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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


Records of the Oregon Superintendency.

The Oregon Superintendency was established in 1848 with the organization of Oregon Territory. There was an earlier subagency for the "country West of the Rocky mountains," which was established in 1842 and located in the Willamette Valley. The superintendency originally included all of the area vest of the Rocky Mountains and north of the 42d parallel. With the establishment of Washington Territory in 1853; the region north of the Columbia River and the 46th parallel became part of the Washington Superintendency. When Oregon was made a State in 1859, it was reduced to its present boundaries; and the remainder of Oregon Territory was made part of Washington Territory. Between 1857 and 1861, however, the Oregon and Washington Superintendencies were combined. For this period the records relating to the superintendency in general and to Indian matters in Oregon are usually with the records of the Oregon Superintendency. Records relating to Washington only are usually with the records of the Washington Superintendency.

There were many bands of Indians in Oregon, including Umpqua, Umatilla, Cayuse, Wallawalla, Wasco, Shoshoni (Snake), Kalapuya, Clackamas, Rogue River, Warm Springs, Shasta, Klamath, Modoc, Paiute, Tenino, and Nez Percés.

The Territorial Governor acted as ex officio superintendent until 1850, when a separate official was appointed. In 1851 the superintendency's headquarters was moved from its original location at Oregon City to Milwaukee. In 1853 it was moved to Dayton; in 1856, back to Oregon City; in 1857, to Salem; in 1859, to Portland; and in 1862, again to Salem.

When the Oregon Superintendency was organized in 1848, three subagents were appointed. They were to be assigned by the superintendent wherever they might be needed. The first agents were appointed in 1830 and were assigned at the discretion of the superintendent. Permanent agencies were gradually established, usually on a geographical basis rather than for particular Indians. The Rogue River Agency for the Rogue River and Umpqua Indians was established in 1850 and was discontinued in 1856, when the agent was transferred to Grand Ronde. In 1851 an agency was established for the Indians east of the Cascade Mountains. This agency was moved several times and was known by many names, including Utilla, Eastern Oregon, Northeastern Oregon, Middle Oregon, and Dalles. By 1861 the agency was designated as the Warm Springs Agency; it was responsible mainly for Wasco, Tenino, and Warm Springs Indians. The Puget Sound Agency, established in 1851, was transferred to the Washington Superintendency in 1853. The Indians in the Port Orford area were usually assigned to a subagent. In 1854 and in 1856, however, when the Indians were to be moved to the Coast Reservation, a full agent was located there. The Southeastern District Agency was established at The Dalles in 1854 for the Indians east of the Cascade Mountains and south of the 44th parallel. In 1856 the agent was transferred to Port Orford and was not replaced. The Grand Ronde Agency was established in the eastern part of the Coast Reservation in 1856. It was responsible for remnants of various bands (mainly from the Willamette and Rogue River Valley areas), including Molala, Clackamas, Yamel, Kalapuya, Umpqua, Shasta, and Rogue River Indians. The Siletz Agency was established on the Coast Reservation in 1856 for Indians who had been removed from along the coast, the Rogue River area, and other parts of Oregon. The principal bands were Joshua, Sixes (Kwatami), Chetco, Rogue River, Chastacosta, and Klamath. The Umatilla Agency for the Umatilla, Cayuse, and Wallawalla Indians on the Umatilla Reservation was transferred from the Washington Superintendency in 1862. The Klamath Agency for the Klamath, Modoc, and Shoshoni Indians in the Klamath Lake area was established as a full agency in 1872; special agents and subagents had been assigned there, however, since 1861. For the agencies in Washington during the period of the combined superintendency, 1857-61, see the introduction to the records of the Washington Superintendency.

The Oregon Superintendency was discontinued in 1873; and thereafter the agents of the Warm Springs, Grand Ronde, Siletz, Umatilla, and Klamath Agencies reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

Among the records of the Oregon Superintendency there are a few records of the agencies. There are also separate records of the Malheur Agency, which was established in 1873 shortly after the closing of the superintendency.

Many of the records of the Oregon Superintendency have been reproduced by the National Archives as Microfilm Publication 2.

1183. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED AND INDEXES TO LETTERS SENT.

1848-72. 2 vols. 5 in.
Two volumes: one for the years 1848-66 and one for the years 1866-72. Each volume is divided into a register of letters received and an index to letters sent. Individual entries in the registers give file number of letter, date of letter, name of writer, subject, and date of receipt. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt, with file numbers assigned in order by year or other period of time. Individual entries in the indexes give volume and page reference for record copy, name of addressee, date, and subject. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or position. Letters to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs are indexed under "C." The individual entries in each alphabetical section are arranged by volume and page number. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. For the letters, see entries 1184 and 1185.

1184. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1848-73. 7 vols. and unbound papers. 5 ft.
Incoming correspondence, including some financial and other records. Arranged for the most part in the same order as the entries in the registers described in entry 1183 -- chronologically by date of receipt. There are also a considerable number of unregistered letters. Some of these are arranged in normal chronological order; others are either at the end of the letters for a year or at the end of the entire series. Through June 1863 the letters registered during each year were numbered in order. Beginning in July 1863 they were bound in volumes designated by letters "A" through "K." The letters in each volume were numbered in order. Four entire volumes and parts of other volumes are missing. The first volume includes an alphabetical index to names of letter writers. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. For copies of letters sent, see entry 1185. For other correspondence, see entries 1186, 1187, 1199-1201, and 1203.

1185. LETTERS SENT.

1848-72. 9 vols. 1 ft.
Handwritten copies, chiefly of letters sent. Until 1856, however, there are also copies of letters received. Arranged chronologically, but in the early volumes the order is imperfect. At the beginning of the sixth volume (1857-59) there are some reports for 1853-55, similar to those in the volume described in entry 1186. Alphabetical name indexes have been prepared and inserted in several of the volumes. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. There are separate indexes (entry 1183). Certain reports and instructions to agents are copied in the volume described in entry 1186 rather than in these letter books. See also the press copies of letters sent, 1865-69 (entry 1187). For original letters received, see entry 1184.

1186. REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONS.

1850-55. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of annual and other narrative reports prepared by the superintendent and agents, instructions from the Bureau, and instructions from the superintendent to agents. Arranged chronologically. An alphabetical name index has been prepared and inserted in the volume. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. The documents described in this series are not usually copied in the letter books described in entry 1185; but there are similar reports, including some duplicates, at the beginning of the sixth letter book.

1187. LETTERS SENT.

1865-69. 3 vols. 3 in.
Press copies. Arranged chronologically. Indexed in part in the second volume. There are handwritten copies of the same letters in the letter books described in entry 1185.

1188. RECORDS CONCERNING NEGOTIATION OF TREATIES.

1851-55. 2 vols. 1 in.
Chiefly proceedings of councils and copies of treaties. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1189. RECORD BOOK CONCERNING THE ROGUE RIVER COMMISSION.

1854-55. 1 vol. 2 in.
The Commission was appointed by the superintendent under provisions of article 3 of the treaty of September 3, 1853, to decide upon claims for property destroyed by the Indians during the Rogue River War and to assess the value of permanent improvements on land set apart as a reservation for the Indians. The record book contains copies of instructions to the Commissioners, oaths of office, reports, testimony, and findings on individual claims. Arranged in rough chronological order except that the records concerning individual claims are arranged by claim number. There is an alphabetical name index. There are also a few loose documents, 1852-56, concerning claims. Both the volume and the loose records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1190. ACCOUNTS.

1849-73. 7 in.
Vouchers, receipts, requisitions, bills, invoices, statements of funds received, statements of account current, abstracts of disbursements, statements of public money, abstracts of liabilities, statements of differences in accounts, abstracts of purchases, property returns, payrolls, and other records concerning the accounts of both the superintendency and the agencies. Arranged in rough chronological order. There are other records of the same types among the letters received (entry 1184) and among the miscellaneous records (entry 1203).

1191. DAYBOOK.

1850-55. 1 vol. 1 in.
A chronological record of financial transactions made at the time of the transactions. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1192. JOURNAL.

1850-54. 1 vol. 1 in.
A revised chronological record of financial transactions. There are references in the journal to entries in a preliminary daybook (entry 1191) and in a ledger (entry 1193). This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1193. LEDGER.

1850-54. 1 vol. 2 in.
A record of financial transactions arranged by accounts, mainly for agents and subagents, and thereunder chronologically. There are page references to the journal (entry 1192) or to the daybook (entry 1191). There is an alphabetical name index. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1194. LEDGER OF AGENTS' ACCOUNTS.

1850-55. 1 vol. 2 in.
A record of financial transactions arranged by accounts for individual agents and thereunder chronologically. The several accounts are in rough chronological order by date of first transaction. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. There are entries for many of the same transactions in the ledger described in entry 1193.

1195. RECORD OF VOUCHERS.

1853-55. 1 vol. 2 in.
An account of money expended, as certified by vouchers. Arranged by voucher number, which was assigned in rough chronological order. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1196. LEDGER.

1861-72. 1 vol. 2 in.
A record of financial transactions arranged by accounts for tribes, persons, and kinds of expenditures. The accounts are in rough chronological order by date of first transaction; the entries in individual accounts are arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical subject index. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1197. CONTRACTS.

1850-67. 3/4 in.
Chiefly contracts for goods to be delivered. Arranged chronologically.  These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. For ether contracts, see entries 1184 and 1203.

1198. BONDS OF AGENTS.

1856-62. 1/4 in.
Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1199. LETTERS RECEIVED BY PERSONS OTHER THAN THE SUPERINTENDENT.

1850-73. 1 in.
Chiefly letters received by agents. Included are a few copies of letters sent by the superintendent. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2. For separate letters received by Grand Ronde Agent James B. Condon, see entry 1200.

1200. LETTERS RECEIVED BY JAMES B. CONDON, AGENT AT GRAND RONDE.

1861-64. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1201. LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE EDITORS OF THE OREGON STATESMAN.

1860-64. 1 in.
Arranged chronologically. Superintendent J. W. Perit Huntington was an owner of the newspaper; this may account for these records being among those of the Oregon Superintendency. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 2.

1202. LEDGER FROM THE WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION.

1861-63. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
This ledger was probably maintained by a trader. It contains accounts for individuals and other accounts. Most of the transactions consisted of sales or issues of goods. The accounts are arranged in rough chronological order by date of first transaction. There is an alphabetical name and subject index.

1203. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS.

ca. 1852-78. 1 ft.
Correspondence, financial statements, receipts, bills, vouchers, canceled checks, estimates, contracts, loyalty oaths, annual reports, school reports, other statistical reports, and other records. Many of the documents, particularly letters and annual reports, are duplicates of documents in other series. The records for the period after the discontinuance of the Oregon Superintendency relate chiefly to the Klamath and Siletz Agencies. Some of these records may actually be records of the central office. Arranged roughly by kind of record and thereunder chronologically.

1203A. RECORDS OF THE KLAMATH LOAN BOARD

ca. 1941-46.
Arranged into two sub-series. The first, arranged alphabetically by surname of loan applicant, consists of a single standardized form for each individual loan detailing the loan's status. These typewritten forms contain 23 fields of information, among them: purpose for loan, amount, agreement number, balance due on December 31, 1945, etc. The second sub-series, also arranged alphabetically, consists of tabular charts listing individual loans. These provide statistics on the status of loans plus comments, consisting of two separate sheets with 23 columns corresponding to the forms in the first sub-series. At the beginning of the second sub-series are charts prepared in November 1946 with summary statistics for the entire loan. (new entry).

Records of the Sault Ste. Marie Agency and Subagency.

See the records of the Michigan Superintendency and Mackinac Agency.

Records of the Southern Superintendency

  The Southern Superintendency was not established until 1851; but its records include those of its predecessor, the Western Superintendency, which was established in 1834. There are a few earlier records that are actually records of the Choctaw Agency, West. The area of jurisdiction of the Western Superintendency extended west of the Mississippi River from Arkansas to the Rocky Mountains and south of the limits of the St. Louis Superintendency -- the northern boundary of the land of the Osage Indians. The principal tribes originally within the superintendency were Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek, Osage, Seneca, and Mixed Band of Seneca and Shawnee. Quapaw, Seminole, and Chickasaw Indians moved into the area of the superintendency within a few years. The Western Superintendent, on occasion, had some responsibilities relating to Caddo, Kiowa, Comanche, and other Indians.

  The Western Superintendency was an "acting superintendency." To the agent for the Choctaw Indians were detailed the extra duties of the superintendent. His headquarters was located at the Choctaw Agency near Fort Coffee in the eastern part of present Oklahoma. Originally there was only one agency (called the Southern Agency of the Western Territory) in the superintendency. It was a continuation of the agency for the Choctaw Indians living west of the Mississippi River. Beginning in 1837 it was, again called the Choctaw Agency. Three subagencies were assigned to the Western Superintendency; they were responsible, respectively, for the Creek, Cherokee, and Osage Indians. The Cherokee Subagency was also made responsible for the Seneca and Mixed Band of Seneca and Shawnee Indians. The Osage Subagency was made responsible for the Quapaw Indians when they arrived in Indian Territory.

  The Western Superintendency was reorganized in 1837. In addition to the Choctaw Agency, full agencies were established for the Cherokee and the Creek Indians. The Seminole Indians were attached to the Creek Agency. The Neosho Subagency was established for the Quapaw, Seneca, and Mixed Band of Seneca and Shawnee Indians. The Osage Subagency was then responsible for only the Osage Indians. In 1839 the Chickasaw Agency was established for the Chickasaw Indians who by that time had moved west onto Choctaw land. A separate subagency was established for the Seminole in 1842. The Osage Subagency was transferred to the St. Louis Superintendency in 1843; it was reassigned to the Western Superintendency in 1847 and to the St. Louis Superintendency in 1849.

  In 1851 the Western Superintendency was replaced by the Southern Superintendency as part of a general reorganization of the field service of the Bureau. The new superintendency, with a full-time superintendent, was responsible for the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole, Quapaw, Seneca, and Mixed Band of Seneca and Shawnee Indians in Indian Territory and for the Osage Indians of southern Kansas. Thus the superintendency was placed in charge of the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Agencies and the Seminole Subagency of the former Western Superintendency. To these was added the new Neosho Agency, formed by a consolidation of the Neosho Subagency and the Osage Subagency.

  In 1855 the Chickasaw Agency was consolidated with the Choctaw Agency, and the Seminole Subagency was made a full agency. In 1867 the Neosho Agency was transferred to the Central Superintendency, the successor to the St. Louis Superintendency.

  In 1857 the Wichita Agency -- for the Wichita and Kichai Indians -- was established under the Southern Superintendency. In 1859 Caddo, Anadarko, Waco, Tonkawa, Hanai, Kichai, Tawakoni, Delaware, Shawnee, and Comanche Indians were moved from Texas to the Wichita Agency in Indian Territory. The agency was consolidated with the Kiowa Agency of the Central Superintendency in 1869. In 1870 the Wichita Agency was established as a separate agency, but it remained in the Central Superintendency. By 1870 the Southern Superintendency had supervision over only the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw, and Seminole Agencies.

  The office of the Southern Superintendency was originally at Van Buren, Ark. In 1853 it was moved to Fort Smith, Ark. At the beginning of the Civil War, Indian Territory was occupied by Confederate troops. The superintendent and some of the agents of the Southern Superintendency accepted similar positions under the Confederacy. The Arkansas Superintendency was the Confederate equivalent of the Southern Superintendency. Some of the Indians of the Southern Superintendency joined the Confederacy, and others remained loyal. The latter fled to Kansas, and temporary headquarters for the various agencies were established in that State. A new superintendent for the Southern Superintendency, unable to reach Fort Smith, also established his headquarters in Kansas. At first his office was located at Humboldt, which was burned by Confederate troops. For most of the war years the superintendent's office was at Leavenworth. For a time he had a second office at Leroy. Beginning in 1865 the superintendent's headquarters was at Lawrence.

  The Indians began to return to Indian Territory in 1864. The office of the Southern Superintendency was returned to Fort Smith in 1866; but in 1868 it was moved to the Creek Agency on the Deep Fork of the Canadian River about 50 miles west of Fort Gibson.

  In 1869 Congress appropriated money for the expenses of only two superintendencies east of the Rocky Mountains. The Southern Superintendency was to be closed on July 1, 1869. Treaties with the various Indian tribes, however, stipulated the services of a superintendent for certain matters, such as the investigation of some claims. An Army officer was therefore detailed to act as superintendent in connection with the treaty stipulations and as especially directed by the Bureau For other matters the agents were to be responsible direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington. This arrangement was continued until August 1870, when the Southern Superintendency was completely abolished and the Central Superintendency was placed in charge of the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw, and Seminole Agencies. It was originally intended that the superintendent should exercise full supervisory control over the agencies; but, on 3 December 21, 1870, the instructions were modified to provide that the superintendent should handle only the treaty matters.

  There are few records of the Southern Superintendency in the National Archives for the years after 1861. In addition to the records of the Western and Southern Superintendencies, there are a few records of the Cherokee Agency and the Wichita Agency and some records of a special agent appointed by the Cherokee Nation. There are also some records of the Confederate Arkansas Superintendency and its agencies, particularly the Wichita Agency. Also included with the records of the Southern Superintendency are some records unrelated to Indian affairs -- records of the Fort Smith Post Office, the sheriff of Sebastian County, Ark. (in which Fort Smith is located), and the Common School Commissioner of Sebastian County. There are also some Army records and some private correspondence. The school records and post office records were maintained by Abraham G. Mayers, who was agent for the Pueblo Agency in New Mexico from 1854 until 1857.

  See also the records of the Union Agency, which include some records of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Agency while it was under the Southern Superintendency.

1204. LETTERS RECEIVED.

1832-61. 5 ft.
Chiefly incoming correspondence, but including some vouchers, estimates, contracts, financial statements, copies of letters sent, and other records. Arranged by year and thereunder in part chronologically and in part by source, particularly from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and the different agencies in the superintendency. For later copies of letters received, 1869-70, see entry 1206. For copies of letters sent, see entries 1205 and 1206. These records have been reproduced on microfilm M234, rolls 833-839.

1205. LETTERS SENT.

1853-61. 4 vols. and unbound papers. 7 in.
Press copies. Included are loose pages from a fifth volume. Arranged chronologically. In the first volume there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. For later letters sent, 1869-70, see entry 1206. There are other copies of letters sent that are with the letters received, 1832-61 (entry 1204).

1206. CORRESPONDENCE.

1869-70. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of letters sent and letters received during period when an Army officer was detailed to act as superintendent. The letters sent are separate form the letters received. Letters in each group are arranged chronologically. For earlier press copies of letters sent, 1853-61, see entry 1205. For earlier original letters received, 1832-61, and other copies of letters sent, see entry 1204.

1207. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE WICHITA AGENCY.

1860-61. 3/4 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent with some other records for Agent Mathew Leeper's period of service. There are a few letters for the early part of 1860, when Leeper was in charge of the Comanche Agency in Texas. Arranged by year. Thereunder letters received are divided from letters sent; letters in each group are arranged chronologically. For records of the Wichita Agency under Confederate control, see entry 1211.

1208. CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS OF THE CHEROKEE AGENCY.

1866-67. 3/4 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, depositions and other records concerning claims, receipts, and other records for Agent John J. Humphreys' period of service. Arranged by year and thereunder by kind of record. For earlier records of the Cherokee Agency in Indian Territory, see entry 1057.

1209. CORRESPONDENCE OF RICHARD FIELDS, SPECIAL AGENT FOR CHEROKEE NATION.

1868-70. 1/4 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent. Fields was appointed by the Cherokee Nation to examine its accounts with the United States, as provided by article 22 of the treaty of July 19, 1866. Arranged chronologically.

Confederate Records

1210. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE ARKANSAS SUPERINTENDENCY

1861-62. 3/4 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent. Included are some other records. Arranged by year and thereunder divided into letters received and letters sent; letters in each group are arranged chronologically.

1211. CORRESPONDENCE OF WICHITA AGENCY

1861-62. 1/2 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent. Included are some financial records. Arranged chronologically. For records of the agency under Union control, 1860-61, see entry 1207.

1212. ACCOUNTS AND OTHER RECORDS

1861-62. 1 in.
Vouchers, invoices, estimates, financial statements licenses to trade, and other records of both the Arkansas Superintendency and its agencies -- particularly the Creek Agency.

Papers found with but not belongong to the records of the Southern Superintendency 

1213. RECORDS OF THE COMMON SCHOOL COMMISSIONER OF SEBASTIAN COUNTY, ARK.

1853-55. Negligible.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, affidavits, and other records maintained by Abraham G. Mayers. Arranged chronologically. Mayers left his position as Commissioner to take up his duties as agent of the Pueblo Agency in New Mexico. For later records of his service as Postmaster at Fort Smith, Ark., see entry 1214.

1214. RECORDS OF THE FORT SMITH, ARK., POST OFFICE.

1858-62. 1 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, receipts, affidavits, statements of account current, schedules and registers of arrivals and departures of mail, and other records maintained by Post Master Abraham G. Mayers, who served under both the United States and the Confederate States. There is also a booklet for 1855-58, including accounts, addresses, and other information. Included also are some records concerning Mayers' activities as editor of the newspaper 35th Parallel.  The records are arranged for the most part chronologically. For earlier records, 1853-55, maintained by Mayers as Common School Commissioner, see entry 1213. From 1854 until 1857 Mayers was agent of the Paeblo Agency in New Mexico.

1215. RECORDS OF THE SHERIFF OF SEBASTIAN COUNTY, ARK.

1857-62. 2 in.
Writs, receipts, correspondence, lists of taxable property, and other records maintained by Sheriff William A. Porter. Sheriff Porter also served as Collector of the Revenue.  Included is some private correspondence of Capt. Mark Tatum of Greenwood, Ark.  Arranged in rough chronological order.

1216. PERSONAL AND MILITARY RECORDS.

1857-63. 1/2 in.
Private correspondence and accounts of various persons and accounts of the Quartermaster of the Arkansas Militia. Arranged by source.

Records of the Southern Apache Agency

The Southern Apache Agency was established in 1852. It had jurisdiction over the Mimbreño, Mogollon, Coyotero, and -- for a time -- the Mescalero Apache. Over the years the agency was located at various places in the vicinity of Ojo Caliente (Hot Springs), N. Mex. In 1873 it was moved to a new Apache reservation in the Tulerosa Valley. In 1874 the reservation and agency were moved to Ojo Caliente. Both the reservation and agency were abolished in 1877, when the Indians were moved to the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona; but a man was left in charge of the property at the agency until the following year. The Southern Apache Agency was in the New Mexico Superintendency until the superintendency was abolished in 1877. Thereafter the agent reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

The earliest of the agency's records described in entries 1217-1222 are dated 1871. See also the records of the New Mexico Superintendency, which include a ledger (entry 1164) that from 1870 to 1874 was used by the Southern Apache Agency.

1217. LETTERS RECEIVED

1873-78. 3 in.
Chiefly incoming correspondence, but including some estimates, contracts, statistical reports, financial statemients, and other records. Arranged by year. Thereunder the letters are usually arranged by source and thereunder they are arranged chronologically. Other kinds of records are filed at the end of the letters for a year. For 1876 there are no letters but only a few contracts and statements. For copies of letters sent, 1873-78, see entry 1218. No earlier correspondence of the agency has been found.

1218. LETTERS SENT.

1873-78. 2 vols. 2 in.
Press copies. There are some letters written in 1863-64 and in 1868 by Col. Robert H. Stapleton. Arranged chronologically. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. 

1219. CASHBOOK.

1875-77.  l vol. 2 in.
Statements of receipts and disbursenents of funds. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; entries for each are arraxiged chronologicaly.

1220. LEDGER

1871-74. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
A record of financial transactions arranged by account. The accounts are in rough chronological order by date of first transaction. See also the ledger among the records of the New Mexico Superintendency (entry 1164).

1221. STATMENTS OF ACCOUNT CURRENT AND ABSTRACTS OF DISBURSMENTS

1874-75 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Chiefly quarterly statements. Arranged chronologically.  In the back of the volume there are some schedules of contracts for goods and services, 1875-77.

1222. RECORD OF CERTIFIED VOUCHERS ISSUED.

1871-78. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Entries give information concerning issuance and payment of vouchers Arranged chronologically by date of issue of voucher. Included are some schedules concerning receipt of goods, property, and other subjects.


Records of the Union Agency

The Union Agency, established in 1874, was the successor to four separate agencies in Indian Territory -- agencies responsible, respectively, for the Cherokee, Choctaw and Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians. These Indians were known collectively as the Five Civilized Tribes. The agency headquarters was at Muskogee in the eastern part of the Creek Nation. The agency was abolished in 1878, but it was reestablished in 1879. In 1914 its name was changed to the Five Civilized Tribes Agency.

One of the few series described below as records of the Union Agency consists of a letter book that was maintained by the Choctaw and Chickasaw Agency (entry 1224). Some of the other series may be considered as tribal rather than agency records.

See also the records of the Southern and Central Superintendencies and the records of Special Agent Alfred B. Meacham (entry 1377).

1223. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE UNION AGENCY.

1876-78. 1 vol. 1 in.
Consists of statements of account current, with weekly abstracts of public funds. Arranged chronologically.

1224. LETTERS SENT BY THE CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW AGENCY.

1867, 1870-73. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Press copies. Arranged chronologically.

1225. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE CHOCTAW NATIONAL TREASURER.

1868-77. 1 vol. 2 in.
Consists of statements of the National Treasurer in account with the Treasury of the Choctaw Nation and of issues of Choctaw National Warrants. Some of the statements have not been bound into the volume. Arranged chronologically.

1226. JOURNALS OF HOUSE OF KINGS, CREEK NATION.

1895-97; Mar. 15-May 18, 1899. 1 vol. and unbound papers. 1 in.
Consist of minutes of meetings. Arranged chronologically.

1227. ACCOUNT BOOK OF THE CREEK NATION.

1905-11. 1 vol. 1 in.
Mainly a record of expenditures under appropriations of the National Council. Some copies of acts and resolutions are inserted in the volume. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of appropriation act, and thereunder entries are arranged chronologically by date of transaction. There is an alphabetical name and subject index.

Records of the Utah Superintendency

The Utah Superintendency was established in 1850 with the organization of Utah Territory. Since 1849 there had been a Salt Lake Agency in charge of the Ute, Paiute, Shoshoni (Snake), Bannock, Pahvant, and other Indians who lived in the Great Basin area between the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada. Utah Territory originally included most of the present State of Nevada, the western part of Colorado, and a corner of Wyoming as well as the present State of Utah. Utah was reduced to its present boundaries by the creation of the Territories of Nevada (1861), Colorado (1861), and Wyoming (1868). The Territorial Governor -- Brigham Young -- served as ex officio superintendent until 1857, when a full-time superintendent was appointed. The superintendency headquarters was at Salt Lake City.

The first regular agency for Utah was established at Salt Lake City in 1851. It was moved to the Spanish Fork Reservation for Ute Indians in 1859. In 1865 it was moved to the Uintah Valley, and thereafter it was known as the Uintah Valley Agency. After 1869 it was the only agency in Utah.

A second agency was established at Provo in 1855. It Was moved to Fort Bridger in 1861 and given responsibility for the Shoshoni and Bannock Indians. In 1869 the Fort Bridger Agency was transferred to the Wyoming Superintendency.

The Carson Valley Agency was established in 1858 for the Paiute and Washo Indians in the western part of the Territory. In 1861 it was transferred to the Nevada Superintendency.

The Utah Superintendency was abolished in 1870. Thereafter the Uintah Agent reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

1228. CORRESPONDENCE, ACCOUNTS, AND OTHER RECORDS.

1855-70. 10 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, invoices, bills of lading, property returns, abstracts of disbursements, statements of account current, reports on employees, and other records. There is little correspondence before 1859. The records are arranged by year, thereunder for the most part by kind of record, and thereunder in rough chronological order.

Records of the Washington Superintendency

The Washington Superintendency was established in 1853 with the organization of Washington Territory. The Indians in Washington previously had been under the Oregon Superintendency. Washington originally included the area north of the Columbia River and the 46th parallel and west of the Continental Divide. When Oregon became a State in 1859, the eastern part of the former Oregon Territory was transferred to Washington -- which then included all of the present State of Idaho and parts of Montana and Wyoming. With the organization of Idaho Territory in 1863, Washington was reduced to its present boundaries. Between 1857 and 1861 the Oregon and Washington Superintendencies were combined. For this period most of the records relating to the superintendency in general and to Oregon in particular are now with the records of the Oregon Superintendency. Records relating specifically to Washington are usually with the records of the Washington Superintendency.

There were many groups of Indians in Washington -- including Makah, Skokomish, Sklallam, Yakima, Colville, Puyallup, Tulalip, Nisqualli, Nez Percés, Flatheads, Spokan, Pend d'Oreille, Cayuse, Paloos, Wallawalla, Quinaielt, Blackfeet, Chehalis, Chilkat, Chinook, Clackamas, Clallam, Lake, Klickitat, Coeur d'Aléne, Cowlitz, Dwamish, Lummi, Muckleshoot, Quileute, Qualtso (Queet), Squaxon, and Swinomish.

The superintendency headquarters was at the Territorial capital, Olympia -- except from 1857 to 1861, when the Oregon and Washington Superintendencies were combined. During this period the headquarters was at Salem, Oreg. (1857-59) and Portland, Oreg. (1859-61). Before the consolidation of the two superintendencies the Territorial Governor acted as ex officio-superintendent. Thereafter there was a separate full-time superintendent.

The first agents in Washington were usually assigned on a geographical basis. After a series of treaties had been negotiated between 1854 and 1856, the Indians who had agreed to a particular treaty were generally assigned to one agency. In addition to the regular agencies, there were numerous special agencies, subagencies, and local agencies.

The Puget Sound Agency, established in 1851 under the Oregon Superintendency, was transferred to the Washington Superintendency in 1853. During 1861 and 1862 the Puyallup, Tulalip, Neah Bay, Skokomish, and Quinaielt Agencies were formed in the Puget Sound area; and the Puget Sound District Agency was discontinued. The Puyallup Agency was the outgrowth of a special agency begun in 1856 for the Indians who had agreed to the Treaty of Medicine Creek. Between 1865 and 1869 the Puyallup and Tulalip Agencies were consolidated. The Skokomish Agency (or Sklallam Agency) was a subagency until 1868. The Quinaielt Agency was a subagency until 1874; it was a special agency from 1874 until 1878.

The Columbia River Agency (or Southern District Agency) was established in 1854 for the Indians in Washington who lived north of the Columbia River and south of the Skookumchuck and Chehalis Rivers. In 1859 it was moved to the Yakima (Yakama) Reservation and thereafter was known as the Yakima Agency

The Flathead Agency, known briefly as the Eastern District Agency, was established in 1854 for the Indians living between the Cascade and Bitter Root Mountains -- particularly the Flatheads, Kutenai, and Upper Pend d'Oreille. The Flathead Agency was discontinued following the consolidation of the Oregon and Washington Superintendencies in 1857; and the incumbent agent was designated as agent for Washington east of the Cascades. Special agents and subagents were assigned to the Flatheads until 1861, when they were again given a full-time agent. In 1863 the Flathead Agency was transferred to the new Idaho Superintendency. By l86l the Washington East of the Cascades Agency (usually called the Nez Perce. Agency) was located on the Nez Perce. Reservation. It also was transferred to the Idaho Superintendency in 1863.

The Umatilla Agency, located in Oregon, was assigned to the Oregon Superintendency. For a few months during 1861 and 1862, however, it was placed under the Washington Superintendency.

The Colville Agency was established as a special agency in 1872 and became a regular agency in 1875.

The Washington Superintendency was abolished in 1874. Thereafter the agents in Washington reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Many of the records of the Washington Superintendency have been reproduced by the National Archives as Microfilm Publication 5. Additional records of the superintendency, particularly those described in entry 1234, have been found since this microcopy was completed. These records probably should be integrated with other series of records: but, since it was not possible to do this before the compilation of this inventory, they are herein described separately.

1229. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1853-62. 3 in.
Included with these letters are some copies of letters received during 1862 and 1863 and two later letters. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. For letters received from the Commissioner, 1869-71, see entry 1231. Letters for other periods have not been found (see the statements described in entry 1230). For letters received from others, see entries 1232-1234. See also the letters received by the Oregon Superintendency (entry 1184). For copies of letters sent, see entries 1235, 1236, and 1238.

1230. MONTHLY STATEMENTS OF LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1864-66. 1/2 in.
Entries for individual letters (the letters themselves have not been found) give date of letter, name of writer, subject, date of receipt, date of reply, and remarks concerning reply or other action. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5.

1231. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1869-71. 1 vol. 3 in.
Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. For unbound letters, 1853-62, see entry 1229. See also the statements described in entry 1230. For letters received from others, see entries 1232-1234. For letters sent, see entries 1235, 1236, and 1238.

1232. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM LOCAL JURISDICTIONS.

1853-74. 3 ft.
Chiefly letters from agents and other employees of the superintendency. Included are some labor reports, statements of persons employed, sanitary reports, financial statements, vouchers, estimates, oaths of office, census rolls, and other records. Arranged by name of jurisdiction or locality and thereunder chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. There are other letters from agents and other employees among the records described in entry 1234. For letters received from others, see entries 1229, 1231, and 1233. For letters sent, see entries 1235, 1236, and 1238.

1233. LETTERS RECEIVED FROM VARIOUS PERSONS.

1853-74. 10 in.
Letters from Army officers, Treasury Department officials, other superintendents, Indians, and others. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. There are other letters from various persons among the records described in entry 1234. For letters from the Commissioner and employees of the superintendency, see entries 1229, 1231, and 1232. For letters sent, see entries 1235, 1236, and 1238.

1234. LETTERS RECEIVED, REPORTS, ACCOUNTS, AND OTHER RECORDS.

1864-73. 1 ft.
Letters received, contracts, oaths, annual narrative reports of agents and other employees, school reports, sanitary reports, labor reports, estimates, proposals for supplying goods, financial abstracts and statements, postal receipts, and other records received chiefly from agencies. Arranged for the most part by year. In some cases records for two years are together. Thereunder the records are arranged in part by name of agency and in part by kind of record. Similar records are among the letters received (entries 1229 and 1231-1233) and accounts (entry 1241).

1235. LETTERS SENT.

1853-74. 9 in.
Handwritten copies and drafts, with a few press copies. There are also some census rolls, estimates, and financial statements. There are only a few letters dated after 1857. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. For other copies of letters sent, see entries 1185, 1236, and 1238. For letters received, see entries 1229 and 1231-1234.

1236. LETTERS SENT RELATING TO EASTERN WASHINGTON.

1858-63. 1 in.
Handwritten copies. They relate particularly to the Nez Percé. and Flathead Agencies. In 1863 these agencies were transferred to the new Idaho Superintendency. The letters are arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. No other copies of letters sent during these years have been found among the records of the Washington Superintendency -- except a few among the records described in entry 1239. There are other letters for the consolidated Oregon and Washington Superintendency among the records of the Oregon Superintendency (entry 1185). For letters sent during other periods, see entries 1235 and 1238. For letters received, see entries 1229 and 1231-1234.

1237. INDEX TO LETTERS SENT.

1869-70. 1 vol. 1 in.
An alphabetical index to names of addressees and subjects of letters copied in the first part of the second volume described in entry 1238.

1238. LETTERS SENT.

1867-72. 2 vols. 4 in.
Handwritten copies. Arranged chronologically. Many of the letters in the second volume (1869-72) are numbered in order. For part of the second volume there is a separate index (entry 1237). These volumes have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5. For unbound copies of letters sent, see entry 1235. For letters received, see entries 1231-1234.

1239. PROCEEDINGS OF TREATY COMMISSION.

Dec. 1854-Mar. 1855. 1 vol. 2 in.
A handwritten journal of Governor and ex officio Superintendent Isaac I. Stevens in his capacity as Commissioner to negotiate treaties with different tribes. Copies of treaties are included. The entries are arranged chronologically. This volume has been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5.

1240. RECORDS CONCERNING NEGOTIATION OF TREATIES.

1854-73. 2 in.
Proceedings of councils, drafts and copies of treaties, correspondence, and other records. Arranged chronologically, in part by date of document and in part by date of treaty. Some of these records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5.

1241. ACCOUNTS.

1854-66, 1870-74. 8 in.
Abstracts of disbursements, statements of account current, property returns, vouchers, invoices, bills of lading, estimates, statements of purchases, statements of liabilities, statements of public funds, abstracts of issues, statements of persons employed, and other records. Arranged by year and thereunder in part by name of agency and in part by kind of record. For other financial records, see entries 1232, 1234, 1235, 1242, and 1243.

1242. "DAY BOOK."

July-Aug. 1856. 1 vol. 1 in.
A record of credits and debits to cash account. Entries for debits and those for credits are on facing pages and are arranged chronologically.

1243. STATEMENTS OF FUNDS REMITTED.

1864-74. 1/2 in.
Statements of funds furnished to the superintendency, which were sent by the Bureau to the superintendent -- usually every 6 months. Arranged chronologically. These records have been reproduced by the National Archives as part of Microfilm Publication 5.

Records of the Western Superintendency

See the records of the Southern Superintendency.