NEW ZEALAND
SPECIAL SETTLEMENTS
WHANGAE, NEAR KAWAKAWA
1866

Auckland Star, Volume XLVII, Issue 45, 22 February 1916, Page 10
WHANGAE SETTLEMENT - ANNIVERSARY OF LANDING
Friday, the 11th of February, was the fiftieth anniversary of the arrival of the full-rigged ship MARY SHEPHERD in New Zealand waters. The vessel dropped anchor in the Bay of Islands, and landed at Waopu the Whangae special settlers.

The settlement was due to the untiring energy of Captain W. C. Daldy, of Auckland, who had been commissioned by the Auckland Provincial Government to tour Ireland with the object of inducing immigration to New Zealand. He prevailed upon many settlers to leave their homes in North Ireland and embark with high hopes for the Southern Seas.

The Mary Shepherd left London docks on October 20, 1865, in charge of Captain Croote. No event occurred that was not customary in those days. The losing of the jibboom and foremast and the becalming off Tasmania for three weeks, were quite ordinary occurrences to the primitive ships. After disembarking her pioneers at Waopu, the Mary Shepherd continued her voyage to Auckland with passengers for this port.

Amongst the many settlers who formed the original settlement at Waopu, and whose names have been identified with the district's settlement were the Rev. R. A. Hall, his wife and five boys, Dr. and Mrs. Bindon and their five sons, Mr. Samuel Hood, his wife, and four sons and a daughter. These were the only married couples that landed from the ship at the Bay of Islands.

The Rev. R. A. Hall and wife returned to Ireland in 1882. His wife and two sons are living at Tollyhurst, Monaghan, Ireland. The three remaining sons, Messrs. J., A. L., and R. A. Hall, took charge of their father's farm at Whangae. Two of Dr. Bindon's sons still live in New Zealand — Mr. J. Bindon, at Ohaewai, and Mr. H1. Bindon, at Okaihau. The two other brothers went to Australia. Mr. Samuel Hood and family at a later date went to Australia. Mr. William settled at Kaeo.

Others of that band of pioneers were Messrs. W. H. Ward and A. Lemon, of Taumarere; Thomas Hall, of Hikurangi; C. Choyce, of Milne and Choyce; S. Chatfield, for many years a representative of Messrs. L. D.Nathan; Thomas Lindesay, of Parnell; James Rothwell; Trevor Curry; Robert Marshall, of Kawakawa; W. Gordon, I. Stuart. Andrew King, Edward Simpson, and the late Archdeacons Walsh and Willis.

The following joined the settlement at a later date: Messrs. John Higginson; Thos. Jamieson, and Thurburns.

Despite the enthusiasm taken in the settlement, it never thrived. Two events that counteracted any prosperity were the lack of a suitable outlet and the distance from the post-office. The only outlet was by a pack track to Opua while the nearest post-office was Russell. Failure to grow the English grasses to advantage, and the absence of a market for the fruits of the soil, finally caused the settlement to be abandoned.Now, after 50 years, aided by the experience of other settlements, and modern inventions, another generation is forcing the lands of the Whangae Special Settlement to give some return for the labour bestowed on it. Railways are gradually opening up the Far North, and fairly good roads lead to Kawakawa and Opua.

Auckland Star, Volume XXIII, Issue 4296, 27 February 1884, Page 4
OBITUARY - MR. J. W. BINDON - PIONEER OF NORTHLAND
Ninety-three years of age. Mr. John Waller Bindon, of Lake Road. Takapuna has died. Born at Moneygall, King's County, Ireland, he was the oldest of five sons of Dr. John Vereker Bindon. Under an early settlement scheme the whole family came to New Zealand and arrived at Whaupu between Russell and Opua in 1860. The late Mr. A. C Caughey and the late Mr. H. C. Choyce, pioneers of well-known city firms, were fellow passengers. On the return of Dr. Bindon to London the sons settled on a farm at Whangae near Kawakawa. but Mr. J. W. Bindon later moved to Ohaeawai.

During his long residence here Mr. Bindon made his farm a model one. He also took mail contracts, ran a coaching service in the Bay of Islands and took building contracts for houses and bridges and for the Russell wharf. In 1920 Mr. Bindon retired and came to live at Takapuna. He was married in Wellington in 1891 to Miss Ellen Kinsella who died in 1935. Mr. Bindon is survived by three sons and a daughter, and there are four grandchildren.

Auckland Star, Volume XXIII, Issue 4296, 27 February 1884, Page 4
Captain Henry, J.P., passed away to his long home early on the morning of the 14th of February, 1884. Captain Henry arrived in Auckland some 19 years ago, having retired from the 17th Regiment a few months previous. About two years after arriral in Auckland, he took up land at Whangae, Bay of Islands, which was formed as a special settlement under the 40 acre system, and for years took an active part in the progress of the district. Deceased was brother-in-law to the Rev. R. A. Hall, who was until two years ago stationed at Howick (and now of Kervey Parsonage, County Cavan, Ireland), to which place he used to go on a visit. After the departure of the Rev. and Mrs Hall, he resided permanently with his nephews, Messrs J. A. L. and R. A. Hall, at Kawakawa. He was a native of County Down, Ireland, and at time of death 47 years of age. Deceased had been ailing for the past 12 months. He was greatly respected by all who knew him. The funeral took place on Friday, 15th inst. Quite 150 settlers followed the remains to the grave.


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