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NEW ZEALAND LAND WARS - LAST SURVIVING VETERANS

In January 2014 I was asked if I knew who the last remaining Maori War [later known as the New Zealand Wars or New Zealand Land Wars] Veterans were. I have managed to find a few but am happy to take additions.

Auckland Star, Volume LXI, Issue 78, 2 April 1930, Page 10
OUR TIME IS SHORT
MAORI WAR VETERANS. FAST-DWINDLING BAND. PATHETICALLY SMALL ASSEMBLY.
NEW PLYMOUTH, this day. A spirit stronger than ever seemed to rise from the members of a body of men growing gradually less in number and more feeble in physique when eight veterans of the Battle of Waireka gathered with their wives and descendants in New Plymouth yesterday as the guests of the Rotarians. Such a gathering is held every year. Sadly, yet bravely and with full, seasoned philosophy, those eight veterans laughed and talked. They remarked that since the last gathering nine of the small band that survived the battle had passed away. They remarked as well that their own remaining days on earth were waning. They wondered, they said to one another and to their descendants, how many of them would be able to attend the function next year. Those who attended were:
Messrs G. A. Adlam, aged 88[George Alfred ADLAM died 30 Jun 1930]
John Andrews, 87 [John ANDREWS 17 Feb 1932]
John Foreman, 83 [John White FOREMAN died 2 Sep 1936]
H. Arden, 83 [Henry ARDEN 21 Nov 1935]
A Binnie, 87 [Alexander BINNIE died 2 May 1935]
Alex. Black, 79 [?]
and W. G. Odd [?]
Colonel Weston, who presided, said the Maori War soldiers were settlers as well, living amongst their enemies and living in a state of tension that was shared by their women and children. He was glad to see so many of the veterans wives. To have lived 20 or 25 years with one's wife meant a growth of mutual fondness, and that fondness must double and treble in strength after fifty years. Colonel Weston assured the veterans that their civil and military record was honoured and that when the time came for them to face the wall, as all must do, they could do so having the respect and admiration of the community. "In a few years more there will be none of us left," said Mr G A Adlam. "Several of the sixteen or seventeen veterans now on the roll were not able to attend. Nine comrades have left us since the last gathering. Nature has called many away. Time is short for some of us, and we do not know who is to be next."

Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 209, 3 September 1936, Page 5
NEW PLYMOUTH, this day. Mr. J. W. Foreman; a widely known Taranaki resident, died at New Plymouth to-day, aged 90. He was born at New Plymouth in 1840 and served in the Maori War. Subsequently he held many public offices, including that of chairman of the National Dairy Association for eight years.

Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 38, 15 February 1938, Page 9
MAORI WAR VETERAN - DEATH IN ENGLAND
Private advice has been received by cable af the death of Colonel J. K. D. TAUNTON, aged 94, at his home at Gloucester. Colonel Taunton served as an officer in the 50th Queen's Own Foot Regiment in the Maori War.

Auckland Star, Volume LXXI, Issue 193, 15 August 1940, Page 6
MAORI WAR VETERAN. CAPTAIN CORBETT-SCOTT
While Auckland, in common with the rest of New Zealand, is celebrating its centenary this year, the death of Captain Joseph CORBETT-SCOTT, at the age of 102, at his residence, Manukau Road, Epsom, earlier this morning, brings vividly back to mind the fact that after all 100 years ie a comparatively short space of time, because during his life Captain Corbett-Scott saw Auckland menaced by the Maoris and must be one of the last defenders of the East Pukekohe Church stockade. Sixty-six years ago yesterday, Captain Corbett-Scott was married at Tuakau to Miss Helen Corbett, and Mrs Corbett-Scott, who is 87 years of age, said today that until her husband took seriously ill several days ago, the captain had been looking forward to a wedding anniversary party which was to have been held at the residence, The Manor House. Born in Cornwall, Captain Corbett- Scott left England with his parents when he was 20 years of age, and arrived at Auckland in the ship Joseph Fletcher in March, 1858. After spending a short time in Auckland, the family removed to Pukekohe, where they were engaged in farming for three years...

Evening Post, Volume CXXXII, Issue 72, 22 September 1941, Page 9
One of New Zealand's few remaining Maori War veterans, Major Frank William GARNER died at Palmerston North yesterday in his 93rd year. He saw three years and nine months of active service at a time when the rebel Te Kooti was active, and he participated in the attack on Omarunui pa. Major Garner, who was at one time commander of the Napier Rifles and the south and north militia and volunteer districts, had a service record of 21 years, and, was believed to be the sole survivor of the fighting on the East Coast of the sixties. He was first under fire as a lad of 19...One of Major Garner's decorations was the New Zealand War Medal.


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