Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

THE SINKING OF THE ST VINCENT
SUNDAY 14 FEBRUARY 1869
IN PALLISER BAY AFTER HITTING THE MOKOMOKO ROCKS, CAPE CAMPBELL

THE LOSS OF THE ST VINCENT – Sunday 14 February 1869

The St Vincent arrived in Wellington on the 1 January 1869 after a tedious voyage of 120 days from Cardiff, with coal for the Panama Company. After discharging her cargo the ship sailed on the 13th for Lyttelton to load with wool. At noon the following day, when the ship was off Cape Campbell, it commenced to blow heavily from the south-east and the St Vincent was blown into the bay where she struck the Mokomoko Rocks and was totally wrecked in Palliser Bay with the loss of 20 lives, including the one passenger on board. The Chief Officer, John STRINGER and the Swedish sailmaker August KANASKI were the only survivors.

As the vessel had cleared New Zealand coastways, a correct list of the crew was not required at the Custom House and as a good many of the original crew has left, and others shipped here, a list is difficult to obtain. (Evening Post 17 Feb 1869p2).

THE KNOWN NAMES OF THOSE WHO PERISHED
BARRON James Captain
DE COSTA Harry -
GRIFFITHS Richard -
HARRISON George -
KENNEDY Alfred -
KIRKPATRICK John -
McKAY E or J Passenger
McKEE Alexander -
MITCHELL Robert Carpenter
PATTERSON William -
RICHARDS Charles -
SMART William -
SMITH Charles -
SMYTH William -
STERLING John -

According to the (Christchurch) Star newspaper of 17 February 1869 (p2colA) the passenger Mr McKAY had been a passenger from England on the Melita (to Wellington), having come out to New Zealand for the benefit of his health. He intended to return by the Melita. Wishing to see Canterbury and having plenty of time on his hands before the Melita sailed for her homeward voyage, he preferred coming to Lyttelton in a sailing vessel and so took a passage in the St Vincent. He was a young man, about 25 years of age, and leaves a wife and family in London.

In a letter to the Editor of the Evening Post on the 3 March 1869 (p2) it says: - Sir – A report being in circulation that Mr STRINGER, late chief officer of the ill-fated St Vincent, was formerly mate of the Snaresbrook, I beg to give it an unqualified contradiction. The mate of the Snaresbrook was named STRAKER, and is not now, I believe in the colony. Mr STRINGER arrived in New Zealand as second mate of the Wild Duck in 1862, he returned as chief officer of that vessel the same years, he was afterwards chief officer and captain of the Chili, on this coast. He went to England, and after remaining a year there, returned in the St Vincent.
I am etc
J W JORDAN
Wellington, 3rd March.

The following is a list of those who have already subscribed for the relief of the sufferers of the wreck of the St Vincent: - (Evening Post 18 Feb 1869)

BANNATYNE W £1 1s
BARRAUD C D £1
BECK J £1 1s
BENSON Captain £3 3s
CHRISTIAN Captain 10s
CRAWFORD G 10s 6d
DRANSFIELD J £1 1s
EDMEADS - £1 1s
GIBSON W £1 1s
GISBORN W 10s
HOLIDAY Captain £1 1s
JOSEPH Jacob £3 3s
KIRKCALDIE and STAINES - 10s 6d
KREEFT Captain £1 1s
KRULL & Co - 10s 6d
LAING P £1 1s
McINTYRE Captain £1 1s
MILLS E W £1 1s
OSGOOD - £1 1s
PEARCE E £20
SEAGER C £1 1s
SPINKS W 10s 6d
STUART AP P £5
TANDY and PRESSMAN - 10s
TURNBULL, REEVES & Co - £1 1s

Return To HOME

FAMILIES I AM RESEARCHING | MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH |NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES |NEW ZEALAND MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL INDEXES|NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE |NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR TWO |NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – BY LOCATION | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – BY CONFLICT | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – MILITARY NURSES | PAKEHA/MAORI TRANSLITERATIONS |PASSENGER LISTS TO NEW ZEALAND | SHAND – FAMILY HISTORY | SOUTH TARANAKI | SPONDON, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND | TE PUKE, BAY OF PLENTY, NEW ZEALAND | WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL