoshoni and Bannock Indians. There were also Cheyenne, Arapaho, and Sioux Indians in Wyoming. The Wyoming Superintendency was discontinued in November 1870. Thereafter the agent reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

1320. LETTERS SENT.

July-Nov. 1870. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Press copies. Arranged, chronologically.

1321. ENDORSEMENTS.

Aug.-Oct. 1870. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of endorsements on letters received by the superintendent and referred to other officials, usually to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Arranged chronologically by date of endorsement.

Records of Nonreservation Schools Records of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School

The Carlisle Indian Industrial School at Carlisle, Pa., was established in 1879 and was closed in 1918. It was the first Government-operated nonreservation boarding school for Indians. An outstanding feature of the school was the "outing" system, which permitted students to live and work outside the school and to attend public school while still enrolled at Carlisle.

Although there are now in the National Archives more records of the Carlisle School than of any other Indian school, these records are very incomplete. There is very little correspondence, and there are serious gaps in other records. Most of the records relate to individual students. Since the school made some attempt to keep track of students after they left the school, the records may include information concerning a former student up to the time the school was closed. The school's records now in the National Archives were transferred to the central office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs when the school was closed; and some additions were made to these records while they were in the custody of the Bureau.

Carmelita S. Ryan's "The Carlisle Indian Industrial School" (unpublished Ph. D. dissertation, Georgetown University, 1962) is based largely on records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs now in the National Archives.

1322. INDEX TO LETTERS RECEIVED.

ca. 1905. 1 vol. 1 in.
An alphabetical index to names of addressees and subjects of letters. The letters themselves have not been located.

1323. LETTERS SENT.

Aug. 28-Oct. 22, 1900; Jan. 26-May 6, 1901. 2 vols. 3 in.
Press copies of letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, field officials of the Bureau, pupils and their parents, merchants, transportation agents, and others. The letters relate to enrollment and transportation of pupils, personnel matters, purchases of supplies and equipment, appropriations, and many other subjects. Arranged chronologically. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. Although there must have been many volumes of letters sent, these two volumes are the only ones known to be extant.

1324. REGISTERS OF PUPILS.

1890-1906. 2 vols. 5 in.
One volume is for the years 1890-1900; the other volume, for the years 1899-1906. Each volume is divided into several sections; and each section provides different information about individual pupils. The sections are designated as follows: "Descriptive Record of Students as Admitted," "Sent to Country Homes," "Discharged from School," "Death Record," and "Historical Record" (not used in the second volume). Entries in each section are arranged chronologically, except that those for boys may be separated from those for girls. There is an alphabetical name index in each volume. For a less detailed consecutive record of pupils enrolled for the years 1905-18, see entry 1325. For more information concerning individual pupils, see the folders and cards described in entries 1327-1330.

1325. CONSECUTIVE RECORD OF PUPILS ENROLLED.

1905-18. 1 vol. 1. in.
Entries for individual pupils give enrollment number, name, tribe, and date of entry in school. Entries for boys are separated from those for girls. Arranged by enrollment number, which was assigned in rough chronological order by date of enrollment. For earlier and more detailed registers of pupils, see entry 1324. For more detailed information concerning individual pupils, see the folders and cards described in entries 1327-1330.

1326. INDEXES TO STUDENT RECORDS.

1879-1918. 14 ft.
Slips for individual students, giving folder number for records concerning the student among those described in entry 1327, name, tribe, State of residence, sometimes class year, and some indication (usually incomplete) of the records available. There are also slips for students for whom there are only card records (see entry 1328). There are three sets of index slips: (1) slips, which are arranged by folder number; (2) slips, which are arranged alphabetically by surname of student; and (3) slips, which are arranged alphabetically by name of tribe and thereunder alphabetically by name of student.

1327. STUDENT RECORDS.

1879-1918. 53 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, applications for enrollment, cards designated as "Descriptive and Historical Record of Student," promotion certificates (including ratings in subjects), records of "outings," medical and dental records, form reports concerning post-school careers, records from other schools, information forms concerning eligibility for Federal aid, clippings, photographs, and other records concerning individual, students. The records relate to enrollment, transportation, progress at school, "outings," health, financial affairs, withdrawals from school, careers after leaving school, special problems, and other subjects. Quantity and type of records for individual students vary; there are, in general, more records for the later years than the earlier ones. A few post-1918 records, added after the records were transferred to the Bureau, relate mainly to requests for information. There are separate folders for individual students, which are arranged numerically in the same order as the numerical index described in entry 1326. Although there is some chronological and alphabetical pattern in the order of the folder numbers, it is necessary to use the alphabetical index (see entry 1326) to locate readily the records for a particular student. For separate card records, including some for students for whom there is no folder, see entries 1328-1330.

1327A. REPORTS ON EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS OF PUPILS, CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

1917-18.
Arranged in chronological order. Most of the series consists of "Reports on Examinations" with a separate sheet for each class. The classes are categorized as being primary, vocational, or pre-vocational courses. For each student is listed: name, sex, age, day's attendance, grades in English, grades in other subjects, a general average, and an action. On the reverse of the sheet is a summary that was not consistently filled out. The "Report on Promotions of Pupils", of which there is only one for the 1916-17 academic year, lists annual enrollment, enrollments for June, number of pupils examined, number of pupils passed, number conditioned, number failed, percentage passed per pupils examined, and percentage passed per annual enrollment. All of these statistics are broken down by gender. On the back of the form is a summary of pupils promoted. (new entry)

1328. STUDENT RECORD CARDS.

1879-1918. 6 ft.
Cards designated as "Descriptive and Historical Record of Student, enrollment cards, and cards concerning student's potential and actual employment after leaving Carlisle. In most instances these cards are for students for whom there is no folder among the records described in entry 1327. The cards are divided into two groups; in each group they are arranged alphabetically by surname of student. Similar cards are in the main series of student records (entry 1327). See also the student information cards and enrollment cards described in entries 1329 and 1330.

1329. STUDENT INFORMATION CARDS.

1879-1918. 10 ft.
Cards for individual students may give name, tribe, agency, age, degree of Indian blood, name of father, date of arrival at Carlisle, date of and reason for departure, time spent on "outings," trade, name of person to whom married, character rating, religion, date of death, and other information. The cards are divided into the following groups: girls, boys, graduates, dead graduates, dead girls, dead boys (cards for students with surnames beginning with letters L-Z are missing), and students enrolled in 1918. Thereunder they are arranged for the most part alphabetically by surname of student. A card for any one student will be found in only one group. Unlike the kinds of record cards described in entry 1328, many of which are filed with the student folders described in entry 1327, all extant cards are filed in this series. See also the enrollment cards (entry 1330).

1330. ENROLLMENT CARDS.

ca. 1897-1913. 2 ft.
Cards for individual students give name, tribe, date of entry, age, and information concerning room assignments, promotions, "outings," leaves, and other changes in status. Information given on the back of the cards includes ratings on conduct, application, class standing, and health. The cards are arranged into two general groups -- for boys and for girls, respectively -- with some smaller groups for those in special status. Thereunder they are arranged for the most part alphabetically by surname of student. For other records concerning individual students, see entries 1324-1329.

1331. ATTENDANCE BOOKS.

1884-91. 2 vols. 1 in.
These books are labeled "morning reports." For each day there is information concerning the number of pupils present, the number of pupils absent, and the reasons for absences. There are notations concerning individual pupils. In the second volume there is also some information concerning school employees.

1332. ENROLLMENT STATUS BOOK.

1898-1902. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
For each month there are symbol notations for each student. There are also written comments. Boys and girls are listed in separate sections; entries in each section are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of student.

1333. DATA CONCERNING FORMER STUDENTS.

ca. 1898. 1 vol. 2 in.
Given for individual former students are name, tribe, address, and some comment on his or her life after leaving Carlisle. Arranged by class year. For more detailed information concerning students after they left Carlisle, see the records described in entries 1327-1329.

1334. REGISTER OF APPLICATIONS FOR STUDENT WORKERS.

1885-90. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual applications give name of applicant, address, date of application or date of its receipt, date when work was required, and kind of work. Often included are the name and address of person given as reference, name of pupil selected, and other information. Applications for boys are entered on separate pages from applications for girls. Entries are arranged in rough chronological order by date of receipt of application.

1335. REGISTERS OF "OUTINGS."

1881-87, 1912-18. 4 vols. 5 in.
Individual entries give name of pupil, date of placement or of leaving school, name of patron and his address, date of return to school (when applicable), and sometimes other information. Entries for boys and those for girls are listed separately: entries for both are in the same volume for the years 1881-87, but they are in separate volumes for the later years. (There are two volumes for girls for the years 1912-18; there is a volume for boys for the years 1915-17.) The entries within each volume or part of a volume are arranged in rough chronological order by date of pupil's placement or of his leaving school. New lists, however, were started periodically, and names of pupils who had not yet returned to school were reentered in the register. In the individual volumes there are alphabetical indexes to names of pupils and of patrons.

1336. LEDGERS FOR STUDENT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS.

1890-1918. 10 vols. 2 ft.
Ledgers containing accounts of individual students as well as accounts for clubs and special funds. There is information concerning deposits and withdrawals, usually with an indication of the source or reason for each. Accounts for boys are in separate volumes from those for girls. There is a separate volume for special accounts. The accounts in each volume are in rough chronological order by date of first entry; the entries for individual accounts are arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes. Some of the volumes are missing.

1337. JOURNAL FOR PAYMENTS TO BOYS.

1908-12. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Given for individual payments are date, reason (usually wages or fare), name of boy to whom paid, and amount. Entries are arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

1338. JOURNAL FOR YWCA ACCOUNT.

1910-14. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
A record of credits and debits to funds of club. Entries are arranged chronologically.

1339. MINUTES OF THE INVINCIBLE DEBATING SOCIETY.

1894-1918. 3 vols. 4 in.
Minutes of meetings of the Society, which was composed of boys in the school. Arranged chronologically. There are rolls of members in . the front of each volume. In the first volume there are also a copy of the Society's constitution and a copy of its bylaws.

1340. ADDRESS BOOK FOR HOME LETTERS.

ca. 1894. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Contains names of students (sometimes on printed rosters) and names, addresses, and sometimes relationships of persons to whom students wrote.

1341. REGISTER OF VISITORS.

1909-17. 1 vol. 2 in.
A register that was signed by the visitors themselves. Each entry includes name and address of visitor and date of visit.

1342. RECORD OF SEWING ROOM SUPPLIES AND PRODUCTS.

1901-8. 1 vol. 1 in.
Included are inventories of supplies on hand and records of receipts, use of supplies, and distributions of finished products. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1343. RECORD OF ISSUE OF GOODS.

1905-6. 1 vol. 1 in.
A record for fiscal year 1906. Given are dates and amounts for issues of different kinds of goods. Entries are arranged by kind of goods and thereunder chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to kinds of goods.

1344. TIME BOOKS FOR EMPLOYEES.

1907-10, 1917-18. 2 vols. 2 in.
For each day there is a symbol notation indicating the presence or absence of each employee. For most periods there is also information concerning employee's pay rate and the amount he was actually paid. A few loose records concerning personnel matters have been inserted in one of the volumes. No time books have been found for the period November 1910-December 1916.

1344A. RECORDS RELATING TO CARLISLE SCHOOL - PERSONNEL.

Arranged in alphabetical order by surname, thereunder in reverse chronological order. Series consists of personnel files, some of which appear to be official personnel folders. Several recurring types of documents are found in each file. Efficiency reports, which were standardized forms filled out by supervisors, rated employees based on varied criteria and included a narrative comment section. Oaths of office and a personnel record that chronicled the individual's service and changes in position are included. There is also correspondence on changes of position and duty station, disputes, recommendations, and letters of resignation. Records are present for only five employees, three of whom held the position of superintendent of the school. (new entry)

1345. STATEMENTS OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1879-99. 3 vols. 5 in.
These volumes are labeled "Cash Books." Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages. Individual entries for receipts give date, source, usually the draft number, appropriation headings, amount under each appropriation, and total amount received. Individual entries for disbursements give date, name of person or firm to whom paid, voucher number (or other identification), appropriation headings, amount under each appropriation, and total amount disbursed. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are arranged chronologically. For similar records for the years 1907-17, see entry 1346. No similar records have been found for the period April 1899-June 1907.

1346. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS UNDER VARIOUS FUNDS AND APPROPRIATIONS.

1907-17. 3 vols. 5 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and amount received or disbursed under different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically. A loose alphabetical index to names of persons and firms has been inserted in the second volume. For similar records for the years 1879-99, see entry 1345. No similar records have been found for the period April 1899-June 1907.

1347. ANALYZED LIABILITIES AMD VOUCHERED EXPENDITURES.

1916-17. 1 in.
Given are figures concerning liabilities under different headings (such as employees and buildings). There are also monthly figures for vouchered expenditures. Arranged by appropriation item; thereunder there are "controlling sheets" on which the entries are arranged chronologically and "activity sheets" on which the entries are arranged by type of activity (such as administration, health, and education).

1348. APPROPRIATION LEDGER.

1917-18. 1 in.
Given are figures concerning debits and credits to appropriated funds. Entries are arranged by appropriation item and thereunder chronologically.

1349. CASH AND CHECK REGISTERS.

1917-18. 1 in.
Given is information concerning receipts and deposits of cash and also concerning deposits in and payments from U.S. Treasury checking account. There are two registers: a check register and a cash register. Entries in each register are arranged chronologically.

1349A. "THE RED MAN AND HELPER", PUBLISHED AND PRINTED BY THE INDIAN SCHOOL, CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

1898-1903. 2 vols.
Arranged chronologically. First known as "The Red Man", it became "The Red Man and Helper" in July 1900. It was published monthly "in the interest of Indian education and civilization" and printed by the students. Starting in July 1900 the format changed to weekly, published on Fridays. Included are articles about the school, literary works and poetry (mainly from outside sources but sometimes by the students), speeches by the Commissioner, local news, opinion pieces, articles on Indian issues culled from the national press, advice columns, puzzles and word games. The paper featured a significant number of photographs and illustrations. (new entry)

1349B. CORRESPONDENCE FILE

ca. 1916-66.
Arranged chronologically. Consists of a single file bound in a format similar to the Central Classified Files with "Opened Nov. 1, 1879 - June 30, 1918" written on the front cover. The correspondence consists mainly of inquiries from members of the public regarding the school which closed in June 1918. The responses from the Bureau referred the inquiries to NARA which received custody of the Carlisle records sometime in the 1940s. Included are copies of informational sheets regarding the school that may have been used as standard responses to inquiries from the public. Among these are lists of Carlisle graduate from 1889 to 1915. (new entry)

1349C. MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS AND RECORDS

ca. 1908-18.
Arranged into several major sub-series, thereunder chronologically. The major sub-series are: The Red Man (Apr. 1910-Oct. 1916), a monthly published by the Carlisle Indian press advertised as "a magazine not only about Indians, but mainly by Indians"; The Carlisle Arrow (May 1913-July 1916), a weekly newspaper; and The Carlisle Arrow and Red Man (Oct. 1917-May 1918), also a weekly. They featured articles on all facets of current Indian life, sometimes focusing on a single theme for an entire issue such as "Indian babies" and were heavily illustrated. Also included are school catalogues, calendars, commencement programs, and a 1939 copy of Indians at Work highlighting an article by "Pop" Warner about the Carlisle football program. At the end are several miscellaneous items from the late 19th century including a newspaper article on the Carlisle football team. A NARA-prepared finding aid is included. (new entry)

Records of the Chamberlain Indian School

The Chamberlain School, a nonreservation boarding school, was located at Chamberlain, S. Dak. It was established in 1898 and was closed in 1909.

1350. "BLOTTER."

1907-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
This volume contains notations concerning arrivals and departures of students and employees, progress on work projects, purchases, disbursements, visits, weather conditions, and other matters. Arranged chronologically.

1351. REGISTERS OF PUPILS.

1901-6. 2 vols. 3 in.
Entries for individual pupils may give name, age, date of enrollment, period for which enrolled, home address, tribe, name of parent or guardian and his address, an indication of payer of transportation costs, date of expiration of term, degree of Indian blood, and information concerning changes in status (such as withdrawal or graduation). The early entries are arranged alphabetically by surname of pupil; thereafter they are arranged for the most part chronologically by date of enrollment. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of pupils.

1352. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1897-1909. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, position, salary, former occupation, sex, age, race, marital status, birthplace, residence, place of employment, dates of service, and other pertinent information. The rosters cover varying periods of time and are arranged chronologically. See also the rosters maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 979).

1353. CASHBOOKS.

1897-1909. 3 vols. 5 in.
Contains statements of receipts of cash and property and of issues and expenditures. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; and entries for each are arranged chronologically.

1354. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1907-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and the amount received or disbursed under different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

1355. LEDGER.

1900-1906. 1 vol. 1 in.
Contains accounts of receipts and disbursements of funds. Arranged by fiscal year, thereunder by appropriation item or other kind of account, and thereunder chronologically. There is an incomplete alphabetical subject index.

1356. MESS MINUTES AND ACCOUNTS.

1908-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Minutes of meetings of employees who ate at the school mess and monthly statements of receipts and disbursements for the mess account. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Fort Shaw Indian School

The Fort Shaw School, a nonreservation boarding school, was located at Fort Shaw, Mont. It was established in 1892 and was closed in 1910.

1357. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1897-98. 1 vol. 2 in.
Original letters are pasted into the volume. Most of them were received from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Arranged chronologically. The volume previously had been used for a daybook of sales at an Army trading post.

1358. REGISTER OF PUPILS.

1892-1908. 1 vol. 2 in.
The volume is divided into several sections, each of which gives different information about individual students. For 1892-1902 there are sections designated as "Descriptive Record of Students as Admitted" and "Discharged from School." There are a death record section for the years 1894-1908 and a combination enrollment and attendance record section for fiscal year 1908. The arrangement of the sections varies.  Usually, however, entries for boys are separated from entries for girls; and entries in each section are arranged alphabetically by surname of pupil.

1359. REGISTERS OF PUPILS.

1902-10. 2 vols. 2 in.
Entries for fiscal years 1903-5 give information concerning individual students, which is similar to that previously entered in the "Descriptive Record of Students as Admitted" section of the register described in entry 1358. For fiscal years 1906, 1907 (incomplete record), 1909, and 1910 there is a combination enrollment and attendance record. Arranged by fiscal year. Thereunder entries for boys and for girls are entered in separate sections; entries in each section are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of pupil. The enrollment and attendance record for fiscal year 1908 is in the register described in entry 1358.

1360. SANITARY REPORTS.

1894-99. 1 vol. 1 in.
Monthly or quarterly reports that were prepared by the school physician. Given for individual students who were taken ill are name, sex, disease or other ailment, date when illness began, date of recovery, and sometimes other information. The reports are arranged chronologically.

136l. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1891-1910. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual employees give name, position, salary, former occupation, sex, age, race, marital status, birthplace, residence, place of employment, dates of service, and other pertinent information. The rosters cover varying periods of time, frequently a fiscal year. They are arranged chronologically. See also the rosters of school employees that were maintained by the Employees Section of the Bureau (entry 979).

1362. CASHBOOKS.

1892-1907. 2 vols. 3 in.
Contain statements of receipts of cash and property and of issues and expenditures. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; entries for each are arranged chronologically.