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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY (PI 163) OF
THE RECORDS OF
THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (RG 75)
WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA

Compiled by Edward E. Hill, 1965

The National Archives in Washington, D. C., holds much of the original Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Indians. These original records must be viewed in person at the National Archives.


Introduction ... Table of Contents ... Appendix I-III ... Index: A-Em ... Em-Mo ... Mo-Z

Entries: 1-74 ... 75-120 ... 121-197 ... 198-284 ... 285-355 ... 356-443 ... 444-521 ... 522-576 ... 577-643 ... 644-711 ... 712-784 ... 785-860 ... 861-940 ... 941-998 ... 999-1040 ... 1041-1112 ... 1113-1182 ... 1183-1243 ... 1244-1362 ... 1363-1401


RECORDS OF THE LAW AND PROBATE DIVISIONS

The Law Office was established in the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1908. Until 1907 a Law Clerk had been assigned to the Land Division. He had, in addition to legal duties, particular responsibility for matters concerning the Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma and for forestry activities other than those affecting the Menominee Indians. On April 16, 1907, he was placed in charge of a new Indian Territory Division, but there were no major changes in his duties. In April 1908 the Indian Territory Division was abolished. The Law Clerk was relieved of his duties relating to the Five Tribes and to forestry, and he was henceforth to serve as Law Clerk for the entire Bureau. He was responsible for preparing legislation, giving opinions on legal questions, and keeping records of suits, legislation, and decisions. By 1911 the Law Office was usually referred to as the Law Division.

An act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 855), authorized the Secretary of the Interior to determine the heirs of deceased Indian allottees. Both the Law Division and the Land Division handled work resulting from this legislation. In 1913 an Heirship Section vas established in the Land Division; but, later in the year, the Section vas transferred to the Law Division, During the same year much of the record keeping work of the Law Division, with the responsible clerks, was transferred to the Mail and Files Section. Thereafter the Law Division was chiefly concerned with probate work. By 1917 the Division was usually called the Probate Division.

The records of the Law and Probate Divisions that are now in the National Archives do not extend beyond 1923. There are many records concerning legal and probate work, however, in the general correspondence of the Bureau. The records of the Law and Probate Divisions and the Land Division were intermingled to some extent, and it has not always been possible to determine definitely to which of these Divisions a particular series belonged.

644. LETTERS SENT.

1907-13. 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies of outgoing correspondence and memoranda of the Law Clerk. The volume contains chiefly monthly reports on the status of work and legal opinions in the form of memoranda. For the period May 1, 1907-April 1, 1908, the volume was used by the Law Clerk in his capacity as Chief of the short-lived Indian Territory Division. Arranged for the most part chronologically.

645. INDIAN WILLS.

1911-21. 8 vols. 2 ft.
Photostatic and typed copies of wills made by Indians and, in conformance with provisions of acts of Congress of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 855), and February 13, 1913 (37 Stat. 678), referred to the Bureau and to the Department of the Interior for approval. Included with each will are the recommendation of an Assistant Commissioner and the decision of an Assistant Secretary, and sometimes there are copies of other accompanying documents. The dates given for this series are those of the actions of the Bureau and of the Department; some of the wills were dated as early as 1906. Arranged in part chronologically by date of approval or date of disapproval. Some of the volumes include alphabetical indexes to names of testators. Many of the original wills and related records are filed in the 351 classification of the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

646. REPORTS OF EXAMINERS OF INHERITANCE.

1919-23. 5 in.
Monthly reports concerning accomplishments and status of field work in determining heirs. Reports of stenographers, clerks, or interpreters are sometimes included. Also included are some copies of letters sent to the examiners. Arranged alphabetically by surname of examiner and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

647. STATISTICAL TABLES AND REFERENCE NOTES CONCERNING PROBATE WORK.

1920-23. 1 vol. 1 in.
Tables shoving status of probate work in Oklahoma, which were prepared from monthly field reports (1920-21); and notes (often including file references) concerning cases, attorneys, guardians, reports, and other matters. Some references are dated earlier than 1920.

648. OPINIONS OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

1848-66. 1 vol. 1 in.
Handwritten copies of legal opinions submitted to the Secretary of the Interior and to other officials. They relate to interpretations of laws and treaties, ownership of land, claims of Indians and others, determination of tribal membership, and disputed jurisdiction of officials. Arranged chronologically. In the volume is a subject index arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of tribe concerned. Although the opinions recorded in this volume predate the establishment of the Law Division, the volume was included with the records of that Division. It is not known whether it was actually compiled in that Division, whether it was acquired from the Land Division or another division, or whether it was placed with the records of the Law Division by mistake.

648A. OPINIONS OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL AND THE ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT

1904-1907. 3 vols.
Arrangement is in rough chronological order. These cases all pertain to the Five Civilized Tribes in the Indian Territory with the bulk focusing on disputes over enrollment, heirship, and land. Each volume begins with an index by subject and name arranged alphabetically by first letter. Except for the latter opinions, most of these are in press copy format and some of are nearly illegible. At the top left of each opinion is a reference to numbered correspondence of the Indian Territory Division. (new entry)

649. COURT DECISIONS.

1904-12. 1 in.
Copies of court decisions for cases relating to heirship, enrollment, and other disputes concerning members of the Five Civilized Tribes. Included are some letters received from the Department of Justice and from the Union Agency. Arranged in rough chronological order.

649A. PROBATE BOOKS OF THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES

1936-42. 3 vols.
Arrangement of these records is chronological by date of case. The three volumes are numbered 3, 8, and 10. There is a separate alphabetical index, formerly in volume 3, that applies to all three books. These records are brief descriptions of probate cases, giving dates of receipt and approval, names of litigants, case numbers, decisions, references to Central Classified Files (CCF), and sometimes more information such as action taken. (new entry)

649B. REGISTER OF ACTIONS OF INDIAN PROBATES FOR OKLAHOMA

ca. 1940-1943. 1 vol.
Arrangement seems to be in no apparent order, but a name index which is alphabetical by first letter of surname is provided at the beginning of the volume. It contains records of probates of deceased members of many different tribes. Detailed descriptions of transactions include the various assessments and payments and their dates and record dealings with the IRS and the Oklahoma Tax Commission. Some of the cases resulted in lawsuits. There are frequent references made to Central Classified Files (CCF). (new entry)

650. DECISIONS AND OPINIONS OF THE COMPTROLLER AND OTHER OFFICIALS.

1911-23. 4 ft.
Chiefly decisions and opinions from the offices of the Comptroller of the Treasury (1911-21), the Comptroller General (1921-23), the Solicitor of the Department of the Interior, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of the Treasury. Included also are come copies of outgoing letters, memoranda, and a 1909 letter from the Secretary of the Interior to Senator La Follette. The decisions and opinions are usually in the form of letters to the Secretary of the interior or to other officials. The decisions of the Comptroller relate mainly to the legality of expenditures, either completed or contemplated. Most of these decisions involve the interpretation of appropriation acts. Some of the decisions relate to the settlement of employees' accounts. The decisions and opinions of other officials, particularly the Solicitor, often relate to more general legal problems, such as ownership of land or entitlement to per capita payments. Most of these records were assigned file numbers as general incoming letters of the Bureau. Arranged by file number, which was assigned in chronological order by date of receipt of document in the Bureau.

651. ACTS OF CONGRESS.

1867-1917. 2 ft.
Printed copies of laws and resolutions relating to Indian administration. Some of them are certified by an official of the Department of the Interior or of the Department of State. Some of the copies are annotated. Copies of appropriation acts are separate from those of other acts and are arranged by the fiscal year for which they were passed. Copies of the other acts are divided into resolutions, public laws, and private laws; and, within each group, they are arranged numerically. For congressional reports and documents, see entry 993.

651A. LEGISLATIVE CASE FILES (93rd-95th CONGRESS)

1973-77.
Arrangement is by bill number. The records in these files pertain to Congressional acts concerning Indian affairs. Files include a copy of the legislation and additional documents pertaining to it such as correspondence with various non-governmental organizations and excerpts from the Congressional Record. Among the topics of this legislation are law enforcement on reservations, Native American Awareness Week, Navajo-Hopi land disputes, and Indian religious freedom. (new entry)

652. REFERENCE MATERIAL CONCERNING APPROPRIATIONS.

1911-23. 2 ft.
Printed copies of congressional hearings chiefly concerning Indian appropriation bills; a photostatic copy of a compilation of information concerning the history of appropriation items; and a draft of a statistical table, with an explanatory letter, showing appropriations for fulfilling a treaty of 1868 with the Ute Indians. Arranged by type of document.

652A. PROBATE INDEX

n.d.
Consists of three sub-indexes, the largest of which is arranged alphabetically by name. The cards list the individual's name and tribe, the date of death, an indication if the heirs were determined and if they were notified, the appraised value, and references to a Central Classified Files number. The exact copy of the CCF index card is sometimes included, especially for later years. The second index is arranged alphabetically by name of tribe, thereunder alphabetically by name. Only a few tribes are covered and the cards give only a volume and page number. The third is arranged alphabetically by reservation in a confusing manner with each card being a land purchase record containing detailed information on purchases. At the beginning of each reservation's listing are cards that act as a guide to the following cards. Many of the cards in this index have green stickers affixed. (new entry)

652B. LEGAL OPINION FILE OF THEODORE H. HAAS, CHIEF COUNSEL

1939-41.
Essentially unarranged but with similar subjects grouped together. Contains memoranda, correspondence, reports, and other records maintained by Haas. Numerous memos commenting on proposed ordinances, OIA regulations, and letters to be sent from the Commissioner's office and other offices are included. Among the topics covered are the Interdepartmental Rio Grande Board, regulations on intermarriage of Indians with members of other races, Indian taxation, law and order on reservations, and Indian equality with other Americans. Haas' work as a member of the Code Commission that traveled to reservations to advise tribes in writing their constitutions is documented. Mixed with the formal records are drafts which appear to be segments of a paper Haas was working on relating to the history of Indians in America with emphasis on their changing legal status. (new entry)

652C. OFFICE FILE OF THEODORE HAAS RELATING TO ALASKA

1921-50.
Unarranged but with similar subjects grouped together. This series relates to Haas' work protecting the legal rights of Native Alaskans and consists principally of memoranda, reports, correspondence, affidavits, and other legal papers. The bulk of the series relates to claims of Alaskan Natives of the towns of Hydaburg, Klawock, and Kake for protection of their fishing rights which were the subject of hearings by the Department of the Interior. Another major subject was the proposed creation of formal reservations throughout the state. Files dealing with the legal ramifications, letters pro and con, and clippings from the local press are included. There is information on the Alaskan Native Brotherhood, founded in 1913 to protect Native rights. There are a lesser amount of records relating to such topics as construction, anti-discrimination, education, Five Year Plans, and the Tongass National Forest. Also included is a reference file on the work of the Solicitor's Office of the Department of the Interior from 1946-50. Related records are found in Entry 822C. (new entry)

652D. MONTHLY REPORTS FROM FIELD ATTORNEYS

1946-50.
Arranged in rough chronological order. Reports were sent monthly from the several districts to the Chief Counsel, (Theodore Haas through June 1950, Edwin Ferguson afterwards). The districts corresponded roughly to the Bureau's area offices, with the exception of Aberdeen, along with reports from the Chief Irrigation Counsel headquartered in Los Angeles. The reports were first prepared in November 1946. They generally provide information about pending litigation in the region including settlement terms, pertinent court rulings, and actions initiated by staff attorneys. Those from the Muskogee Region are by far the most voluminous and largely relate to probate cases. At the beginning are reports submitted by Haas to the Commissioner detailing what the Office of Chief Counsel accomplished each month. There are also copies of Supreme Court cases apparently kept for reference purposes. (new entry)

652E. SUPREME COURT EXHIBITS RELATING TO PROTECTION OF INDIAN WATER RIGHTS

1954-56.
Arranged alphabetically by name of agency or reservation with miscellaneous records at the end. These are copies of original records with tabs corresponding to exhibit numbers affixed. They summarize a given reservation's water situation. The most extensive exhibits are for the Navajos. There is generally a table of contents at the beginning of the exhibits for each reservation. Among the recurring documents are: a history of irrigation on the reservation, excerpts from Commissioner's Annual Reports, excerpts from Irrigation Service's Annual Reports, Annual Crop Data reports, maps and diagrams, irrigation data from 1944 Long Range Planning Programs, Engineering Studies of Land and Water Resources, population tables (generally from the early 1900's to 1956), and copies of Congressional hearings. Many maps mentioned as exhibits are not present, presumably they were maintained elsewhere. Sometimes a rebuttal (generally only a single page) is included at the end. These exhibits were used in Original Jurisdiction Case #8, Arizona vs. California, from October Term 1961. Out of place at the end of the series are a few miscellaneous documents from 1961-62 consisting of Corps of Engineers notices and minutes and proceedings of commissions dealing with water issues. (new entry)

652F. ATTORNEY CONTRACTS

1933-57.
Arranged in rough chronological order by date of approval. Each contract is annotated with a volume and page number. These contracts were apparently filed in volumes at some point. Volumes 10 to ?? are covered in this time frame. There is a two part index at the beginning that incorrectly dates the series from 1935-56. The index is arranged by letter of alphabet of tribe, thereunder in chronological order. A few contracts are missing. The appointments contain numerous approvals and signatures all the way to the Assistant Secretary of the Department of the Interior. Most of the contracts were for attorneys specializing in claims with a smaller number for general counsel services or expert witnesses. Tribal resolutions approving attorneys are usually included. This series was drawn from the Central Classified Files. (new entry)

652G. PROBATE FILES

1961-75.
Arranged into three sub-series. Each sub-series is arranged alphabetically by name of agency or reservation, thereunder chronologically. These probate records had previously been sent to one of the Bureau's Title Plants where they were microfilmed and inventoried. The files document the process of determining the validity of Indian wills. Each file has a jacket on which is listed a file number, the reservation, the name of the Title Plant, and generally a stamped annotation stating when the information was posted. Sometimes "No extractable material" is stamped on the cover. Most files contain a final decision, notices of hearings, orders determining heirs, family history forms, and transcripts of hearings. Less frequently, the actual wills or other documents are included. For some agencies, only a single file is present. Some files have additional documents inserted dated as recently as the early 1990's. (new entry)

652H. RECORDS RELATING TO FISHING RIGHTS

1972-1985.
Unarranged. Much of the correspondence included arose from the litigation U.S. vs. Washington (1972-82). Among the topics are: treaties between the US and Canada, pending legislation, fisheries damage claims filed by several Indian groups following the suit, efforts by the Skokomish Indians to intervene in the federal re-licensing of the Cushman Dam Project, the International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Committee (IPSFC), and fishing rights on tribal lands. Of note is a 1985 "values report" by the Northwest Values Project related to the Lummi Indians who are heavily dependent on fishing and their relations with outside groups. (new entry)


RECORDS OF THE IRRIGATION DIVISION

The Irrigation Division was formally established in 1924, but administrative units concerned with irrigation had been set up in the Bureau much earlier. The records of these units are now among the records of the Irrigation Division.

Until 1907 the Land Division was responsible for irrigation activities. In that year the Field Work Division (also known as the Cooperation Division) was established and given responsibility for irrigation and certain other matters. By the end of 1908 the Field Work Division had been reduced to a section in the Office of the Chief Clerk. In 1909 the section was abolished and irrigation activities were transferred to the Uses Section of the Land Division. In 1910 a separate Irrigation Section was established in the Land Division; but, later in the year, it was combined with the Forestry Section to form the Field Section. In 1912 the Field Section was again divided into an Irrigation Section and a Forestry Section, and they were no longer part of the Land Division. Until the Irrigation Section was made a Division in 1924, it seems to have been identified with the Indian field service rather than with the central office of the Bureau.

Irrigation officers in the field were appointed before 1900. In 1898 Walter H. Craves was appointed as Inspector of Irrigation. An act of March 3, 1905 (33 Stat. 1049), authorized the appointment of two engineers as inspectors and the designation of one of them as Chief. The Office of Chief Engineer was formally established under provisions of this act although, in practice, the position of Chief Engineer was a continuation of the former position of Inspector of Irrigation. Inspector William H. Code became the first Chief Engineer. Although there were changes in the legal designation of the title, "Chief Engineer" continued to be used. The Office of the Chief Engineer was located in Los Angeles until 1912, when it was moved to Washington, D.C.

Irrigation districts were gradually established, and superintendents of irrigation were placed in charge. Permanent districts were established by law in 1918, and the superintendents of irrigation became known as supervising engineers. There were later changes in the boundaries of districts, especially in 1923. Project engineers were in charge of individual projects, and other employees had more specific duties. The irrigation force as a whole was known as the Indian Irrigation Service. It was concerned with all phases of irrigation activity: planning, construction, and often operation and maintenance.

Until the Irrigation Division was established in 1924, most of the correspondence concerning Indian irrigation activities seems to have been handled in the Office of the Chief Engineer, although it was often referred by that Office to the central office of the Bureau. Beginning in 1924, correspondence was usually transmitted direct to the central office, where it was handled by the Irrigation Division. In 1931 the Chief Engineer was replaced by a Director of Irrigation. The Chief of the Irrigation Division -- to be known as the Assistant to the Director -- was to report to the Director. An Assistant Director was placed in charge of field work. Under the reorganization of 1940, the Irrigation Division was assigned to the Engineering Branch. Later it became the Irrigation Branch of the Division of Resources. Since the reorganization of 1954, irrigation activities have been assigned to the Branch of Land Operations in the Division of Resources.

The records described in entries 653-666 consist of records of the Irrigation Division proper and its predecessors as well as the records of the Office of the Chief Engineer. They have become so intermingled that it would be impractical to try to separate them. Series begun by the Office of the Chief Engineer, for instance, were often continued by the Irrigation Division.

There are many other records relating to irrigation in the central classified files of the Bureau, chiefly in the 341 classification (see entry 121). Earlier records concerning irrigation have been brought together in Special Case 190 (see entry 102).

There are many records in Record Group 115; Records of the Bureau of Reclamation, that relate to irrigation projects on Indian lands. In 1907 the Bureau of Reclamation was given much of the responsibility for Indian irrigation projects. After 1910, however, the Bureau of Reclamation controlled only three major projects, all in Montana; and in 1924 these projects were transferred to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. (See Preliminary Inventory 109, "Records of the Bureau of Reclamation.")

653. GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE.

1901-31. 34 ft.
Chiefly incoming correspondence and copies of outgoing correspondence of the Office of the Chief Engineer and copies of the Bureau's incoming and outgoing correspondence retained for reference purposes by the Irrigation Division. Included are reports, memoranda, photographs, maps, blueprints, clippings, and other kinds of records. These records were originally in two separate series that were later combined. Although the position of Chief Engineer was not established until 1905; records of William H. Code for the period 1901-5, while he was still serving as Irrigation Inspector, are included. There are also copies of Bureau records and a few original records, dated as early as 1871, in the correspondence of the Chief Engineer. There is little correspondence of the Office of the Chief Engineer after 1924. The records maintained in the Irrigation Division are chiefly copies of general correspondence of the Bureau relating to irrigation matters, but included are printed matter and other reference material. There are a few letters dated before 1901 and after 1931. All the records are divided into general correspondence and correspondence relating to the individual irrigation districts. The general correspondence is arranged alphabetically by name of State or by subject and thereunder for the most part chronologically. The correspondence relating to irrigation districts is arranged numerically by district number; thereunder alphabetically by name of jurisdiction, reservation, or project; and thereunder for the most part chronologically. For both the general correspondence and the district correspondence, however, the correspondence of the Office of the Chief Engineer is kept in separate folders from the correspondence of the Irrigation Division. There are sometimes folders of correspondence for both offices relating to the same subject. The boundaries of irrigation districts changed, and correspondence may be filed under a district different from the one in which the projects were finally located. Correspondence relating to several northern California projects, for example, is filed with correspondence for District 1 rather than with correspondence for District 4, the district in which the projects were located after 1923. In a few cases, records relating to a project are divided between two districts. Other folders of correspondence maintained by the Irrigation Division are with the reports described in entry 657.

654. ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER.

1908-24, 1932. 3 ft.
Narrative reports concerning progress on and costs of irrigation work and the furnishing of statistical information, including summary irrigation data sheets (see entry 658). The statistical data for the later reports is in a separate binder from that of the narrative report. Also included with the reports are photographs, maps, blueprints, and tables. The 1932 report was prepared by the Director of Irrigation, the successor to the Chief Engineer. The reports are arranged chronologically. Other copies of the reports are in the 341 classification of the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

655. ANNUAL DISTRICT AND PROJECT REPORTS.

1908-40. 19 ft.
Narrative and statistical reports submitted by superintendents of irrigation, supervising engineers, project engineers, and other officials concerning progress on and costs of irrigation work. Included with the reports are photographs, maps, and tables. Cost reports may be filed separately or combined with the progress reports. There are only a few reports for the 1936-40 period. Arranged by district and thereunder by year.

655A. ACCOUNTS OF THE COLORADO RIVER AGENCY (EXHIBIT C)

1913-58.
Arrangement is by tract number. The accounts are kept on standardized forms titled as schedule 1103-10. At the top of each form are the name of assignee or allottee, tract number, and a tract description. Also listed is assessment year, acreage, rate, assessment, amount paid, balance due, unpaid excess water charges, and total amount due. At the bottom of each page is the phrase "Recommended for Cancellation Due to Factor(s)" followed by a blank space where a numerical code was inserted. It is unclear why these are listed as Exhibit C. (new entry)

656. MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORTS.

1907-35. 34 ft.
Narrative and statistical reports submitted by superintendents of irrigation, supervising engineers, project engineers, and other officials relating to progress on and costs of irrigation work. For the period from 1907 to 1912 there are also copies of reports submitted by the Chief Engineer to the Secretary of the Interior. Included with the reports are maps, charts, and photographs. As cost reporting became more elaborate, separate cost reports were prepared; but these reports have not been kept. Through 1917 the reports are arranged by month; beginning in 1918 the reports are arranged by district and thereunder by month.

657. REPORTS AND RELATED RECORDS.

1891-1946. 36 ft.
Reports submitted by superintendents of irrigation, supervising and project engineers, and other officials; reports (often printed or processed copies) prepared by other agencies -- especially the Bureau of Reclamation, the Geological Survey, and the War Department; correspondence of the Office of the Chief Engineer; copies of correspondence of the central office of the Bureau, photographs; maps; congressional documents; clippings; and other related records. These records relate to many subjects, such as water supply, land classifications, feasibility of projects, plans and estimates for construction power possibilities, progress on projects, special phases of project work, testing of equipment, irrigation conditions, silt accumulation, investigations, histories of projects, and histories of irrigation in certain geographical areas. This series, in general, consists of reports maintained by the Chief Engineer and the Irrigation Division other than the periodic reports described in entries 655 and 656. There are, however, periodic reports of various kinds among these records. Included also are some folders containing copies of Bureau correspondence retained by the Irrigation Division and similar to the general correspondence of the Division (see entry 653). The records are arranged alphabetically by name of State; thereunder alphabetically by subject or by name of reservation, project, or jurisdiction; and thereunder in order of assigned numbers. A list of these records is available (NC-75).

658. SUMMARY IRRIGATION DATA SHEETS.

1910-29. 2 ft.
Chiefly forms submitted semiannually by superintendents of irrigation, supervising engineers, project engineers, and other officials. Information is given concerning the location of projects, climatic conditions, water supply, irrigable area, construction, cultivation, costs, and other aspects of Indian irrigation projects. For each report period there is usually one form for each reservation or project. Included are some transmittal letters and other correspondence and copies of reports concerning irrigation conditions in 1898 and 1903. Most of the records are for the period 1912 to 1926; they are arranged by district and thereunder chronologically. For other data sheets, see the annual reports of the Chief Engineer (entry 54).

659. WEEKLY AND BIWEEKLY ACTIVITY REPORTS.

1934-36. 1 ft.
Submitted by supervising engineers, project engineers, and other officials in the form of letters, memoranda, or newsletters. These reports relate chiefly to activities concerning projects of the Public Works Administration. The reports were submitted weekly until 1936 and biweekly thereafter. Arranged chronologically.

660. PHOTOGRAPHS.

ca. 1909-43. 5 in.
Relate to construction work, structures, project areas, floods, and other aspects of irrigation projects. There are binders of mounted photographs for Irrigation Districts 1 and 4; photographs in each of these binders are arranged alphabetically by name of project. Some unmounted photographs are arranged by project or reservation.

661. ATLAS OF RESERVATION AND PROJECT MAPS.

1908-32. 1 vol. 2 in.
Processed maps, prepared by the Indian Irrigation Service, showing various aspects of irrigation work. Arranged alphabetically by name of State and thereunder by name of reservation or project. An index, arranged in the same order, includes entries for larger maps that are not in this atlas.

662. MAP.

1923. 1 item.
A printed map of the western part of the United States. Shown are locations of reservations, former reservations, schools, hospitals, and agency headquarters. The boundaries of the irrigation districts before they were changed in 1923 have been drawn in crayon.

663. MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR PROJECTS OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION.

1918-24. 4 in.
Copies of form reports of the Bureau of Reclamation (known as the United States Reclamation Service until 1923) for the Fort Peck, Black-feet, Flathead, and Riverton Projects, which were then under the supervision of the Bureau of Reclamation. The first three projects were transferred to the supervision of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1924. The reports consist chiefly of combined balance sheets and statements of assets, liabilities, reserves, and capital. Included are some statements of appropriations accounts, other statistical forms, and a few letters. Arranged chronologically.

663A. RECORDS OF THE MISSOURI RIVER BASIN INVESTIGATIONS PROJECT

ca. 1948-74.
Arranged into two sub-series. The first consists of general records relating to the project as a whole while the other consists of reports arranged alphabetically by name of reservation. The MRBI was formed in 1946 in response to the planned construction of massive dams on the Missouri River. Its duty was "to analyze and report on Indian interests in Missouri River Basin developments, particularly those associated with Federal water development and conservation projects. The bulk of the series consists of numbered reports generated by the MRBI staff, most of whom were technicians. Much of the subject matter is sociological or economic in nature and only tangentially relates to federal water and irrigation projects. There are studies, for instance, on housing conditions on reservations. Some reports focus on the issue of the dislocation caused by flooding from the dams and policy alternatives for the Indians so affected. Correspondence, some with members of Congress, is included as well as opinions and assessments of the overall MRBI program by personnel from other parts of the BIA. Included are checklists and listings of the numbered reports. Among non-MBRI reports included is a publication titled "Progress: Missouri River Basin" by the Interior Missouri Basin Field Committee, composed of representatives of several federal agencies. Another recurring publication is "Mineral Resources and Their Potential on Indian Lands", published by the Bureau of Mines. (new entry)

664. INDEX TO CORRESPONDENCE.

1926. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
An alphabetical index to some of the correspondence in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121) relating to irrigation matters. It appears to be entirely for letters, dated in 1926, but there are often references to earlier base files in which letters were filed. The index entries include names of reservations or jurisdictions, names of persons, and various other subjects.

664A. CASE FILE OF USA vs. GILA VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT

1935. 5 vols.
This series comprises five identical published copies of a decree in this case. The case was heard in the U.S. District Court for Arizona and was filed by the government against the irrigation district along with a lengthy list of co-defendants over the issue of water diversion. The San Carlos and the Gila Indian Reservations were both affected by this case. Much of the decree consists of "priority schedules" which list the party entitled to divert from the stream, the date of priority, the location of the land, point of diversion, name of diverting structure, ownership of the land and statistical information such as acre feet of water diverted or maximum rate of diversion in cubic feet per second. The defendants were sub-divided into smaller groupings whose cases were settled separately. (new entry)

664B. FORT HALL IRRIGATION PROJECT, VOLUME 2

1940. 3 vols.
Arranged by township and section. Consists of three identical copies of a bound report containing land descriptions. The whereabouts of volume #1 are unknown. The project and lands described are in Idaho and pertain to non-Indian landowners. Each entry consists of two pages, one featuring statistics (the tabulation page) and the other with detailed plats of the land on the facing page. Statistics provided include gross area acres, deductions, net irrigable area acres, existing repayment contracts, corrections recommended, and remarks. There is a table of contents by land area, mislabeled "Index," at the beginning. The introductory page contains grand total statistics. (new entry)

664C. CHRONOLOGICAL FILE

1983.
Arrangement of these records is in chronological order. These files consist of memorandums and letters pertaining to water projects, irrigation, water rights, construction, and land matters related to Indian reservations. Sidney Mills was the director of the Office of Trust Responsibilities and these appear to be his files. There is some Congressional correspondence along with correspondence with non-governmental organizations. (new entry)

Cartographic Records Maintained Separately From the Textual Records

665. MAPS OF THE UNITED STATES SHOWING IRRIGATION PROJECTS SUPERVISED BY THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

1938-42. 2 items.
A published map for 1930 and an annotated map for 1942 that also shows proposed projects.

666. MAP FILES OF THE DIVISION.

1872-1943. 1 ft.
Manuscript, annotated, published, and photoprocessed maps of Indian reservations and parts of reservations. These maps consist of general topographic and outline maps of the reservations and of maps showing allotments, irrigable and nonirrigable lands, locations of irrigation projects and proposed projects, cultivated areas, canals and ditches, pumping stations, wells, dams, and the classification of lands according to use or to potential use. Included are other records consisting of plans of canals, dams, reservoirs, and other irrigation facilities installed on the reservations or in the projects located on the reservations. Arranged alphabetically by State and thereunder alphabetically by name of Indian tribe or Indian reservation. See Special List No. 13, "List of Cartographic Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs" (entries 416 through 540), for detailed descriptions of these map records, by area and by Indian reservation.


RECORDS OF THE FORESTRY DIVISION

The Forestry Division was not formally established until 1924. Most of the records described in entries 667-673 were originally those of predecessor units. The Land Division was responsible for forestry matters until 1907. In the field, the regular superintendents and agents usually were in charge of affairs relating to Indian timber. There were a few special forest officers, however, including a General Superintendent of Logging. In April 1907 all timber matters, except those of the Menominee Indians, were transferred from the Land Division to the Bureau's new Indian Territory Division. This seemingly illogical arrangement was the continuation of an assignment of work in the Land Division. George A. Ward, who was placed in charge of the new Division, had been in charge of forestry as well as Five Civilized Tribes matters in the Land Division. In April 1908 the Indian Territory Division was abolished. Responsibility for forestry matters was then given to the Field Work Division (sometimes known as the Cooperation Division). By the end of 1908 this Division had been reduced to a section in the Office of the Chief Clerk. In 1909 the section was abolished; and forestry matters, along with other activities, were transferred to the Uses Section of the Land Division.

In 1910 a separate Forestry Section was established in the Land Division. Later in the same year this Section was combined with the Irrigation Section to form the Field Section. In 1912 the Field Section was divided into a Forestry Section and an Irrigation Section. These Sections were not assigned to any of the divisions of the Bureau. They seem to have been associated with the field service rather than the central office until they became divisions in 1924.

The organization of an Indian Forest Service in the field began after the termination of a short-lived agreement (1908-9) with the Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture whereby that Service undertook the management of Indian forests. After a period of confusion, the Indian Forest Service was put in the charge of a Forester; this title was later changed to Chief Supervisor of Forests. Special forest officers were assigned to reservations, but the regular superintendents continued to exercise a considerable amount of authority concerning forestry matters.

The Indian Forest Service was concerned chiefly with appraisals, care and preservation of forests, lumbering activities, and reforestation. In 1930 responsibility for grazing activities was also assigned to the Indian Forest Service.

In 1931 the position of Director of Forests was established. The Director had general charge of both the field work and the business activities of the Forestry Division. In 1936 the Forestry Division was renamed the Forestry and Grazing Division. There were further changes in organization after 1940.

The records of the Forestry Division now in the National Archives are fragmentary and relate primarily to timber surveys and valuations. Most of the correspondence, reports, and other records concerning forestry are in the central classified files of the Bureau, particularly in the 339 classification (see entry 121).

667. RECORDS CONCERNING SALE OF CHOCTAW TIMBER LANDS.

1910-14. 2 in.
Copies of correspondence and reports, advertisements, lists, schedules, maps, and plats. Arranged to some extent by type of document.

668. REPORTS OF INSPECTION AND APPRAISAL OF TIMBER LANDS ON THE FLATHEAD RESERVATION.

1908-9. 24 vols. 2 ft.
These reports were prepared in connection with the work of the Flathead Appraising Commission. For each quarter section there is a table giving, for individual lots, information concerning the type, quantity, and value of timber. Included also are a plat and some notations concerning logging conditions, quality of timber, and distance from transportation. Arranged by location of land. Among the records described in entry 671 are other maps and plats relating to timber on the Flathead Reservation. For correspondence, reports, and other records concerning the activities of the Appraising Commission, see "85564-08-339 Flathead" in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

668A. MENOMINEE AGENCY FORESTRY REPORTS

1907-44.
Arrangement is by subject, thereunder chronologically. These records consist of letters and reports, placed into binders, concerning timber and forestry at the Menominee Indian Reservation in Wisconsin. Among the titles on the binders are Reforestation, Actual Practice of Forestry, and Methods of Silviculture. The LaFollette Act of March 1908, that altered forestry practices, is a major topic. Many of the records are photostatic copies made by BIA officials (in some cases after the originals had been accessioned by NARA), apparently in preparation for their use in legal proceedings. These copies are often derived from the Central Classified Files. A "Report on Forestry Survey" conducted in 1935 and reports on timber sales are also included. (new entry)

668B. COMPILATION OF ANNUAL REPORTS

1933-1938, 1941-1953.
Arrangement is chronological by year. These Annual Forestry and Grazing Reports contain statistical information about such subjects as area of reservations, forest resources, timber cut, forest fires, grazing resources, grazing permits, grazing trespass, Indian free grazing privileges, Indian livestock resources, and cost analysis. Of note are the minutes of a Crow Tribal Council meeting from 1933 that debated the granting of grazing privileges on their reservation. For 1942 there is both a calendar year and a fiscal year report. Starting in 1941, these reports were part of the Central Classified Files. The format of the reports changed somewhat over the years while the volume increased. (new entry)

668C. AREA ANNUAL REPORTS

1957-64.
Arrangement is chronological by year. For each year there is a compilation by area offices; a compilation by states; and individual area office reports which give detail at the reservation level. These reports were officially known as Report No. R-27-2 (through 1959) and Report No. 53-4S (starting in 1960). Form 5-490A is the principal standard form used. The statistics provided are incredibly detailed. The two major category headings of the statistics are "Timber Cutting Record" (which comprised the first pages of the report) and "Fire Suppression" (which comprised the latter pages). Starting in 1963, "Timber Resource Data" became another statistical category heading, located on the report's final page. These reports were also formerly part of the Central Classified Files. (new entry)

668D. ANNUAL REPORTS

1974-75 and 1978-81.
Arrangement is chronological by year, thereunder alphabetically by agency (for 1974-75) or by area office (for 1978-81). These reports contain statistical information on such things as timber cut, annual fire report, timber resource data, timber stand improvement, reforestation accomplishments, equipment and supply data, forest management, and forest insect infestations. The reports were officially known as Report No. 53-4F and consist principally of Form 5-490. The major category headings of the statistics are data related to timber cutting, the annual fire report, and timber resource data. These appear to parallel the category headings in Entry 668C but are quite different and contain no compilations for states. The final page of the report is entitled "Timber Stand Improvement & Reforestation Accomplishments". Also, unlike in Entry 668C, the reports sometimes contain narrative reports and maps of the lands described. Starting in 1978 the reporting period was changed from calendar year to fiscal year. For fiscal year 1981, Portland and Sacramento area offices are missing. (new entry)

668E. TIMBER CUT REPORTS

ca. 1926-61.
Arranged into several sub-series. Consists primarily of the basic timber cut report, Form 5-486. Among the statistics reported on that form are: species, number of pieces, volume, price, value, advance payments, and advanced deposits. For certain years, the reports are filed under decimal code (032) or (339) of the Central Classified Files and are arranged alphabetically by name of agency. These reports are for specific units. There is no narrative content - strictly statistical. The date span for each unit varies widely with a few reports dating back to 1926, but the bulk is from 1947-59. Also, there are four "Closed Final Reports" for units on which cutting was finished and sent to files in September 1960. These feature an index in front listing: sale unit, purchaser, reservation, and contract number. Various other combinations of the reports follow including: "Volume and Value Reports" for 1947-53, "Closed Reports of Timber Cut, 1951-59 and sent to the files in August 1960, "Timber Cut Reports" sent to the files in Apr. 1961 covering through 1960, and "Final Report Of Timber Cut" sent to files in Apr. 1961 listing: sale unit, purchaser, reservation, and contract number. These latter reports cut across various units. (new entry)

669. FIELD NOTEBOOKS RELATING TO AN EXAMINATION OF TEE RED LAKE RESERVATION.

1909-10. 17 vols. 1 ft.
Notebooks used by topographers and timber cruisers during an examination of the Red Lake Reservation in Minnesota, which was conducted in 1909 under the direction of the Forest Service with the cooperation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The particular purpose of this survey was to estimate, by species, the amount of timber. The notebooks contain rough plats of subdivisions, indicating the location and amount of different timber species, the surface of the ground, the quality of the land, and other pertinent information. The volumes were numbered in consecutive order, but there are now gaps in the numbers. Volume No. 17 was not used and was not submitted; three other volumes are missing. The individual plats within the volumes are arranged by location of land. The narrative report of the examination was submitted by Patrick Kennedy, Lumberman, and James A. Howarth, Jr., Forest Assistant. For the report and related correspondence, see "21359-10-339 Red Lake" in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

670. SCHEDULES OF TIMBER APPRAISEMENT ON THE COLVILLE RESERVATION.

1914. 1 ft.
Forms completed under the supervision of the Colville Appraising Commission. Individual entries for subdivisions give description, acreage, land classification (such as agricultural, grazing, or timber), and information concerning the quantity, type, and value of timber. There is a form for each section of land. Arranged by location of land. For correspondence, reports, and other records concerning the activities of the Colville Appraising Commission, see "37087-10-313 Colville" in the central classified files of the Bureau (entry 121).

671. MAPS AND PLATS.

ca. 1914-26. 5 vols, and unbound papers. 10 in.
Topographical and contour maps and plats showing locations and amounts of timber as well as other features on the Flathead, Klamath, Menominee, and Spokane Reservations. Arranged alphabetically by name of reservation and thereunder by geographic location of quarter township.

671A. CHART OF FOREST FIRES ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS

1910-26.
Consists of one large chart listing by reservation and year number of fires, number of acres burned, amount of damage done, cost of fire suppression, value of equipment purchased, and acreage. Totals for each category are tabulated on the bottom of the chart. (new entry)

672. PLATS OF THE SPOKANE RESERVATION.

1910. 8 vols. 4 in.
Plats of sections, showing location of timberland, prairie land, and cultivated land. Included are tables indicating the acreage and quality of agricultural land and the acreage of grazing land. There are also notations concerning the surface of the land, the type of soil, and the quantity of timber. The plats are arranged by location of land. Other plats and maps relating to timber on the Spokane Reservation are among the records described in entry 671.

Cartographic Records Maintained Separately From the Textual Records

673. MAPS OF THE UNITED STATES SHOWING FORESTRY BRANCH DISTRICTS AND OFFICES AND INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

1940-41. 2 items.
Published maps.

674. FIRE CONTROL MAPS OF INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

1920-44. 43 items.
Published maps showing drainage features, boundaries, roads, trails, railroads, communication and power lines, wells and springs, reservoirs and dams, reserved lands, and ranger, fireguard, and lookout stations. Arranged alphabetically by name of reservation.

RECORDS OF THE CIVILIZATION DIVISION

 The Civilization Division (known at first as the Civilization and General Statistics Division) was established in 1846, when divisions were formally established in the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The regulations provided that ''This division will have the immediate charge of the moral, intellectual, and social improvement of the Indians. It will embrace all matters connected with emigration, Schools, agricultural, and mechanical pursuits, trade and intercourse with the Indians, and the correspondence and other matters arising out of the same." The Division was specifically charged with maintaining information concerning Indian population, wealth of tribes -- advancement in agricultural and mechanical arts, schools and educational advancement, missionary establishments, and traders.

 There were many changes in responsibilities of the Division. It took over matters concerning depredation claims, conduct of the Indians, liquor control, intrusions on Indian lands, and field personnel. (This last responsibility was transferred to the Accounts Division in 1876.) From 1873 until 1881 there was a separate Medical and Educational Division; thereafter educational matters became a responsibility of the Civilization Division and medical matters were assigned to the Accounts Division. By 1884 the Civilization Division was usually called the Civilization and Education Division. 

 In September 1885 the Division was assigned responsibility for educational matters only, and it became known as the Education Division. The issuance of licenses for traders was assigned to the Office of the Chief Clerk. Depredation claims were assigned briefly to the Finance Division until a separate Depredation Division was established in October 1885. Other matters previously handled by the Civilization Division were assigned to the Land Division.

 The records of the Civilization Division are fragmentary, mainly because the functions exercised by the Civilization Division were inherited by other divisions and the pertinent records were transferred to those divisions. Thus records that at one time were a part of the records of the Civilization Division are now among the records of the Education Division, the Depredation Division, the Office of the Chief Clerk, and other administrative units of the Bureau. Other records, such as farming reports, were disposed of by authority of Congress. Most of the incoming and outgoing correspondence of the Bureau that was handled by the Civilization Division is now with the general correspondence of the Bureau. Some of the records relating to cession of Indian lands east of the Mississippi and to the removal of the Indians to the West may be considered as records of the Civilization Division. Other records would more properly belong to the Land Division. The records concerning Indian removal, however, form a rather distinct and extensive subgroup and are described in a separate section of this inventory (see entries 198-301).

675. POPULATION FIGURES

1800-1853. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Lists and notes concerning the size and location of tribes and bands of Indians in various localities. The dates given above are those noted in the volume and not the dates of compilation of the volume.

676. CENSUS ROLLS

1835-69. 5 in.
Rolls of Eastern Cherokee, Chickasaw, Sank and Fox of the Missouri, Iowa, Miami, Chippewa, and other Indians. Arranged by name of tribe. Entries in the individual rolls are variously arranged and give different kinds of information. Other copies of the Cherokee rolls are described in entry 219. For the main series of census rolls maintained by the Bureau, see entry 964.

677. ABSTRACTS OF FARMING REPORTS

1863-65. 1 vol. 1 in.
Consist of statistical data compiled from annual reports submitted by agents. The abstracts give information concerning acreage, buildings, crops, livestock, sale of fish and furs, manufacture of sugar, and other aspects of Indian agriculture. Arranged by agency and thereunder by year. Occasionally there are breakdowns for individual tribes or reserves. There is a table of contents. The volume is labeled "Vol. 1"; however, no other volumes have been located among the Bureau records now in the National Archives.

678. MEMORIALS OF NEW MEXICO LEGISLATURE

1863. 1/4 in.
Memorials to the U.S. Congress concerning Indian depredations, the establishment of reservations, and the release of Indian captives. Included is a joint resolution to the Territorial Governor directing that the memorials be transmitted. Arranged chronologically.

679. CERTIFICATES FOR SIOUX CHIEFS

1872-73. 1/4 in.
Forms certifying that the United States recognized a certain Sioux Indian as chief of a band and that the band was at peace with the United States. Included also is one 1875 character reference for an Indian. Arranged chronologically.

680. PROCEEDINGS OF SPECIAL COMMISSION TO VISIT INDIANS IN THE VICINITY OF FORT PHIL KEARNEY

Mar.-July 1867. 2 vols. 2 in.
This commission was appointed as a result of the massacre of 1866. The records consist of copies of reports and correspondence. The first volume relates to the overall activities of the commission. The second volume contains the proceedings of a commission detachment that was sent to visit the Indians of the Upper Missouri area. The material in each volume is arranged chronologically.

681. RECORDS CONCERNING AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FORT PHIL KEARNEY (OR FETTERMAN) MASSACRE

1867. 1 ft.
Reports, transcripts of testimony, minutes, council proceedings, letters received by the Commissioners, and other records transmitted to the Bureau by a commission appointed by the President to investigate the massacre by Indians of a detachment of soldiers under Capt. William Fetterman near Fort Phil Kearney in December 1866. The commission consisted of Alfred Sully, John B. Sanborn, N. B. Buford, Ely S. Parker, G. P. Beauvais, and J. F. Kinney. Arranged in part by file numbers of the letters that have been withdrawn from the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau relating to the Upper Platte Agency (see entry 79) and in part by type of document.

682. SCHEDULES OF INDIANS, SOLDIERS, AND CITIZENS KILLED OR CAPTURED

1873-75. Negligible.
Drafts of data submitted with a report to the Secretary of the Interior on January 27, 1875, that is copied on page 408 of Report Book No. 25 (see entry 85). The drafts consist of schedules of (1) citizens and soldiers killed by Indians and (2) Indians killed or captured during 1873 and the first half of 1874. Entries for individual incidents give dates, places, tribes concerned, names of individuals (if known), circumstances, and other pertinent information. With the exception of one schedule in which the entries are arranged alphabetically by name of State or Territory in which the incident occurred, the entries in the schedules are in no apparent order.

683. CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING THE WHITE RIVER AGENCY

1877-79- 1 vol. 1 in.
Press copies that were often made from copies rather than the originals. This correspondence was probably prepared in connection with the investigation of the destruction of the agency and the killing of Agent Meeker and other employees by the Indians in 1879. Arranged for the most part chronologically. See also the correspondence relating to the Ute Commission (entry 684).

684. CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE UTE COMMISSION

1881-82. 2 in.
This Commission was appointed by the President chiefly to supervise the removal of the Ute Indians in Colorado to a new reservation. The records consist mainly of copies of correspondence between members of the Commission and the Secretary of the Interior. Arranged chronologically by date of letter and numbered consecutively. There is other correspondence concerning the activities of this Commission in Special Case 112 (see entry 102).


Records relating to Civil War claims of Loyal Indians

During the Civil War many Indians remaining loyal to the United States were driven from their homes or suffered property damages. In several cases, treaties negotiated after the war provided for the determination of these losses and for the compensation of the Indians.

685. RECORDS RELATING TO CLAIMS OF LOYAL CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW.

1866. 4 in.
Petitions, affidavits, lists of damages claimed, findings of the Commissioners, and other records concerning individual claims of loyal Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians against the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, as provided by article 49 of the treaty of April 28, 1866. Commissioners Elliott W. Rice and A. H. Jackson were appointed by the President to investigate the claims. Arranged by claim number, which was assigned in chronological order by date of filing of claim. Some numbers are missing.

686. RECEIPT BOOK FOR LOYAL CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW CLAIMS.

ca. 1868. 1 vol. 1 in.
Individual entries give name of claimant, claim number, amount claimed, amount allowed, amount paid, and the attested signature of the claimant or the administrator of the claimant's estate. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or Indian name of claimant, thereunder by tribe, and thereunder by claim number. There are some copies of letters of administration in the back of the volume. For records concerning the individual claims, see entry 685.

687. RECORDS RELATING TO LOYAL CREEK CLAIMS.

1869-70. 1 ft.
Consist of affidavits of claimants and witnesses and of the joint findings of the Creek Agent, Capt. F. A. Field, and the Southern Superintendent, Gen. W. B. Hazen. These records relate to individual claims of loyal Creek Indians and freedmen, as provided by article 4 of the treaty of June 14, 1866. Arranged by claim number, which was assigned in chronological order by date of filing of claim. For abstract of claims, see entry 688. There is a roll of loyal Creek among the annuity payment rolls (entry 906). There are later records concerning loyal Creek claims in Special Series A (entry 126).

688. ABSTRACT OF LOYAL CREEK CLAIMS. 1869-70.

1 vol. 1/2 in.
A copy of a schedule prepared by Superintendent Hazen and Agent Field. Each entry gives claim number; name of claimant; claimant's racial status, sex, age, and other information concerning him; amount of claim; and amount of award. Arranged by claim number. There are also copies of an 1866 report on Chickasaw claims (see entry 685) and an 1862 schedule of Indians tried by a military commission For records submitted concerning individual Creek claims, see entry 687.   Loyal Creek Abstract

689. RECORDS CONCERNING CLAIMS OF SENECA, MIXED SENECA AND SHAWNEE, AND QUAPAW INDIANS

1869-70. 4 in.
Claims, affidavits, testimony, and findings of Commissioners J. W. Caldwell and Landon Carter (who were appointed to investigate the claims, in conformance with article 12 of the treaty of February 23, 1867) concerning claims for losses suffered by the Indians as a result of being driven from their homes in Indian Territory during the Civil War. Included are a few reports of the Commissioners and copies of reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior. Arranged for the most part by claim number, which was assigned in chronological order by date of presentation of claim. Most of the claims submitted by members of one tribe are grouped together.

690. RECORDS RELATING TO SHAWNEE CLAIMS

186l-68. 2 in.
Claims, evidence, powers of attorney, incoming correspondence of the Bureau, a draft of a report to the Secretary of the Interior, and other records relating to claims of Shawnee Indians in Kansas for property losses suffered during and after the Civil War. Most of these records were kept separate from the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 79) and are arranged by file number.

691. TESTIMONY CONCERNING SHAWNEE CLAIMS

1866. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
Copies of depositions taken by Shawnee Agent James B. Abbott from claimants and witnesses testifying to property losses suffered by Shawnee Indians in Kansas. Arranged chronologically by date of testimony.

RECORDS OF THE DEPREDATION DIVISION

 The Depredation Division (or Depredation Claims Division) was established in October 1885 to carry out certain provisions of an act of Congress of March 3, 1885 (23 Stat. 376). This act provided that the Secretary of the Interior should undertake to investigate claims against Indians for depredations that had been approved but never paid and those that were pending but not yet examined. The Secretary was then to make a report to Congress concerning each claim. The Depredation Division was made responsible for conducting the investigations and for making reports to the Secretary on its findings. A small staff was organized in Washington, and a number of special agents were designated to conduct investigations in the field. (Work of the Bureau relating to depredation claims had been handled by the Civilization Division.) 

 By an act of Congress of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. 851), the investigation and determination of Indian depredation claims were transferred from the Secretary of the Interior to the United States Court of Claims. The Depredation Division continued to operate until 1893; but mainly in order to service records and to answer inquiries. On April 30, 1893, the Division was abolished, and the remaining work relating to depredation claims was assigned to the Land Division.

 In this inventory the records relating specifically to depredation claims against Indians are considered as being records of the Depredation Division -- not records of the Civilization Division or the Land Division -- regardless of their date. The records of the Civilization Division relating to depredation claims were transferred to the Depredation Division. Many of these records were used by the Depredation Division in its work, and they have been interfiled with later records. Some of the records, however, relating to claims that had been settled before 1885 do not appear to have been used by the Depredation Division. There are also a few records for the period during which depredation work was handled by the Land Division.

 Many of the records relating to individual claims were transferred to the Court of Claims in 1891 and later. There are many more records relating to Indian depredation claims in Record Group 123, Records of the United States Court of Claims, than there are among the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. (See entry 31 in Preliminary Inventory No. 58.) There are also many records concerning Indian depredation claims in Record Group 205, Records of the Court of Claims Section (Justice). (See entries 79 and 80 in Preliminary Inventory No. 47.)

692. REGISTERS OF INCOMING CORRESPONDENCE

1889-98. 2 vols. 4 in.
Registers of incoming correspondence of the Bureau relating to depredation claims that were referred to the Depredation Division (later the Land Division) for examination and action. The two volumes differ in form. Individual entries in the first volume give type of document (such as letter, claim, or report), file number, date of document, name of writer, date when document was received or when it was referred to the Division, remarks concerning action taken, and sometimes other information. Individual entries in the second volume give file number of letter, date it was received in the Division, name of writer, subject, and an indication of action taken. Arranged chronologically by date of receipt. Much of the correspondence is with the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entry 91) rather than with the records of the Depredation Division.

693. INDEX TO LETTERS SENT

1889-90. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
A subject index for five press-copy letter books for the Bureau's outgoing correspondence that was handled by the Depredation Division (see entry 96). The letter books are cited in the index as Volumes 44-48; they are now bound, however, as the last half of Volume 74 and Volumes 75 and 76. Arranged by subject and thereunder in order of letter's entry in the letter books.

694. INDEX TO REPORTS

1890-91. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
An index to names of claimants in the press copies of reports concerning claims submitted by the Bureau to the Secretary of the Interior. These reports are in letter books separate from copies of other outgoing Bureau correspondence that was handled by the Depredation Division; they are, however, with the main series of press-copy letter-books of the Bureau (entry 96). Citations in the index are to the nine letter books, which have been bound into three volumes. Arranged by initial letter of surname of claimant and thereunder by number of letter book.

695. COPY OF REPORT TO SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

June 18, 1887. 1/4 in.
A narrative report concerning the organization of the Division, the type of work performed, methods of operation, the volume of work, and employees of the Division. Included are some statistical tables

696. REGISTER OF DEPREDATION CLAIMS

ca. 1835-87. 1 vol. 2 in.
Entries for individual claims vary, but each one usually gives claim number, name of claimant, nature and amount of claim, name of tribe accused, and information concerning action taken. Often included are the date of the letter transmitting the claim or file references and the name of the writer, date of depredation claimed, and an indication of the evidence submitted. There are entries for claims received from about 1835 until 1860, and there are indications of action taken as late as 1887. Arranged in part by name of tribe and in part by initial letter of name of claimant. The entries are numbered according to claim numbers, which were assigned at a later time. The entries in this volume were copied into Volume 1B of the registers described in entry 698. Included are a table of contents and a detached index, incomplete, to names of tribes. The records submitted to support the claims are described in entry 700.

697. INDEX TO REGISTER OF DEPREDATION CLAIMS

ca. 1862-80. 1 vol. 1/4 in.
An index for the first volume of the registers described in entry 698. It consists mainly of page references for names of claimants, but included are a few subject entries. Entries are arranged in rough alphabetical order by surname of claimant.

698. REGISTERS OF DEPREDATION CLAIMS

ca. 1862-91. 7 vols. 2 ft.
 Entries for individual claims usually give claim number, name of claimant, nature and amount of claim, by whom the depredation was alleged to have been committed (usually the name of the tribe), date of depredation, file number of letter transmitting claim, name of writer, date of receipt of letter, a summary of evidence submitted, and sometimes the amount awarded. Often included are remarks concerning the action taken on the claim and the disposition of supporting papers. The first volume appears to have been started sometime between 1862 and 1872, but claims submitted as early as 1835 have been registered in it. There are a few entries for the years 1892-95; and there are some notations, chiefly concerning transfers of records, dated after 1900. Entries are arranged in chronological order by date of registration. A claim, however, may have been registered when it was first submitted or when it was reconsidered; and, in some cases, older claims were registered apparently for reference purposes only. The claims are for the most part numbered in the order in which they are registered. There is some duplication in the entries. The seven volumes are designated as Volumes 1, 1A, 1B, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Volume 1A contains entries for the same claims as those in the first part of Volume 1, but it includes additional notations. Volume IB contains entries for the same claims as those in the last part of Volume 1 and also entries for additional claims. Volume 2 is a continuation of Volume 1B rather than of Volume 1. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of claimants. The index in Volume 1 is not complete; there is, however, a separate index for this volume (entry 697). For the documents submitted concerning the individual claims, see entry 700. For another register, see entry 696. For docket books, see entry 699.

699. DOCKET BOOKS

1885-91. 4 vols. 8 in.
Docket books for claims considered by the Depredation Division. For individual claims are given the docket number, claim number, name of claimant, amount of claim, tribe accused, date of depredation, a summary of evidence, and a summary of action taken. The dates given above are those of actions taken in the Bureau and in the Department; the claims were frequently submitted much earlier. Arranged by docket number, which was assigned in the order in which the claim was reported to the Secretary of the Interior. The docket numbers do not correspond with the claim numbers that are used in the registers (entry 698) and by which the evidence concerning depredation claims (entry 700) is filed. In each volume there is an alphabetical index to names of claimants.

700. EVIDENCE CONCERNING DEPREDATION CLAIMS

ca. 1835-96. 22 ft.
Affidavits of claimants and witnesses, reports of agents and other field officials, reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior, decisions of the Secretary of the Interior, transmittal letters and other correspondence, and other records concerning individual claims of whites and Indians for depredations by Indians (and a few claims of Indians against whites). Many of the records were originally parts of the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau (entries 79 and 91). In many cases there are only endorsement sheets or jackets remaining, for the records were transferred to the Court of Claims. There are a few copies of records dated as late as 1908 and on some endorsement sheets there are notations dated as late as 1911. Arranged by claim number, which was assigned in the order of registration (see entry 698). There are also some separate empty jackets not in numerical sequence. For other records concerning individual claims, see entries 699, 701, and 702.

701. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS CONCERNING DEPREDATION CLAIMS.

1831-93. 1 ft.
Included are incoming correspondence, copies of outgoing correspondence, reports, affidavits, lists, schedules, abstracts, memoranda, and other kinds of records concerning groups of claims and individual claims. Some of the records are arranged by tribe or geographical location, and some of them are arranged chronologically. For the main series of records concerning individual claims, see entry 700.

Records Relating to Claims for Depredations by Sioux Indians in Minnesota in 1862

Under the provisions of an act of Congress of February 16, 1863 (12 Stat. 652), a commission was appointed by the President to investigate claims for depredations suffered during the outbreak of the Sioux Indians in Minnesota in 1862 and to make awards. The commission consisted of Albert S. White, Eli R. Chase, and Cyrus Aldrich. For other related records, see entries 898 and 899.

702. EVIDENCE AND FINDINGS.

1862-63. 2 ft.
Affidavits, petitions, powers of attorney, and other records concerning individual claims submitted to the Commissioners. Included are certificates of the Commissioners' findings. Arranged by claim number; there are, however, gaps in the numbers. There is a separate bundle for claims for which no proof was submitted.

703. MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS CONCERNING SIOUX DEPREDATION CLAIMS.

1862-69. 2 in.
Letters received by the Commissioners, correspondence of the Bureau and the Department of the Interior, reports, affidavits, powers of attorney, vouchers, Treasury form letters, assessors' returns on taxable property, schedules, and other kinds of records. Arranged in rough chronological order. For the main series of records concerning individual claims, see entry 702.

704. RECORD OF RECEIPTS FOR PAYMENTS ON CLAIMS.

1865. 1 vol. 1/2 in.
A record for duplicate receipts issued for the amount of claims distributed by Northern Superintendent Clark W. Thompson.  Individual entries give claim and receipt numbers, name of payee, amount of claim, and sometimes information concerning the handling of the receipt and draft. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of payee. Other fragmentary financial statements are scattered throughout the volume.

Other Records

705. NAME INDEX TO DEPREDATION CLAIMS.

ca. 1838-64. 1 vol. 2 in.
An index to names of persons submitting depredation claims.  Individual entries give name of claimant, nature of claim, jurisdiction, and file references; and they are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname and thereunder in rough chronological order. This volume was compiled before claim numbers were assigned and is of limited use in locating records that are no longer to be found in the general incoming correspondence of the Bureau.

706. SCHEDULES AND ABSTRACTS.

1835-78. 6 in.
Schedules of depredation claims filed and of payments made. There are also narrative abstracts. Included are summaries and reports of claims. Arranged by name of tribe. For other schedules, see entries 701, 703, 707, and 711.

707. SCHEDULES OF DEPREDATION CLAIMS AGAINST SIOUX AND CHIPPEWA OF THE MISSISSIPPI.

1857-62. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
These schedules were probably prepared in the office of the Northern Superintendent. There is one schedule for the claims against each tribe. Individual entries give date of claim, claim number, name of claimant, nature of claim, amount of claim, date when claim was submitted to Indians, decision of Indians and remarks of agent, date when claim was sent to Washington, and sometimes other information. The claims were submitted between 1857 and 1860; action was taken between 1860 and 1862. Entries in each schedule are arranged by claim number. For other schedules, see entries 703 and 706.

708. LIST OF CLAIMS RETURNED FROM CONGRESS.

July 1885. 1/4 in.
Listed are names of claimants only. Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname. There is another copy of this list with the lists of claims sent to special agents (entry 709).

709. LISTS OF CLAIMS SENT TO SPECIAL AGENTS FOR INVESTIGATION.

1885-87. 1 vol. 1 in.
Individual entries usually give claim number, name of claimant, amount of claim, date when claim was transmitted to agent and date when it was returned, and sometimes other information. Arranged by name of agent and thereunder chronologically by date when the claim was sent to agent. There is also a copy of the list of claims returned by Congress in 1885, which is described in entry 708.

710. RECORD OF CASES REPORTED BY CASPAR W. BELL.

1886-88. 1 vol. 3/4 in.
Bell was a clerk in the Depredation Division. Individual entries give name of claimant, claim number, and date of report to the Secretary of the Interior. The entries are arranged chronologically. Included in the volume are some notes concerning laws, treaties, and other subjects.

711. SCHEDULES OF CLAIMS.

ca. 1891. 2 in.
Two undated schedules of claims subject to consideration. Each entry in these schedules gives claim number, name of claimant, locale of depredation, and address of claimant. There is also a schedule of claims not subject to consideration. Each entry in this schedule gives claim number, name of claimant, and information concerning the status or disposition of the claim. The latest year noted in this schedule is 1891. One of the two schedules of claims subject to consideration seems to have been compiled at the same time as this schedule; the other schedule was compiled somewhat earlier. Entries in each of the three schedules are arranged by claim number. For records concerning the individual claims, see entry 700.