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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


Records of the Cherokee Agency, East

 An agent was appointed for the Cherokee Indians living east of the Mississippi River, mainly in Tennessee and Georgia, as early as 1792. There is very little information concerning the agent and his successors; but, by 1801, the Cherokee Agency was permanently established at South West Point (now Kingston, Tenn.). Between 1807 and 1820 the agency headquarters was at or near Hiwassee Garrison at the mouth of the Hiwassee River. After 1820 the agency was located farther up the Hiwassee River, opposite Calhoun, Tenn. On December 31, 1834, the Cherokee Agency in the East was discontinued as a regular agency; and the Superintendent of Emigration for the Cherokee (the title varied) was designated to perform the duties of the agent. By 1839 the Bureau considered the removal of the Cherokee Indians to Indian Territory as completed. The Superintendency of Emigration and the Cherokee Agency in Tennessee were therefore discontinued on January 26, 1839. Actually, however, there were still many Cherokee living in the East.

 For many years the Cherokee Agent also served as Agent of the War Department in Tennessee. In this capacity he handled matters such as payments to troops, procurement of supplies, and accounts of military officers and other Indian agents. There are records of the Agent of the War Department among the records of the Cherokee Agency. These records include those concerning other agencies and tribes, particularly the Chickasaw. Among the records of the Cherokee Agency there is also some correspondence of Governor Joseph McMinn, who performed duties for the War Department among the Cherokee. McMinn later became Cherokee Agent, which may account for his correspondence being among the records of the Cherokee Agency.

 For records of the agency for the Cherokee Indians living west of the Mississippi River, see entry 1057. The Cherokee Agency, West, was established in 1813; but, until 1817, the agent was an assistant to the Cherokee Agent in the East. See also the Cherokee removal records (entries 217-251).

 Many of the records of the Cherokee Agency, East (Tennessee), have been microfilmed by the National Archives as M208, rolls 1-14.

1041. CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS

1798-1838. 6 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, receipts, financial statements, abstracts, Treasury Department notices, minutes, journals, rolls, lists, affidavits, petitions, addresses, passports, and other records. Arranged in rough chronological order. Most of the records dated before 1824 have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For separate correspondence, 1800-15, of the agent in his capacity as Agent of the War Department in Tennessee, see entry 1055. For letter books containing copies of correspondence, see entries 1042 and 1043. For other financial records, see entries 1044-1054.

1042. LETTER BOOKS

1822-27, 1832-35. 2 vols. 3 in.
Handwritten copies of letters received and letters sent. The first volume is divided into the following headings: letters from the War Department (chiefly the Bureau of Indian Affairs), letters to and from the Treasury Department, letters to the War Department, letters to and from Indian chiefs, and miscellaneous letters; and thereunder the letters are arranged chronologically. For 1822-24 all the letters are from the War Department. The second volume is divided for the most part into similar headings, but they are not so veil ordered as those in the first volume. There is a register in each volume, the entries of which are arranged for the most part in the same order as the letters themselves. These two volumes have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For original letters received and loose copies of letters sent, 1798-1838, see entry 1041. For letter books of the combined Superintendency of Emigration for the Cherokee and Cherokee Agency, see entry 1043.

1043. LETTER BOOKS OF SUPERINTENDENCY OF EMIGRATION AND CHEROKEE AGENCY

1831-39. 7 vols. 9 in.
Handwritten copies of letters received and letters sent by the superintendency, 1831-34; and by the combined superintendency and agency, 1835-39. Most of the correspondence is with the Secretary of War, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Commissary General of Subsistence, and officers connected with removal. For 1831-34 there are two volumes containing, respectively, letters received from and letters sent to the War Department (Secretary, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Commissary General). For 1835 and the first part of 1836 there is one volume, which is divided into sections for letters received from the War Department and letters sent to the War Department. Beginning in the latter part of 1836 there are separate volumes for letters received from the War Department, letters sent to the War Department, letters received from removal officers, and letters sent to removal officers. Letters in each volume or section of a volume are arranged chronologically. There is also a separate chronological register with each volume or section of a volume. There is some 1835 correspondence in the last letter book of the Cherokee Agency described in entry 1042. There are some copies of letters sent, 1835-36, in the volume described in entry 1052. For original letters received and loose copies of letters sent, see entry

1044. DAYBOOKS

1801-4, 1807-21, 1823-34. 5 vols. 6 in.
A chronological record of financial transactions made at the time of the transactions. Parts of some of the volumes have been used for other purposes, particularly for records of receipts and disbursements of goods, lists of claims submitted, and financial statements (dated as late as 1837). These records have been microflimed by the National Archives as part of M208. No daybooks appear to be extant for other periods. For journals and ledgers, see entries 1045-1048. See also the volume described in entry 1052.

1045. JOURNAL

1801-8. 1vol. 1 in.
A revised chronological record of financial transactions. There are references to the preliminary daybooks (entry 1044) and to the ledger (entry 1048). This journal has been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. The journal was continued in the volumes described in entries 1046 and 1041. See also the volume described in entry 1050.

1046. RECEIPT BOOK AND JOURNAL

1801-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Contains copies of receipts, 1801-2, received by the agent in his capacity as Agent for the War Department rather than as Indian agent. There are some copies of indentures (contracts) concerning leasing of land from Indians for 1807; and there is a journal, 1808-9 (with one 1810 entry), that continues the journal described in entry 1045 and is itself continued in the volume described in entry 1047. Arranged chronologically. For other receipts, see entries 1049 and 1051.

1047. JOURNAL

1801-11. 1 vol. 1 in.
For 1801-9 this is a journal recording issues of goods and money to Indians. For 1809-11 it is a standard journal of financial transactions, continuing the journal described in entry 1046. Arranged chronologically. This volume has been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208.

1048. LEDGER

1801-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Like the daybooks and journals (entries 1044-1047), this ledger is a record of financial transactions. The entries, however, are arranged by account rather than chronologically. Most of the accounts were kept for individual persons, but there are also some accounts for various uses of funds. Included are references to entries in the journals. The accounts are arranged for the most part in the order in which they were opened. The entries within each account are arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to accounts in the back of the volume. This volume has been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208.

1049. RECEIPT BOOK

1801-2. 1 vol. 1 in.
Contains copies of receipts received by the agent in his capacity as Indian agent. Arranged chronologically. This volume has been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For receipts received by the agent in his capacity as Agent for the War Department, see entry 1046

1050. ACCOUNT BOOK

1801-2, 1808-9, and 1817. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Contains daybook or journal entries for military transactions rather than Indian transactions, 1801-2 and 1808-9, and some 1817 schedules concerning goods for emigrating Indians. These records have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For main series of daybooks and journals, see entries 1044-1047

1051. ACCOUNTS

1801-20. 1 ft.
Receipts, vouchers, accounts current, abstracts of disbursements, invoices, and other financial records. Included are records concerning the agent's service as Agent of the War Department. Arranged in rough chronological order. Some of these records have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For other financial records, see entries 1041, 1044-1050, and 1052-1054

1052. LEDGER

18233-4. 1 vol. 1 in.
Consists chiefly of accounts of agents with the United States and those with various persons. The entries in individual accounts are arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical name and subject index. For 1835-36 there are some copies of letters sent by the combined agency and superintendency of emigration. There are other accounts -- for the period 1831-36 -- with one of the Cherokee emigration rolls now among the Indian removal records of the Bureau (entry 220). For an earlier ledger, see entry 1048. For the main series of correspondence of the agency and superintendency, see entry 1043.

1053. CONTRACT LEDGER AND RECORD OF ISSUES

1828-34. 1 vol. 1 in.
This volume contains accounts of transactions in fulfillment of contracts, which are intermingled with schedules of issues of goods and supplies. 

1054. JOURNAL OF DISBURSEMENTS TO HELP INDIANS

1825-28. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Comprises a chronological record of disbursements to help Indians in suits to recover lost reservations and in other legal cases. Included are some abstracts of improvements, 1831-32, and some information concerning debts of Indians.

1055. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE AGENT OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT IN TENNESSEE

1800-15. 7 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent - with some affidavits, financial records, and other records. The records relate to payments to troops, claims for militia service, accounts of military officers and Indian agents, purchases of supplies, and other subjects. Arranged chronologically. These records have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208. For correspondence of the agent in his capacity as Indian agent, see entry 1041

1056. CORRESPONDENCE OF GOVERNOR JOSEPH McMINN RELATING TO THE CHEROKEE

1817-21. 2 in.
Letters received and copies of letters sent. Most of the correspondence is with the War Department. McMinn was Governed of Tennessee; but he also performed duties for the War Department, particularly relating to the enforcement of the treaty with the Cherokee of July 8, 1817, and the removal of the Cherokee to Arkansas. There are two sets of letters; letters in each set are arranged chronologically. There are also some duplicate copies of letters at the end of the series. These records have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of M208.

Records of the Cherokee Agency, West

The Cherokee Agency in the West was established in 1813 for the Cherokee Indians then living between the Arkansas and White Rivers in the present State of Arkansas. Until 1817 the agent was an assistant to the Cherokee Agent in Tennessee. In 1829 the Indians moved to Indian Territory; and in 1830 the agency was moved from Arkansas to Fort Gibson. The agency continued to operate in Indian Territory, either as a full agency or as a subagency, until 1874. 

The few records described in entry 1057 are for the period when the agency was located in Arkansas. There are some later records of the agency, 1866-67, among the records of the Southern Superintendency (entry 1208). Records relating to the Cherokee Agency in Indian Territory are also among the records of the Southern Superintendency (which include records of its predecessor, the Western Superintendency) and the Central Superintendency. See also the records of the Cherokee Agency, East.

1057. CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS

1816-19. 1/4 in.
Letters received, a copy of a letter sent, transcripts of speeches, vouchers, and receipts. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Chickasaw Agency

The Chickasaw Agency was established in 1800. It was responsible for the Chickasaw Indians, who then lived mainly in the present State of Mississippi but who also lived in adjacent parts of Alabama and Tennessee. This agency remained in operation until 1839; when it was replaced by a new Chickasaw Agency in Indian Territory for the Chickasaw who had moved West by that time. There are also records concerning the Chickasaw Agency among the records of the Cherokee Agency. For records concerning the Chickasaw Agency in Indian Territory, see the records of the Western and Southern Superintendencies. See also the records of the Union Agency.

1058. CORRESPONDENCE

1812-16. 1/4 in.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent. Included are a few other records, mainly enclosures. Included also is an estimate of expenses for 1806. Arranged for the most part chronologically. 

Records of the Choctaw Agency, East

An agent for the Choctaw Indians living east of the Mississippi River (mainly in the present State of Mississippi) was appointed as early as 1792; and the Choctaw Agency was permanently established before 1800. The agency continued in operation until the end of 1832. By that time most of the Choctaw had moved to Indian Territory. The few records described in entry 1059 cannot be positively identified as those of the Choctaw Agency, East; but there are no other records with which they seem more likely to belong. For records of and relating to the Choctaw Agency in the West, see the records of the Western and Southern Superintendencies and the Union Agency. 

1059. CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS

1817-21. Negligible.
Correspondence, vouchers, and a list of employees. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Agency

See the records of the Union Agency.

Records of the Cimarron Agency

See the records of the New Mexico Superintendency.

Records of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency

The Consolidated Chippewa Agency was established on July 1, 1922. It was responsible for the Chippewa Indians living on the Cass Lake, White Earth, Leech Lake, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, and Nett Late (Bois Fort) Reservations in northern Minnesota. These Indians previously had been assigned to the White Earth, Leech Lake, and Red Lake Agencies. The White Earth and Leech Lake Agencies were abolished; but the Red Lake Agency continued to be responsible for the Red Lake Chippewa. The Consolidated Chippewa Agency was located on the Cass Lake Reservation throughout the period covered by the records described in entries 1060-1064. More recently it has been replaced by the Minnesota Agency.

Since the Indians of the agency were scattered over a vide area, agency field employees on the several reservations often acted as subagents - although they were not usually officially designated as subagents. There are no records of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency now in the National Archives, but there are records of several of the agency's field employees. In some cases there are records antedating the establishment of the agency. 

See also the records of the White Earth, Leech Lake, and Nett Lake Agencies.

1060. RECORDS OF THE GRAND PORTAGE DAY SCHOOL

1913-21. 1 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, school reports, school enrollment applications, calendars, estimates, vouchers, notices, circulars, pamphlets, and other records. Most of the correspondence is with the superintendent of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency. The teacher in charge of the school had general responsibility for Indian affairs on the Grand Portage Reservation and for a time also served as deputy special officer for liquor control. Therefore there are records concerning various subjects, in addition to school matters, particularly records relating to the financial affairs of individual Indians. There are a number of subject folders for individual Indians. There are relatively few records dated before 1927. The records are arranged alphabetically by subject or by name of correspondent.

1061. CORRESPONDENCE OF CHARLES D. WILKINSON, FOREST GUARD AT BEAULIEU AND WHITE EARTH

1919-29. 3 in.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent. Most of the correspondence is with the superintendent of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency. Mr. Wilkinson was the field representative of the agency at Beaulieu from 1922 until 1926, and then he became the representative at White Earth. The records relate not only to timber matters but also to annuity payments, land allotments, issuance of rations, and other subjects. Arranged in part in rough chronological order and in part by subject and thereunder chronologically. 

1062. CORRESPONDENCE OF JOHN G. MORRISON, FIELD CLERK AT WHITE EARTH

1930-35. 1 ft.
Letters received and copies of letters sent with some circulars, vouchers, and other records. Most of the correspondence is with the superintendent of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency. It relates particularly to individual Indian money, issuance of rations and other relief work, and emergency conservation work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Arranged for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of name of correspondent or person about whom the letter was concerned. There are, however, several separate subject headings and the 1935 letters are all grouped together. 

1063. CORRESPONDENCE OF CLYDE W. FLINN, FIELD CLERK AT MAHNOMEN ON THE WHITE EARTH RESERVATION

1933-34. 2 in.
Flinn was appointed as field clerk in 1933. Most of the correspondence is with the superintendent of the Consolidated Chippewa Agency. It relates mainly to annuity payments, individual Indian funds, leases, and relief. Included are a few records of Mr. Flinn's predecessor. The correspondence is arranged roughly by subject and thereunder chronologically.

1064. LETTERS RECEIVED BY FRANK FISHER, FARMER IN CHARGE AT LEECH LAKE

1922-30. 2 ft.
Chiefly letters received. Most of the letters were received from the Consolidated Chippewa. Agency. Included are carbon copies of letters sent by the superintendent to other persons; timber contracts; hay leases; and other records. The letters relate particularly to land allotments, timber, individual Indian money, and issuance of rations. Most of the letters are still in envelopes; and many of the envelopes include a notation of the subject of the letter. Some of the letters have been removed from the envelopes and flattened. Letters in each of these groups are arranged in rough chronological order. Among the correspondence of the Leech Lake Agency (entry 1075) there are earlier letters and reports received from Mr. Fisher.

Records of the Creek Agency, East

An agent was appointed for the Creek Indians living east of the Mississippi River, mainly in Georgia and Alabama, as early as 1792. The agency continued in operation until 1836. For records concerning the Creek Agency in the West, see the records of the Western and Southern Superintendencies. See also the records of the Union Agency.

1065. CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER RECORDS.

1794-1818. 1 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, licenses to trade, vouchers, and other records. Arranged chronologically, except for some undated records at the beginning of the series.

Records of the Dakota Superintendency

The Dakota Superintendency was established in 1861 with the organization of Dakota Territory. The original area of the Territory extended from the 43d parallel to Canada and from Minnesota to the Continental Divide. Before 1861 the Indians in this region had been under the Central Superintendency. In 1863 that part of Dakota west of the present States of North and South Dakota was made part of Idaho Territory. With the organization of Montana Territory in 1864, most of the present State of Wyoming was attached to Dakota Territory -- where it remained until Wyoming Territory was established in 1868. Thereafter Dakota Territory comprised the present States of North and South Dakota. The Dakota Superintendency, however, at times supervised some agencies actually located in Nebraska and Wyoming.

The Territorial Governor at Yankton served as ex officio superintendent from the beginning of the Dakota Superintendency until it was abolished in 1870. The superintendency was reactivated in 1877, with headquarters at Yankton. There was a full-time superintendent in charge. The superintendency was again abolished in 1878. Thereafter the agents in Dakota reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

Most of the Indians in Dakota belonged to various bands of Sioux -- including Hunkpapa, Oglala, Yankton, Blackfeet (Sihasapa), Brule, Sisseton, Wahpeton, Yanktonai, Sans Arcs, Miniconjou, Two Kettles (Oohenonpa), Cut Head (Pabaska), and Santee. There were also Cheyenne, Arapaho, Arikara (Arickaree), Mandan, Ponca, and Crow Indians.

The Blackfeet, Ponca, Upper Missouri, and Yankton Agencies were operating in Dakota when the Dakota Superintendency was established in 1861. In 1863 the Blackfeet Agency was transferred to the Idaho Superintendency and, in the following year, to the Montana Superintendency. The Ponca Agency was removed to Indian Territory in 1877. The Upper Missouri Agency was renamed the Grow Creek Agency in 1874. Between 1863 and 1866 Indians of the Winnebago and St. Peters (Santee) Agencies were living at Crow Creek.

The Fort Berthold Agency was established in 1864; but it was not included in the Dakota Superintendency when that Superintendency was revived in 1877. The Grand River (Standing Rock), Whetstone (Spotted Tail), and Cheyenne River Agencies were all established in 1869; the Red Cloud Agency, in 1871; the Flandreau Agency, in 1873; and the Lower Brule Agency, in 1875. The Sisseton and Devil's Lake Agencies -- established, respectively, in 1867 and 1871 -- were located in Dakota Territory but were never under the supervision of the Dakota Superintendency.

Among the records of the Dakota Superintendecy there are a few records concerning agencies in Dakota for the years 1873-76, even though the superintendency was noy in operation during this period.

1066. CORRESPONDENCE, ACCOUNTS, REPORTS, AND OTHER RECORDS.

1860-78. 4 ft.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, vouchers, receipts, payrolls, statements of funds remitted, abstracts of disbursements, statements of account current, Treasury Department notices, statements of letters received, reports on farming and education, reports on employees, inventories, and other records. Arranged by year. Thereunder the correspondence is usually separated from the accounts and statistical reports. The correspondence for each year is usually in three parts: (1) with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, (2) with each of the agencies in the superintendency, and (3) with other persons; and thereunder it is arranged chronologically. If there are letters sent, they are usually separated from the letters received. Beginning in 1865 record copies of letters sent were kept in letter books (see entries 1067-1069).

1067. LETTERS SENT.

1865-69. 1 vol. 2 in.
Handwritten copies. Arranged chronologically.

1068. LETTERS SENT TO AGENTS.

1869-70. 5 vols. 7 in.
Handwritten copies. There are separate volumes for letters sent to the Grand River, Ponca, Upper Missouri and Fort Berthold, Whetstone, and Yankton Agencies, respectively. Letters in each volume are arranged chronologically. There is a register in each volume. No volumes of letters sent to other offices or persons have been found.

1069. LETTERS SENT.

1877-78. 2 vols. 3 in.
Press copies. One volume consists almost entirely of letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs; the other volume contains letters sent to other persons. Letters in each volume are arranged chronologically. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees.

Records of the Green Bay Subagency

The Green Bay Subagency in Wisconsin was in operation from 1837 until 1855. There was a Green Bay Agency from 1815 until 1836 and also from 1855 until 1909. Among the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the National Archives, however, there are only a few records of the subagency for the year 1850. During the period from 1848 until 1851 the Green Bay Subagency was not a part of any superintendency; and the subagent reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington. The subagency was responsible chiefly for Menominee, Oneida, and Stockbridge Indians.

See also the records of the Michigan, Wisconsin, and Northern Superintendencies, to each of which the Green Bay Agency and Green Bay Subagency were assigned at different times.

1070. CORRESPONDENCE.

1850. 1/4 in.
Chiefly handwritten copies of letters received and letters sent. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Idaho Superintendency

The Idaho Superintendency was established in 1863 at the same time as Idaho Territory. From 1848 until 1853 the present State of Idaho was part of Oregon Territory. Part of it was transferred to Washington Territory in 1853 and the rest of it in 1859. From 1863 until Montana Territory was organized in 1864, Idaho included Montana and part of Wyoming. Thereafter Idaho had its present boundaries.

Until 1869 the Territorial Governor served as ex officio superintendent. Thereafter an Army officer was detailed to the position. The superintendency headquarters was at the Territorial capital, which was briefly located in Lewiston but was moved to Boise in 1864.

After 1864 the principal Indian tribes under the supervision of the Idaho Superintendency were the Nez Perce, Shoshoni, and Bannock. Coeur d'Alene, Kutenai, Pend d'Oreille, and Spokan Indians also lived or roamed in Idaho. The Coeur d'Alene and Spokan, however, were more closely associated with the Washington Superintendency; and the Kutenai and Pend d'Oreille, with the Flathead Agency of the Montana Superintendency.

The Nez Perce, Flathead, and Blackfeet Agencies were assigned to the Idaho Superintendency in 1863. In 1864, however, the Flathead and Blackfeet Agencies were transferred to the new Montana Superintendency. The Flathead Agency was again assigned to the Idaho Superintendency from September 1865 until February 1866.

In 1867 a special agent was assigned to the Boise and Bruneau bands of Shoshoni. In 1869 these Indians and some Western Shoshoni and Bannock were moved to the Fort Hall Reservation in southeastern Idaho; and the agency thereafter was called the Fort Hall Agency.

The Idaho Superintendency was discontinued in 1870. Thereafter the agents in Idaho reported direct to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington.

1071. REGISTER OF LETTERS RECEIVED.

1867-70. 1 vol. 2 in.
A register for letters received by the superintendent and for letters addressed to agents but routed through the office of the superintendent. Entries for individual letters give date of receipt, name and address of sender, subject, date of disposition, indication of action taken, and a copy of the endorsement. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt. For the letters, see entry 1072.

1072. CORRESPONDENCE, ACCOUNTS, REPORTS, AND OTHER RECORDS.

1863-70. 10 in.
Letters received, copies of letters sent, abstracts of disbursements, vouchers, estimates, abstracts of bids, contracts, abstracts of property purchases, receipts for goods, abstracts of articles issued; statements of employees, medical reports, farming reports, council proceedings, and other records. Arranged by year. Thereunder the records are divided mainly into letters sent and letters and other records received, particularly those from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and each of the agencies in the superintendency; and thereunder they are arranged for the most part chronologically. For a register of letters received, 1867-70, see entry 1071. Beginning in 1867 record copies of letters sent were kept in the volumes described in entries 1073 and 1074.

1073. LETTERS SENT.

1867-70. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies. Arranged chronologically. Earlier copies are with the records described in entry 1072.

1074. LETTERS SENT.

July-Dec. 1870. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. Arranged chronologically.

Records of the Leech Lake Agency

The Leech Lake Agency was established in 1899 for the Leech Lake Pillager, Cass and Winibigoshish Pillager, White Oak Point Mississippi, and Red Lake bands of Chippewa living on reservations in Minnesota. These Indians had formerly been under the White Earth Agency. There had been a separate Leech Lake Agency between 1874 and 1879; but there are no records of this agency among the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs now in the National Archives.

The agency headquarters was on the Leech Lake Reservation near Walker, Minn. The town established there was named Oningum. In 1906 a separate Red Lake Agency was established. The Leech Lake Agency was abolished in 1922 and the Indians were assigned to the new Consolidated Chippewa Agency.

The sale of timber on Indian lands was of particular importance at the Leech Lake Agency. The records of the agency include some school records. For records of the farmer in charge at Leech Lake (under the Consolidated Chippewa Agency), see entry 1064.

1075. CORRESPONDENCE.

1899-1921. 23 ft.
Letters received and copies of letters sent -- with some petitions, affidavits, reports, schedules, contracts, school calendars, and other records. These records are arranged in part by name of office with which correspondence was conducted (mainly the Washington office of the Bureau and the subagencies and schools under the agency), in part alphabetically by initial letter of surname of correspondent, in part by subject, and in part chronologically. Letters concerning an office or a person may be filed with the correspondence exchanged with that office or person. Therefore a particular letter may be filed in any one of several places. The individual documents that are filed under a heading or subheading are usually arranged in rough chronological order. For press copies of letters sent, see entries 1076-1080.

1076. LETTERS SENT TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1899-1914. 26 vols. 3 ft.
Press copies of letters sent to the Commissioner (other than those concerning timber and allotments, which are described in entries 1078 and 1079). Arranged chronologically. Most of the volumes include a chronological register. For letters received and later letters sent, see entry 1075.

1077. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING LOGGING.

1900-1901. 4 vols. 5 in.
Press copies of letters sent to superintendents of logging, lumber companies and individual loggers, banks, and other persons relating to logging on Indian lands. There are only a few letters to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Arranged chronologically. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. Copies of letters concerning logging that were sent to the Commissioner during this period are with the general series of letters to the Commissioner (entry 1076). Copies of letters concerning logging that were sent to other persons during 1899 and 1902-3 are with the miscellaneous letters sent (entry 1080). Beginning in 1904 the letters relating to logging were copied in the letter books described in entries 1078 and 1079. For letters received, see entry 1075. For timber contracts, see entry 1087.

1078. LETTERS SENT TO WASHINGTON OFFICIALS CONCERNING TIMBER AND ALLOTMENTS.

1904-14. 10 vols. 1 ft.
Press copies of letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Auditor for the Interior Department, and the Forester. They relate to logging operations, receipt and deposit of payments for timber, use of money in accounts of individual Indians, changes in allotments, sales of allotments, issuances of patents, and other subjects. Arranged chronologically. In most of the volumes there is a register, with entries arranged by name of office addressed. For copies of earlier letters sent concerning timber and allotments, see entries 1076, 1077, and 1080. For copies of letters concerning these subjects, which were sent to other persons during the years 1904-14, see entry 1079. For other records concerning timber and allotments, see entries 1075 and 1084-1088.

1079. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING TIMBER AND ALLOTMENTS.

1904-14. 25 vols. 3 ft.
Press copies of letters sent to superintendents of logging and other subordinate officials, sealers, lumber companies, banks, registers of land offices, prospective purchasers of land, Indians, and other persons. For the early part of 1904 there are some letters to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and to the Commissioner of the General Land Office. Later in 1904 the letters sent to Washington officials concerning timber and allotments were copied in the letter books described in entry 1078. The letters relate to contracts for removal of timber, payments for timber, deposits of funds, withdrawals from accounts of individual Indians, adjustments of debts of Indians, appraisements, changes of allotments, sales of allotments, determination of heirs, issuance of patents, and other subjects. There are also letters concerning these subjects among the miscellaneous letters sent (entry 1080). Two volumes are missing. The letters are arranged chronologically. In the individual volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. For other records concerning timber and allotments, see entries 1075-1077 and 1084-1088.

1080. MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS SENT.

1899-1914. 59 vols. 6 ft.
Press copies of letters sent to school superintendents, physicians, superintendents of logging, other employees, other agents, manufacturers, merchants, shippers, banks, traders, job applicants, and other persons. They relate to annuity payments, schools, health, law and order (especially liquor control), enrollment, allotments, timber, trade with Indians, personnel matters, supplies, buildings, and many other subjects. Two volumes are missing. The letters are arranged chronologically. In most of the volumes there is an alphabetical index to names of addressees. For letters sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, see entries 1076 and 1078. For separate letter books concerning logging, 1900-1914 and timber and allotments, 1904-14, see entries 1077-1079. For letters received and later letters sent, see entry 1075.

1081. APPLICATIONS FOR ANNUITIES.

1903-13. 3 in.
Copies -- prepared on forms -- of the applications of claimants for unpaid annuities. On each application there are a certificate of witnesses testifying to the identity of the claimant and a certification by the agency superintendent that the claimant had not received the payment. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or Indian name of claimant.

1082. ANNUITY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES.

1903-22. 7 in.
Each certificate -- prepared on a form -- consists of a certification by witnesses that the person was entitled to a payment (and sometimes a certification to the identity of the witnesses) and a certification by an interpreter stating that he had explained the certificate to all parties (and sometimes also stating that he had paid the claim). Arranged chronologically by date of certificate. Thereunder there are usually one or more groups of certificates for a particular payment, with the individual certificates arranged by assigned number.

1083. ANNUITY PAYMENT ROLLS.

1899-1905, 1912. 3 in.
Most of the rolls are for back payments and for payments to members of a single band. Arranged chronologically. There is little discernible order to the listing of names on individual rolls; family groups, however, are entered together and the entries are numbered. Not all of these rolls are duplicated by rolls maintained by the Washington office of the Bureau (entry 906).

1084. APPLICATIONS FOR LAND ALLOTMENTS.

July-Oct. 1902. Negligible.
Prepared on forms. Arranged chronologically.

1085. ALLOTMENT SCHEDULES.

1902-13. 1/2 in.
Chiefly supplemental schedules and schedules for changed allotments. Arranged chronologically. See also the allotment schedules among the records of the Chippewa Commission (entry 1307) and those of the Land Division (entry 343).

1086. APPLICATIONS FOR SALE OF INHERITED LAND.

1903-10. 1 in.
Submitted by heirs of Indian allottees. Arranged by number, which was assigned in chronological order; there are, however, gaps in the numbers.

1087. TIMBER CONTRACTS.

1900-17. 7 in.
Chiefly contracts for the sale of timber on Indian allotments. The contracts were made with lumber companies by Indians or by the agent on behalf of Indians. Included are a few contracts for the cutting of timber. Through 1911 the contracts are arranged in rough chronological order. Thereafter they are arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of timber contractor. There are other timber contracts, filed under the heading "Timber Sales," among the correspondence described in entry 1075.

1088. INDUSTRIAL SURVEY REPORTS.

ca. 1915. 3/4 in.
These reports -- prepared on forms -- give information concerning Indian allottees, particularly their land and improvements. Arranged by location of land.

1089. CENSUS.

Oct. 12, 1899. 1 vol. 1 in.
Prepared by the agent. Given for individual Indians are name, age, sex, and position in family. Arranged by band and thereunder by family group. The individuals for each band are numbered in order of listing. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

1090. DRAFT REGISTRATION CARDS.

June-Sept. 1918. 1 in.
Copies of cards completed for Indians enrolling for the Selective Service in World War I. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of Indian.

1091. QUARTERLY REPORTS OF FIELD MATRONS.

1911-15. 1/4 in.
Prepared on forms. Arranged chronologically.

1092. SANITARY REPORTS.

1898-1918. 3 in.
Monthly and quarterly reports of diseases and injuries. Included are some semiannual reports submitted by school and agency physicians. Arranged chronologically.

1093. MARRIAGE LICENSES AND CERTIFICATES.

1901-16. 1 vol. 1 in.
Record copies. Sometimes included are copies that were supposed to have been given to the married couple. They are special forms for use by Indians. Arranged chronologically. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

1094. BIRTH CERTIFICATES.

Feb.-June 1917. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Record copies of certificates for births in Oningum, Minn. The certificates were made and filed between February and June 1917; they are, however, for births as early as 1915. Arranged chronologically by date of filing.

1095. DEATH CERTIFICATES.

Jan.-Feb. 1919. Negligible.
Prepared on Bureau of Census forms. Arranged chronologically.

1096. RECORDS CONCERNING LICENSES TO TRADE.

1899-1909. 1/2 in.
Licenses, applications, bonds, statements of persons acquainted with applicants, and correspondence. Arranged alphabetically by name of trader or applicant. There are other records concerning traders' licenses with the correspondence described in entry 1075.

1097. ROSTERS OF EMPLOYEES.

1899-1922. 1 vol. 2 in.
Given for individual employees are name, sex, age, race, marital status, position, previous occupation, birthplace, residence, place of employment, dates of service, salary, and other information. The rosters cover different periods of time, usually a fiscal year or a quarter. Arranged chronologically. The entries in the individual rosters are often divided by place of employment (the agency itself and each of the several schools). See also rosters of employees among the records of the Employees Section of the Bureau.

1098. CASEBOOKS.

1899-1908. 3 vols. 4 in.
Consist of statements of receipts and disbursements of funds. Entries for receipts and for disbursements are on facing pages; and entries for each are arranged chronologically.

1099. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS.

1907-17. 4 vols. 5 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter, voucher number, and the amount received or disbursed under different appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

1100. SCHOOL REPORTS.

1899-1916. 1 ft.
These reports were prepared on forms. They were submitted monthly and quarterly by officials and teachers of Indian schools. The quarterly reports contain information concerning individual children. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1101. APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLLMENT IN NONRESERVATION SCHOOLS.

1908-14. 3 in.
Copies of applications -- prepared on forms -- that were retained by the agency; the originals were sent to the several schools. They contain information concerning the parents and past schooling of the applicants. Included with some of the applications are medical charts or correspondence. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of applicant. There are other applications with the "descriptive statements of children" (entry 1102) and the "statements of arrival and departure of pupils" (see entry 1106).

1102. "DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENTS OF CHILDREN."

1899-1907. 3/4 in.
Statements -- prepared on forms -- that were sent to schools to which children were being transferred. They give information concerning the individual children. Sometimes applications for enrollment (such as those described in entry 1101) accompany the forms. Arranged chronologically.

1103. SCHOOL CENSUS REPORTS.

ca. 1915-21. 1 in.
These reports were prepared on forms that were to be completed annually by the agency superintendent. They give information concerning both children in school and those not in school. Arranged chronologically by date of preparation and thereunder by reservation. A few reports are not dated.

1104. REPORTS OF ATTENDANCE OF INDIAN PUPILS IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

1909-21. 1 in.
Chiefly quarterly reports, but including some monthly and annual reports, that were submitted on standard forms by public school officials and teachers. They contain information concerning individual pupils. Arranged in rough chronological order.

1105. FARM STATISTICS REPORTS.

1904-7. 1/2 in.
Reports -- prepared on forms -- that were intended to be submitted annually for each Indian school. Arranged chronologically.

1106. MISCELLANEOUS SCHOOL RECORDS.

1899-1920. 1 in.
These records -- prepared on standard forms -- consist of "statements of arrival and departure of pupils" (with some applications for enrollment), reports on homes visited by teachers, reports on children eligible for transfer to nonreservation schools, reports on children ineligible to attend schools for normal children, yearly records of pupils' weights, reports on promotions, and reports on examinations. Arranged by kind of record and thereunder chronologically.

1107. LETTERS SENT BY LEECH LAKE BOARDING SCHOOL.

1910-12; Mar.-Apr. 1913. 3 vols. 3 in.
Press copies of letters sent chiefly to the agent. Included are letters sent to other persons, memoranda, minutes of mess meetings, rosters, study schedules, and circulars. Arranged chronologically.  There are incomplete subject indexes in the first two volumes.

1108. ATTENDANCE BOOKS OF LEECH LAKE BOARDING SCHOOL.

ca. 1902-14. 10 vols. 2 in.
Chiefly daily records of attendance of individual pupils, but including some recapitulations and academic ratings. Arranged for the most part chronologically.

1109. ENROLMENT BOOK OF LEECH LAKE BOARDING SCHOOL.

1916-19. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given for individual pupils is information concerning date of entry and -- when applicable -- promotions, desertions, illnesses, withdrawals, and other pertinent matters. The book was apparently maintained during the years given above, but the date of entry may be as early as 1910. Most of the entries are divided into those pertaining to boys and those pertaining to girls; thereunder they are arranged alphabetically by surname of pupil. The later entries are arranged chronologically by date of enrollment. There is an alphabetical name index in the volume.

1110. PROGRAMS AND OTHER RECORDS OF LEECH LAKE BOARDING SCHOOL.

1902-20. 1 in.
Study programs, Sunday evening programs, daily schedules, and final examinations. Arranged in rough chronological order. Some of the documents are not dated.

1111. EXAMINATION PAPERS OF LEECH LAKE BOARDING SCHOOL.

1917-20. 5 in.
Arranged by school grade. Included are a few essays on citizenship, which are arranged alphabetically by surname of pupil.

1112. ATTENDANCE BOOK OF SQUAW POINT DAY SCHOOL.

1909-12. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
Contains a daily attendance record for each pupil. Arranged chronologically.