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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


RECORDS OF THE EDUCATION DIVISION

The Education Division was established in September 1885, when it replaced the Civilization and Education Division. The Civilization Division, one of the original divisions of the Bureau, had been established in 1846, with responsibility for the moral, intellectual, and social improvement of the Indians. This responsibility included matters concerning schools and agricultural and mechanical pursuits. From 1873 until 1881 there was a separate Medical and Educational Division. In 1881 responsibility for educational matters was returned to the Civilization Division; and, by 1884, it was usually known as the Civilization and Education Division. With the establishment of the Education Division, noneducational matters were divided among other administrative units of the Bureau.

The term "education," however, was used in a broad sense to include the physical, mental, moral, industrial, and social advancement of the Indians. The Division had charge of school administration -- including plans and specifications of buildings, personnel, and the purchase of supplies. It supervised training in agricultural and mechanical pursuits. For many years it handled matters concerning law and order (including liquor suppression) and health and sanitation. During the reorganizations, beginning in 1907, personnel matters concerning agency employees were transferred from the Accounts Division, the issuance of traders' licenses was transferred from the Miscellaneous Division, and, for a short time, purchases were transferred from the Purchase Division (formerly the Finance Division). In 1908 construction work was assigned to a separate Construction Division, but in the following year it was returned to the Education Division.

Sections were apparently first organized in the Education Division on March 8, 1909, at the same time that the Purchase and Construction Divisions were consolidated with the Education Division. There were four original sections: Administration, Appointments, Construction, and Purchase.

There were many changes in the Division during the next several years. By 1914 there were seven sections in the Division: Employees, Law and Order, Health, Schools, Industries, Construction, and Statistics. The Employees Section had general supervision over field personnel matters. The Law and Order Section was responsible for liquor control; matters relating to marriage, divorce, and morals; and other matters of a miscellaneous nature. The Industries Section handled matters concerning agriculture, the employment of Indians, traders' licenses, roads, and exhibits. The Statistics Section, transferred from the Office of the Second Assistant Commissioner in 1914, kept statistical data for the Bureau. The work of the other Sections is clearly indicated by their names.

In 1924 a separate Health Division was established; and in 1926 the Statistics Section of the Education Division was transferred to the Office of the Chief Clerk. On June 1, 1926, the Education Division was designated as the Administrative Division. On August 15, 1930, the Schools Section of the Administrative Division became the Education Division. There was then both an Administrative Division and an Education Division. In December 1930 the Agricultural Extension and Industry Division (later known as the Division of Extension and Industry) was established, replacing the Industries Section of the Administrative Division.

With the reorganization of March 9, 1931; the Administrative Division was abolished. The Education Division, the Agricultural Extension and Industry Division, and the Health Division were placed under the general supervision of the Assistant to the Commissioner for Human Relations. Also placed under his direction were the Employees Section and a new Miscellaneous Activities Section, which was to handle work connected with law and order. The Construction Section was placed under the Chief Finance Officer.

On March 16, 1931, the Alaska Division of the Office of Education, which had charge of education and medical relief for the natives of Alaska, was transferred to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Its work relating to education was gradually merged with that of the Education Division; but separate records of the Alaska Division continued to be maintained.

The Education Division has continued in operation until the present time. It is, however, now called the Branch of Education and is in the Division of Community Services.

In addition to the Education Division in Washington, D.C., an elaborate field organization was gradually developed. The position of Superintendent of Indian Schools was established in 1883; and in 1910 its title was changed to Chief Supervisor of Education. Similar positions were created for the supervision of medical work, Indian employment, law enforcement, and construction. The supervisors directed the field work in their respective areas and eventually built up sizable staffs. Considerable confusion developed concerning the authority of the Education Division, the field supervisors, and the regular agency and school officials. In 1926 the position of General Superintendent was established, with overall responsibility for school, agricultural, and industrial matters. Under the reorganization of 1931 -- in an attempt to end the conflicting authority -- there were appointed directors of various services, who were in charge of both field and central office activities. A Director of Education was placed in general charge of educational matters.

The records described in this inventory as those of the Education Division include records other than those of the Division itself; and, on the other hand, some records once with those of the Division are now with the records of other administrative units. Included with the records of the Division are some records that were inherited from the Civilization Division and the Medical and Educational Division. There are also some records of the Chief Supervisor of Education, the General Superintendent, and the Office of the Director of Education.

The records for the Administrative Division are included with those of the Education Division. Most of these records, however, relate to school and educational activities rather than to other activities of the Administrative Division. In most cases the records concerning other activities were transferred to new divisions or other units as those units were separated from the Education Division or the Administrative Division. There are two noteworthy exceptions, (1) There are three series of records of the Industries Section (entries 760-762) that were not transferred to the Agricultural Extension and Industry Division. (2) There are records of the Law and Order Section, which for the most part are records of the Chief Special Officer rather than belonging to the central office. The Chief Special Officer maintained his office in the field -- at first in Salt Lake City, Utah, and later in Denver, Colo. -- instead of in Washington, D.C. There are records of this office as late as 1947. From 1931 until 1947 law and order work in Washington, D.C., was assigned, successively, to the Miscellaneous Activities Section and to the Tribal Welfare Division of the Bureau. Since there are no other records of these two units in the National Archives and since all except two of the series of records of the Law and Order Section and the Office of Chief Special Officer described in entries 763-772 include records before 1931, their records are described with the records of the Education Division.

See also the records of the Health, Statistics, Construction, and Extension and Industry Divisions and of the Employees Section. Records concerning purchases are now with the records of the Finance Division.

General Records

712. REGISTER OF LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE MEDICAL AND EDUCATIONAL DIVISION.

1878-81. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual letters received by the Bureau and referred to the Division for examination and action give file number and heading, date of receipt of letter in the Division, date of referral of letter to a clerk, name or initials of clerk, subject of letter, and often an indication of the action taken. Arranged chronologically by date of referral of letter. No earlier registers of the Division have been retained. These letters have also been entered in the general series of registers of letters received by the Bureau (entries 75 and 88). The original letters are usually with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entries 79 and 91).

713. INDEXES TO LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE EDUCATION DIVISION.

1895-1907. 13 vols. 2 ft.
Indexes -- by names of writers and by names of schools and other subjects -- to letters received by the Bureau and referred to the Education Division for examination and action. There is one index volume for each year. Within each volume the entries are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of correspondent or by subject. For school entries and some of the other entries, there are subheadings. These letters were also indexed in the general indexes to letters received by the Bureau (entry 87), but they are under headings different from the ones used in the volumes described in this entry. For registers, see entries 88 and 89. The letters indexed are usually with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

714. REGISTERS OF LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE EDUCATION DIVISION.

1906-8. 4 vols. 6 in.
Entries for individual letters received by the Bureau and referred to the Education Division for examination and action give file number, date of receipt in the Division, name or office of writer, date of letter, subject, and an indication of the action taken. There are only a few entries for letters received after the classified filing system was adopted in August 1907. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt in the Division. No earlier registers of the Division have been retained. For indexes, see entry 713. These letters were also entered in the main series of registers of letters received by the Bureau (entries 88 and 89). The original letters are usually with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

715. INDEXES TO LETTERS RECEIVED BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN SCHOOLS.

1895-1907. 5 vols. 7 in.
Indexes -- by names of writers and by names of schools and other subjects -- to letters addressed to the Superintendent of Indian Schools. The volumes are for the years 1895, 1896-97, 1898-1902, 1902-6, and 1906-7, respectively. The entries in each volume are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of writer or by subject. The letters that are indexed in these volumes are also entered in the general indexes to letters received by the Bureau (entry 87). The letters are usually with the general incoming correspondence (entry 91).

715A. LETTERS CONCERNING SCHOOLS SENT BY THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR TO OFFICIALS IN INDIAN TERRITORY

1898-1906. 1 vol.
Arrangement of these letters is in chronological order. These letters pertain to many matters, including appointment of officials, appropriation of funds, and improvement of school conditions. They are in press copy format and some are barely legible. There is a very incomplete index up front. On the left side of most letters is a reference to numbered correspondence of the Indian Territory Division. (new entry)

716. SUMMARIES OF WORK COMPLETED AND RECORDS RELATING TO MISSION SCHOOLS.

1887-91. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. Included are weekly summaries of work completed in the Division, 1887-88; weekly reports concerning uncompleted work, March-May 1890; a transcript of a conversation between the Commissioner and two representatives of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions; and some letters, memoranda, and other records relating chiefly to mission schools and to the teaching of English -- as opposed to Indian languages -- in Indian schools. Each type of record is arranged for the most part chronologically. Included also is a loose copy of an 1892 report from the Director to the President of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. For later reports of work completed in the Division, see entry 717.

717. MEMORANDA AND OTHER RECORDS.

1905-15. 3 vols. 4 in.
Chiefly press copies (but including a few carbon copies) of memoranda, tables, schedules, contracts with mission schools, reports on the status of work in the Division, and some other records. Volume 3 contains only reports on the status of work. The memoranda and other records relate to appropriation bills, personnel matters, bonds, investigations, health of Indians, mission schools, office procedures, and other pertinent subjects. Arranged chronologically. The first two volumes are indexed for the most part by name of person, tribe, or agency. For earlier reports concerning work in the Division, see entry 716.

718. CIRCULARS ISSUED BY THE EDUCATION DIVISION.

1897-1909. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. The circulars relate primarily to the operation of schools. Arranged chronologically and numbered in order. The volume includes a table of contents and an incomplete index. Also included are loose processed copies of some of these circulars.

719. CIRCULARS ISSUED BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN SCHOOLS.

1899-1908. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Relate particularly to meetings and institutes. The circulars are arranged chronologically and are numbered in order.

720. AUTHORITIES.

1902-5. 3 vols. 3 in.
Press copies of authorities issued by the Secretary of the Interior or his representative relating to establishment of positions, salary increases, settlement of debts for irregular services, and other matters of concern to the Education Division. Arranged chronologically. There is a register in each of the volumes. Most of the original authorities are with the records described in entry 110.

721. LETTERS SENT CONCERNING TEXTBOOKS.

1907-9. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies. Many of these letters were sent to publishers who had submitted textbooks for examination. Included are a few letters not relating to textbooks. Arranged chronologically. There is an incomplete index to names of addressees and to names of agencies and schools concerned.

722. OFFICE FILE OF HERVEY B. PEAIRS, CHIEF SUPERVISOR OF EDUCATION AND GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT.

1910-27. 3 in.
Included are letters received, copies of letters sent, programs, copies of speeches, clippings, statistical reports, and outlines. The records relate to examination papers, courses of study, textbooks, conferences, and other pertinent subjects. The records are arranged for the most part by subject and thereunder chronologically. Other records of Mr. Peairs are among the later records of the Director of Education (entry 723).

723. OFFICE FILE OF W. CARSON RYAN, DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION.

1931-35. 2 ft.
Included are letters received, copies of letters sent, reports, memoranda, copies of addresses and speeches, historical sketches, notes, clippings, congressional bills, maps, bulletins, copies of pamphlets, and other printed and processed reference materials. The records concern Federal-State relations, program planning, field trips, conferences, mission schools, histories of schools and reservations, and other pertinent subjects. Arranged in part by subject, in part alphabetical by name of State, and in part alphabetically by name of agency or other jurisdiction. The documents filed under a specific heading are usually arranged chronologically. There are some records dated before 1931 and a few records dated after 1935.

724. OFFICE FILE OF MARY STEWART, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION.

1929-36. 3 ft.
Included are letters received, copies of letters sent, memoranda, reports, survey forms, worksheets, historical sketches, printed reference material, copies of addresses, photographs, and tables. Many of the records are in draft form. Most of them relate to a survey of school enrollment and vocational opportunities for Indians in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and northern California. The survey was conducted at the Salem School in Chemawa, Oreg., under the supervision of Lulu Eldridge; and many of these records were forwarded by her to Miss Stewart. Most of the survey records are arranged by name of State. The other records are arranged for the most part by name of relevant agency or school.

725. REFERENCE BOOKS CONCERNING SCHOOLS.

1882-1909. 8 vols. 10 in.
Consist chiefly of abstracts from letters and reports among the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91). The abstracts relate particularly to the physical condition of school buildings and to general conditions at schools. Arranged for the most part chronologically, with some breakdowns by type of school. The material in the individual volumes is arranged by name of school or agency, most often in alphabetical order. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to jurisdictions and sometimes to other pertinent subjects.

726. BRIEFS OF INVESTIGATIONS.

1899-1911. 2 vols. 3 in.
Chiefly press copies of abstracts of records relating to charges, evidence, and recommendations of inspecting officers concerning charges against Bureau employees. Arranged in rough chronological order. In each volume there is an index to names of persons and agencies and also to certain subjects. Most of the original records are among the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

727. ABSTRACTS OF LETTERS RELATING TO EPIDEMICS.

1901-8. 2 vols. 1 in.
There is one volume for the first part of 1901 and one volume for the rest of the period through 1908. Entries in each volume are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of jurisdiction. The letters are usually among the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

727A. ROSTER OF SCHOOLS, NEW YORK TO MAKAH

1862-64. 1 vol.
Arrangement within this volume is by agency. A table of contents by agency, labeled "Index," is at the beginning of the volume. Information covered in the roster is number of letter, tribe, designation and locality of school, numbers of teachers and scholars, under what charge, annual amounts of funding, treaty under which funds applied, population, wealth in individual property, number of missionaries and what denominations, and remarks. Some of the remarks relate to agricultural and other economic activities. (new entry)

728. STATISTICS RELATING TO EDUCATION.

1859-69. 2 vols. 3 in.
Data taken from reports that were submitted by Indian agents.  Included is information concerning the location of schools, the number of pupils and teachers, the religious denominations operating schools, financial support, the population of tribes; the wealth of tribes in individual property, and the number of missionaries. One volume is for the period 1859-65; the other volume is for the period 1865-69. Information in each volume is arranged by agency and thereunder chronologically. Most of the original reports have not been found.

729. STATISTICS RELATING TO INDIAN SCHOOLS.

1874-84. 4 vols. 9 in.
Rosters of employees and information concerning attendance and progress of children at Indian schools. This information was taken from reports submitted by agents and school superintendents. Also included in the earlier volumes is information concerning buildings, costs, contracts, and other pertinent subjects. The volumes are for the years 1874-78, 1878-80, 1880-83, and 1883-84, respectively. Information in each volume is arranged for the most part by name of school or agency. In each volume there is an alphabetical index by name of State or Territory, or by name of school or agency.

730. STATISTICS RELATING TO INDIAN SCHOOLS.

1882-1909. 22 vols. 3 ft.
Information taken from monthly and quarterly reports -- submitted by agents and superintendents -- concerning both Government and privately operated schools. The original reports usually have not been retained. The form of the volumes varies somewhat, but entries usually give information concerning salaries of teachers and other employees, capacity of schools, number of daily sessions, enrollment, attendance, and different kinds of expenditures. Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder for the most part alphabetically by name of agency or school. The entries for each school are arranged chronologically by month or quarter. The 1886-89 entries are in no definite order and are incomplete. In each volume there is an alphabetical index by name of agency or school. For later reports, see entry 745.

731. STATISTICS RELATING TO SCHOOLS.

1890-1908. 2 vols. 2 in.
Chiefly press copies of tables, prepared quarterly, showing enrollment and attendance at different types of schools as compared with the same quarter of the previous year. Included are press copies of some tables prepared for other periods of time and of some lists and schedules relating to contract schools and school operation costs. Arranged chronologically.

732. STATISTICS FROM SEMIMONTHLY SCHOOL REPORTS.

1893-95. 1 vol. 1 in.
Figures for school capacity, enrollment, and attendance, which were taken from reports submitted by school superintendents. The original reports have not been retained. Arranged alphabetically by name of school or agency and thereunder chronologically by date of report. Indexed by name of school.

733. STATISTICS FROM MONTHLY SCHOOL REPORTS.

Jan.-Oct. 1895. 1 vol. 1 in.
Figures for enrollment and attendance, which were taken from reports submitted by school superintendents. The original reports have not been retained. Arranged alphabetically by name of school or agency and thereunder chronologically by date of report. Indexed by name of school or agency.

734. STATISTICS FROM MONTHLY SCHOOL REPORTS.

July 1895-June 1896. 1 vol. 2 in.
Figures concerning capacity, enrollment, attendance, and status of pupils, which were taken from monthly reports submitted by school superintendents. Sometimes included are abstracts concerning outstanding occurrences during the month and various comments. The original reports have not been retained. This volume contains considerably more detailed information than that in the volumes described in entries 732 and 733. The entries are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of school or agency and thereunder in chronological order by date of report. Indexed by name of school. For similar information for a later period, see entry 735.

735. STATISTICS FROM MONTHLY SCHOOL REPORTS.

1904-10. 3 vols. 5 in.
Information concerning pupils (including the number of those who had run away, those who had returned, those who had been expelled, and those who had died), which was taken from monthly reports submitted by school superintendents. The reports have not been retained. Each volume is for a period of two school years. The entries are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of school or agency. The entries for individual schools are arranged in chronological order by date of report. In one of the volumes the entries for nonreservation schools are in a separate section. Each volume is indexed by name of school.

736. ATTENDANCE BOOKS FOR CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

1900-1901, 1906-7. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual schools give name of teacher, number of days in session, and information concerning enrollment and attendance of Indian, white, and Negro children. Entries for Choctaw schools for fiscal years 1901 and 1907 are on alternating pages; they are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of school and thereunder chronologically. There are only a few entries for the second half of each fiscal year. Entries for Chickasaw schools are for fiscal year 1907 only. They also are arranged in rough alphabetical order by name of school and thereunder chronologically. There is an alphabetical index to names of schools and teachers.

737. ATTENDANCE STATISTICS FOR CHEROKEE DAY SCHOOLS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

1906. 1 vol. 1 in.
The volume -- intended to be used for fiscal year 1907 -- consists mainly of figures for September 1906. Entries for individual schools give name of teacher, number of days in session, and figures for enrollment and attendance of Indian, white, and Negro children. Arranged alphabetically by name of school. There is an alphabetical index to names of schools.

738. RECORD OF SCHOOLS.

1895. 1 vol. 2 in.
The information in this volume was taken from reports submitted by agents and superintendents. Entries for individual schools give name, location, date of organization, capacity, brief description of buildings, and information concerning water supply, drainage, sewerage, ventilation, and facilities for industrial education. Arranged alphabetically by name of school or agency. The original reports are with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

739. ABSTRACTS OF OFFICIAL REPORTS CONCERNING SCHOOL PLANTS.

1898-1905. 5 vols. 9 in.
Abstracts of reports from supervisors, superintendents, inspectors, special agents, and others concerning school locations, school buildings, lighting, electrical systems, water supply, sewerage, heating, and other physical aspects of school plants. Included are certain recommendations. Arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of State and thereunder by name of school. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of schools. The original reports are among the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91).

740. RECORD OF SCHOOL CONTRACTS.

1887-1911. 2 vols. 2 in.
Information concerning contracts for the education of Indian children, which were negotiated with public school systems and with private groups (mainly missionary societies). In the first volume there is also some information concerning authorities for transportation of pupils. Entries for individual contracts give name of school, name of contractor, number of pupils, rate charged for each pupil, total amount of contract, and, for the later years, information concerning approval by the Secretary of the Interior and financial settlements. Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder in various ways. For most of the years during the period concerned there is some breakdown by type of school. There is an incomplete alphabetical subject index in the first volume.

74l. REGISTER OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CONTRACTS.

1923-24. 1 vol. 1 in.
A register of contracts made with public schools for the education of Indian children. Each entry gives contract number, name of school, district, number of pupils, daily rate for each pupil, total amount charged, and information concerning administrative handling of the contract. Arranged alphabetically by name of agency and thereunder by contract number. In the back of the volume there are entries arranged by contract number. There is also an alphabetical index to names of agencies.

742. ANNUAL SCHOOL CENSUS REPORTS.

1912-39. 32 ft.
Standard forms usually submitted by superintendents in charge of reservations. They are actually census rolls of children of school age, both in and out of schools. Entries for individual children give name, sex, age, tribe and degree of Indian blood, distance of home from a public school, and name of parent or guardian. Included for children attending school are name of school, grade, length of school term, and number of grades; and included for children not attending school is the reason for nonattendance. Included also are some correspondence and copies of sections of the annual statistical reports submitted by superintendents (see entries 961 and 963). The forms are arranged alphabetically by name of reservation or jurisdiction, thereunder by year, and thereunder for the most part by type of school. The names of children on these rolls also appear on the regular Indian census rolls (entry 964).

742A. CENSUSES OF SOUTHERN UTES OF SCHOOL AGE AT SOUTHERN UTE AGENCY AND OF MESCALERO AND WHITE MOUNTAIN APACHES

1892. 1 vol.
Arranged into three groupings: Southern Utes, Mescalero Apaches, and White Mountain Apaches, thereunder into smaller bands for the Southern Utes and White Mountain Apaches. Information given is parent's name and children's name, gender, age, and school. Whether the children are orphans is also indicated. All the information was gathered in the fall of 1892 by the various school superintendents. (new entry)

743. MONTHLY SCHOOL REPORTS FOR TULALIP AGENCY IN WASHINGTON.

1874-85, 1889-1911. 2 in.
Standard forms submitted for both Government and private contract schools. They give summary information concerning pupils and other pertinent information. Arranged chronologically. Included are a semimonthly report for Tulalip Agency and a monthly report (June 1883) for the Chehalis Industrial School. For quarterly reports of the Puyallup and Tulalip Agencies, see entry 744. No other monthly or quarterly school reports before 1910 have been retained among the records of the Education Division, but there are some among the records of field offices, particularly the Central Superintendency and the Mackinac, White Earth, and Leech Lake Agencies.

744. QUARTERLY SCHOOL REPORTS FOR PUYALLUP AND TULALIP AGENCIES IN WASHINGTON.

1886-1910. 3 in.
Forms submitted for Government and private contract schools. They give information concerning attendance of individual pupils and, for some years, information concerning individual employees and summary information. Arranged by agency and thereunder chronologically. For monthly reports of the Tulalip Agency, see entry 743. No other monthly or quarterly school reports before 1910 have been retained among the records of the Education Division; but there are some among the records of field offices, particularly the Central Superintendency and the Mackinac, White Earth, and Leech Lake Agencies.

745. QUARTERLY SCHOOL REPORTS.

1910-39. 58 ft.
Standard forms submitted for both Government and private contract schools. For most of the years given above there is information concerning individual pupils as well as summary information. Entries for individual children usually give name, age, tribe and degree of Indian blood, date of entry in school, grade type of training, number of days in attendance, distance of home from a public school, and other pertinent information. Beginning in 1936 the information concerning individual pupils (except for those pupils who were dropped from the school rolls) was gradually eliminated. There are few reports for the years 1925-36, when semiannual reports (entry 746) were in general use. The reports are arranged by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by name of agency or other jurisdiction, thereunder by name of school, and thereunder chronologically. Except for those reports described in entries 743 and 744, the earlier reports were not retained among the records of the Education Division. There are, however, volumes of statistical information taken from those reports (entries 728-735). For separate reports for schools in Alaska, see entry 818.

746. SEMIANNUAL SCHOOL REPORTS.

1925-37. 18 ft.
Standard forms submitted for Government and private contract schools. There is information concerning individual pupils as well as summary data. Entries for individual pupils give name, age, tribe and degree of Indian blood, date of entry in school, grade, attendance record, distance from home to nearest public school, course taken, and other pertinent information. Arranged by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by name of agency or other jurisdiction, thereunder by name of school, and thereunder chronologically. For earlier and later periods, quarterly reports (entry 745) were used instead of semiannual reports.

747. ANNUAL SCHOOL REPORTS.

1924-37. 4 ft.
Standard forms submitted for both Government and private contract schools. They give much the same information concerning individual pupils and summary data as the quarterly and semiannual reports described in entries 745 and 746. Many of these annual reports are submitted on forms intended for quarterly and semiannual reports. Annual reports were not submitted as systematically as were the quarterly and semiannual reports. Included with the annual reports are some correspondence concerning attendance and some lists of pupils for the years 1913-19. The reports are arranged by year, thereunder alphabetically by name of agency or other jurisdiction, and thereunder by name of school.

748. PUBLIC SCHOOL MONTHLY ATTENDANCE REPORTS.

1913-14. 1/4 in.
Standard forms submitted by public schools (in Nebraska and South Dakota only) concerning the attendance of individual Indian pupils. Arranged by State, thereunder by name of school, and thereunder chronologically.

749. PUBLIC SCHOOL QUARTERLY ATTENDANCE REPORTS.

1913-15, 1922-37. 7 ft.
Standard forms submitted by public schools with Indian pupils. The forms vary for different periods; but they all give general information concerning the school and some information concerning the attendance of individual Indian children. Arranged for the most part by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by name of agency, thereunder chronologically by date of report, and thereunder by name of school. Reports for some of the years are incomplete.

750. REPORTS CONCERNING EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS.

1924-25, 1930-34. 5 in.
Statistical reports on standard forms. Arranged by school year and thereunder alphabetically by name of school or agency. Only a representative sampling of these reports has been retained.

751. MISCELLANEOUS SCHOOL REPORTS.

1901-36. 2 in.
Chiefly statistical reports on standard forms. Included are copies of annual statistical reports of agents, annual statistics for public schools, descriptive statements concerning transferred pupils, statistics for mission schools, and reports concerning school farms. Arranged by type of report.

752. EXAMINATION PAPERS.

1888, 1899, 1915. 6 in.
Samples of examination papers of Indian pupils. The papers for 1888 are from the Green Bay Agency; those for 1899 are from the Grand Junction School; and those for 1915 are from Haskell Institute.

752A. SCHOLASTIC REPORTS ON COMMERCIAL STUDENTS AT THE HASKELL INSTITUTE

1947-1950.
Arrangement is chronological. These are reports on students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas who were enrolled in the two-year post-high school commercial program. The reports provide grade information and record student progress and, on occasion, contain additional comments on individual students. The reports cover six-week terms. Also included are tests, curriculums, and reports sent to the University of Chicago for analysis in June 1949. (new entry)

752B. MISCELLANEOUS STUDENT RECORDS RELATING PRINCIPALLY TO LOAN APPLICATIONS

1948-49.
Unarranged. The bulk of the records are background information sheets completed by graduating Indian high school seniors who sought student loans. These forms provide biographical information and information on their schools. The forms are sometimes accompanied by filled-out test forms. Also included are a list of Indian students in schools listing the institution they were attending; a list of students broken down by state listing the institution they were attending, their tribe, their loan amount, and additional comments about their progress; a draft report on educational loan students in college; and materials related to statistics and their interpretation that relates to the previously mentioned report. (new entry)

753. STATISTICS FROM MONTHLY SANITARY REPORTS.

1880-81. 1 vol. 1 in.
Given for each agency are the number of cases of different diseases (by type) and the number of births, deaths, and vaccinations. Arranged in a rough geographical pattern by name of agency and thereunder by month. There is an alphabetical index to names of agencies. Most of the original reports have not been found.

754. SCHOOL CALENDARS.

1930-34. 1 ft.
These calendars were prepared at the beginning of each school year. They usually consist of a schedule for the school year; daily programs; a roster of employees; and information concerning details of teachers, special events, and activities. Only a representative sampling of the calendars has been retained. Included with the calendars are some correspondence and a number of descriptive pamphlets concerning schools. A few of the calendars and other items are dated before 1930. The calendars are arranged alphabetically by name of school or agency and thereunder chronologically.

755. OFFICE FILE OF CARRIE A. LYFORD.

1929-32. 6 in.
Miss Lyford was Demonstration Teacher of Home Economics and later was Associate Supervisor of Home Economics. The file consists of letters received, copies of letters sent, reports, notes on field trips, copies of Bureau correspondence, and other records. Arranged for the most part by type of record and thereunder chronologically.

756. REFERENCE FILE OF CARRIE A. LYFORD.

ca. 1921-32. 6 in.
Copies of publications concerning child care and teaching, textiles and clothing, family relationships, and other subjects; Bureau circulars and other procedural issuances; sample forms; and other materials, mainly printed or processed. Arranged alphabetically by subject. For a file of Miss Lyford's correspondence, see entry 755.

757. EDUCATIONAL SURVEY FORMS.

1929-32. 1 ft.
The purpose of the survey was to determine which children should attend public schools and which children should receive Federal aid. Given on forms for individual families and for summaries is information concerning members of families, homelife, distance of home from a public school, and other pertinent matters. Arranged alphabetically by name of school, agency, or tribe. There are records for the Chemawa (Salem) School; for the Cheyenne and Arapaho, Cheyenne River, Consolidated Chippewa, Crow Creek, and Kiowa Agencies; and for the Creek Nation. The forms for the Chemawa School are arranged by name of Indian agency to which the pupils belonged.

758. REPORTS OF SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS.

1932-36. 1 in.
Chiefly monthly narrative reports of social workers, but including also some reports of home economics teachers. Arranged alphabetically by name of agency and thereunder chronologically.

759. CASE RECORDS CONCERNING THE TRAVELING MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC.

1935. 6 in.
Reports of school social workers, case summaries, case record cards, health survey forms, and other records relating to the work of the clinic, which was organized as part of the school social work program to study problem Indian children in Oklahoma. Arranged by number assigned to each case in rough chronological order by date of examination.

759A. PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO INDIAN SCHOOLS

ca. 1885-1952.
Unarranged. These records consist almost completely of volumes, mostly published. Examples are curriculums, manual for cooks, mission school records, Regulations Governing Examinations, Rules for the Indian School Service, Regulations for the Indian Office Indian Schools, Statistics of Indian Schools, Routes to Indian Agencies and Schools, Report of the Superintendent of Indian Schools, Regulations Concerning Education in the Indian Territory, Regulations of the Indian Office, and periodicals of individual Indian schools. Some of these, especially the publications of individual Indian schools contain photographs and illustrations. (new entry)

Records of the Industries Section

760. REPORTS CONCERNING GRADUATES OF INDIAN SCHOOLS.

1914-16. 2 in.
Replies from heads of Indian schools to requests for the names and addresses of graduates before 1914 and of members of the 1914 and 1916 graduating classes. Included are some copies of the letters of inquiry sent to the schools. Arranged alphabetically by name of school and thereunder chronologically. These records are for only those schools with names beginning with the initials A through P.

76l. RECORDS CONCERNING FORMER STUDENTS.

1910-25. 3 in.
Letters received from and copies of letters sent to Indians and to agency and school superintendents, completed forms, and other records relating to the careers of Indians who had attended Indian schools and to their opportunities for employment. These records include those of a general nature and those relating to individual Indians. Arranged in rough chronological order; related documents are sometimes fastened together.

762. REPORTS OF INDUSTRIAL SURVEYS.

1922-29. 22 ft.
Most of these surveys were made in 1922 and 1923. The reports, submitted by agency superintendents, consist chiefly of descriptions of home and farm conditions of individual Indian families. Included are many photographs. Included also are some correspondence concerning surveys, copies of annual narrative reports of superintendents, and other pertinent records. The records are arranged alphabetically by name of agency and thereunder chronologically by date of report.

Records of the Law and Order Section

763. RECORD OF ARRESTS.

1909-10. 2 vols. 3 in.
Entries for individual arrests -- chiefly for liquor violations -- give name of person who was arrested, place and date of arrest, charge, and name of person reporting; and, when applicable, they give date of indictment, amount of bond, court in which case was tried, names of witnesses, date of plea of guilty, date of conviction or of dismissal, date and amount of sentence, and other information. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of arrest. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of persons who were arrested.

764. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE CHIEF SPECIAL OFFICER RELATING TO PEYOTE.

1908-11, 1915-18. 4 in.
Letters received (all for the 1908-11 period are copies) and copies of letters sent. Most of the correspondence is with agency superintendents and relates to the use of peyote by the Indians. Arranged in rough chronological order.

765. WEEKLY NARRATIVE REPORTS OF SPECIAL OFFICERS AND DEPUTIES.

1915-17. 2 ft.
These reports relate mainly to liquor control activities. Included are some special reports and correspondence. The weekly reports are arranged alphabetically by surname of special officer or deputy and thereunder chronologically by date of report.

766. REPORTS OF LIQUOR SEIZURE ON RESERVATIONS.

1915-17. 5 in.
Standard forms -- completed by special officers and deputies -- mainly for seizures in Minnesota. Given for each seizure are date, place, kind and quantity of liquor, method of disposal, name of owner, names of consignor and consignee (when applicable), and a statement of facts. Arranged in rough chronological order.

767. REGISTERS OF PERSONNEL ACTIONS.

1911-15. 7 vols. 6 in.
Individual entries give date of appointment, date of renewal of commission, and dates of other personnel actions concerning special officers and deputies. Sometimes included is information concerning compensation and accounts. Entries are arranged by fiscal year, thereunder by name of officer or deputy in rough chronological order by date of first entry concerning him. Material in two of the volumes duplicates in part that included in other volumes. There are some loose sheets dated 1917. Each volume is indexed by name of special officer or deputy.

768. CASEBOOK.

1908-14. 1 vol. 2 in.
Consists of statements of receipts and disbursements of funds. The entries for receipts and those for disbursements are on facing pages; entries for each are arranged chronologically. Some certificates of deposit are attached.

769. RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF FUNDS.

1915-17. 1 vol. 1 in.
Entries for individual receipts or disbursements give date, from whom received or to whom disbursed, purpose, quarter of year, voucher number, and amount received or disbursed under various appropriation headings. Arranged chronologically.

770. CASE REPORTS.

1923-33. 4 ft.
These reports, prepared by special officers, relate chiefly to liquor law violations. Each report gives title of case (including the name of the defendant), charge, place where offense was committed, names of witnesses, statement of evidence and of action taken, and other information. With the reports are included some affidavits and correspondence. The records are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of defendant and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of report. Later case reports are with the correspondence of the Chief Special Officer (entries 771 and 772).

771. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE OF THE CHIEF SPECIAL OFFICER.

1933-47. 7 ft.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent, but including memoranda, narrative and statistical reports, case reports (see entry 770), transcripts of testimony, affidavits, notices of personnel action, photographs, clippings, tribal constitutions and law codes, council proceedings, and other records for the period when Louis C. Mueller was Chief Special Officer. The correspondence is with Washington officials of the Bureau, special officers and deputies, agency superintendents, U.S. attorneys, and others. It relates to law enforcement (including individual cases), jurisdiction of tribal and Federal courts, appointment of deputy special officers, administrative matters, and other pertinent subjects) arranged alphabetically by name of State. For the individual States there is general correspondence and correspondence relating to each of the agencies in the State; arranged alphabetically by name of agency. There are a few separate records relating to special subjects. The individual documents within each heading are arranged chronologically. For separate correspondence with special officers, see entry 772.

772. CORRESPONDENCE OF THE CHIEF SPECIAL OFFICER WITH SPECIAL OFFICERS.

1933-47. 3 ft.
Chiefly letters received and copies of letters sent. Included are statistical reports, case reports (see entry 770), expenditure reports and other financial records, notices of personnel actions, and other records relating both to case activities and to administrative matters. Arranged alphabetically by surname of special officer. Thereunder case reports are usually separate from the other records. The individual documents within each group of records are arranged chronologically. There are few records dated before 1942. For other correspondence with special officers, see entry 771.

RECORDS OF THE HEALTH DIVISION

The Health Division was established in the early part of 1924. From July 1924 until 1931 it was called the Medical Division. Until 1924 health activities had been assigned to the Education Division.

The objectives of the Indian health program were the prevention and the cure of illnesses -- particularly tuberculosis, trachoma, venereal diseases, the diseases of childhood and infancy. Medical and dental services were provided to Indians in hospitals, sanatorium, and dispensaries and by health officials who traveled from place to place.

The medical service of the Bureau was reorganized, in 1926, in cooperation with the Public Health Service. This agency detailed a physician to serve as Chief Medical Director. Four districts were established, each under a District Medical Director. In 1931 the designation of the Chief Medical Director was changed to Director of Health.

Physicians and nurses were assigned to agency and school hospitals. Additional physicians were employed on a contract basis. There were traveling special physicians -- eye, ear, nose, and throat specialists -- who concerned themselves particularly with trachoma work. There were also traveling field dentists and field nurses. Field matrons were employed to teach hygiene, housekeeping, and care of children to Indian women.

In 1940 the Health Division became part of the new Community Services Branch. In 1949 the nomenclature was reversed, and it became the Branch of Health of the Community Services. Division. On July 1, 1955; responsibility for Indian health activities was transferred to the Public Health Service.

The records of the Health Division now in the National Archives consist chiefly of different kinds of reports. Correspondence concerning health activities is filed under the appropriate headings in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121); in the Inspection Reports (entry 953); and in Special Agent Files (entry 949). Many of the reports were routed through the Statistics Section (later Division); and there is correspondence in the records of the Statistics Division concerning the submission and correction of medical reports.

In Record Group 90, Records of the Public Health Service, there are records relating to Indian health activities.

773. PHYSICIANS' ANNUAL AND SEMIANNUAL REPORTS.

1925-30. 3 in.
Statistical reports -- on standard forms -- submitted by physicians at agencies and schools. The annual reports give information concerning births, deaths, and cases treated; and they include special data concerning tuberculosis, trachoma, epidemic diseases, and venereal diseases. The semiannual reports give more detailed information concerning individual ailments. Included are some transmittal letters and some other correspondence. For 1925 there are only a few reports for Chippewa Indian jurisdictions; and there is only one report for 1929. Some reports for 1930 were actually written in 1931. The reports are arranged by year; and those for 1926 are also arranged alphabetically by name of jurisdiction. These reports were discontinued in January 1931.

774. HOSPITAL REPORTS.

1923-38. 33 ft.
Several kinds of statistical reports -- chiefly on standard forms. The reports are mainly weekly and monthly ones, but included are some annual and semiannual summary reports. Before 1926 the reports are fragmentary. Through 1930 there are chiefly two kinds of reports: Hospital Reports, usually submitted monthly, with information concerning the number of patients and medical and surgical services rendered; and Weekly Census Reports, with information concerning bed occupancy and the number of patients and employees. Included also are some copies of the health sections of annual statistical reports of agencies and schools (see entries 961 and 963) and monthly Trachoma Reports for fiscal years 1929 and 1930 (see entry 776 for other Trachoma Reports). In 1931 the several kinds of reports were replaced by Weekly Reports of Health Activities. In July 1932 these were replaced by two kinds of reports: Weekly Reports of In-Patient and Dispensary Patients, and Weekly Reports of Domiciliary Patients and Out-Patients. There are no reports for the period July 1933 through June 1936. For fiscal years 1937 and 1933 there are Monthly Reports of In-Patients and Dispensary Patients. With these there are often individual cards for patients suffering from more than one ailment. The reports for domiciliary and out-patients, for these two fiscal years, are filed separately (entry 775). Arranged alphabetically by name of jurisdiction (school, agency, or hospital) and thereunder in rough chronological order. The different types of reports for each fiscal year are usually separate. The name of the agency or school is ordinarily used rather than the name of the hospital; and there may be more than one hospital in a jurisdiction. Reports for fiscal year 1928 are among the records of the Statistics Division (entry 961).

775. PHYSICIANS' REPORTS OF DOMICILIARY PATIENTS AND OUT-PATIENTS.

1936-38. 2 ft.
Annual, semiannual, and monthly statistical reports on standard forms. They concern medical work done outside agency or school hospital buildings or attached dispensaries; and they give information concerning calls, treatments, births, deaths, diseases treated, examinations, and laboratory tests. There are reports for fiscal years 1937 and 1938. Arranged by fiscal year and thereunder, in descending order, alphabetically by name of State, alphabetically by name of jurisdiction, and chronologically by date of report. There are earlier reports of this type among the Hospital Reports (entry 774).

776. TRACHOMA REPORTS.

1926-June 1928; July-Dec. 1930. 1 ft.
Monthly statistical reports -- on standard forms -- submitted by physicians. Sometimes attached are lists of names of patients. The reports relate to examinations and treatments for trachoma. Included are a few 1925 reports and also some narrative reports, transmittal letters, and other kinds of records. The 1926-28 reports are separate from the 1930 reports. Each set is arranged alphabetically by name of jurisdiction and thereunder chronologically. Reports for the period from July 1928 through June 1930 are with the Hospital Reports (entry 774). Trachoma Reports were discontinued in January 1931.

777. REPORTS OF SPECIAL PHYSICIANS.

1925-32. 8 in.
Statistical and narrative reports for various time periods. Many of the reports are for the period of time spent by the physician at one place. Much of the work of the special physicians was concerned with trachoma cases. The reports are divided into two sets, each arranged alphabetically by surname of physician and thereunder in rough chronological order. The first set contains chiefly reports for the years 1925-30, and the second set contains reports for fiscal years 1931 and 1932; there is, however, much overlapping between the two sets. See also Trachoma Reports (entry 776), Hospital Reports (entry 774), Inspection Reports (entry 953); and Special Agent Files (entry 949).

778. REPORTS OF FIELD DENTISTS.

1926-32. 6 in.
Statistical reports on standard forms. Typed lists concerning individual, patients are often attached to the reports. The reports give information concerning the number of patients examined and treated and the types of work done. A single report is for the period of time spent by a dentist at one place. Arranged alphabetically by surname of dentist and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of report. There are other reports of dentists in the Special Agent Files (entry 950).

779. REPORTS OF FIELD NURSES.

1931-43. 14 ft.
Statistical reports on standard forms and narrative reports of activities of field nurses. These reports were usually submitted monthly, but included are reports for other time periods and also some special reports. The reports are divided into the following time periods: 1931-33, 1934, 1935-June 1936, July 1936-Dec. 1937; 1938, 1939-40, 1941, 1942, and 1943. Within each set the reports are arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of agency or school and thereunder chronologically. There are box lists to accompany the reports for the years 1941-43.

780. REPORTS OF FIELD MATRONS.

1933-38. 2 in.
Weekly reports -- on standard forms -- of daily activities, with statistical data. Included are a few monthly narrative reports. The reports are arranged alphabetically by surname of field matron and thereunder in rough chronological order.

781. REPORT OF GENERAL HEALTH SURVEY OF THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS IN NORTH CAROLINA.

June 5-17, 1933. 1 in.
A narrative report, with accompanying statistical tables, photographs, forms, mimeographed procedural material, and other kinds of records. The survey was made under the direction of M. V. Ziegler of the U.S. Public Health Service. The report is arranged for the most part according to the administrative organization of the survey. Included is a table of contents. For related correspondence, see "21376-33-700 Cherokee School" in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

782. FORMS FOR FORT TOTTEN SANITATION SURVEY.

Aug. 26, 1929. 3 in.
Mimeographed forms giving information concerning housing, water supply, sanitary facilities, farming, and health of families and individuals of the Fort Totten Agency in North Dakota. Arranged by name of head of family or individual. Most of the forms for persons without homes are at the beginning of the series.

783. FORMS FOR POTAWATOMI INDIAN HEALTH SURVEY.

ca. 1928. 2 in.
Photostatic copies of forms for individual families of Potawatomi Indians in Kansas. Included is a copy of a brief general report. The forms give information concerning housing, sanitary facilities, water supply, family health history, present health, living conditions, diet, and other pertinent matters. Included also are some photographs. The forms are undated, but there are several indications of deaths and illnesses occurring in the early part of 1928. Arranged by name of family.

784. FORMS FOR ZUNI HEALTH SURVEY.

1934. 1 ft.
Standard clinical record forms completed for persons living on the Zuni Reservation in New Mexico. They give information concerning personal and family medical history and the results of physical and medical examinations. The forms are numbered in the following order: forms for child patients at the Blackrock Sanatorium are first; forms for most of the other children are next; and forms for adults are last. For the report of the District Medical Director on the findings of the survey and for other related correspondence, see "49558-34-737 Zuni" in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

784B. SOCIAL WORKER'S REPORTS

1932-51.
Arranged into two sub-series for each of which there is a BIA-prepared folder list. The first is arranged alphabetically by name of area office. These consist of varied reports (e.g. "Housing in Oklahoma - FCT - 1944"), files relating to specific social workers (often 160 files), and information pertaining to the over-all social welfare situation in individual states. The latter deal with the status of legislation, changes in state welfare policies, and state-wide statistics on Indians. There also is a file entitled "Classification of Social Workers" consisting primarily of responses by social workers to a questionnaire about their duties which was circulated for the purpose of "writing uniform and equitable standards for evaluating Social Worker positions". The second sub-series consists strictly of social worker reports from 1932-42, arranged in very rough chronological order requiring the use of the folder list. Reports for different agencies are bound together. All phases of social work are covered with a great variety in detail and format from report to report - some are much more narrative than others. Photos are included in some. The reports bear Central Classified File numbers. (new entry)

784C. DIVISION OF SOCIAL SERVICES CENTRAL FILES

1974-77, 1978-80.
Arrangement is alphabetical by subject from 1974-77 and alphabetical by alphanumeric code from 1978-80. The files consist mostly of correspondence and memorandums addressed to and sent by Ray Butler, chief of the division. Examples of a few of the subjects covered are disbursement of funds, legal matters, legislative reports and pending legislation, meetings, Social Security income, Indian organizations, and the area offices. There are also reports and related correspondence with non-governmental organizations such as the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) and the North American Indian Women's Association that had contracts with the BIA. Congressional correspondence on behalf of constituents make up a sizable part of some subject files. There are many inquiries from citizens concerning health matters that were referred to the Indian Health Service by use of a standardized letter. There are also complaints by citizens concerning BIA social service policies along with the BIA's response. (new entry)