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16. John3 Wallingford (John2, Nicholas1) was born in Bradford, Essex County, Massachusetts 14 December 1688.(310) He was baptized in Bradford on 30 June 1695 ("30: 4m: 1695").(311) John died before 27 January 1762, in Rochester, New Hampshire. His will was written on 27 October 1761 and proved the following January 27th.

He married Charity, probably by 1713. Their son William was sued in court on 12 November 1734, meaning he would have to have been born by November of 1713.(312)

Charity died sometime after April 1771, probably in Rochester, N.H.. She was still alive when her son Peter wrote his will 18 April 1771.(313) Given that John and Charity had children named Phebe, Patience and Peter -- names not in existence in the Wallingford family before this point, it is likely that these names came from Charity's family. Using the database on Ancestry.com a search was made of all the Charitys mentioned in the Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. One possible match popped up in the Rhodes family. A Charity Rhodes born 8 or 28 November 1687 to Thomas and Mary (Thompson) Rhodes of Kittery. No further information is included about her, which likely means that there was no obvious information as to her future. At the very least she was still alive when her father died around 1711. This Charity's brother Jacob, who died before their father, had a daughter Mary Rhodes who married Samuel Place of Newington, giving a connection to that town. Samuel Place's sister Abigail Place was the mother of Abigail Walker who married John and Charity Wallingford's son Peter. If Charity Wallingford was born Charity Rhodes, this means that her son Peter would have married his first cousin's niece by marriage. Both families moved from Newington to Rochester, which would increase the likelihood of a common bond. Charity Rhodes also had a brother Miles who married a woman named Patience Donnell, and had a daughter Charity. There appear no Phebes or Peters in this family, however. Another possible family connection is with the Wittum family, which interestingly enough also connects up with the Rhodes family when they were in Kittery and later went to Newington. On 24 June 1715 John and Charity Wallingford sold a one acre parcel of land to Newington minister Rev. Joseph Adams at "Stony hill" in Newington. Abutters to the property included the Reverend himself, as well as William "Witham".(314) The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire reports that William had a father, brother and son named Peter. His father Peter had a sister Sarah Wittum who was the second wife of George Brawn. George Brawn was the father of Eleanor Brawn who was the wife of Jacob Rhodes, mentioned above as the sister of Charity Rhodes born in 1687. William Wittum's brother Peter also had a daughter Eunice who married Richard Brawn, another child of George Brawn above. William Wittum married before June 1701, and his children aren't well accounted for, so Charity could belong to his family as well. His wife's name was probably Mary (Nason) Trickey, and she had a brother Joseph Nason who had a daughter Charity born in 1682, although they lived in Nantucket. The names of Phebe and Patience don't appear in any of these families, however.

Despite all of the convoluted connections between the Rhodes, Wittum and Brawn families there appears very little to tie them to the Wallingfords aside from their being neighbors to William Wittum. These possible connections are extremely tentative at best, and shouldn't be construed as evidence that she belonged to either family. They are intended as leads for future research only. It is entirely possible that Charity may have come from some distance away, or even come over from England as an immigrant.

John Wallingford served in a scouting party against the French and Indians in 1712 as is shown by a muster roll of men serving under Captain James Davis from Captain Westerbrook's Company. In May 1723 Corporal John Wallingford was part of a scouting party led by Capt. John Gilman to Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H. They scouted for Indians for 13 days before returning.(315)

In 1727 John became one of the original proprietors of the town of Barnstead, N.H., receiving lot number 20 in the first division and number 100 in the second.(316) A man named Henry Allard shared this lot number 100, and that appeared to be the only instance of sharing amongst the original proprietors, so there may be some kind of relationship between Wallingford and Allard that is worth checking out. The Rev. Joseph Adams of Newington was the primary individual responsible for the establishment of Barnstead.(317)

On 18 September 1729 John Wallingford of Newington sold land in Dover to Thomas Kenny of Dover, the land being some originally laid out to his grandfather John Tuttle in 1693/4(318). A few months later, on 2 December 1729, he purchased some land in Rochester from his brother Thomas.(319) On 9 February 1729/30 he sold his land in Barnstead, N.H. to Samuel Green of Stratham.(320) On 28 May 1730 he purchased more land in Rochester, this time from William Twombly of Dover.(321) His next land transaction wasn't for 18 years until 7 November 1748 when John Wallingford of Rochester sold land in Rochester to William Twombly of Dover.(322)

He was taxed in Newington, NH in 1732. The tax showed that there were two taxable males 16 or over, probably John and his eldest son William.(323) He held an assortment of town offices in Newington between 1724 and 1738. At the town meeting in 1724 he was chosen field driver. In 1725 it was "heawards", or hayward, the person in charge of fences and enclosures and keeping livestock from getting out to ravage the fields. In 1726 he was chosen as hayward and field driver, in 1727 as tithingman (a sort of religious constable), and in 1729 as hayward again. His last office in Newington was in 1738 as hayward.(324)

On 16 November 1737 John Wallingford of Newington, husbandman, sued Timothy Roberts of Rochester, husbandman, for 58 to collect an overdue note of 29, dated 8 July 1737, it being for one pair of oxen Roberts purchased from Wallingford. He was awarded 58 and the sheriff attached a chair worth 2 shillings.(325) On 19 October 1738 John apparently sued him again over the same note, although the papers say the note was dated 8 July 1738. In all other respects it is the same. This time he was awarded 50 and the sheriff attached a hat, 21 November 1738.(326)

On 2 March 1746/7 John and his son Peter signed a petition, designating themselves as father and son, from several Rochester residents asking the Provincial government for a guard of soldiers to defend the town from Indian attacks. The town has suffered badly from such attacks over the course of the previous year.(327) This was during one of the many French and Indian Wars in the colonies.

In June 1750 he deposed that he was born at Bradford, moved to Newington about 40 years ago, to Somersworth about 7 years ago, and to Rochester about 4 years ago.(328) This would mean he lived in Bradford, Mass. from 1659-1710, Newington, N.H. from 1710-1743, Somersworth, N.H. from 1743-1746, and Rochester, N.H. from 1746-50. His will dated 27 October 1761, proved 27 January 1762, has him still living in Rochester.(329) Newington wasn't incorporated as a parish until July 1713 so before that time he would have technically been living in a part of Dover.

Their children John, Mary, Sarah, Phebe and Patience were baptized in Newington April 30, 1724. On June 27 of the following year "John Wallingford & Charity his wife were admitted to full Communion in our Church".(330) Secondary sources place their son William as their last child, but William was sued in court on 12 November 1734 so must have been at least 21 at the time, meaning he was born by November 1713 and must be the eldest child. He is the first child listed in his father's 1761 will. Why he wasn't baptized with his five next siblings is unknown. Perhaps he was baptized at another time and place. On 26 June 1720 Charity "owned ye covenant & was baptized" into the Newington Church.(331) Why they waited four more years before having their children baptized there is unknown.

In his will he leaves all his homestead lands, containing about 60 acres to his son Peter. Scales history of Dover states that some of these lands were in Milton, N.H., which was at that time a part of Rochester.(332) Witnesses to the will were Joseph Watson, James Plaisted Hill and Josiah Main, and the latter two acted as sureties for son and executor Peter's bond, with witnesses to the bond being William Parker and Joseph March.(333)

John Wallingford and Charity had the following children:

child 74 i. William4 Wallingford was born before November 1713. He was sued in court on 12 November 1734 so must have been at least 21 at the time, meaning he was born by November 1713 He was still living when his father wrote his will in October 1761. He only received five shillings as his inheritance, while his younger brother Peter received all the family real estate.(334) My guess is that Peter was a more stable and upstanding individual. William appears nine times in Provincial Court records, and eight of those times he was the defendant. A few times he was arrested for his debts. Details are as follows:

12 November 1734: Elizabeth Allcock, shopkeeper of Portsmouth, sued William Wallingford of Newington, husbandman, for 10 to collect an overdue note of 5-9s-8d, dated 10 August 1732, the outstanding bill on items purchased in the shop totalling 8-19s-8d. The sheriff attached one of his chairs valued at 2s and Elizabeth was awarded judgment and costs in the sum of 10. Many of these items were things like silverware and other household goods, so one wonders if he might have been setting up his own household at the time.(335)

21 June 1736: William Wallingford of Newington, laborer, sued Benjamin Richards of Dover for 14 to collect an overdue note of 3-10s, dated 15 November 1734. He was awarded 14 and Benjamin Richards was arrested on 8 August 1736, with Joseph Ranken giving bail.(336)

13 February 1737: Jonathan Downing of Newington, housewright, sued William Wallingford of Rochester, husbandman, for 14 to collect an overdue note dated 15 April 1736 at Newington. The note was for 7 cash or "a thousand of good Clapboards shaved & jointed & fit to Lay upon a house to be delivered at his father's Landing place in Newington". He was awarded 12. On back of this writ was the signatures of William and John Wallingford. William signed by his mark but John signed his name.(337)

18 November 1737: William Hight of Berwick, trader, sued William Wallingford of Rochester, husbandman, for 6 to collect an overdue note for 2-9s, dated 9 September 1737 at Rochester. He was awarded 6 and the sheriff attached one of William's chairs worth 2s.(338)

29 July 1738: Joseph Richards Jr. of Rochester, husbandman, sued William Wallingford of Newington, also of Rochester, husbandman, for 8 to collect an overdue note of 4, dated 17 October 1737 at Portsmouth. He was awarded 7 and William was arrested on 31 July, with John Wallingford giving bail. A second writ identical in every respect but one to the above was included, with the date of the original note being 18 October 1737.(339)

17 May 1739: Benjamin Dockham of Portsmouth, laborer, sued William Wallingford of Rochester ("Rochester" was written over "Newington"), husbandman, for 20 to collect an overdue note of 10, dated 4 December 1738 at Portsmouth. He was awarded 20 and the sheriff attached one of William's spoons worth 1s.(340)

21 June 1739: John Field, Jr. of Dover, laborer, sued William Wallingford of Rochester, laborer, for 11 to collect an overdue note for 5, dated 24 April 1738 in Dover. He was awarded 7 and the sheriff attached William's coat worth 3s.(341)

24 October 1739: Stephen Pendergast of Newmarket, trader, sued William Wallingford of Rochester ("Rochester" was written over "Newington"), husbandman, for 34 to collect an overdue note of 17, dated 14 September 1738 at Newmarket. He was awarded 20 and the sheriff attached William's coat worth 3s. William signed the note with his mark.(342)

21 April 1740: John Wood of Dover, innholder, sued William Wallensford of Rochester, husbandman, for 12 to collect an overdue note of 6, dated 4 June 1739 in Dover. He was awarded 10 and on 3 May 1740 William was arrested, with Benjamin Roberts, Jr. giving bail. William signed with a mark.(343)

William's name doesn't appear in any known records beyond this point until his father wrote his will in 1761. What became of him after that point is unknown. He doesn't appear in the 1790 census.

child + 75 ii. John Wallingford was born say 1716.

child 76 iii. Mary Wallingford was born probably in Newington, N.H. say 1718. Mary was baptized in Newington on 30 April 1724 along with four of her siblings.(344) She was the second one listed, so counting back two years at a time would suggest an approximate birth date of 1718 for her. Mary died of old age, 29 March 1799, in Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire.(345) This is the death date for the Widow Dore. She married William Dore, 24 April 1740, in Newington, New Hampshire.(346) William was said to be "of Cocheco" (or Dover) when they were married. She is referred to as Mary Doore in her father's will in 1761.

William was born possibly about 1709.(347) He was aged 78 when he died in 1785. GDMNH states that he may not be the son of Philip and Sarah, but offers no other possible parentage. His parents were married in May 1708 so if William were truly 78 when he died he would have been born before his parents' marriage. William was the son of Philip Dore and Sarah Child.

William died 23 April 1785, in Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire.(348) Dore family researcher George Gleason of Hampton, N.H. has found no evidence for any children of William and Mary. The only possibility is a William Dore who shows up in Portsmouth, parentage unknown.

child 77 iv. Sarah Wallingford was born probably in Newington, N.H. say 1720. Sarah was baptized in Newington on 30 April 1724 along with four of her siblings.(349) She was the third one listed, so counting back two years at a time would suggest an approximate birth date of 1720 for her. Sarah died before October 1761. She is not mentioned in her father's will of October 1761 so was likely deceased before that time. Nothing further is known about her.

child + 78 v. Phebe Wallingford was born say 1722.

child + 79 vi. Patience Wallingford was born before 30 April 1724.

child + 80 vii. Peter Wallingford was born before 29 May 1726.

child 81 viii. Frances Wallingford was born probably in Newington, N.H. before 1 September 1728. She was baptized in Newington on that date.(350) Fanny died between 1809 and 1816, probably in Berwick, Maine.(351) She is still said to be alive in a deed dated 9 September 1809 but is deceased by the time of another deed dated 3 August 1816.(352) She married twice.

She married first, Daniel Clements, before 27 October 1761.(353) She was referred to as Frances Clements in her father's of that date.

Daniel was born about 1700, in Dover, New Hampshire.(354) Daniel was the son of Job Clements and Abigail Heard. Daniel died between 1773 and 1784, probably in Somersworth, New Hampshire.(355) He is last mentioned as alive in 1773 and first mentioned as deceased in 1784.(356) Daniel inherited 100 acres of land in "Cocheco Woods", later the town of Somersworth, from his father Job's will in 1716. He continued to live in Dover until 1744 when he moved to Somersworth where his brothers James and Job were both living. In 1761, after he was married, his brother James conveyed to him 42 acres of land in Somersworth with reservations in favor of James's children if Daniel should die without issue. This was probably the same farm which Daniel sold to James in 1739, and perhaps was a part of Daniel's original bequest from his father. It became known as the "Fanny Farm", probably from the long ownership of Frances or Fanny (Wallingford) Clements. Much more information about his various real estate transactions can be found in the Clements Genealogy.(357)

She married second, Samuel Gubtail, after 1 May 1784, probably in Berwick, Maine.(358) There was an intention of marriage filed between these two on this date in Berwick, but there is no marriage record found there. Various family deeds do call her Fanny Guptail, however, so it is clear that they did eventually marry.(359)

Samuel was born before 5 June 1743, probably in Kittery, Maine.(360) He was baptized in Kittery on that date.(361) Samuel was the son of Samuel Gubtail and Mary.

Samuel died before 9 September 1809.(362) Fanny was referred to as the "Widow Frances Guptail" on that date in a relative's deed.

His surname can also be spelled Guptill or Guptail. Samuel Gubtail and Samuel Gubtail, Jr. are to be found in the 1790 census of Berwick, Maine.(363) Frances had no children of her own, but apparently helped raise the Hammock children of her deceased sister Patience. In the record for their family in schoolmaster Joseph Tate's "Diary" are "Mr. Danl. Clementss who Married Frances Wallingford", and listed with them are "Thos. Hammock Born April 18. 1756" and Eliz Hammocks Daughter Frances [whom] she Swore on Wm. [worn].(364) This record was made in 1767.

child 82 ix. Susannah Wallingford was born probably in Newington, N.H. before 7 September 1735. She was baptized in Newington on that date.(365) Susannah died before October 1761. She is not mentioned in her father's will of October 1761 so was likely deceased before that time. Nothing further is known about her.

child 83 x. Judith Wallingford was born probably in Newington, N.H. before 4 July 1736. She was baptized in Newington on that date.(366) Judith died before October 1761. She is not mentioned in her father's will of October 1761 so was likely deceased before that time. Nothing further is known about her.

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