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Special File 285 [M574, roll 77, frames 89-119, 145-170]


Stidham Roll of Creek Self-Emigrants, 1886
Exhibits A-Z, AA

Part 1 ... Part 2 ... Recapitulation ... Exhibits


Exhibit A.


TUL-MO-CHUS MICCO and NO-PO-ITH Harjo, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

Question 1. State your age, town in which you live, and how long you have lived in the Territory.

Answer 1. Tul-mo-chus Micco says he was born in the year 1813 or 1814. I live in Oakfuskee Town, Ind. T., and has lived in the Territory since 1837 or 1838, and came West from the State of Alabama.

Question 2. Did you know Tusekiah Charty, of Oakfuskee Town, whose name and the names of his family are reported in the list furnished by G. W. Stidham to the Interior Department, and are the names, ages, and sex of himself and family correctly stated in said report, and is the date of their emigration correctly stated, and did they pay their own expenses, and are they entitled to re-embursement therefore?

Answer 2. Yes, I knew him; he and his family moved to Texas, as stated, in the year 1839, and in the year 1842 came into the Indian Territory. I left this family in Alabama, and they moved to Texas on their own account, and at their own expense. The United States did not move the Creeks into Texas, and this family was sent for by their relatives in the Territory.

Question 3. Did you or have you in this examination had all the names called over to you by D. M. Wisdom, clerk at Union Agency, Ind. T., and by G. W. Stidham who interprets and explains to you, and did you fully understand the list here with shown to you, and is it a correct statement of names, ages, sexes, date of emigration, where to, etc., of Indians of the Creek tribe who paid their own expenses, and are entitled to remuneration therefore?

Answer 3. Yes, every name individually was called out to me, and the list gone over by the said clerk and interpreter carefully to me, and each name identified, and I directed a few alterations or changes in the original copy. The names are all correct, the town Oakfuskee is correctly given, but in a very (few) instances the ages are not correctly stated. The Indians did not keep family records, and the ages can only be estimated, and some instances their age is stated when the roll was prepared, when it should represent the date they came into the Territory; otherwise the list is a very correct one. I was born and raised in Oakfuskee Town, and have been chief of said town, or rather town king, for at least fifty years, and have had special management of the internal affairs during that time.

TUL-MO-CHUS Micco (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me October 8, l886

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.

No-po-ith Harjo states that he heard the names called over to Tul-mo-chus HARJO; that he identified them as correctly set out in the list Exhibit ed to him, and that in all essential points he corroborates statement of said Micco

NO-PO-ITH HARJO (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me October 8, l886.
Witness my hand and seal of office.

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge


Exhibit B.


JANE O. CHEE, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I was eight or ten years old when I emigrated to the Indian Territory. I came from Alabama, leaving there in the fall of 1836. It was towards spring of 1837 when we reached the Territory. I am about sixty to sixty-one years old. I came with a party or number of Creek Indians, and I remember the following heeds of families:

Nannie Miller, in Coweta Town, and one name, viz, Sin-war-ki-keo, Malo, is (omitted in the list of G. W. Stidham here shown me, and explained to me as belonging to said family, but I find that it is entered separately on the list, and is correct. Is-fi-e-cher was one of the number, and his family also, making five in number.

Ninne Chapper HARJO was of the number, with his family, nine in number. He was my father, and I came along with him. Tulloaf HARJO and family were of the number, seven in all. Nart-kar and family, three in number, came also. Toh-lot-te-ke and family, four in number, came also. Lucy Locco and family, five in number, came also. Purhoso HARJO and family, nine in number, came also. To-me-che was of the number. Wox-e-ho-lar-ter was of the number also, and family, four in all Tuc-ko HARJO and family, eight in all, were of the number. I also state that Arparlar Harjo and family came also. His name is omitted from the list. His family embraced the following names: Che-wo-ner (f), Peter Gibson (m), John Gibson (m), Nalkar , Jimmy (m), Lucinda (f), Noke-to-che (f), eight in number.

There was also another family that came out when I did whose name is omitted in the corrected list of G. W. Stidham, viz, Chullo (f), head of family, aged about thirty years, and her two children, Ok-bar-ne (f), about eight years old; Top-pot-te-tar-kee (m), about six years old.

These parties, as I understand it, only claim transportation from the United States, and they are entitled to be re-imbursed therefore.

JANE O. CHEE (her x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me October 8, 1886.
Witness my hand and seal.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit C.

NO-LAH-TA, a Creek Indian, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am about seventy years old; came from Alabama to the Creek Nation with James Island band or company, or at least overtook them on the way; it was in the year l839. My family embraced five members, viz, Lone-ja, Tum-me, Wicy, Cony, and Billy, and myself, making six (6) in all. I claim transportation, for I paid my own expenses. I am a member of Coweta Town, Indian Territory, to which nation I emigrated, and where I now reside. I swear that I have never received any remuneration from the United States on account of my transportation. I have examined the revised list of G. W. Stidham, embracing the names of emigrants who paid their own expenses, etc., and I find the list of my family to be a correct one.

NO-LAH TA (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me October 8, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U. S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit D.

In the matter of Creek Indians who emigrated themselves from the old Creek Nation in Alabama to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, west of Arkansas, at their own charge and expense, and who subsisted themselves twelve months after their arrival, said names being reported to the Indian Office by G. W. Stidham. Under said investigation one Kilto, a Creek Indian, aged over sixty years, who now lives near We-a-laka, Creek Nation, Indian Territory, being sworn, deposed as follows:

I came to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, in or about the year l839. Among those who came whom I remember were Nilla-bee-Harjo and his family, which consisted of Pe-thlar-me, Nar-ke, Locey, and Mary, aged, respectively, forty-six, twenty-six, twenty-one, and eighteen, and all females. They came with the James Island band. They belonged to Broken Arrow Town, Creek Nation.

I also came along in the emigration with No-yar-no-che, a male about twenty-four years of age; Melissa, a female, aged twenty-two years; Litchar and Parley, who were small children. They came in or about 1839 and came with the James Island band; both of these families paid their own expenses or transportation, and so far as I know have never been re-imbursed by the United States Government. They belonged to Broken Arrow Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

Said deposition interpreted by Joseph Mingo under oath to interpret faithfully.

KILTO (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, November 16 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent




Exhibit E.

STATE OF INDIAN TERRITORY,

Before me, on this 31st day of December, A. D. 1885, personally appeared Mrs. Sarah Davis, colored, who being duly sworn, did on her said oath state as follows:

My name is Sarah Davis, am I am a citizen of the Creek Nation, and reside at Muscogee, Ind. Terr. I do not know my age, but was born in Alabama, and was a slave of a daughter of General McIntosh, who married Samuel Hawkins. My first child (now Ned Gibson's wife, and residing at the old Creek Agency near Muscogee) was born in Alabama shortly after General McIntosh and Sam Hawkins were killed. I had two children when I left Alabama. I came through from near Columbus, Ala., with a party in charge of Ben Hawkins. There were other parties with ours, one in charge of Sam Sells. I think that there were over twenty persons in Sells's party, as I know he had two large wagons and one carriage. Besides these he had plenty of horses, and I saw a good many of the Sells party riding on horseback all of the way along until we reached the Verdigris River, in the Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I know that both Ben Hawkins and Sam Sells bought provisions for their respective parties all along the way, as I, among other slaves, was required to help pack bacon and other things into the camps. I did not know of any one else buying provisions for the two aforesaid parties but Hawkins and Sells, as herein before stated. The two parties continued near together all the way from the starting point to the Creek Nation, so that I was well acquainted with both, and to the best of my knowledge and belief there was over twenty persons in the Sells party.

SARAH DAVIS (her x mark).

Sworn and subscribed to before me, on this the 4th day of January, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Commissioner and Agent


Exhibit F.

PINKNEY HAWKINS, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:
I am a citizen of the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, and am about seventy years old, perhaps a little older, and I reside in Hil-a-bee Town, Creek Nation. I came to the Indian Territory in the year 1831, and emigrated from the State of Alabama. I paid my own way, furnished money and transportation, and I came in company with an uncle of mine by the name of Benjamin Hawkins. I have never been re-imbursed for my expenditures in coming to the Territory, nor have I drawn the twelve months' subsistence under the treaty. There were no Indians transported to the Territory in the years 1830-1831, and I do not believe the records will show any such fact.

PINKNEY (his x mark) HAWKINS.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.
Witness my hand and seal.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit G 1.

POLLY ISLAND (colored), being duly sworn as to the matter of Creeks who emigrated to the Indian Territory, and paid their own expenses, and subsisted themselves twelve months after their arrival: Witness does not know her age, but I came to the Creek Nation in or about 1830; I was a woman grown and had one child before I came. I knew Millie Reed (f.), Elizabeth Sells (f.), Juda Reed (f.). Sallie Reed (f.), Rosanna Reed (f.), William Reed (m.), Susan Reed (f.), James Reed (m.), Hepsey, and David, ten in all. They are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's revised list, except Susan Reed, who is a female, and she is still living. The others mentioned of this family are dead. I came along with these people from Alabama to the Territory, moving a little ahead of them, but camping together at night. These people paid their own way -- they had to do it or starve -- and subsisted themselves twelve months after their arrival, and so far as I know have never been re-imbursed therefore by the United States Government. They belonged to Thlop-thoc-ko Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I also knew Pleasant Auston (m.), Polly Auston (f.), Daniel Auston, Nathaniel Auston and Sooky (a servant). They are all dead, so far as I know. Their names and ages are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's revised list, and the same has been read over to me. They belonged to Thlop-thoc-ko Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I came along west as they did in or about 1830, and whilst we moved in day time in separate squads, we camped together at night. They had to pay their own expenses or starve, and they subsisted themselves for twelve months after their arrival, and so far as I know have never had any remuneration therefore from the United States Government. I also knew the Berryhill family, viz, John Berryhill (m.), Te-na Berryhill (f.), and Rainey Berryhill (f.). They came along at the same time I did west, and emigrated themselves at their own expense, paying transportation and subsisting themselves twelve months after their arrival. They are all dead, and they belonged to Thlop-thoc-ko Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. Their names, ages, etc., are correctly put down in G. W. Stidham's list, and being called over to me I identify them as the persons whom I knew. I also knew the Sells family, twenty-three in number, whose names, sex, etc., are correctly set out in said Stidham's revised list. I have heard their names called over in this investigation, and recognize them each and all. They came along is I did in the same year to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, and paid their own way and expenses. They had to pay their own expenses or starve on the road, and they subsisted themselves for twelve months after their arrival, and so far as I know have never been remunerated therefore by the United States Government. They were of Broken Arrow Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

POLLY ISLAND (her x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, November 29, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.

Exhibit G2 -- In the matter of Creeks who emigrated to the Indian Territory, who paid their own transportation and subsisted themselves for twelve mouths after their arrival.

SCIPIO SANCHO, aged about seventy years, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I live in the Creek Nation Indian Territory, near Muscogee. I was born in Alabama, and brought when a boy to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I knew Millie Reed, Elizabeth Sells, Juda Reed, Sallie Reed, Rosanna Reed, William Reed, Susan Reed, James Reed, Hepsey(f.), and David(m.), ten in family, whose names are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's revised list, which is before me. Their ages seem to be correctly stated; I identify the parties. I also knew Pleasant Auston, Polly Auston, Daniel Auston, Nathaniel Auston, Sooky, a servant, six in family, whose names, ages, and sex are properly set out in said list. Sooky was my sister. I also knew John Berryhill, Te-na Berryhill, and Rainey Berryhill; I identify their names, and their ages, sex, etc., are properly set out in G. W. Stidham's revised list, which is before me and has been read over to me. These people belong to Thlop-thloc-ko Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I have heard Pleasant Auston and my father say that they did not come with any band of emigrants to the Creek Nation, that is to say, they came along themselves and paid their own expenses.

I have hear them say that they located one season at Ten Islands, near Mobile, Ala., and then came on west, landing finally in the Creek Nation, Indian Territory. I do not understand that Jefferson, a servant, came with the Auston family to the Nation. He was purchased by them after their arrival.

SCIPIO SANCHO (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, November 23, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.

John S. PORTER, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a citizen of the Creek Nation, am seventy-eight years old, and belong to Broken Arrow Town. I knew that the Reed family came here in 1829, that is, in the winter of 1829. On January 30 I passed the family at Fort Smith, Ark. The family embraced old Mrs. Reed, Elizabeth Sells, Judah Reed, Sallie Reed, Rosella Reed, William Reed, Susie Reed, David Reed, James Reed, Hepsey Reed, Pleasant Austin, Polly Austin, Daniel Austin, Nathaniel Austin, and one servant girl, whose name was Sukey, John Berryhill, Tena Berryhill, and Rainey Berryhill. I know by general reputation that the above family, which consists of two branches, descended from old Mrs. Reed, bore the expenses of moving to the Territory, and should be re-imbursed therefore.

JNO. S. PORTER (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 5, 1886.

ROBT L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit H.

PARHOSE HARJO, or PHILLIP, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a son of Tus-ton-nop-chup-co, and I reside in the Indian Territory, Creek Nation, Indian Territory, in Tol-see Town. I am well acquainted with my father's family, and their names, sex, age date of emigration are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's corrected list of self emigrants, which has been explained to me and read over to me. We came after the "big emigration," because sickness in the family detained us in Alabama. We are entitled to transportation, and should be re-imbursed by the United States.

PARHOSE HARJO (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit I.

HO-TUL-KE-MAH-THLA, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of Fish Pond Town, Creek Nation. I am about sixty-eight years of age. I have been chief of said town for many years, and am now a member of the House of Kings of the Creek Council. I knew Ar-pek-ko-che-marthla, who is dead; his name, and that of his family, ten persons in all, is correctly set out in the list prepared by G. W. Stidham, showing the names of persons who emigrated West at their own expense, settled in the Indian Territory, and subsisted themselves for twelve months after their arrival. This Ar-pek-ko-che-marthla emigrated to the Territory in 1834-'35, that is, in the winter time, and they had no transportation from the Government of the United States, nor did they receive any assistance after their arrival, and they are fully entitled to remuneration for their expenses under the treaty. I knew the family aforesaid in Alabama, and I have known them in the Territory. They removed West because one of the young men of the family was charged with being too intimate with the wife of another man, and in order to escape punishment, which was severe under the Creek law or custom, the family came to the Territory. The name Tar-war-pi-ke is set out incorrectly, it should be Hillis Harjo, who did emigrate at his own expense and subsist himself one year after his arrival, and is en titled to re-imbursement under the treaty. He came in 1840. He was arrested under a false charge, tried and acquitted in Alabama, and afterwards worked his way West, and reached his tribe in the Territory. I am conversant with the facts of his case. Had he not been wrongfully detained, he would have come with the main body of emigrants who removed some time before.

HO-TUL-KE-MAH-THLA (his x mark).

Sworn and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.
Witness my hand and seal.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit J.

JOHN LASLEY, in the matter of self-emigration of certain Creeks to the Indian Territory, deposes and says:

My name is John Lasley; I am about sixty-two years of age, and I live on North Fork River, 12 miles northwest of Eufaula, Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

I knew Thlom-ne-hum-ke Marthla and his family, consisting of five persons, viz, Lucy, Sop-pe-hoh-ye, Tol-mo-chus Harjo, and myself. Their names are correctly set out in the revised list prepared by G. W. Stidham in the matter of investigation and also their age and sex. They are now all dead except myself. We emigrated to the Creek Nation in the year 1839, and paid our own expenses, and have never received any re-imbursement for the same. The family is properly put down as of Ar-pe-kar Town, Creek Nation. I am of said family.

JOHN LASLEY (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me November 12, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U. S. Agent.


Exhibit K.

HO-PE-CHEE, commonly called ELIZA, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of Ar-tus-see town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory; I am about fifty-eight to sixty years of age, and came to tile Territory with the "big emigration" of 1837-'38, and remember all about it. I knew Saf-o-he-kee, and left him back in Alabama, and he emigrated to the Indian Territory in 1841, at his own expense. He was an orphan boy and remained over in Alabama for a few years in Alabama, before he rejoined his people. His name is enrolled as Taf-o-he, but it should be Saf-o-he-kee. The kee is omitted through mistake. He is entitled to transportation and subsistence under the treaty.

I also know that Fok-loto-ka and family, four in number, and Ar-tah-thle and family, two in number, and Hol-th-ka-see and family, three in number, are correctly set out in said Stidham's statement or list, and their names have been gone over to me, and their date of emigration is also correctly stated to the best of my recollection, and they are entitled to re-imbursement for transportation and subsistence for twelve months, etc.

HO-PE-CHEE (her x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 5, 1886.
Witness my hand and seal.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit L.

INEY, a Creek Indian woman, being duly sworn, deposes as follows:

I am a daughter of Yar-te-ka, of lower Eufaula town, and emigrated to the country in the year 1846, but was several years on the road. I knew the two families mentioned in G. W. Stidham's revised list as Okfus ke, Micco, and Yah-te-kee. Their names are properly set out Okfuske-Micco-Yolth ka, Te-mo-chee, Lucy, Cho pen chlocco, and Yar-te-ka, Oak Locey, In-ka-kee, Iney and John, except two that are not given, Walker and Miser, man and wife. I do not know their ages. These people paid their own transportation and supported themselves for twelve months after their arrival, and are entitled to remuneration therefore. They came along slowly and finally reached the Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

INEY (her x mark.)

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 7, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U. S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit M.

JACKSON LEWIS, being sworn, deposed as follows:

I live in the Indian Territory, and am enrolled in Hitche-tee town, on the list of G. W. Stidham. The head of the family, as entered on said list, is Fob-bin-ho-yee, and my name is entered or enrolled as Jackson (m), six years old, which is a mistake. I am about fifty-five years of age. The statement as to our emigration is correct in part, but it fails to show that the family stopped for several years in the Choctaw Nation, near Doaksville. We paid our own expenses, and are entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months after our arrival.

JACKSON LEWIS.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit N.

CHOWEE COLBERT, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of the Indian Territory; belong to Hickory Ground Town. I am about sixty-three to sixty five years of age. I knew Emarthla Harjo; he is dead. He was a man who had crazy spells, and did not like to mix in crowds, and therefore would not come in the "big emigration." His age and family are set out correctly in G. W. Stidham's revised or corrected list also that of his family and the date of his and their emigration. He only claims transportation, to which he is entitled.

CHOWEE COLBERT, his x mark.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.

ROBERT L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit 0.

GEORGE FISHER, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, aged about fifty-seven to fifty-eight years. I am a son of Samuel Fisher, who emigrated with his family from Alabama to the Creek Nation in 1847. His family names, sex, date of emigration, etc., are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's corrected list of self emigrants to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory.
The family is entitled to transportation and subsistence.

G. W. FISHER.

GEORGE FISHER, being recalled, further states:

I knew the Ancil family in Hickory Ground Town, Indian Territory, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. They are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's corrected list as to age, sex, date of emigration, etc., and are entitled to transportation and subsistence. I also knew the Chook McNac family in Co-was-sar-da town in the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, and their names, age, sex, and date of emigration are correctly set out in G. W. Stidham's corrected list, which I have before me. They are entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months under treaty.

G. W. FISHER.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 5, 1886.

ROBERT L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit P.

WARD COACHMAN, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of the Indian Territory, Creek Nation; aged about sixty-six years. I knew Angeline McCombs and Cornelia McCombs. They came to the Territory from Alabama in 1877, and they paid their own expenses and are entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months after their arrival. Their age, sex, and date of emigration is fully set out in G. W. Stidham's corrected list, which has been explained to me. I sent the money to them to pay their expenses, they being relations of mine.

WARD COACHMAN.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 5, 1886.

ROBERT L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit Q

THOMAS HARRISON, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I live in the Indian Territory, Creek Nation, Hickory Ground Town; am about forty-five years of age. I am a half brother of Benjamin Knox, who is put down on the roll prepared G. W. Stidham as the head of the family. My parents died, on the way to the Indian Territory, at Memphis, Tenn. The family at the outset consisted of seven persons, but the two old ones and a child died. When the family reached the Territory it embraced Benjamin Knox, William Harrison, Silla, a servant, and myself. I am enrolled as Thomas C. Harrison. The date of our arrival is correctly stated in said Stidham's list. We paid our own expenses, and have never been re-imbursed by the United States; and we are entitled to subsistence for twelve months after our arrival to the Indian Territory.

THOMAS C. HARRISON.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.
Witness my hand and seal.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit R.

THLA-THLO-YOHOLA, sometimes called Siah Fish, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am about seventy-six years old; I came to the Territory in the "big emigration" of 1837-'38, and live in Hutche-Chupper and Kia-li-che Towns, which are practically one and the same. I know or knew Cosista Harjo. He is dead. He went to Texas and he and family were brought to the Territory; that is, they were sent for by their people. In this family, in the corrected list of G. W. Stidham, one name was omitted, viz: Suf-fol-la-kee (f.), and the wife of Cosista Harjo. I knew Chelar Fixico; he is dead; his name and family are correctly stated, and their date of emigration. I also knew Tim-mon-mar-feche (f); her age, date of emigration, etc.,is correctly stated in Stidham's list. The statement as to Jonney is correct. I knew him and family, and the date of their emigration is put down correctly in said Stidham's list. There were five in Jonney's family.

All the above-named bore their own expenses in moving to the Territory; and are entitled to transportation and twelve month's subsistence.

THLA-THLO-YOHOLA (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
United States Indian Agent.

There are four names omitted, Sar-pa-we (m) and three others, viz, It-chas-war-che (m), Se-yar-par-ho-ye (f), and Tar-ho-siche (m), in the corrected list of G. W. Stidham This family paid its own expenses and emigrated to Texas and reached here in about 1840.


Exhibit S.

SILAS JEFFERSON, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I am a resident of the Indian Territory, Creek Nation; am about fifty-four or fifty-five years old, and live in Tars-ke-kee Town, Creek Nation. I knew Dic McNac; he is dead ; his family is correctly set out in the list of names of self emigrants prepared and corrected by G. W. Stidham This family emigrated to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, in 1838. I came in a previous emigration, I think in 1836. I have heard Dic McNac say that he paid his own expenses, and I knew that he made efforts in his lifetime to get his pay, or to get his money back. Some of Dic McNac's children still reside in the Indian Territory. Dic McNac was my uncle.

SILAS JEFFERSON (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.
[SEAL.]

C. S. SMITH,
Supreme Judge.


Exhibit X.

In the matter of investigation of self-emigrant claims, this day came PRECILLA CRABTREE, a citizen of the Creek Nation by blood, and made the following statement under oath:

I am seventy-one years of age and live at Eufaula, Ind. T. I came from the State of Alabama to the Creek Nation in 1874 or l875, having stopped on the way several years. I came with my husband, William B. Crabtree, and we emigrated at our own expense, paying for transportation, and have never received any re-imbursement therefore from the United States Government, and we claim re-imbursement for the same, and also subsistence for twelve months after our arrival.

PRECILLA CRABTREE {her x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, November 12, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U. S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit Z.

JOHN MCINTOSH, a Creek citizen about sixty-seven years old, being duly sworn, deposed as follows:

I knew Samuel C. Brown and Goliah Herrod. They were Creek Indians, and were sent from Alabama to Col. Dick Johnson's school in Kentucky. I think (after their education) they came out in the year 1834 to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory. At any rate they came to the Territory about that time, and coming from Kentucky they traveled on horseback and paid their own expenses. In those days the principal way of traveling was on horseback, and they are entitled to transportation and twelve months' subsistence after their arrival in the said Creek Nation.

JOHN MCINTOSH (his x mark).

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
U.S. Indian Agent.


Exhibit A A.

G. W. STIDHAM, being duly sworn, testifies as follows:

I reside in the Indian Territory, Creek Nation, Nitchito Town, and am sixty-nine years of age. I prepared the corrected list of self-emigrants which is now before me, and find a mistake in the enrollment of Mary Ann Jones. The date of emigration is fixed at 1837, and it should be 1847. She is entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months after her arrival. Her age is correctly stated in said list, and she is now dead. I remember distinctly when she came into the Territory.

I also knew Arche-wi-che, enrolled in Oke-te-Yak-ney Town, and I knew that he arrived in the Territory in 1833, and he paid his own expenses and is entitled to transportation and subsistence under the treaty.

I knew John Shepherd, of Nichito Town. He was left a small boy in Alabama, and came west and found his own mother, by whom he was identified. His date of arrival in the Territory is correctly stated in the list by me - that is, the corrected list. He paid his expenses, and is entitled to transportation and subsistence under the treaty.

I also knew the facts as stated as to the emigration of Elijah Beaver, in Coweta Town, to be correct, and I verify the statement in the list prepared by me.

I also know Muscogee Sutbury and her family, four in number, which are set out in the revised list prepared by me. Their age, sex, and date of emigration are correctly stated, and they are enrolled in Broken Arrow Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory. They are entitled to transportation and subsistence.

I also know the Wadsworth family, of which Lewina Wadsworth is put down at the head in my revised list Their age, sex, and date of emigration are correctly stated on said list, and they are entitled to transportation and subsistence.

I also knew Thomas Morris, Nitchito Town, Creek Nation, Indian Territory His name is correctly stated, and his date of arrival also to the Indian Territory. He is entitled to transportation and subsistence.

I also know Thomas Grayson, of Nillabee Town; his family is correctly stated, viz, Thomas Grayson, Levy Grayson, Samson Grayson, Millie Grayson, Lizzie Grayson, and David Grayson, in all six persons. As stated in my revised list, these people emigrated to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, in l830, and are entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months after their arrival. They were never paid by the United States Government their transportation or furnished subsistence under the treaty.

I also state that A. J. Doyle emigrated himself in 1836 and paid his own expenses. He is entitled to transportation and subsistence for twelve months after his arrival in the Creek Nation, Indian Territory.

G. W. STIDHAM,

Sworn to and subscribed before me, October 8, 1886.

ROBT. L. OWEN,
Indian Agent.


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