Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

NEW ZEALAND FIGHTING FAMILIES
1914 - 1918

Thanks to Jackie Walles for these. PLEASE NOTE - these are in date order not alphabetical (use CTRL-F) and are taken from the Auckland Weekly News.

AUGUST 1916

BIRNIE – SIX SOLDIER SONS The record of being the parents of six sons who are either serving at the front, have served, or are in training, belongs to Major & Mrs J Birnie of O’Rorke Ave, Remuera. One of their sons, Sergeant Robert BIRNIE, has just been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous bravery in France. Sgt Birnie is 27 years of age and was born in Auckland. He was educated at the Grafton school and was a prominent member of the College Rifles Football Club. For some years prior to the inauguration of the territorial scheme he was an enthusiastic member of the A Battery Field Artillery. When the territorial scheme came into being, although still of territorial age, he was discharged with a first-class certificate in order to make room for others. When the war broke out he left as a gunner with the main body. Serving throughout the whole of the Gallipoli campaign, he was wounded twice but was never away from duty. On one occasion a high explosive shell burst over his gun, killed one of his companions and slightly wounded him.
Major John BIRNIE is an old volunteer officer of 27 years service and holds the Colonial and Auxiliary Forces and the NZ long service and efficiency medals. He also served some time in the A Battery. At present he is chief of staff of the National Reserve. Two other sons of Mar BIRNIE, John and William, also left with the artillery with the main body and fought at Gallipoli, the latter being slightly wounded on one occasion. They are both at the front. Arthur, another son, left for the front recently with the Mounted Rifles; Charles was a member of the Motor Transport Corps and was invalided from Egypt and discharged; and George is a Lieutenant in the Post & Telegraph Rifles in Christchurch and is going to the front shortly. [AWN 03.08.1916]

OCTOBER 1916

BILLING Private H A W BILLING, reported wounded, is the eldest son of Mr H Billing, Auckland. He was born in Helensville but resided for a considerable period in Dargaville. He left with the main body and was wounded in the landing at Gallipoli. Later he returned to the firing line. His brother Charles and two cousins have been killed in action and two other cousins have received shrapnel wounds. [AWN 26.10.1916]

BLOOMFIELD Rifleman Roy BLOOMFIELD, wounded, is the youngest son of Mr & Mrs Bloomfield of Motamaoho. This is the second time he has been wounded. Six members of the family are taking part in the war, four sons being in the army and two in the navy. Roy is the fifth son who has been wounded; Allen, being at the present time in a London hospital suffering from injuries sustained in the recent fighting at Flers. [AWN 26.10.1916]

DUNLOP Sergeant John DUNLOP, reported killed in action on 23 September, left with the main body and was at the landing at Gallipoli. He was a native of Manchester, England, where his parents still reside. His father is at present an engineer on a transport and two brothers are serving in France. He was resident in Auckland when he enlisted. [AWN 26.10.1916]

HEARD, Private H, who has died of wounds in France, was a member of the crew of the cable streamer Iris before his enlistment and has two brothers in the fighting ranks. Another brother, Gunlayer R HEARD, was on HMS Invincible when she was sunk in the naval battle off Jutland. Private T HEARD is now in the trenches. Private T HEARD has been twice wounded, but has again rejoined his unit. [AWN 26.10.1916]

The honourable roll of families who have provided three or more brothers for the service of the Empire increases in dimensions from day to day as casualties to one or other of the kinsmen in khaki are reported. It is not given to many to equal the record of the EARNSHAWS of Petone, of whom six have gone to the front and a seventh offered his services but could not meet the medical test, while their mother has six brothers on active service; or the BURNIES of Ellerslie, another gallant half dozen, one of whom has been decorated with the Distinguished Service Medal. The family records of three and even four, soldier sons are now coming daily into evidence, a splendid testimony to the patriotic enthusiasm of young New Zealand. [AWN 26.10.1916]

MACKIE Private William K MACKIE, reported wounded in the jaw, is the youngest son of Mr Joseph Mackie, secretary to the North Auckland Farmers Co-operative Assn, Whangarei. Prior to leaving NZ with the main body, Private Mackie was employed by Messrs A S Paterson & Co and formerly by Messrs Dalgety & Co. in Auckland. On the peninsula he was in General Godley’s bodyguard. Since going to France he had been trained as a sniper and at the last competition at the sniping school, his score was third on the list out of 100 men taken from the different battalions. Another brother is also in France and a third brother is in training with the nineteenth reinforcements. [AWN 26.10.1916]

McKEE Lieutenant Fred G McKEE, killed in action, was one of the first to enlist and left with the Main Body as a sergeant. He was in the thick of the fighting with the Turks at the Suez Canal, at the time of the death of Private Ham of Motueka, the first New Zealander to be killed in action. He was at the evacuation and soon after returning to Egypt was given a commission. Lieut McKee, who was 24 years of age, was a son of Mr Arthur McKee of Nelson, well known in the fruit-growing world. Frank McKEE, a brother, was wounded on 16 September. Another brother, Lieutenant A McKEE, leaves with the twentieth reinforcements. [AWN 26.10.1916]

MORRIS Private H B MORRIS, who has died of wounds, was the youngest son of the late Mr Wm Morris of Cork, Ireland, and has three brothers, all of whom are fighting for the Empire, one in German East Africa and two in other parts of the Imperial forces. Private Morris had not been in NZ more than 10 months when he volunteered for one of the early reinforcement drafts. At Gallipoli he was wounded three times, in one engagement was shot through the head, in another struck on the head by a Turkish bomb which failed to explode but injured him by the original impact; and on a third occasion was wounded in a charge. [AWN 26.10.1916]

OLDBURY Mr J C OLDBURY, of Belle Vue Rd, Mt Eden, has four sons in khaki, two of whom have been wounded, Privates Frederick William OLDBURY, aged 22 years, and George Edward OLDBURY, aged 19 years, were reported wounded on 1 October. Both brothers were born in Turner Street, Auckland, and attended the Newton East public school. Prior to enlisting, Frederick was employed as a grocer’s assistant to Mr W Winn, Khyber Pass, while George for many years was engaged in farming operations at Bombay with Mr Bambury. The two other soldier members of the family are Privates Charles & Henry OLDBURY. [AWN 26.10.1916]

TALL – 9 Soldier Sons Mr & Mrs Benjamin Edward TALL, 93 Albany St, Dunedin, have eight sons wearing the King’s uniform, or have done so, and another, the youngest, accepted for service at the Front. Mr Tall himself fought in the Indian Mutiny and the Maori Wars. The eldest son Benjamin Edward, was wound in the neck in the Boer War. Now living in Dunedin. Second son Daniel Thomas, wounded in the face in the Boer War. Now living in Auckland. Third son George Gilbert also fought in the Boer War and is now at the Front. Received shrapnel wounds in the shoulder. William TALL served in India with the Royal Horse Artillery and when transferred to France it was to serve in the Royal Fusiliers. He was in Ireland at the time of the Sinn Fein revolt and there won the Victoria Cross. Harry Phillips served in India with the Royal Horse Artillery. He was in the Loos battle where he was shot in the lungs. No word has been received since and he is supposed to be invalided. Jack served in India with the RHA, was transferred to England then to France Leonard Ernest enlisted in Dunedin, wounded at Gallipoli receiving five bullets in his right arm. He is now discharged and in Wellington. Charles Gilbert joined an early reinforcement draft and was wounded, is now back with his regiment. Arthur Simons, aged nearly 20, has enlisted with the 22 reinforcement and is waiting to go to the Front. [AWN 12.10.1916]

WHITMORE The late Private Francis G WHITMORE, son of Mr C E Whitmore of Paeroa, was one of three brothers in the NZEF. He was born at the Thames, 36 years ago and was educated at the public school, Turua. Afterwards he worked as a sawmill machinist and joiner at Paeroa and Hamilton. He was a keen football player and received a gold medal as being the best all-round player in the Paeroa Rugby Team. Two of his brothers are now on active service in France. [AWN 26.10.1916]

NOVEMBER 1916

ADAMS Four sons of Mr Colin Adams of High St, Auckland, have borne their part in the great war. One joined the main body of the Expeditionary Force as a member of the15th, North Auckland, Regiment and laid down his life at Gallipoli. Another, Jack ADAMS, left with an early reinforcement draft and is now in hospital, wounded. The third Charles is serving with the Queensland Cavalry. The eldest son, George has just gone into camp, while a fifth son, yet under military age, is restive to get away and add further luster to his family’s patriotic record. [AWN 30.11.1916]

BLOOMFIELD The family of Mr William Bloomfield of Morrinsville is entitled to a prominent place amongst the fighting families of the Dominion. Six of Mr Bloomfield’s sons have served in the war. Stanley BLOOMFIELD, who left with the main body, was wounded at the landing at Gallipoli. He recovered and joined his company and is still fighting. Purce BLOOMFIELD, who went with one of the early reinforcements, was invalided home and has been discharged as no longer fit for active service. Allen BLOOMFIELD, who left early this year, has been severely wounded. Arthur BLOOMFIELD, who went away last year, is now at the front. Harold BLOOMFIELD, who for the past six years has served in the British Navy, was wounded in an engagement about twelve months ago. Roy Victor BLOOMFIELD, the last son to join the colours, has been twice wounded. [AWN 23.11.1916]

BLUCHER Six members of one family from Houhora, the sons of Mr Edmund BLUCHER, formerly of Hawera now of Beresford St, Auckland. The youngest son Norman went to Egypt with the 3rd, Auckland, Mounted Rifles, was transferred to the Machine-gun Section and served at Gallipoli. He was then invalided to England, then to France and promoted to Sergeant. He is still in France. Edmund served in the Boer War, is now on the water; Charles left later; Alfred J; Frederick Desmond, wounded at the Somme; A.W. in camp at Featherston. [AWN 09.11.1916]

BROWN Mrs C Hawksworth Brown of Hawkes Bay, is the proud mother of four soldier sons. The two youngest left NZ with the main body, one in the artillery and the elder one in the Wellington Mounted Rifles. The younger one, Bombardier Clare BROWN, was wounded in Gallipoli campaign and has just been wounded while fighting in France. His brother, Sergeant Major C Hawkesworth BROWN, laid down his life on the peninsular. He had been recommended for his commission. The eldest son, who is married, enlisted for active service with the Australians but was put on home service duty and is now a staff-sergeant major at Geelong. The second son, Sergeant Cecil BROWN, well known in ‘A’ Battery, is on active service in France. [AWN 16.11.1916]

CAREW Six sons of Mr D W Carew – now of the railway workshops at Invercargill, and formerly officer representing the Railway Dept in the oversight of the manufacture of locomotives in the foundry of Messrs A & G Price, at the Thames – have done their share in upholding the honour of the Empire. All six were in the trenches at Gallipoli. Three of their number have returned, disabled for further service, and have received their discharge from the army. A fourth, Private D W Carew, was killed in action on 12 September. Pte Carew was a native of Auckland and at the time of his enlistment was engaged in farming at Invercargill. Two other brothers are still in France serving with the Australian forces. [AWN 09.11.1916]

CARTER Four sons of Mr & Mrs Carter of Honikiwi near Otorohanga, are on active service. Acting Sergeant Major W R CARTER was at Gallipoli and was wounded twice there. He is now in hospital in England. Corporal E C CARTER was also at Gallipoli and is now in Egypt. Corporals H G & H W CARTER are fighting in France. [AWN 16.11.1916]

CATTEN Four sons of Mrs Catten of Henderson, widow of the late Mr Thomas Catten, have been helping to uphold the honour of the Empire and two of their number, Private Chas W Catten and Private John Bruce Catten, have given up their lives, having been killed in the same week of last month. Another of the lads, Private Thos R Catten has been wounded. The fourth Private Alan Catten, is still in the trenches, so far uninjured. All four received their early education at the Avondale school and the remainder at Spreydon, Canterbury, where the family lived for some time. Their occupations prior to enlistment was that of farmers. [AWN 09.11.1916]

FEARON Rifleman A E FEARON, who has died of wounds, was the youngest son of Mr H W Fearon of White Bluff, Hillsboro. He was born in Christchurch. On leaving school he joined the railway service. He enlisted at Halcombe. Henry Guy FEARON, his brother, who enlisted with the main body was killed at Gallipoli. Another brother is a member of the 20th Reinforcements. [AWN 16.11.1916]

GILLESPIE Another fighting family from the King Country is the Gillespies. One son is now fighting in France, another enlisted but was drowned in the flood last year, and the other three have been accepted and go into camp on December 10. [AWN 09.11.1916]

GIRVEN Three sons of Mr Adam G Girven of Sackville St, Grey Lynn, are helping to uphold the honour of the Empire and all three have suffered scars. Lance Corporal Edward GIRVEN has been wounded twice and on the second occasion underwent the horrors of gas. Robert GIRVEN fought in three engagements in Egypt, without mishap, but since he went to France has been wounded. Ewen GIRVEN has also been wounded but not seriously enough to prevent him from remaining with his unit. [AWN 23.11.1916]

GREENWELL, Flight Lieutenant Arthur of the Royal Naval Flying Squadron, killed, was only 20 years of age. For the last twelve years he lived in Huntly, receiving the chief part of his education there and being engaged latterly with his father at the brick and fire-clay works. Leaving the Dominion in December last he was, on arrival in England, immediately accepted for service with the Royal Naval Flying Corps. His previous studies now came to his aid, and he was quickly placed in charge of a machine. He saw considerable service in connection with the Zeppelin raids and gave promise of a brilliant career. Very genuine and hearty sympathy is expressed for Mr & Mrs Greenwell, following so closely on the loss of their second son, George, who was killed on September 16. His brother, Flight Lieutenant N GREENWELL, was badly hurt a few months ago, and another brother, Gunner G Greenwell, was killed on 16 September. [AWN 02.11.1916]

HENDERSON Private James Roy HENDERSON, who has been wounded in France, is one of three brothers fighting in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force – the sons of Mr J R Henderson of Clifton Rd, Parnell. Another of the trio, Private Robert HENDERSON, was also wounded lately and is now in England and the third Thomas HENDERSON, is still in the trenches. Pte J R Henderson was educated at the Parnell school and was afterwards employed in the News job-printing department. As a hockey player he has been a member of district representative teams and he has also been a cricketer. When war was declared he joined the Expeditionary Force to Samoa and after returning to NZ he went to Egypt with one of the reinforcements drafts. [AWN 09.11.1916]

HINTON A Waikato paper mentions the record of the family of the late Mr Henry HINTON who came over with Captain STEELE from Sydney in 1863 as a recruit for the 3rd Waikato Militia. There are now thirteen grandsons of the deceased gentleman fighting in the present war. [AWN 23.11.1916]

HULBERT, Captain Leslie, killed, was well known in Christchurch, being a son of Mr C P Hulbert, at one time Mayor of that city. Prior to enlisting he was in the service of Murray Roberts & Co, Wellington, as an accountant. On the outbreak of the war he was attached to the Garrison Artillery, Wellington, and after serving in the forts left NZ with the first howitzer battery to leave these shores, with the rank of Lieutenant. He served in Egypt and in Gallipoli and at the time of his death was in charge of a heavy trench mortar division. He has three other brothers on active service. [AWN 09.11.1916]

INNES JONES The family of Mr Herbert F Innes Jones of Te Awamutu, is able to show a good record as a fighting family. Five of six sons of the family have enlisted. The other son also offered his services but failed to pass the medical test. Sergeant Melville INNES JONES and Troopers Howard & Evan INNES JONES left with the main body. Their brother Herbert, who is married, went on the hospital ship Maheno with the medical corps. The youngest son Humphrey, is now serving in France. All except Humphrey have been invalided home, wounded or sick. Melville and Evan fought in the early days at Gallipoli, both being severely wounded. Melville was first wounded in the hand but he would not leave the trenches. Later on he was shot through the head, the bullet entering in front of one ear and emerging at the other side of the head. His jaw was shattered but although he was hardly expected to survive his injuries, he has recovered sufficiently to again offer his services but has not yet been passed as fit for another campaign. [AWN 16.11.1916]

JENNINGS Mr W T Jennings, M.P. for Taumarunui, has also lost two sons in the war, one being killed at Gallipoli, whilst another died from wounds received at Loos. A third son is on active service. [AWN 16.11.1916]

JOHNSON, Sergeant Hubert A, lately reported as wounded, is one of four brothers in NZ’s Army. He is the fifth son of Mr Henry Johnson of the Hukerenui stud farm and before his enlistment was engaged at bush work in the Northern Wairoa district. Sergeant JOHNSON is a noted athlete and holds two gold medals for football. As a boxer he won the heavyweight competitions of his day at Trentham and also held his own against all comers on the transport which took him to Europe. Two of his brothers are now at the front and one is in camp. It is noteworthy that he is a member of a family of thirteen. [AWN 16.11.1916]

KIDD A correspondent writes from Omaio: “Here is a good record : Mr P Kidd, brother of the late Mr James Kidd of the Tramways Company, has two sons and a daughter (nurse) at the front; two sons at Trentham, leaving shortly; and one daughter in training for a nurse and going as soon as her course of study is complete. This leaves a son of about 12 years old at home. In order to let his boys away, Mr Kidd has had to sell his farm. [AWN 09.11.1916]

LANGWILL A worthy example to many families is set by Mrs E M Langwill of Huntly Avenue, Auckland, all her sons, three in number, having enlisted. Lance Corporal Herbert J LANGWILL and Rifleman John W LANGWILL left with the reinforcements, Rifle Brigade. Both saw service in Egypt and later went to France, where the former was wounded on 29 September and the latter on 1 October. Lance Corporal LANGWILL is now reported convalescent, while his brother is still in hospital. Mrs Langwill’s youngest son, Private Samuel Henry LANGWILL, left with a later draft of reinforcements. [AWN 23.11.1916]

LE BEAU Mr Le Beau, a Waikato settler, has thirteen nephews in the firing line, one son (killed) and a grandson. [AWN 23.11.1916]

LE CREN Lance Corporal LE CREN, killed in action, France, Inspector of Factories with the Labour Dept, Wellington, father of Staff Sergeant Major Hubert Ernest LE CREN, invalided home from Samoa, left NZ with the rank of QMS of his transport. On arrival at the fighting front he met his younger son, Trooper Leslie Le CREN, who had left the Dominion a month earlier than his father. Beside the three male members of the family already mentioned, Mrs Le CREN, who is a daughter of the late Mr Hubert FERGUSON, also a former Inspector of Factories in Auckland, is working as a Clerk in the Defence Dept at Wellington. She has a brother and four nephews at the Front and a fifth nephew now in camp with the 21st Reinforcements. [AWN 23.11.1916]

McDONALD The household of Mr D McDonald of Fendalton, Canterbury, has provided five soldiers for the Empire. One of their number, Private Colin McDONALD, was killed in action on 25 September. Three of his brothers are at the front and a fourth has enlisted and will go into camp with the next draft. [AWN 30.11.1916]

MILLS The household of Mr David Mills of Opotiki is represented in the fighting line by three sons. Recent casualty lists showed that Private Francis M MILLS has been wounded and a cable message received from him on 14 October indicated that he was then in hospital and progressing well. Privates James MILLS and John MILLS fought through the Gallipoli campaign, the latter on the headquarters signalling staff. Both were invalided to England but are now in France as gunners. Private J M MILLS was seriously ill for some months at Lemnos before going to Egypt and France. [AWN 09.11.1916]

OKEY The representative for Taranaki in the House of Representatives, Mr H J H Okey, M.P., has lost two sons in the war – Sergeant Sydney OKEY, who was killed at the Dardanelles on 8 August 1915 and Private Lionel G OKEY, who was killed in action at the age of 28 in the recent fighting in France. A third son is still in the trenches. [AWN 16.11.1916]

ORR A family with a good record is that of Mr & Mrs John W Orr of Kaitangiweka, a settlement near Tangitu in the King Country. Rifleman H W ORR was in action by Christmas in Egypt and was wounded in France last month. Private Norman ORR, Trooper Leonard ORR, Rifleman Ernest ORR, Rifleman Arthur L ORR, left with various reinforcements. Another member of the family was rejected. Their father served for nine years in the NZ Armed Constabulary during the trouble with Te Whiti in Taranaki. [AWN 09.11.1916]

PATTILLO The family of Mr & Mrs J Pattillo of the Kaitangiweka district, has also responded nobly to the call of King and country. Trooper J D Pattillo went with the Main Body, Private A Pattillo is with the divisional sanitary section and Private G Pattillo left with a reinforcement draft. [AWN 09.11.1916]

READY The Rev W Ready, who three years ago was minister of the Pitt Street Methodist Church, has joined the hospital ship Maheno as a chaplain. His three sons have all enlisted and with his departure Mrs Ready will be the only representative of the family in the Dominion. Mr Ready has been minister of an Invercargill church since he left Auckland. [AWN 23.11.1916]

SCOTT The household represented by Private H V SCOTT, who was killed in action on 15 September 1916, has a double title to be ranked as a fighting family, both from its part in the present war and the record of its forbears. Beside the soldier lately fallen, there is still in the field his brother Lieut V R S SCOTT, while a third brother Private C A S SCOTT is now on his way to the Front. They are the sons of Mrs Scott and the late Mr W G Scott of Hikutaia and are well known in the Thames and Te Aroha district. Prior to his enlistment, Private H V Scott and Lieutenant Scott were farming in partnership at Ngarua. Their late father was a veteran of the Maori war in the Waikato while some of his brothers took part in the Heke war in the North. [AWN 30.11.1916]

SKELLON Three sons of Mrs Sarah SKELLON of Belgium St, Auckland, have borne their part in the great struggle. The eldest, Rifleman Thomas H SKELLON, died from wounds received in action on 21 September. The youngster Private G F SKELLON, was wounded on 29 September. Another son, Private Percy SKELLON, is still in the firing line. The father of the lads, the late Mr Thomas SKELLON, was himself a veteran of the Maori war. [AWN 16.11.1916]

SMITH, Private Frank Andrew, wounded in France, is the second son of Mr H A Smith of Dairy Flat. The Smith family has given the full strength of its manhood to the service of the Empire. William, the youngest son, when last heard from, was spending five days’ leave with relatives in Middlesex, after which he expected to be sent to Egypt; while Harry, the eldest son, is in training in England. All three were engaged in farming before they enlisted. [AWN 02.11.1916]

STAYTE Mrs E Stayte of Pukekohe, has four sons with the colours. Lance Corporal Ollie, who was wounded in the right hand, is convalescent. Private Jack Walter was wounded in July last; another son, Syd, is fighting in France; and her eldest son, William, has sailed for the front. Mrs Stayte and her family are well known at Thames, Paeroa, Waihi and Auckland. [AWN 23.11.1916]

TAYLOR The report that Rifleman William F TAYLOR was wounded on 15 September, directs attention to the fact that the family to which he belongs, that of Mr John Taylor, farmer of Whakapirau, has been represented in the war by four soldiers. Rifleman TAYLOR, prior to his enlistment, was in the employment of Messrs Stewart Bros. Ltd of Helensville. For nine months before he went on foreign service he was a member of the military corps which mounted guard over the wireless station at Awanui. So also was his brother, Arthur Edward TAYLOR, who afterwards trained for foreign service but died of meningitis at Trentham on 1 January. Two other brothers, Privates Alfred John TAYLOR and George Henry TAYLOR, are now serving in Egypt. [AWN 23.11.1916]

THOUMINE Mr P Thoumine of Kaponga has three sons on active service. Trooper L C THOUMINE, who left with the fourth reinforcements, served in Egypt for some time and then went to Gallipoli and was there for the evacuation. He then went back to Egypt and has served there ever since. He has had the best of health all through. In a recent letter he states that he came through the recent fighting in Egypt with just a few scratches. Private D E THOUMINE and Private L S THOUMINE who left with the 12th Reinforce-ments, have both been wounded in France. Leonard was wounded on 27 September and David on 1 October. David enlisted in the main body and was the first in Kaponga to enlist but after being a fort-night in camp was rejected on account of a bad leg. Mr Thoumine also had three nephews on active service, Sergeant Horace J PRATTLEY who was killed in action in France on 1 October, Trooper N WHEELER, who died of enteric, and Trooper J WHEELER who has returned as unfit. [AWN 23.11.1916]

WATSON At a meeting of the Nelson City Council last week, the Mayor referred to the patriotism of the Watson family of Nelson. Mr & Mrs Robert Watson had five sons, all of whom had voluntarily enlisted. Two have been killed, one severely wounded, one was at the Front and the fifth – and youngest who had just reached military age - was in camp with reinforcements. The Council placed on record its appreciation of the patriotism and regard of Mr & Mrs Watson and their sons. [AWN 23.11.1916]

WATSON The great patriotic sacrifice made by a Nelson family was referred to by the Mayor at a recent meeting of the City Council there. Mr Watson, a member of the council, and Mrs Watson, had, he said, sent all their five sons to the war, the youngest leaving with the last reinforcements. Two had unhappily been killed and a third was seriously wounded. He thought that was a record for one family and it showed very great patriotism indeed. He moved that the council place on record its deep sense of the patriotism of Mr & Mrs Watson and their sons. The motion was carried unanimously. [AWN 30.11.1916]

DECEMBER 1916

ATKINSON Mr G R Atkinson, Mangatete, Awanui North, has four soldier sons. Private Reginald L ATKINSON and Private George F ATKINSON, have lately been wounded. Privates R ATKINSON and G F ATKINSON, are still in the firing line. [AWN 21.12.1916]

CHITTY Mr L Chitty, O’Neill Street, Ponsonby, has received information that his son Private J E CHITTY has been killed in action. He has another son in hospital in England, another has been wounded and a third was incapacitated by illness just after the commencement of the offensive on the Somme. [AWN 14.12.1916]

DIBBLE Mrs Dibble, Ellerslie, widow of the late Mr A Dibble of Arthur Street, has four sons at the front. Trevor was with the original forces that went to Samoa, Gallipoli and France and was awarded the Military Medal. Three other brothers went away in one reinforcement in the course of the present year – Sergeant Ralph DIBBLE; Private Victor DIBBLE ex John Burns & Co Ltd and more recently farming; and Private Jesse DIBBLE, also a farmer. [AWN 21.12.1916]

FINN The spirit of patriotism has been well exemplified by the sons of Mrs A Finn of Clevedon South. Four have given their services to the army, while a fifth was prevented from doing so by an accident, just before he was due to go into training with the Main Body. Of the four soldier sons, one, a member of the Main Expeditionary Force, fought through the Gallipoli campaign, was twice wounded and has since been invalided home. The other three left NZ with early reinforcements and have been fighting in France where one of them was recently wounded in the Somme battle. [AWN 21.12.1916]

FOLEY Three sons of Mr Foley of Edenvale Rd, Mt Eden, are in the NZ forces. Sergeant E J FOLEY, Main Body, Auckland Mounted Rifles, has been a number of months at Gallipoli where he gained a high reputation for devotion to duty. It was due to Sgt FOLEY that the Rev Father DORE, Chaplain to his regiment, was carried to the beach in time to save his life. Rifleman W E FOLEY is fighting with the Rifle Brigade and Driver J O’S FOLEY is a member of the NZ Field Artillery. [AWN 21.12.1916]

FRANDI The Frandi family of Wellington has five soldiers in its ranks. Captain Ateo FRANDI, killed in action at Gallipoli; two brothers wounded in France and two others still in the ranks. Their father, who is now 84 years of age, fought for Italy’s liberation under Garibaldi. [AWN 14.12.1916]

GARBETT In the Garbett family of Murchison are four brothers – Alfred made the supreme sacrifice in the Somme battle on 15 September; Harry, wounded there on the same day, now in Brockenhurst Hospital; Amos and William are in the firing line in France. [AWN 14.12.1916]

GREY Three sons of Mr G M Grey, Kelvin Rd, Remuera, are now on active service. Two have been wounded and Captain A L GREY, the eldest, is still in hospital in England. He was wounded at Flers on 25 September when he led an attack on two German positions which is company captured within twenty minutes. During operations following these successes he was wounded, his left thigh being badly broken. The process of recovery may occupy twelve months. He had seen thirteen months fighting in Gallipoli, Egypt and France, practically continuous, without a days sickness or casualty of any description up until the attack at Flers. He is now in a London hospital and in a cablegram received on Tuesday last, he was reported to be progressing favourably although still on the seriously ill list. Gunner Alfred Mennons GREY is 26 years of ae, born in Canterbury. He was originally in the Army Service Corps as a driver but transferred in Egypt to the Infantry and was subsequently attached to a machine-gun section. While in France he was wounded in the foot by a piece of shrapnel. This necessitated hospital treatment for ten days. Upon rejoining his regiment he participated in the Flers fighting. He also went through Gallipoli and Egypt operations unscathed. Staff Sergeant Eric G GREY, youngest son, left as a Private in the Army Service Corps with an early reinforcement draft. Aged 24, he is presently serving in France. He and his eldest brother Arthur both left Gallipoli together at the evacuation. [AWN 21.12.1916]

HENDERSON Three Thames born sons of Mrs E Henderson of Surrey St, Grey Lynn, have been in the fighting ranks. Private Claude V HENDERSON and a brother went with the original Expeditionary Force to Samoa and returned invalided. Claude enlisted again and was wounded at Gallipoli. He is now in the trenches in France. Harry L HENDERSON and Wallace HENDERSON have also been in the fighting in Frances and have been invalided to England. Harry is understood to be on his way back to NZ in the Maheno. [AWN 14.02.1916]

HUNTER Mr C L Hunter, Honikiwi, recently invalided home from Egypt is the brother of Corporal H J HUNTER, fighting in German East Africa and Trooper N E HUNTER of Otorohanga who is in Egypt. Two other brothers are fighting in France. [AWN 21.12.1916]

JACQUES Mr W P Jacques, Otahuhu, has three sons in uniform. Private William JACQUES enlisted early in the war, another will be leaving shortly with a reinforcement contingent and a third has lately gone into a training camp. Official information two months ago stated that Pte William JACQUES had been wounded but a letter from Rev Clement HOUCHEN, Military Chaplain, makes it clear that William was wounded on 16 September and died the same evening. Before enlistment he was working on his father’s farm. [AWN 14.02.1916]

KINGI Three Kingi brothers of Wanganui volunteered early in the war. Private Henare Mete KINGI went with the First Maori Contingent and was killed in action in France on 14 September. He was aged about 21. He went through the Gallipoli campaign and the great evacuation of the peninsula besides spending several months in France. [AWN 21.12.1916]

LIPPIATT Three sons of Mr W E Lippiatt, Otahuhu, have been serving in France. The eldest, Corporal Walter Eric Lippiatt, aged 24, was lately reported killed in action. He was educated at Otahuhu State School and Auckland Grammar School where he was a prominent rifle shot and was one of the lads who laid the foundation of the school’s recent achievements in the shooting world. After leaving school he joined his father in the nursery business and was an active member of the Akarana Rifle Club and won a number of trophies for rifle shooting. The territorial movement was responsible for his joining the 3rd, Auckland, Regiment in which he soon arose to the rank of Sergeant. On the outbreak of war he applied for a commission but was given to understand that the positions were filled for 12 months ahead. After waiting for about that period and finding the commission no nearer, he decided to enlist as a private, leaving NZ as a Corporal. [AWN 07.12.1916]

LYNCH Mr Thomas LYNCH has had five sons in the Colonial portion of the Empire’s army. Private Noel LYNCH enrolled in the Australian forces and did his share of fighting at Gallipoli from which place he returned to Auckland with a permanent injury to his foot. Sgt Major Ron LYNCH and Private Milford LYNCH are now fighting in France. Private Gladwin LYNCH was also in France but was lately reported missing and has not been further heard of. Lieut Audley LYNCH is now at sea on the way to support his company for the great encounter. [AWN 21.12.1916]

MOLES Mrs Sarah Moles, Moturoa, New Plymouth, has four sons in the Army. The eldest, Private Albert Leo CASEY was wounded in July last in France. The other three brothers took part in the great advance in the Somme on 15 September; Rifleman F J CASEY, killed in action; and Sergeant B CASEY AND private T R CASEY, wounded. [AWN 21.12.1916]

MORPETH Of a family of six sons, Mr H D Morpeth of Waihi has given five to the Empire’s service, the remaining son being under military age. Lieut Niccol MORPETH, L/Cpl Gerald MORPETH and Private Moore MORPETH, took part in the memorable landing at Gallipoli where Private Moore MORPETH was killed in action and his two brothers were wounded. When he had recovered Lieut MORPETH joined the 16th Waikatos and was promoted to Captain in Egypt. On 27 September he was wounded again at Flanders, in the leg which unfortunately had to be amputated. He is now in Roehampton Hospital awaiting the arrival of an artificial limb. L/C MORPETH returned to the front after recovery only to fall victim to typhoid fever. Upon recovery he went to France where he was shot through the leg at Flers. He is again in hospital. Lieut Allan MORPETH joined as a non-commissioned officer and will shortly leave for the front. George MORPETH who, after unsuccessful attempts to pass the medical examination in the earlier stages of the war, has now succeeded in passing and will go into the non-commissioned officers’ training camp at Trentham early next year. [AWN 07.12.1916]

NICHOLSON Five sons of Mrs N Nicholson, Northcote, have all answered the call to arms. Privates Eustace and Marmion and their half-brother Private Arthur ATKINS, left with the Main Body and went through the fighting at Gallipoli where ATKINS was promoted to Sergeant Major and received the D.C.M. for conspicuous bravery. He has since returned to the Dominion, permanently disabled as a result of wounds. Private Marmion Nicholson has also been invalided to NZ and will proceed again to the Front as soon as he is physically fit. Private Edward Nicholson and another brother, Edward, are now fighting in France. The fifth son has only recently been sent back from Trentham, being under age. A son in law of Mrs Nicholson, also in the trenches in France, has recently been wounded while bomb-throwing. All these boys are either sons or grandsons of Imperial Army officers. [AWN 07.12.1916]

WALLER Lance Corporal L J WALLER, killed in action in France 15 September, was the eldest son of Mrs Annie Waller, Te Kuiti, one of four brothers on active service. Private A E WALLER has been wounded; Private H T WALLER is still in France and Arthur G WALLER is in the Navy. [AWN 21.12.1916]

WALSH Three sons of Mrs Margaret Walsh, Ryle St, Ponsonby, and the late Mr Wm Walsh, have worn the King’s uniform in the New Zealand forces. Private Norman H WALSH laid down his life at Gallipoli, dying from the effects of wounds and dysentery. Signaller Sergeant Clifford WALSH has been wounded three times and is now at the Walton on Thames Hospital. Private Clarence William WALSH left with a reinforcement draft some months ago. Mrs Walsh also has a brother and numerous cousins and nephews in the forces despatched from England. [AWN 07.12.1916]

WARREN There is reason to believe that the Aubrey WARREN mentioned in a cable message as having been on board the hospital ship Arabia recently blown up in the Mediterranean by a mine or torpedo, and who is now reported missing, is the son of Mrs J H BUTLER of O’Neil St, Ponsonby, by her first marriage. His real name is Aubrey SMITH but he had enlisted under his mother’s maiden name, first on HMS Challenger and then on the hospital ship Maheno, from which a transfer to another hospital ship is not improbable. Mrs Butler is making enquiries at Port Said where other survivors from the Arabai are in hospital, with a view to establishing the missing man’s identity. Two other sons have served with the Australian forces. A fourth son, Private Frederick J SMITH, who left with the NZ troops, was on Gallipoli but has been invalided home. Mrs Butler has also lost a brother and two nephews. [AWN 07.12.1916]

WATSON Five sons of Mr & Mrs Robert Watson of Washington Valley, Nelson, have joined the forces. Private Noel WATSON, the fifth son, is a specialist attached to a reinforcement at present in camp. The late Gunner Cameron WATSON, the fourth son enlisted in the Samoan Expedition. After his return to NZ he joined a reinforcement draft, being attached to the Howitzer Battery. He fought at Anzac, right up to within a few hours of the evacuation, when he was killed on 14 December 1915. Sergeant William Thornton WATSON, the eldest son, enlisted at Sydney with the Australian Expeditionary Force for New Guinea. He took part in the fighting at Rabaul and after the defeat of the Germans at that island he was, owing to the illness of the British Commissioner, appointed captain of the native police and, as acting-commissioner, was sent in charge of a company of armed natives to the island of New Hanover, where the British flag was hoisted and the German settlers were rounded up to take the oath of neutrality. In New Guinea he contracted fever. Afterwards he joined the Australian Forces and served at the Dardanelles. Since then he has seen fighting in France and in Belgium. Sergeant Walter WATSON, the second son, enlisted and left NZ with the Main Body as a farrier attached to No.2 Battery. While in Egypt he was promoted to farrier-sergeant. He was present at the landing at Gallipoli, but as the horses were not required he returned with them to Egypt, where he remained for some time. Being desirous of seeing the fighting he applied to be allowed to join the battery as a gunner. After an examination he was appointed a sergeant and he has seen much service in France. He was mentioned in General Orders and has been complimented on the excellency of the shooting of the gun in his charge. About the middle of October he was wounded severely in the chest and right arm and was removed to a hospital in England. The late Lieutenant Kenneth Robert WATSON, Howitzer Battery, the third son, enlisted and left NZ as a specialist in the Howitzer Battery. He was present at the landing of the British forces at Gallipoli and afterwards was engaged on observation work at Walker’s Ridge. He was mentioned in despatches by General Birdwood for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. He was invalided to England and after two months absence he returned to the firing line just a few weeks before the evacuation was decided upon. Prior to the forces being removed from Egypt after the Dardanelles campaign and being taken to France he was promoted to be a lieutenant. He fought through the great push in France in September. While attending to his duties in an ammunition dump on 5 October he was killed by a shell. [AWN 21.12.1916]

JANUARY 1917

BERRY Four son of Mr T C Berry of Ohingaiti have left for the Front. The first, W C BERRY, went in the 5th reinforcements. He was wounded at Gallipoli, a bullet passing through his arm. After his recovery he went back to Gallipoli and was there for some weeks. He left Gallipoli at the evacuation and was in Egypt for some time where he met two of his brothers, Bert BERRY, who went in the 7th reinforcements and Maurice BERRY (signaller) who went with the 9th reinforcements. These three have been in France since the troops were sent from Egypt and they were in the 22-days fight in the Somme battle. Bert was three times buried by shells and once had to be dug out. He suffered from concussion and had other very narrow escapes but came through safely. Maurice was slightly gassed in the same battle but Wallace came through without a scratch. Wilfred BERRY, the fourth son, left with the 19th Reinforcements. [AWN 04.01.1917]

CAFFERY, Private Michael J – Reported believed killed in action in France. He was one of four sons of Mrs Mary Caffery of Melford St, Ponsonby, who have enlisted for service. He came to Auckland from Mangaia, Cook Islands, in order to volunteer. He was reported missing in September and is now believed to have been killed. Another brother, Private Robert CAFFERY, left with the Main Body, saw the Gallipoli campaign through in safety and later went to France. He was engaged as a bomb thrower in the battle of Armentieres early in July, was reported missing, and later reported to be a prisoner of war at Giessen, Germany. Another brother, Joseph, accompanied Michael and by latest advice, received two months ago, was in the firing line and well. A younger brother, Donald, is now in camp in Australia, only one son, a lad of 16, being left at home. [AWN 18.01.1917]

CLARKE Corporal S J CLARKE of Masterton, who was lately reported as having been wounded on 16 November, is one of four brothers at the front. Corporal Clarke is well known in the cycling world of NZ, having at the age of 19 won the Timaru-Christchurch road race and the Mt Egmont road race and since then many path events. [AWN 11.01.1917]

CRANE Mrs A M Crane, Beresford St, Auckland, has four sons now either in the firing line or on the way - Frank S G CRANE, the youngest of 7 brothers, a private in the AIB, at the Somme; Frederick William CRANE, the eldest, joined the AIB during the Somme offensive; Bert and Charles CRANE, are in camp; George James CRANE, the sixth son, is en route to England with reinforcements. Bert and George have left wives who are resident in Auckland. [AWN 25.01.1917]

GARLICK Private William GARLICK, late of Taneatua, who died on pneumonia in the Godfrey Hospital, England, was 28 years of age and the eldest of four brothers who enlisted. Thomas and Richard GARLICK went away with the Main Body, both were at Gallipoli and were invalided to England with enteric. Richard returned to Auckland but Thomas, who is still suffering from rheumatism, is at Hornchurch. James GARLICK has been serving with a machine-gun section on the Somme since last May. William GARLICK, deceased, did not get away until comparatively recently, arriving in England only four weeks prior to his death. His previous military training was in the Whakatane Mounted Rifles. He was a fine horseman and rough-rider. He always followed farming work. [AWN 04.01.1917]

GAWN Trooper Thomas George GAWN, reported wounded on 12 December 1916, is the youngest son of Mrs Julia Gawn, Victoria St, Auckland, and the late Mr Frank Gawn of South Dunedin. He and his brother Charles GAWN enlisted at the outbreak of war and served in the original Samoan Expeditionary Force for twelve months. On return to NZ they again volunteered with the two other brothers. Thomas GAWN was the first to be wounded. These soldiers are the grandsons of the late Sgt James KENNEDY who was under arms for the extremely lengthy period of 44 years. [AWN 25.01.1917]

GLASTONBURY, Private A C, NZ Rifle Brigade, late of Ohingaiti, who died of gastritis in the Codford Hospital, England, was 34 years of age and was the eldest of four brothers who enlisted. Frank (then Corporal but advanced to Sergeant) went with the main body and being wounded at Gallipoli, was sent to England. On recovery he eventually arrived in France where he fell in a night raid on the enemy trenches on 14 July 1916. Len went with the 2nd Battalion of the NZ Rifle Brigade and Will with the Canterbury Infantry. The two latter are now in France after being in Egypt for a while. Mrs A G Glastonbury (nee LECKS) has six brothers enlisted, three of whom have fallen, two on Gallipoli, the other in France, the same time as Frank GLASTONBURY. Another came safely through the ‘great push’ of September 15 last in France, two more are in the 21st and 22nd reinforcements respectively. The seventh brother has endeavoured to enlist more than once but was rejected for eyesight and the other, though willing to follow his brothers’ example is under age. [AWN 18.01.1917]

HUTCHISON Three sons of the late Mr Alen Hutchison of Arthur St, Onehunga, are on active service. Privates W W & H F A Hutchison are both serving with the Rifle Brigade in France. Sapper T M HUTCHISON is with the wireless troop. [AWN 18.01.1917]

KIRKWOOD Another fighting family is that of Mrs Kirkwood of Turama Road, Onehunga, whose four sons have responded to the call of King and country. The youngest, Private R G KIRKWOOD, served with the first Expeditionary Force in Samoa and was discharged after nine months’ service. Private W J KIRKWOOD enlisted with the reinforcements and is now somewhere in France. Sub Lieutenant R A KIRKWOOD, the eldest son, and Sub Lieutenant M S KIRKWOOD, have been accepted for the Motor-boat Patrol Service. [AWN 11.01.1917]

LIVESAY A remarkable record of service for King and country is that of Sergeant Major Charles LIVESAY and his six sons. Five of them have given their lives. Sergeant Major LIVESAY, although 64, was one of the first in NZ to volunteer for active service. He went to Egypt with the first battalion of the NZ Rifle Brigade and afterwards was drafted to France. He has taken part in the Somme fighting and was recently in London on leave. He was formerly Sergeant Major in the Scots Guards and his service includes the Mashona Rebellion, Matabele War, Boer War and the Zulu Rebellion. Thirty years ago Livesay was in the employment of The Times as commissionaire and afterwards came to NZ to take up sheep farming. His six sons, who were in England at the outbreak of war, all became soldiers and five were killed in the early months. The sixth, who has taken his commission, expects to go to the front shortly. [AWN 11.01.1917]

PARFITT Three members of the Parfitt family of Onehunga are in uniform. Private A H PARFITT enlisted in an early reinforcement, served at Gallipoli – where he was twice wounded – and is now in France. Private R G PARFITT has been in France for more than 12 months and so far has gone through the campaign scathless. The third brother, Private L C PARFITT, is a member of a draft now on the water. [AWN 18.01.1917]

RESTON The three sons of Mr & Mrs S J Reston of Sunnyvale Rd, Remuera, have all enlisted and one, the eldest, has made the supreme sacrifice. Bombardier George Robert RESTON, who was killed in action in France on October 5 last, at the age of 34 years, was the eldest son of Mr & Mrs Reston. He Was born in Timaru and educated at Lyttelton. At the age of 15 he came to Auckland with his parents and commenced farming at Whangarata, where he remained until war broke out. He joined the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force as a driver in the artillery. After being in Egypt for four months he was sent to Gallipoli. Owing to the horses not being required he was sent back to Alexandria, where he remained for four months, during which time he was quartermaster-sergeant’s clerk. He subsequently7 went to France as gunner and had plenty of fighting until he met his death. In France he met his younger brother, Roland, who went with an early reinforcement draft and who has since been awarded the Military Medal and two stripes. The third and youngest son, Oscar Glen RESTON, went into camp with the twenty-third reinforcements. Eleven first cousins of the Reston family have joined the colours. Two have been killed in action, one died at sea and one was severely wounded. At present there are four at the front and three in camp. [AWN 11.01.1917]

RICKUS An excellent record of war service is held by Mr J Rickus, a Maori living at Temuka, who has five sons and four grandsons serving in the NZ forces. Of the sons, Private W T RICKUS and Private S P RICKUS left with the Maori force, whilst Private S RICKUS and Private T P RICKUS left with separate European reinforcements and Bugler J M RICKUS is now on final leave and leaves with the next Maori reinforcements, Mr Rickus’ four grandsons left from the North Island. [AWN 11.01.1917]

SAVAGE Five brothers of a well known Thames family have established a good record as a fighting family. Trooper Valentine Le (sic) SAVAGE, who enlisted in an early reinforcements draft, was invalided home some time ago. Lieutenant Charles SAVAGE of the 2nd Maori Contingent, was the next to go to the Front. Sergeant Major Samuel SAVAGE, who enlisted in Australia, was killed at Gallipoli. Corporal Thomas SAVAGE, who was a member of the Main NZ Body, was wounded at Gallipoli and came back to NZ. He has since enlisted again and is now in France. The fifth soldier from the family is Private Ben SAVAGE who enlisted recently. [AWN 04.01.1917]

SOFFE Four members of the family of Mr J N Soffe of Waitara have worn the King’s uniform. Private George SOFFE left NZ with the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force and served at Gallipoli for four months, when he was wounded and invalided home to NZ. On recovery from his injuries he rejoined the NZ army and returned to the front as a member of a machine-gun section. Lance Corporal William SOFFE left NZ with a reinforcement draft and was wounded in the advance on the Somme in September last. Private John SOFFE sailed later but was in time to take part in the great offensive, in which he also suffered a wound. The fourth brother, Samuel SOFFE, volunteered last year. After spending two months in camp he was obliged to return to his home on account of illness. He is, however, again in Khaki and will leave NZ shortly. There remains a fifth son who is also anxious to take his turn in the ranks but has not yet reached the required age. [AWN 11.01.1917]

UNDERWOOD Out of five sons of Mr William Underwood of Paparoa who have gone to the Front, three have now been heard of through the casualty lists. Percy UNDERWOOD died of wounds last October; Fred UNDERWOOD, was dangerously wounded at Gallipoli but recovered and was sent home and discharged as unfit for further service. Twice since then he has sought to re-enlist but has been rejected. Now Arthur UNDERWOOD has been sent from the Front to a hospital in England, dangerously ill. Arthur (sic) and Herbert UNDERWOOD, the remaining brothers, are still, as far as is known, in the firing line. Ernest UNDERWOOD, cousin of the five brothers, who was a member of their household, left NZ with the Main Body and has been wounded three times, on the last occasion seriously. [AWN 25.01.1917]

FEBRUARY 1917

CLARK John Clark, Lee St, Parnell, has three sons serving, two of whom have been killed in action. The eldest, Eric H CLARK was killed at Gallipoli; Private J B CLARK was killed in France – born at Hamilton and educated at Mt Eden School. He enlisted before he was 20. He had been employed by Auckland City Treasury Dept. He was an enthusiastic cadet and an active territorial. He went to France in the general transfer of New Zealanders from Egypt and served in the machine-gun section of the Auckland Battalion. He was wounded in the early part of the Somme offensive and was the first member of the City Council staff to be killed in action. The third son Percy P CLARK is in the Artillery in France. [AWN 22.02.1917]

GABB One son and two stepsons of Mr C Gabb, Ponsonby, are in the fighting forces. Ernest George DRYLAND is already in France and Thomas A H GABB is on the water. Another stepson, Walter DRYLAND, has enlisted for a later reinforcement. [AWN 22.02.1917]

GRAHAM, Two sons of Mr J F Graham, manager of Rototahi Station near Gisborne, died on the same day on 10 January, as a result of injuries received in an engagement in Egypt. The brothers, Trooper John Fairlie GRAHAM and Trooper Thomas R GRAHAM, had been through the Gallipoli campaign together and had also share the same Egyptian engagements. Another brother, Private Ronald GRAHAM, is also away with the New Zealand forces. [AWN 15.02.1917]

RUSDEN, Sergeant G C, son of Mr R J Rusden of Kingsland, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field during the Somme action. He left NZ with the Main Body as a Sapper in the Engineers. His brother Trooper Len RUSDEN was wounded last August but has since resumed duties. He comes of a fighting family, his great-grandfather and great-great-grandfather having been Waterloo veterans while no fewer than five uncles saw service in the Maori war. Over twenty of his relatives are serving in the present war. [AWN 08.02.1917]

SINEL All the sons of Mr T E Sinel of Auckland have volunteered for active service and six of them are now in khaki. The other two have been declared unfit for active service. All the brothers have served in the volunteer or territorial forces before the war. The first son E J SINEL, went to Samoa. After returning he re-enlisted in one of the early reinforcements and went to Gallipoli whence he returned wounded and sick. He has since re-enlisted and left as a Corporal in a recent reinforcement. The second son, Major W C SINEL, left as Second in Command of the sixth Haurakis, Main Body, landed at Gallipoli on 25 August 1915, was gazetted Major in the field and fought through until 7 August and was wounded in the knee and invalided to England, thence to NZ and Rotorua. Upon recovering he was again passed as fit for active service and left NZ as Officer Commanding a reinforcement draft. The fourth son, Regimental Sergeant Major R SINEL, Field Artillery, is now Instructor at Featherston and will leave shortly for the front. The sixth son, Corporal P M SINEL, also left with reinforcements. The seventh son Sergeant H G SINEL, is now in the trenches in France as is also the eighth son Private Kenneth SINEL. Another son, Mr J C SINEL, is now in London working at his profession as a commercial artist. He offered himself for duty in Kitchener’s army but was rejected on account of physical unfitness. The remaining son, Mr A H SINEL, chief clerk of the NZ Shipping Co, Auckland branch office, was also anxious to go but on account of a serious accident to his head on board the Ayrshire some years back, has not gone. Three of the brothers were members of the reinforcement draft of which Major SINEL was in command. [AWN 08.02.1917]

MARCH 1917

BLUCHER, Sergeant A N, who was wounded severely in the face and hands on 21 February is one of six brothers on active service – the sons of Mr E Blucher, Beresford St, Auckland. Sgt Blucher enlisted with the Auckland Mounted Infantry and left NZ in December 1914. After arriving in Egypt he transferred to the Machine-gun Section and fought through the Gallipoli campaign until September 1915 when he was invalided to England. On recovery he left for Egypt and in May last received his sergeant stripes. One of his brother was wounded in the advance on the Somme and is now in England making good progress. [AWN 29.03.1917]

BOYNE, Sergeant H W, son of W Boyne at Hamilton St, Grey Lynn, was reported as missing last November and believed to be killed. A private cable now shows that his death is now unfortunately a certainty. Mr Boyne has three sons, all of whom have taken part in the present war. The eldest is employed in making aeroplanes for the British Government in Loughborough and another brother is fighting with the NZ Field Artillery. Sgt Boyne, who was a signwriter by occupation, left NZ with the original Samoan expedition in August 1914. On return to NZ he enlisted again and sailed for Egypt with the reinforcement which sailed in August 1915, receiving his three stripes and his marksman badge before the force left Trentham. Later on he was recommended for a commission. He was a keen Association footballer, playing for the Everton Club. [AWN 29.03.1917]

ELLISDON Four sons of Mr F J H Ellisdon, Kingsland, have given their services at the front. Sergeant Thomas E Ellisdon, who was reported wound the other day, left NZ with an early reinforcement draft. He gained his promotion from the ranks on service, being made a corporal soon after arrival in Egypt, then fighting through the arduous days of Anzac and finally received his sergeant’s stripes in January of this year. His brother, the late Captain ELLISDON, left with the same reinforcement in the Auckland Mounted Infantry. His name was mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig in connection with the Somme operations. The third brother, Private Lionel ELLISDON, has been invalided home, suffering from rheumatism and arrived in Auckland this week; while the fourth, Private Roy ELLISDON, took his place in the trenches some weeks ago. [AWN 08.03.1917]

MacDIARMID, Captain John C, NZMC, died on Sunday last after undertaking an operation for appendicitis. He was formerly in medical practice at Huntly was the son of Dr R C MacDiarmid, also of Huntly, and for some time past was one of the doctors at Featherston Camp. The funeral took place on Monday at the Karori Cemetery with full military honours. Captain MacDiarmid was married in June last to Miss Maud WOODFORD, Opotiki. [AWN 29.03.1917]

McDONALD Mr John McDonald of Jersey Park, Waipipi, Waiuku, can justly be proud of the record his sons are putting up in defence of the Empire. His eldest son Ernest, aged 35, a married man with a wife and four children, left with one of the earliest reinforcements as captain of the 16th Waikatos and was wounded at the landing on Gallipoli in the shoulder and lung. He was invalided home and making a rapid recovery, was able to leave NZ again as a Major. At present he is in charge of troops at Sling Camp. Elwyn, aged 32, left some time later and the latest news shows him to be in the firing line ‘somewhere in France’. Ronald, aged 29 years, left with one of the reinforcement drafts for the Rifle Brigade, was wounded in France, was sent to hospital, recovered and returned to the front in time to take part in the Somme advance. In December last Ronald was again wounded in the ear and face. The latest news states that he is ‘making good progress’. Another son, Harold, was not 20 when he left NZ. He took part in several sharp engagements in Egypt and came through safely. Then he met his brother Ernest who arranged for a transfer and he was taken on to the English camp. Mr McDonald’s father, the late Mr Peter McDonald, saw active service in the Maori war where, while serving under Colonel Nixon in the Waikato Mounted Constabulary, he was severely wounded. A nephew of Mr John McDonald also went through the Gallipoli campaign and is now serving in Egypt. [AWN 08.03.1917]

MUNRO Private John Frederick MUNRO, who has received severe gunshot wounds in the right arm and leg, is the son of Mr John A Munro of Clevedon and their third son on active service. He left NZ last July and arrived in France in October, serving there until wounded on 12 February. His eldest brother, Robert, left with the main body as a farrier and went to Gallipoli. He was killed in action, being the first boy from Clevedon to give his life for his country. A third brother, Frank of the 3rd, Auckland, Mounted Rifles, is still serving on the Egyptian frontier. Three cousins, of whom one has been wounded, are also on active service. [AWN 22.03.1917]

MURRAY A striking instance of a patriotic family is afforded in the case of the three sons of Mrs M Murray of Wynyard Road, Mt Eden, all of whom are serving in France. The eldest, Private J MURRAY, left NZ in November 1915 and has been twice wounded, the second time by the accidental bursting of a bomb while acting as instructor in bomb-throwing in France. He was sent to hospital in England but returned to France in January last. The second son, Private B MURRAY, went into camp in December 1915, leaving NZ in the April following. He was wounded in France during the great advance in September last. He is married and has two young children. Mrs Murray’s youngest son, Signaller G MURRAY, enlisted in 1914 and, being refused for foreign service as under age, served for several months as a gunner in the Garrison Artillery, afterwards joining the signallers while at Trentham camp. At Slip camp, Salisbury, he was selected as one of a special party of signallers for service in France during May last. He is an old Grammar School boy. The sacrifice made by Mrs Murray will be better realised when it is stated that she is a widow, as is her daughter, the latter’s husband having been killed in the trenches in France early in July last, leaving two small children. [AWN 22.03.1917]

PLUGGE, Lieut Colonel A, D.S.O., commanding the First, Auckland, Infantry Battalion, First Brigade, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Order and also mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches for the excellence of his work during the last year’s operations on the Somme. He is aged 39, a native of Hull, England. He was formerly connected with the 3rd, Auckland, Regiment as a Major and was one of the first to volunteer for service at the outbreak of war in 1914. He went away with the main body as officer commanding the Auckland Infantry Battalion. He played a conspicuous part in the landing at Gallipoli in April 1915, on which occasion he was wounded in the wrist. He refused to retire after receiving his wound and continued to lead his men. He was more severely wounded at Cape Helles and had to go into hospital, being ultimately invalided to England. He then took up duty in France. He was created CMG in October 1915. Col Plugge was formerly on the staff of King’s College bur for four or five years before going to war, was Principal of the Dilworth Institute. Mrs Plugge, who is a daughter of Mr Graves Aickin of Auckland, is now in London. [AWN 01.03.1917]

PRICE, Private Tom, who was reported last week as having died of wounds, was one of three brothers in the firing line, sons of Mrs M Price of Cambridge, who also has a son in law amongst NZ’s soldiers. Private Price left NZ a few months after the commencement of the war. He was wounded in June last and on recovery returned to the operations on the French front. Again he was wound on 4 February and this injury proved fatal. While resident in Cambridge, he took an active role in YMCA work. For 4 ½ years prior to his enlistment he was in the territorials. [AWN 08.03.1917]

REES Information has been received by Mr W J Rees of Shelly Beach Road, to the effect that his son Corporal E O L REES, of the Auckland Infantry, who was some time ago reported as in hospital in France suffering from pneumonia, has been discharged from that institution and is now at the base depot. Corporal Rees left NZ with the Main Body and was at the landing at Gallipoli, where he was severely wounded in the fighting on the ‘Daisy patch’. Cpl Rees has two brothers on active service. Private S J L REES, who was in England when the war broke out, is in the King’s Liverpool Regiment and has been in the firing-line on and off, since September 1915. The other brother, W P M REES, left with the Main Body. He served on Gallipoli with the Army Medical Corps, under Lieut Col D N W Murray, DSO, and was promoted on the field to the rank of sergeant. Sgt Rees returned to NZ on a hospital ship on 1 January 1916, and was discharged. About two months ago he re-enlisted and is now in camp with the Army Medical Corps. [AWN 22.03.1917]

RICHARDSON Sergeant R W RICHARDSON, son of Mr H G Richardson, of Uruti, Taranaki, who was wounded in France on 4 February, is one of three brothers serving in the same regiment. He was previously wounded in August 1915. On that occasion he was sent to England and after his recovery rejoined his regiment in France, where he gained his sergeant’s stripes. [AWN 08.03.1917]

ROUSE, Private Henry Lee, who died of spinal disease at Auckland Hospital recently, was the youngest son of Mrs S A Rouse of Hukerenui and one of three brothers who have enlisted in their country’s service. Another of the three has lost his left arm through a wound and is now in England, while the third is in camp at Trentham. Private H L Rouse, who was 22, was born at Hukerenui and educated at the public school there and the Whangarei High School. He was for two years in the Territorials and at the time of his enlistment for foreign service was employed in the timber trade. [AWN 29.03.1917]

STEVENS Mrs Stevens of York St, Parnell, has four sons who have given their services to the fighting ranks. Trooper R B STEVENS left NZ with the Main Body, fought in the trenches in Gallipoli and from there was invalided home in September 1915. Driver W H STEVENS left with a reinforcement draft in March of last year and is at present ill in a NZ General Hospital. Private George G STEVENS is serving with the Australian Imperial Forces in France and a another brother, Harold, has enlisted and is proceeding to camp shortly. [AWN 01.03.1917]

APRIL 1917

BIRNIE A very fine record of service stands to the credit of the family of Mr John BIRNIE of O’Rorke St, Remuera. Mr Birnie, who himself held a commission as Major in the Volunteers had 7 sons. One was killed in action in France, four are at present on active service and another leaves for the front shortly. The seventh son, Gordon BIRNIE, was called up in the ballot system. He appeared before the Military Service Board on Thursday and his appeal was allowed on the grounds that he was not of military age. His father stated that his lad was anxious to go to the front but his parents were wishful that he remain until he came of military age. The lad took it as a slur that he could have been drawn in the ballot. The Board congratulated Mr Birnie on his fine family record of service for the Empire. Mr G Elliot said there were few families in NZ who had sent six sons to the war. [AWN 19.04.1917]

CLARK, Private Alfred Colin, youngest son of Mrs John Clark, Karaka, seriously wounded in the spine on 21 February, is now out of danger and has been moved from a hospital in Boulogne to the King George Hospital, London. He is one of three brothers serving. He was previously farming at Karaka. Privates Leslie Gold CLARK and Joseph Reynolds CLARK have both given their lives. Leslie, who was killed on the infamous Daisy Patch, Gallipoli, farmed at Karaka and Joseph, employee of the Waihi Goldmining Co in the maintenance of the electric line from Horahora, died from wounds received in France. Their late father, John CLARK, took part in the Maori War. [AWN 05.04.1917]

EDGECUMBE, Lance Corporal J H, youngest son of George Edgecumbe, Frankton has been awarded the Military Medal. He was studying architecture in London when war broke out and joined the Royal Engineers. He has seen much service in France. [AWN 12.04.1917]

EDWARDS Mrs E Edwards, Paeroa, hold a commendable record of three sons on active service. Lieut Edwin EDWARDS, wounded in France on 21 February, left NZ in March 1916. He was a keen volunteer officer and enthusiastic footballer and tennis player and played in the Goldfields Representative football team. He was in business as a land and financial agent. He has lost his left eye and is suffering from gunshot wounds to the face but is making favourable progress. Sergeant Major Parry EDWARDS was in Australia at the outbreak of war and left with the main body of the Australia Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded at Gallipoli and left unfit for active service. He was transferred to the Army Pay Office in London. Corporal Cedric EDWARDS, was on the Staff of the Bank of NZ, Rotorua. He is at present attached to the Non-commissioned Officers Class now in training. [AWN 05.04.1917]

GILLARD The family of Mrs Gillard, East Tamaki, has already provided three soldiers for the NZEF and will shortly make a number up to five. F GILLARD was killed at Gallipoli, Tom has been wound and is in hospital in France; Ben is in camp at Trentham, while Louis and D GILLARD have enlisted and will go into camp shortly. [AWN 26.04.1917]

GRIFFITHS, Rifleman George Arthur, lately reported to have died of disease, was a member of a family which has sent three sons on active service. Their father, Mr Thomas Griffiths, lives at Okoroire. At the time of enlistment he was employed at Huntly. In Egypt he was engaged in desert operations. After arrival in France he fought in the early part of the Somme advance but just prior to his fatal illness he was employed on railway construction. His brother Ralph enlisted early in the war and fought at Gallipoli. He is now in France where he was wounded on 16 September. Another brother, Thomas, has volunteered for the Army Postal Corps. [AWN 19.04.1917]

HARPER One trio of fighting men who have gone from Devonport are a father and two sons from the HARPER family of Church Street. Rifleman A HARPER was wounded in the advance on the Somme on 15 September last and his son, Sergeant C P HARPER received gas into his lungs on 12 November. Both were sent to English hospitals and Mrs Harper has been informed they are now on the convalescent list and both at Hornchurch Hospital. Driver Henry ROBERTSON, NZFA, another son of Rifleman Harper, has completed his primary training and will leave NZ with the next reinforcement draft. [AWN 19.04.1917]

PARR Private Ellis Alexander PARR, who was recently reported wounded, is a member of a family which is doing its share in the war. His home is at Petone, Wellington, and he has two brother, Rupert and Mark PARR, in the fighting lines, while his father is a member of the garrison at Samoa. All the male members of their household are in khaki. Ellis Parr is well known in rowing and football circles in Auckland, where he was a clerk in the loco department of the railway service at the time of his enlistment. [AWN 12.04.1917]

ROBERTSON The family of Peter Robertson of Avondale has five members engaged in war work, 3 sons and 2 daughters. Lieut Gordon ROBERTSON, and engineer by training, is presently employed on construction operations for the Naval Air Service, Sunbeam Motor Works, England. Private Norman ROBERTSON, Australian Machine-gun Company, and Private Benjamin ROBERTSON is enrolled in a NZ reinforcement contingent. Nancy ROBERTSON is a Nursing Sister in Lord Darby’s Hospital in Wallingford, and Miss Susan ROBERTSON, just qualified for the medical profession at Edinburgh University, proposes volunteering for medical service in France. [AWN 19.04.1917]

SAIES Splendid as has been the record of the fighting families who have been sent out from NZ to fight for the Empire and the cause of international righteousness, all instances yet recorded are eclipsed by one which came under the notice of a reporter on Tuesday. The household of Mr J H SAIES of Totara North, Whangaroa Harbour has provided no less than 7 soldiers for the Army, while an eighth offered his services but was obliged to stay at home owing to medical unfitness. Six of the young men left NZ in one reinforcement draft. The names of the eight are: Alfred, killed in action 16 Sept 1916; Joseph, Arthur, Edward and James are still fighting in France; Albert and Frederick have returned with honourable wounds and been discharged; and Charles, is the man who was debarred from following the patriotic example of his brothers through a physical defect. [AWN 05.04.1917]

SOMMERVILLE Another creditable family record is that of the late Colonel R J SOMMERVILLE of Wanganui and of Mrs Sommerville now of Glen Road, Stanley Bay, whose five sons have taken, or are about to take, a very active part in the war. The eldest son Captain L S SOMMERVILLE, reported wounded, saw service in the Boer War in which he was wounded and twice mentioned in despatches. He is now in Egypt with the Mounted Rifles. Major J A SOMMERVILLE, also in Egypt, was wounded At Romani but has since rejoined his regiment. Trooper Stanley SOMMERVILLE was killed at Gallipoli in August 1915. Two more brothers are in training and are to leave NZ shortly. [AWN 05.04.1917]

TEW Four sons of Mr T Tew of Opotiki are bearing arms and a fifth volunteered but was rejected. Gunner Herbert TEW is in the crew of a warship and served for four years in the Persian Gulf where he was wound in a fight with gun runners. More recently he took part in the Battle of Jutland and other engagements in the North Sea. Private Leslie TEW left NZ with the June 1915 reinforcement draft and was wounded at Gallipoli. He was again wounded in France last September at the Somme offensive, losing the use of his left arm. He is presently in a NZ hospital in England. Private Stanley TEW left last June and is now in the trenches. Private Harold TEW is in camp, having enlisted as soon as he reached military age. [AWN 26.04.1917]

WATSON, Private Walter McKinley, reported to have died of wounds on 25 March, was the fifth son of Mr J Watson, Drummer St, Auckland, and one of four brothers serving in the Expeditionary Force. He served through the greater part of the Gallipoli campaign, went to France with the NZ Division and served continuously with the Auckland Battalion up to the time of his death. He was wounded in Gallipoli and again at the battle of the Somme. [AWN 12.04.1917]

MAY 1917

CAPPER Of the family of the late Mr E H Capper of Ohinewai, three sons have been in the Empire forces. One has returned to NZ medically unfit and another has been wounded twice and is now suffering from shell shock. The eldest son, now in France, also saw service in the Boer War with the veteran forces. Seven of Mr Capper’s grandsons have gone to the front, one of whom lost his life at Gallipoli, while two have returned to NZ after having been wounded. One son in law is also now on the French frontier. [AWN 24.05.1917]

GEMMINGS (actually GEMMING) A returned soldier, Private T A C GEMMINGS, died at Kopu on Friday and was accredited a military funeral on Sunday. He left with the main body and was invalided home twelve months ago, having been shot through the lungs at Gallipoli. Three sons of Mr & Mrs GEMMINGS have given their lives for their country during the present war, the other two having been killed in action, while a fourth has been invalided to England. Two sons in law are also serving. [AWN 03.05.1917]

HASTINGS An excellent record of fighting sons is that held by Mrs Allan Hastings of Disraeli St, Mt Eden, formerly of Kihikihi. Two are at present on active service and one made the supreme sacrifice at Gallipoli. John and James left with the Main Body, James losing his life on 12 May 1915. John was severely wounded twice but is now back in the firing line. Robert is now on the way to the front. All men were previously farming at Kihikihi. [AWN 17.05.1917]

HASWELL Six sons of Mr W H Haswell of Auckland are serving in His Majesty’s forces. John HASWELL has been serving in the Royal Navy for the last 18 years. Trooper Harry HASWELL left NZ with the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force, fought through the Gallipoli campaign and is at present with the Auckland Mounted Rifles in Egypt. Sergeant William HASWELL went away with the earliest reinforcement draft and is now with the NZ Field Artillery in France. Corporal Drummond HASWELL also fought at Gallipoli and is now in the Auckland Mounted Rifles in Egypt. Trooper Tui HASWELL is also with the same corps and Bert HASWELL, the last male member of the household, is now on his way to the front. [AWN 03.05.1917]

HODDER The Hodder family of Seddon Rd, Remuera, stand out conspicuously amongst the young New Zealanders who are doing their share of the Empire’s work. It was recently reported that Cpl Charles HODDER, Auckland Mounted Rifles, was wounded on 19 April. This is the second time he has been struck down. He left with the Main Body and took part in the Gallipoli campaign. Trooper A S HODDER, 16th Lancers, a veteran of the Boer War, has been twice wounded. Rifleman A HODDER left with the Main Body in the Rifle Brigade and is still at the front. Private R HODDER has been away since June 1916. Gordon HODDER also enlisted for one of the reinforcement drafts and after spending five months in camp, was discharged medically unfit. [AWN 17.05.1917]

MILLAR Four sons in the Expeditionary Force and one now in training to qualify for active service is the splendid record of the family of Mr Charles Millar of Komata Paeroa. Allan, who is a member of the Rifle Brigade, was wounded on 30 April. He took part in the operations against Senusi on the Egyptian frontier and was later transferred to the western front. Harold, is in the Engineer Corps and Norman is in the Artillery, both being at the front. Godfrey, of the Machine-gun Corps, is now on the way to sphere of action. The grandfather of these soldiers, Mr W JOHNS of Parnell, took part in the Maori Wars. [AWN 24.05.1917]

PITKETHLEY Of the sons of Mrs J Pitkethley of Crummer Road, Ponsonby, two have suffered severely in battle and the third is now in the fighting ranks. Lawrence PITKETHLEY went away with the original Expeditionary Force, was wounded more than once and was on a hospital ship that was sunk by the enemy. He is now in an English hospital. Norman PITKETHLEY received a wound in the thigh and internal injuries. James PITKETHLEY is still at the front. [AWN 03.05.1917]

TREWHEELA Sergeant W Trewheela, who has been killed in action whilst fighting with the Australian Forces and whose name was transformed in telegraphing the official message which was published early last week in the ‘Treasure’, was the son of Mr S Trewheela of Lake Road, Takapuna, and one of four brothers who have been fighting for the Empire. The other three are in the NZEF. Cpl Joseph TREWHEELA has been reported wounded but his two brothers are still in the firing line. [AWN 24.05.1917]

JUNE 1917

HEIGHTON Rifleman H O (Billy) HEIGHTON, who has been slightly wounded and admitted to Walton Hospital, England, enlisted when he was b barely 17 years of age. He has been in the firing line in France for six months. He was educated at the Vermont Street school and the Sacred Heart College, Ponsonby, and he held the position of Sergeant Major in the College cadets. He represented Sacred Heart College in both cricket and football in 1913, 1914 and 1915. He was also a member of the Marist Brothers Old Boys’ Football Club. Rflm HEIGHTON, whose parents reside at 15 Newton Rd, belongs to a fighting family. Two brothers are now at the front in France and two more, and a half-brother, are shortly going into camp. [AWN 14.06.1917]

PENNELL The family of Mr John PENNELL of Thames Road, Paeroa, is represented in the fighting forces by four of his sons. Only a few days ago it was reported that one of the number, Private Harold E PENNELL, was wounded on 8 May. This young man has been in the thick of the fighting ever since the NZ Mounted Brigade first went into action and was wounded once before at Gallipoli. His brother James left NZ in the original body of the Rifle Brigade and is still in the trenches. Thomas PENNELL is a member of the Tunnelling Corps and has been wounded once but is again serving with his unit. The fourth member is Private George PENNELL who was in Australia when the war began, enlisting in an early contingent of the Commonwealth Field Forces with which he has fought at Gallipoli, Egypt and France. After the engagement at Pozieres he was reported missing but rejoined his comrades after 5 or 6 days absence. Mr Pennell also has five grandsons in the NZ forces, one of whom has been wounded while a sixth grandson is now in camp. A son in law was killed in the Somme advance. [AWN 14.06.1917]

JULY 1917

BISHOP The number of Auckland fighting families who have sent all their sons to the war is constantly increasing. The three sons of Mr J Bishop of Dun Egan, Titirangi, have all enlisted as volunteers. The eldest son, J BISHOP, who left NZ as a sergeant last year, received a commission in London after several months’ service in France and has returned to the Front. Sergeant T A BISHOP, the second son, after being detained on duty for some months in England, also recently went to France. The third and youngest son is Private W N C BISHOP, who is now in camp. The three brothers were educated at the Titirangi and Avondale schools and the Auckland Grammar School. Their grandfather, the late Mr J Bishop, fought in one of the Maori wars. [AWN 05.07.1917]

CROWHURST, Corporal Samuel A, Auckland Infantry, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is the son of Mr S G Crow Hurst of Rexburg St, Newmarket. He enlisted in the Auckland Infantry and left with an early reinforcement. He has been on active service since in Gallipoli and France. He comes of a fighting family. His brother, Corporal Victor R CROWHURST, who left in the same reinforcements, was wounded at Gallipoli and again in France and is now in the Brockenhurst Hospital. Another brother, Private Arthur CROWHURST, enlisted in the Rifle Brigade and succumbed to cerebro-meningitis while in camp. Two other brothers, Francis and Leslie, went into training camp last week. The Newmarket Borough Council at a meeting last night congratulated Mr & Mrs Crow Hurst upon the distinction conferred on their son and also upon the fine record of the family. [AWN 12.07.1917]

ELLIOTT, Rifleman Hugh, aged 39, killed in action, was the fifth son of the late Mr Samuel Elliott and Mrs Elliott, Opotiki. He attended the Opotiki school and in 1910 joined his brother John farming at Tamaki. The brothers then went to Rototuna near Hamilton farming. In 1916 he joined the Rifle Brigade. Two brother, William and George, are also members of the British forces, William being in South Africa and George in France. [AWN 05.07.1917]

FARRELL Five sons of Mr John Farrell, Dexter Ave, Mt Eden, all of whom enlisted voluntarily, are now at the front. A sixth son has just been called up but owing to weak health he may not be able to follow his brothers. One of Mrs Farrell’s sisters has three sons and another sister has tow sons on active service. [AWN 05.07.1917]

FOLEY The three sons of Mr T Foley, Eden Vale Road, have seen considerable service in the Expeditionary Force. Edmund FOLEY left in the main body of the Auckland Mounted Rifles, served on Gallipoli and through the Sinai campaign and has received his commission. The eldest son, W E FOLEY, left NZ in October 1915 in the Rifle Brigade. He saw service in Egypt, having been in the engagement on Christmas Day 1915 when the Sensual were routed. He has been in France since April 1916 and went through the whole Somme offensive without receiving a scratch. His wife has just received news that her husband has been wounded in both the upper and lower extremities. A younger brother, Jack, who left NZ with him, is still in France with the Artillery. [AWN 05.07.1917]

GIBSON Private Albert J B GIBSON, reported wounded, is the eldest son of Mr F R Gibson, late of Te Awamutu. He had been only a short time in France when he was wounded. His young brother, Noel P Gibson, sailed with the Main Body, and was present at the landing at Gallipoli but was lost at Hill 60 on 28 August 1915. Another brother, George W GIBSON, sailed with an early reinforcement drafts and after a few months in Egypt, was killed in action at Kantar on 9 August 1916. His youngest brother Fred is now on active service. The only brother of the family left is married. [AWN 05.07.1917]

HODDER Private Victor J HODDER, aged 25, killed in action, was born at Richmond, Surrey, England, and arrived in the Dominion in December 1913. He saw service at Gallipoli and on the evacuation was transferred to France. At the battle of the Somme he was wounded in the face, being invalided to England. On recovery he was again sent to the front. Private Hodder is one of four brothers of a Devonport family who have served in the present war and is the second to be killed. Another brother was severely wounded but is again in the trenches. [AWN 05.08.1917]

INGRAM Corporal Frank C INGRAM, killed in action at Messines, left with a reinforcement at the beginning of last year. After a short stay in Egypt he was drafted to France where he had been 14 months in the trenches. He was promoted corporal after the Somme offensive. Cpl Ingram, who was 26 years of age, was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs W H Ingram of Invercargill. His brother, Sergeant H INGRAM, had been fighting side by side with him in France and another brother, Sub Lieutenant W R INGRAM of Auckland, is serving with the RNVR. His sister, Mrs W McLEAN, is nursing at Lady Hammersmith’s Hospital in London and his brother in law, the Rev Walter McLEAN, late of the Somerville Memorial Church, Remuera, has been doing duty in France for nearly two years. [AWN 05.07.1917]

INNES-JONES Bugler Humphrey Irwin INNES-JONES, reported wounded in the Messines fight, is one of six sons of Mr Innes Jones of Kihikihi who have enlisted for active service. [AWN 19.07.1917]

KIRKWOOD, Private W J, reported severely wounded in the right arm, is one of four sons of Mrs J A Kirkwood, Turama Rd, Onehunga. Prior to enlistment he was employed on the Auckland tramways. Two brothers are with the Royal Motor Boat Patrol and three served with the Samoan Contingent. [AWN 19.07.1917]

LENNAN A splendid record of one family’s war service was disclosed when the Auckland Military Service Board reviewed the case of Paul LENNAN, dairyman, Waiwera. His mother, Mrs Dora LENNAN and Major WHITNEY supported the appeal for exemption on the ground of undue hardship, he being practically the sole support of his parents. Out of a family of 8 sons, one had been killed in action, three were now serving in France and one in Egypt. The sixth brother had been retained for home service and the seventh, who was married, had enlisted and been granted extension of time to complete some contracts. His father was 74 years old and unable to work, while his mother at 65 was in very poor health. They lived with appellant who was the youngest of the family and had recently married. Appellant was managing a farm for a neighbour so that the latter’s sons could enlist. Aided by his sister, he was at present milking 39 cows. With so many brothers away he considered he had to stay and look after his parents and maintain the farm. [AWN 26.07.1917]

McKENZIE, 2 Lieutenant F E, M.C., is the fifth son of Mr Kenneth McKenzie, Mangarimu, Feilding. He was previously employed in Jackson & Russell’s office in Auckland. He joined the Mounted Brigade and was wounded at Gallipoli and the Somme. He has a brother in France and George was killed at the Somme. The fourth son is now home on final leave. The eldest son served in the South African war. [AWN 19.07.1917]

MOIR Private David R MOIR, died of wounds, was the second son of Mr D Moir of Mangawai and was born in that township 31 years ago. His grandfather was an officer in the Imperial troops and took part in the Maori war. Pte Moir left NZ as an infantryman but at the time of his death was serving with the Ambulance Corps. Prior to his enlistment he was a farm manager. He was a keen hockey player. Two of his brothers are at the front, while one other enlisted, and after spending some time in camp, was discharged as unfit for service. [AWN 05.07.1917]

MOONEY J P MOONEY, who has been wounded, is the eldest son of Mr J Mooney, Inspector of Permanent Way, Railways, Hamilton. Before enlisting he was a railway guard. He is one of four brothers who have enlisted. His youngest brother, A MOONEY, was wounded in the Somme battle and is in England making a good recovery. His two other brothers, J MOONEY and J F MOONEY, are still in the firing line. [AWN 26.07.1917]

MOORE, Sergeant Charles Alexander, was severely wounded in the right leg and is now in Walton Hospital. He is the eldest son of Mr F A Moore, Alfriston, late of Onehunga. He left NZ as a Lance Corporal. He has three brothers in the Expeditionary Force, two still in France. Before enlisting he was a carpenter at Makatea. His wife and family reside at Onehunga. [AWN 19.07.1917]

ORR Rifleman Ernest ORR, killed in action on 7 June, and Lance Corporal Henry Wm ORR, killed in action 8 June, were two of the six soldier sons of Mr J W Orr of Kaitangiweka, Taumarunui. Rifleman Orr left NZ last year and had been on service in France and Belgium since last September. L/Cpl Orr left the Dominion as a member of the Rifle Brigade and saw service in the fighting against the Senusai in Western Egypt and since then on the western front. He took part in the Somme battle in September when he was wounded in the neck. He made a speedy recovery and had been with his unit ever since. The other brothers on active service are: Private Norman ORR, who was awarded the Military Medal for services in the Somme battle; Rifleman A L ORR, reported wounded on 8 June; Private Percy ORR and Trooper Lea ORR of the Australian Light Horse, now on active service in Palestine. [AWN 05.07.1917]

RAXWORTHY Sapper C H RAXWORTHY, who died of wounds, was on the postal staff of the GPO, Auckland, prior to his enlisting. Recently he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry during the Somme offensive. He is the second of five sons to give his life, while a third has been twice wounded and the other two are still on active service. Their father, Mr T Raxworthy, resides in Upper Riccarton, Christchurch. [AWN 05.07.1917]

REEVE, William Charles Leslie, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr E Reeve, Gate Pa, Tauranga. He was born and resided in Tauranga up until he enlisted. His grandfather fought in the Maori wars; his father, who left NZ with an earlier reinforcement, was invalided home last March and his uncle, Rifleman J F REEVE, was wounded on the same day, having previously been through the same battle. [AWN 19.07.1917]

SAVAGE Sergeant Charles SAVAGE, killed in action in France, was born at Thames 23 years ago. He went through the Gallipoli campaign uninjured and fought at the battle of the Somme. Three brothers also enlisted, one having returned wounded, the other two are still at the front. Prior to going overseas he was a Drill Instructor at Narrow Neck Camp. [AWN 12.07.1917]

SAVAGE A good record as a fighting family is that of the SAVAGE family of Tairua, Thames. Sergeant Charles SAVAGE who took part in the battle of the Somme, was killed in action in France on 21 June 1917 aged 24. While in Egypt he attended the School of Instruction and passed the examination. His brother Samuel enlisted in Australia and was twice wounded. Thomas, wounded at the landing at Gallipoli, returned to NZ. He afterwards again enlisted and is presently at the front. Valentine was also at the Gallipoli landing and was invalided home. [AWN 19.07.1917]

SCOTT Another family with a good record is that of Mr W Scott, First Avenue, Kingsland, whose eldest son Private John Oscar SCOTT, has been wounded and admitted to hospital. He left NZ with the First Cyclists’ Battn and after spending some time in Egypt was transferred to France. His brother William is at present in France and Edward, the younger brother, is in camp having enlisted directly he attained military age. [AWN 12.07.1917]

SEARLE Private Edwin, M.M., Auckland Infantry, is a native of Devonshire, England. He came to NZ on leaving school to join his uncle, Mr John Searle of Kaipaki, Cambridge. He left with the Mounted Rifles and transferred to the Infantry in Egypt and has been in France for the last eighteen months. He went through the Somme offensive, receiving only a slight wound and was mentioned in despatches. He is aged 20, the youngest of three brothers lately serving with the Colours. Frank, engineer on HMS Indefatigable, lost his life in the Jutland battle. Private Thomas SEARLE, was severely wounded in Palestine and is now in hospital in England. [AWN 12.07.1917]

SIMSON SIMSON, Private Charles M, who died of wounds on 4 July 1917, was the eldest son of Ian Simson, Te Aroha. He was aged 30 and was in farming at Te Aroha. The second son has been in France for fourteen months and the youngest son is in camp at Trentham. [AWN 19.07.1917]

THOMSON Three sons of Mr William Thomson of Gordonton have taken part in the war. His third son, Alexander McGregor THOMSON, was killed in action on 22 February. Private Thomson, who was born in Sydney 26 years ago, was educated at Pukekohe. He enlisted in the Mounted Rifles but owing to family affairs, he obtained leave from camp. A brother went through the Gallipoli campaign and returned with the loss of an eye. Another brother served through the Somme battle and is still on active service. Private Thomson for a long time was a Corporal in the 16th, Waikato, Regiment. [AWN 19.07.1917].

AUGUST 1917

BRICKELL The family of Mr Robert B Brickell of Morrison’s Bush, Greytown, has a fine record. Mr Brickell, who is a Maori War veteran, has four sons at the front. Of his sons, Ernest (Main Body), Paul (5th Reinforcements), Robert and William, all are in the fighting line with the exception of the latter, recently wounded in the shoulder. A grandson, Raymond BRICKELL, was wounded in the left knee and arm lately. Hugh left with the 6th Reinforcements. John and William BARR, and Robert and Joseph SMYTH, who left with various reinforcements, are nephews, while John CAMERON is a son in law who is on the battlefield. [AWN 16.08.1917]

FOY Private Joseph Michael FOY, who was reported missing on 21 February, is now reported to be dead and to have been buried by the Germans. He was the youngest son of Mr G M Foy of Summer St, Eden Terrace. Prior to enlisting in the 13th Reinforcements, he was in the railway service. He was a member of the St Benedict’s Club and was educated at the Thames Convent and Marist Brothers School, Auckland. Two other brothers have enlisted. One who was in the 19th Reinforcements, has been discharged through ill health. The other brother is in the 28th Reinforcements. [AWN 30.08.1917]

COWAN, Private James L, who has died of wounds, was 20 years of age and was educated t Hunua school. He took an active part in all sports in the district and was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Prior to enlisting he was manager of the Waikato Dairying Co’s cheese factory. Robert Cowan, a younger brother, who has been wounded, was 25 years of age, also was educated at the Hunua school. Mr Cowan, father of the two soldiers, who is 65 years of age, is managing his farm and has refused to appeal for exemption for any of his sons. He has three sons and twelve nephews at the front. They all volunteered for service. One son has been killed and one wounded, while three nephews have been killed and one wounded. Mr Cowan himself was a volunteer for a great number of years and his father saw service in the navy. [AWN 23.08.1917]

GILROY Private Neil GILROY, who was killed in action on 7 June, in his 22nd year, was the youngest of three brothers who have been serving in the war. His eldest brother, Private John GILROY, was wounded at the Somme in September last and has been invalided home. Private James GILROY, the fourth brother, enlisted in the Main Body of the Australian Forces and also was invalided home to Australia from Gallipoli. Private Neil GILROY, who was born at Coromandel, worked for some years in Auckland prior to enlistment in the 7th Reinforcements. His mother resides at 18 Rile St, Ponsonby. [AWN 30.08.1917]

JONES Four sons of Mrs M Jones, 38 George St, Rocky Nook, have enlisted, three being on active service and one on home service. Gunner Owen J JONES, has just been reported wounded; Private Charles JONES is still at the Front; and Corporal William JONES, who left with the Main Body was wounded at Gallipoli and invalided. [AWN 02.08.1917]

LYNCH Lieut Cecil Audrey Lynch, died of wounds, was the youngest of five brothers who have seen active service. He was educated at the Epsom school and Auckland Grammar School. On leaving school he entered the office of Carr Poultney & Co. He was on the clerical staff of Wingate & Co., Auckland, when he enlisted. He took a keen interest in all military matters and was lieutenant of the 32nd, Auckland, Company of cadets. He left NZ in November last as officer commanding the E Company of the 19th Reinforcements. He declined an offer of a position at Sling Camp, preferring to do his share on the field of battle. [AWN 16.08.1917]

MAISEY Four members of the family of Mr & Mrs Massey of Turango-o-Moana, Matamata, have earned an honourable place in the list of fighting families. The first to go to the front was N E MAISEY who left with the Main Body and made the supreme sacrifice at Gallipoli. Sgt Major T D MAISEY, who enlisted with the 3rd Reinforcements, was wounded at Gallipoli and was invalided home. He left again with the 12th draft and has been in France for several months. Trooper J M MAISEY, who left with the 6th Reinforce-ments, was wounded at El Irish and was in hospital for a month, after which he rejoined his comrades in Palestine. Trooper R J MAISEY joined the 25th draft this year. [AWN 23.08.1917]

MARSHALL Lieut A J MARSHALL, who is returning to NZ under orders from the NZ Government as expert in the manufacture of ammunition, is one of three brothers who voluntarily went to the front. He first served at the forts at Auckland on the outbreak of war and subsequently joined the fifth reinforcements with a brother. Lieut MARSHALL went to Egypt as lieutenant of the Howitzer ammunition column. He after-wards went to France where he was in the firing line until he was called to England to train for the special work of bullet making. He also is an electrician. The second brother, Gunner John L MARSHALL, who left with the same body, has been all through the late fighting at the front without a day’s sickness or mishap. Another brother, Private Thomas MARSHALL, left with the 17th Reinforcements and was quickly in the firing line. It was there that he contracted, owing to the excessive cold, a serious attack of pleurisy, necessitating his being taken to hospital. He is now progressing favourably. [AWN 16.08.1917]

MARTIN Three sons of Mr R B Martin, Queen’s Parade, Devonport, have gone on active service with the NZEF. The second son, Gunner Leonard MARTIN, was reported died of wounds on 12 July. He was 33 years of age and left with one of the early reinforcements. He was born in Auckland and educated at Newton West and Church Street State schools. Two brothers are attached to the artillery branch. [AWN 16.08.1917]

McFARLAND Private Daniel James McFARLAND, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr McFarland of Papakura. He was born in Auckland and educated at the Remuera school. He served in the Kitcheners Fighting Scouts in the South African War. Previous to enlisting, he was employed in the King Country. Two of his brothers are at the front. [AWN 02.08.1917]

STILL Mrs J Still of Queen St, Hamilton, has the proud record of having six sons in the NZ Forces at the front, all of whom volunteered whilst residing in Wellington. Their names, in order of enlistment, are: Corporal Amos E STILL Corporal Richard W STILL Private Archibald E STILL Gunner R E STILL Private Leslie J STILL Private John H STILL Amos is at present sick in hospital, being the first of the six to be laid aside. Both he and his brother Richard went through the Somme battle. The latter won his two stripes in France. [AWN 16.08.1917]

WECK Five sons of Mrs A L C Wick, Puhoi, have established a good record as a fighting family. Trooper J T TURNWALD, 11th Reinforcements, who was a railway porter for several years, has died of wounds. Private B J TURNWALD, 7th Reinforcements, and Private T TURNWALD of the Rifle Brigade, have both been gassed and wounded, and Private L TURNWALD, 8th Reinforcements, has been wounded. Trooper Joseph TURNWALD enlisted in the Australian Forces some two years ago and is believed to be still fighting. All five enlisted voluntarily. [AWN 30.08.1917]

SEPTEMBER 1917

Private John N CORLETT, who was admitted to Walton on Thames Hospital on 16 August, is reported to be seriously ill. He left with the Main Body, was invalided home from Egypt in 1915 and returned to the Front with the 7th Reinforcements. He came through the Messines battle unscathed and was subsequently in the first line trenches before he became ill. Four of the CORLETT brothers have served at the Front. Corporal Alfred S CORLETT died of wounds received at Gallipoli; Harold P CORLETT went from Auckland with the 9th Reinforcement is still serving; Herbert, the eldest brother, is attached to the Divisional Ammunition Column, British Expeditionary Forces. Pte Corlett is a brother of Mrs G M RIMBLOTT of Albert Rd, Devonport, and prior to enlisting was employed by the Auckland Harbour Board. [AWN 06.09.1917]

DIGNAN Corporal F P J DIGNAN, who has received a severe gunshot wound, is now at Brockenhurst Hospital, England. He is the second son of Mrs A M Dignan, Church St, Epsom. He is an Aucklander and was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and was on the staff of the Bank of NZ. He subsequently took up engineering and when he enlisted in the Divisional Signal Corps, he was Manager of the Paeroa Gas Works. Two brothers, Gunner Walter DIGNAN of the 7th Reinforcements, and Sergeant G Dignan of the Australian Forces, are now serving in France. [AWN 06.09.1917]

GODSELL Two sons of the late Mr John GODSELL of the Waikato District have been killed in action and another has been wounded. Private Amos William GODSELL, who was killed at Messines on 7 June was educated at one of the Roman Catholic convent schools and the Onehunga High School. He went to Samoa with the Advance Guard and 8 months later returned to NZ and left again with the 17th Reinforcements. He was killed by shrapnel whilst carrying ammunition to the front lines, death being instantaneous. He was aged 20 and resided for some time in Wellington where he identified himself with ever4y RC movement. Private John Amos GODSELL, who also left with the 17th Reinforcements, Was killed in action at Flanders on 15 August, aged 24. Another brother, James Richmond GODSELL, who is doing duty in Palestine has been wounded. [AWN 06.09.1917]

GRAHAM An unusually fine record of surrender in the war interests can be claimed on behalf of the family of the late Thomas GRAHAM who was well known in Clinton whose 7 sons are with the Ex Force. Taking those sons in order of seniority – Thomas is in camp with the 33rd Reinforcements; Alex is away with the 23rd; Frank enlisted in the 4th; Peter is in the 28th; William is in the 31st; and Robert is in the 29th. [AWN 20.09.1917]

McLEOD Alexander McLEOD, reported died of wounds on 17 August, left with the 11th Reinforcements. His father, William McLeod, late of Taheke, Hokianga but now residing at Buxton St, Point Chevalier, has two other sons on active service. [AWN 06.09.1917]

MILLER Mrs A Miller, Argyle St, Morningside, is the mother of three sons now on active service. The eldest son, Harold, saw service in Egypt and was wounded in the leg at the Somme. He spent six months in hospital in England and is now back in France. Her second son Francis was wounded in the eyes on 1 August and is now at Walton on Thames Hospital, England. Her third son is a signaller in the Australian Forces in France. Her fourth son is to leave for camp shortly. [AWN 06.09.1917]

ORR Private Norman ORR, severely wounded on 21 July, is the fourth son of J W Orr, Kaitangaweka, King Country. He left with the 8th Reinforcements and has been serving with the headquarters staff of the 2nd, Wellington, Battalion. He was awarded the Military Medal for carrying despatches at the battle of the Somme, going through the German barrage five times in the course of one afternoon, without receiving in injury. The ORR family has a splendid record of military service. No fewer than six sons have gone on active service, while a seventh volunteered but was rejected. Rifleman E ORR and Lance Corporal H W ORR were killed, Rifleman A L ORR was wounded at Messines. [AWN 06.09.1917]

STANAWAY Private Alfred STANAWAY, previously reported missing, now reported wounded in the left hand and knee and is a prisoner of war in Lambert Allah, Germany, was employed by the Auckland Racing Club prior to enlisting. He had also served in the South African War. His brother, L/Cpl Charles STANAWAY, died of wound at the Somme. There is also another brother on active service. All three are married. [AWN 06.09.1917]

OCTOBER 1917

BISHOP Lieutenant J J BISHOP, who has been killed in action, was the eldest of the three sons of Mr J J Bishop of Dunvegan, Titirangi, all of whom went on active service. Lt Bishop, who was a teacher in the employ of the Auckland Education Board, was educated at the Titirangi and Avondale schools and went through a two year course at the Auckland Training College. He was in charge of the Kaitaia school prior to his enlistment. He left as a sergeant in the Rifle Brigade in the 13th Reinforcements in 1916. He went to France from England as a private and obtained some of his first experiences of the firing line as a member of a Lewis machine-gun section. He subsequently was promoted on the field and on obtaining his commission was attached to the Otago Infantry Battalion. He was 24 years of age. Sgt T A BISHOP, the second son, who left with the 12th Reinforcements, is now serving on the western front. The third and youngest son, Private W N C BISHOP, enlisted on attaining his 20th birthday and left with the 28th Reinforcements. [AWN 25.10.1917]

BLUCHER An excellent record in the service of their country is that of the family of Mr G E Blucher of 64 Beresford St, all of whose sons, six in number, have left on active service as volunteers. Cable advice has just been received that the third son, Sergeant C T BLUCHER has been killed in action in France. He was 32 years of age and left with the 7th Reinforcements. He had been in France for the past two years, during which he had only had 10 days leave. The other sons are Gunners A W & A J BLUCHER, who left with the Machine-gun Corps attached to the 21st Reinforcements and are now in France; Gunner C F E BLUCHER, attached to the Army Service Corps of the 18th Reinforcements, who is also in France; Private D F BLUCHER, who left with the 7th Reinforcements and was wounded in France over a year ago and is still in hospital in England; and Company Sergeant Major A M BLUCHER who, at the age of 19 enlisted in the second reinforcements and after seeing service on Gallipoli was invalided to England. He afterwards left with the NZ Division for France, where he was wounded in February last. After spending some time in hospital he was attached to the Headquarters Staff in England. [AWN 18.10.1917]

BOSCAWEN Captain H T BOSCAWEN, who is reported to have been killed in action, was the eldest son of Colonel Hugh BOSCAWEN, of Mt Eden. Captain Boscawen, who formerly was a Lieutenant and Acting-Captain in the Franklin Mounted Rifles, saw service in the Boer War. He left NZ as a private with the Main Body three years ago. He has served both in Gallipoli and in France and advanced to the rank of captain by various promotions in the field. He had just spent a holiday in England with his relatives. Captain Boscawen, who was 37 years of age, was well known in the Waikato and King Country, he having been the first manager of the Te Kuiti Co-operative Dairy Co’s factory. He leaves a wife and child, his widow being the eldest daughter of Mr R CROWE, secretary to the Auckland Education Board. Colonel Boscawen’s two other sons also are on active service. Lieut Spencer BOSCAWEN, who is in the artillery, likewise left as a private with the Main Body. The youngest son, Lieut Edward BOSCAWEN, is at present serving with the NZ Division of the Camel Corps in Egypt. Captain Boscawen and his brother Spencer were mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches about two months ago. Colonel Boscawen’s only unmarried daughter, Sister Dorothy BOSCAWEN, is now on the nursing staff of one of the military hospitals in England. A son in law, Major SKIPP-MATTHEWS, and two of his sons, are serving in the Canadian Forces. Colonel Boscawen himself was previously an officer in the British Navy and he took an active part in the volunteer movement in its earlier days. [AWN 18.10.1917

FERGUSON, Rifleman Charles Costello, has been awarded the Military Medal. He is the eldest son of the late Herbert Ferguson, one time Officer in Charge of the Labour Dept, Auckland. He was severely gassed at Messines while attending to wounded under heavy fire. Three nephews are in the firing line and one in camp. His brother in law, Cpl E A Le CREN was killed last year on the Somme. Mrs Ferguson resides in Chamberlin St, Grey Lynn. [AWN 04.10.1917]

HORSCROFT Private C A HORSCROFT, reported killed on 4 October, is the youngest son of Mr C Horscroft, Church St, Onehunga. He volunteered for service and left with the 20th Reinforcements. He was educated at the Mangere Bridge school. He was interested in cycling and won several race. He was a letter carrier at Onehunga. Two brothers are at the front, one in Egypt and one on the western front. [AWN 25.10.1917]

JACKA, Sergeant Major T Selwyn, who has been killed in action, was one of three sons of Mr T S Jacka, manager of the Auckland branch of the Norwich Union Ins. Co., who have left on active service. Sgt Major Jacka left NZ with the Main Body exactly three years ago. Prior to leaving for the front he was engaged in farming pursuits. His two brothers with the forces are Sergeant F C JACKA, who left with the 8th Reinforcements, and Corporal H W JACKA, who left with the 28th Reinforcements. [AWN 18.10.1917]

MAHONEY Several members of the family of the late Mr Patrick MAHONEY of Mercer have been on active service during the war. Private Frank MERCER, DCM, who was reported wounded and missing on 21 August, left NZ with the 5th, Wellington, Battalion took part in the Suvla Bay attack on Gallipoli. During the fighting on the peninsula he assisted Captain GRAINEY of the Wiltshire Regt in rescuing some soldiers who had been cut off from the main body. This task was accomplished under heavy Turkish machine-gun fire and at considerable risk. For this heroic action he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He subsequently returned to NZ but left again with the 14th Reinforcements. He was born and educated at Mercer and was successively at Auckland and Raetihi in the employ of the Railway and Public Works Depts respectively. His elder brother, Private John MAHONEY, is a member of the 22nd Reinforcements. Another brother, Leonard MAHONEY, who had served in the South African War, was in hospital with an attack of fever when the last news was heard of him. Private A G WEBSTER, a half-brother, is with the 21st Reinforcements. [AWN 11.10.1917]

MORPETH Lieutenant Allen MORPETH, who is reported missing and believed killed, is the eldest son of H D Morpeth, Town Clerk, Waihi, one of six brothers who have joined the forces. He is an engineer and was engaged on various Government work schemes in the north and south islands. The second son, Moore MORPETH, was killed at the Gallipoli landing; Niccol, who was wounded in France, was awarded the Military Cross, lost a leg and was invalided back to NZ; Gerald MORPETH, was wounded at Gallipoli and shot through the knee in the Somme battle. He was sent to England where he found himself incapacitated for service with the Infantry, staying for a commission in the British Royal Artillery. Sgt Major George D MORPETH and Corporal Sloan MORPETH, are at present in Waihi on their final leave. [AWN 18.10.1917]

REID, Private Robert Alexander, who is reported to have died of wounds in a French hospital on 6 October, was the second son of Mr A S Reid of Herbert St, Mt Eden. He was an old Grammar School boy and prior to enlisting was engaged with his two brothers in farming at Karaka. The three brothers all went on active service. Lieutenant Alfred S REID went with the 22nd Reinforcements. He was wounded on 5 October and now is in hospital. Private L H REID went away with the 4th Reinforcements and was wounded at Gallipoli. He has since been twice wounded in France and has been invalided home. The late Private R A REID enlisted in the 17th Reinforcements. The three brothers were all with the same regiment in France at the battle of Messines. [AWN 18.10.1917]

SCOTT The family represented by Lieut Victor R S SCOTT, who was killed in action on 4 October, has now lost three sons in the service of the Empire. Private R H C SCOTT who was farming at Ngarua with Lt Scott before the war, was killed in action on 15 September 1916 and another brother, Private R H G SCOTT, lost his life on the same day. One member of the family, Private C A S SCOTT, is still on active service. Lt Scott who was the son of Mr W S Scott of Hikutaia, himself a veteran of the Maori wars, was interested in military matters for some years prior to the war, as a member of the Piako Mounted Rifles. [AWN 25.10.1917]

YOUNG, 2nd Lieutenant E H, wounded, son of Mrs W S Young, Otakeho, Taranaki. Before he enlisted he was employed by Hesketh & Richmond, solicitors, Auckland. He has served with the NZ forces since they landed in France and went through the Somme battle unscathed. At the end of last April, then L/Cpl Young was sent to England and after five weeks study, passed and was granted a commission. He went back to Divisional Base on 12 July. Sergeant Major O M YOUNG, who died of wounds at Flers last October and Sergeant Vivian YOUNG, who is now probably in France, left with later reinforcements. A J & J E YOUNG have volunteered for service. [AWN 25.10.1917]

NOVEMBER 1917

CODLIN Leonard C CODLIN, a farm hand of Waiuku, has three brothers at the front, another on a transport and the fifth was to go into camp shortly. Also a brother in law who is on active service. [AWN 29.11.1917]

KINDBERG The family of Mrs M Kindberg of Vogeltown, New Plymouth, have a fine record. Six sons have seen service on Gallipoli or on the western front. Private Gus (4th Reinforcements) was wounded in the right thigh at Gallipoli and right hip at the Somme. Private Andrew (13th Reinforcements) was wounded in the foot at Messines; Private Robert (11th Reinforcements) returned some time ago having received gunshot wounds in the chest, penetrating the lungs at the Some. Edward (20th Reinforcements) has been ordered back owing to ill health. Two others are at the front, whilst a seventh goes into camp on 9 January. This fine record was laid before the Minister of Defence at the Soldiers’ Club on his visit to New Plymouth and he expressed the opinion that Mrs Kindberg’s family were deserving of congratulation for the part they had played. [AWN 15.11.1917]

McNICKLE, Rifleman George, aged 23, who has been severely wounded, is the second son of Mr McNickle of Hamilton. He left NZ with the 25th Reinforcements. His three brothers have enlisted voluntarily – Private Moses McNICKLE, the eldest brother, 7th Reinforcements, was killed in action at the Somme; Private John McNICKLE, the third son, 21st Reinforcements, was slightly wounded in the back and returned to duty; James, who has just come of military age leaves for camp this month. [AWN 15.11.1917]

NANKERVIS Private William H Nankervis, reported killed in action on 22 October, was the third son of Mrs H C Nankervis, Elgin St, Grey Lynn. He left with the 17th Reinforcements and had seen considerable service when he was awarded the Military Medal. He left a widow and three young children who reside in Union St, Auckland. His two younger brothers have been wounded and are now in England. [AWN 22.11.1917]

NICKLIN Private A NICKLIN, of the 9th Reinforcements, who was killed in action on 4 October, was one of four sons of Mr A Nicklin of Putaruru who have been in the firing-line. Gunner L M NICKLIN, who enlisted with the Main Body was wounded at the Somme. Private Edgar NICKLIN, who left with the 19th Reinforcements, and Corporal H NICKLIN of the Royal Warwickshire Regt, are the two other brothers. The four soldiers were born at Walsall, Staffordshire, England. [AWN 15.11.1917]

PATTON Rifleman William Charles PATTON, killed in action, was a son of Mr John Patton of Pip Pio. He was born in Upper Tairua, Thames. He enlisted at the Thames in 1915 and proceeded to Egypt with the 3rd Battalion of the Rifle Brigade early in 1916. He was 28 years of age. On the day previous to his death, his brother in law Private J D MICHIE of the Machine-gun Section, of the Auckland Infantry Regt, was killed. A brother Private Cuthbert H PATTON of the Lewis Gun Section, was wounded in the Somme advance. He returned to the Dominion last August and is at present an inmate of King George’s Hospital, Rotorua. Another brother, Terence F P PATTON, has just reached military age and enlisted. [AWN 15.11.1917]

ROLLETT A cablegram has been received stating that Dereck Carr ROLLETT was wounded and gassed in France on 16 October. Owing to some mistake this name appeared in the casualty lists as D CARR. A later cablegram states that he is progressing satisfactorily. He is the youngest son of Mr Wm Carr Rollett of Matamuku Downs, Tokoroa and joined the 22nd Specialist Corps but transferred to the infantry. Mr Rollett’s eldest son Ray was killed at Gallipoli. The third son Norman, who was also in the NZ Expeditionary Forces, is in an English hospital recovering from an attack of pneumonia. [AWN 15.11.1917]

SANDERSON Private Benjamin SANDERSON, killed in action in France on 23 October, was the fourth son of Mrs E and the late Benjamin Sanderson, Okupu, Great Barrier. He is one of four brothers who volunteered for active service. [AWN 22.11.1917]

DECEMBER 1917

BIRNIE The record of the household of Mr John Birnie of Maurice Ave, Remuera, in service to the Empire, is one which is not often exceeded in any part of the Dominion. Mr Birnie, who is an ex major of NZ volunteers and has been an officer of the National Reserve in Auckland, has had six sons in the Expeditionary Force, three of whom had laid down their lives, while three are still on service. Battery Sergeant Major Robert BIRNIE, D.C.M., who was killed at the Somme at the age of 27, was prior to enlistment on the staff of the Provident Life Ass. Co., and was a member of A Battery. As a member of the Main Body he saw service at Gallipoli from April 1915 till the evacuation and was mentioned in despatches, also being awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Sergeant Charles BIRNIE who also has made the great sacrifice, served for five months at an Auckland fort and then joined artillery reinforcements that left NZ in April 1915. In Egypt he was transferred to the Motor Transport Corps. Contracting enteric fever, he was invalided home but returned to active service in February last. He was wounded in Flanders on 31 July, succumbing on 26 August. He was 24 years of age. Trooper Arthur BIRNIE, who was on Messrs P Hayman & Co’s staff, left NZ in July 1916 and has fought in the mounted brigade in Palestine. He died of wounds on November 14 at the age of 21. Sergeant William BIRNIE of the 7th Battery, N ZFA, who is well known in North Auckland as a bridge builder for the Public Works Dept but in April 1914, when he enlisted, he was on the staff of Messrs Brown Bros & Geddes of Auckland. He was captain of the City Second football team, who won their caps in 1914. He enrolled in the Waikato Mounted Rifles but in Egypt was transferred to a machine-gun section. At Gallipoli he sustained shell shock and was invalided to England. Returned to Egypt he joined the Field Artillery with which he went on to France. He was wounded at the Somme in 1916, took part in the Messines battle and when last heard from, in August, had just been ordered to England on duty. Quartermaster Sergeant John BIRNIE, another artilleryman, also has been in the war from its commencement and has served in Egypt, Gallipoli and in France, where he still is. Lieutenant George BIRNIE, known in Auckland as an officer of the Post & Telegraph Engineers, is attached to a reinforcement still at Trentham. Driver Gordon BIRNIE, the member of the family still in Auckland, is doing local service in the A Battery. [AWN 06.12.1917]

CARTER, Sergeant A C, killed in action in Palestine on 14 November, was the second son of Mr F R Carter, Otorohanga. Before enlistment he was working on his father’s farm. He belonged to the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles. He left with the Main Body to Gallipoli and came out without a scratch. Up to the time of his death he had been through all engagements against the Turks in Egypt. His brother, Sgt W R Carter, was twice wounded at Gallipoli and returned to NZ. Two other brothers were wounded – Sgt H G CARTER at Messines, and Sgt H W CARTER, when in the advance about a month ago. [AWN 13.12.1917]

SPEAKMAN Private J B SPEAKMAN, aged 21, youngest son of Mr W H Speakman of Mt Albert, who has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, was born in Auckland and educated at the Grafton school. He was a sergeant in the territorials before e enlisted in the 17th Reinforcements. He is a motor mechanic and is well known as a cyclist. His brothers Charles and S H SPEAKMAN, both went to the front in the Australian force and both have been wounded and invalided back to Australia. Another, Veterinary Sergeant F SPEAKMAN, who enlisted in the Red Cross section of the 10th Reinforcements, is now serving on the western front. [AWN 20.12.1917]

JANUARY 1918

ANGEL, Lance Corporal Edmund, Ponsonby, late of Matakohe, who died of wounds on 29 December 1917, was the youngest son of Mr W A Angel, 203 Ponsonby Road. He left with the 3rd Reinforcements when not 15 years of age and was wounded at Gallipoli. He was invalided to England and upon recovery went to France early in 1916. He had been on active service on the Western Front for over 18 months when he received the wound that caused his death. His brothers William and Richard also left with the 3rd Reinforcements, the former returning wounded in May 1916. Richard, who was promoted to Sergeant at Gallipoli, went to France after the evacuation of the Peninsula and was awarded the Military Medal. He returned to NZ last April and received his commission. He left again for the front with a recent Maori Contingent. [AWN 31.01.1918]

STILL A fine military record is being made by the family of Mr & Mrs J H STILL of Petone. Eight sons have enlisted voluntarily. The eldest, Private J H STILL, was killed in action on 14 December last. Five of his brothers are still fighting and two more are going into camp early next months. [AWN 17.01.1918]

FEBRUARY 1918

BARNARD News has been received of the death in action of Rifleman Charles V BARNARD, who was one of a family of fighting men. Six of the eight brothers composing the family have been or are on active service and the head of the family, Mr H J Barnard, is employed in the Defence Dept in Wellington. Of the brothers, two have been killed, two invalided home severely wounded, and two are still fighting. The late Rfm Barnard was just 21 years of age at the time of his death. He had been on active service for 2 years 2 months. [AWN 14.02.1918]

COOKE A recent list of New Zealanders killed in action, included the name of E Claude COOKE, son of Mr H G Cooke of Whangarei. Deceased was educated at the Maungakaramea school and afterwards went to the Commercial College in Auckland, of which Mr Tharle Giles was then principal. From there Mr Cooke went to St John’s College, Tamaki, where he was trained for the ministry. Later he was curate at St Albans Church and subsequently occupied a similar position at St Mary’s, New Plymouth. Mr Cooke, who enlisted with the Medical Corps, was killed on 18 January. His youngest brother Austin was killed early in the war. Two other brothers are now on active service and a fifth will go into camp shortly. [AWN 07.02.1918]

EYTON – A creditable military record is that of the four sons of Mr & Mrs Jeyton of Matakana, Rodney. The eldest son, William, left with the 9th Reinforcements and is attached to the 3rd Battalion of the Rifle Brigade. The second son, George, also left with the 9th Reinforcements and is with the Army Service Corps. The third son, Arthur, left with the 20th Reinforcements and is now in Palestine with the mounted machine-gun section. The last remaining son, Herbert, who is only 19, volunteered and left for camp a fortnight ago. [AWN 07.02.1918]

FISH Private Arthur G FISH, reported died of wounds on 1 February, was the son of Mr J H Fish, Grange Road, Mt Eden. Before joining the 16th, Waikato, Regt he was working on the roads in the Te Kuiti district and at the outbreak of war he walked 50 miles to enlist. He left with the Main Body and served on Gallipoli before going to France. A brother, Private S H FISH, is in the 14th Reinforcements, now on the Western Front. Another brother, Private T C FISH, has just been drafted from C1 Camp to the 37th Reinforcements. The remaining eligible brother is to enter C1 camp this month. [AWN 14.02.1918]

HUGHES Another Marlborough record is that of the family of Mr James Hughes of Conrass, Canvastown. His four sons have all gone into khaki and one of them has given his life for the cause. The first to enlist was Corporal Robert F A HUGHES, the third son, who went away with the Main Body and was killed on Gallipoli on 8 May 1915. The second boy, Private J H Y HUGHES, left with the 4th Reinforcements. He went through the Suvla fighting and went on to France with the NZ troops. There he has seen much service, including the heavy fighting of last October. Private F A HUGHES, the youngest son, was a member of the 22nd Reinforcements. He was wounded in the face and right arm on 29 December. Latest advices stated that he was transferred from France to the 2nd London General Hospital on 6 January. Although a married man with three children, Private T A F HUGHES, the eldest son, soon followed his youngest brother. He was wounded and badly gassed on 12 October and is now convalescent. Corporal A Morris JONES, who recently returned invalided, is a cousin of the Hughes boys. He was shot in the elbow and is now undergoing treatment at Rotorua. [AWN 07.02.1918]

Private John H NEWDICK, killed in action on 5 November, was a son of Mrs P Newdick of Great North Rd, Grey Lynn. He enlisted in the Machine-gun Corps and left with the Main Body. He served throughout the Gallipoli campaign, only being slightly wounded. He spent some time in England before going to France. When killed he was serving with the Artillery in Belgium. His brother, Corporal Alf. NEWDICK, is now serving in France, whilst another brother, Roy NEWDICK, enlisted in the 34th Reinforcements on attaining military age. [AWN 07.02.1918] ROGERS The four sons of Mr & Mrs Charles Rogers of Maketu, Bay of Plenty, have enlisted for active service. The eldest, Augustus, left with the First Maori Contingent and served at Gallipoli and in France. He was awarded the Military Medal. Fred left with the First Australian Expeditionary Force, was wounded at Gallipoli, then went to France where he was again wounded. He was admitted to hospital for a third time, having been gassed severely. Robert went with the 17th Maori Reinforcements, was wounded at the Somme and is now back at the front again. ‘Kuku’ ROGERS is now in camp. [AWN 14.031918]

STAYTE Sergeant Ernest Oliver STAYTE, killed in action, was the fourth son of Mrs E Stayte of Pukekohe and was 31 years of age. He left NZ in October 1915 as a private in the Rifle Brigade, being promoted on the field. He was wounded at the Somme and was gassed at Messines. He was educated at the Waiokaraka school, Thames, and served his apprenticeship to the wire-weaving with Messrs Eastway Bros., Auckland. His three brothers are still with the colours, the youngest Sydney being in Walton on Thames Hospital suffering from lung trouble. Sgt Stayte was a keen footballer. [AWN 07.02.1918]

WOOLLEY A Marlborough family that may well be entitled to adopt as the motto of their house the words ‘Pro Patria’, is that of the late Mr Frank Woolley of Para, Marlborough. The family consists of seven sons and two daughters. Private E A WOOLLEY of the 3rd Reinforcements was wounded and returned to NZ. He is still in hospital. Rifleman L S WOOLLEY is in a unit of the NZ Rifle Brigade. Private W F WOOLLEY left with the 13th Reinforcements and has been wounded and gassed. Private D D WOOLLEY was also with the 13th Reinforcements and has been wounded. Private A S WOOLLEY, also wounded, left with the 16th Reinforcements. Private S WOOLLEY left with the 33rd Reinforcements. The seventh son volunteered for service and was very disappointed on being rejected. Mrs Woolley died some 14 years ago and the father followed her just recently. [AWN 07.02.1918]

WORLEY Lieutenant R P WORLEY, has been promoted to the position of Intelligence Officer to a NZ Battalion in France. His younger brother Lieut Rupert WORLEY, MC, is acting Director of Railways on the same front. Another brother Lieut C P WORLEY, returned to NZ last year after long service in France and has been invalided out of the Expeditionary Force. He is now on the staff of the Wanganui Collegiate School. [AWN 14.03.1918]

MARCH 1918

DRUMMOND The family of Mr Robert Drummond of Hukatere near Matakohe has to its credit a fine record of service in the present war. Two of his sons have made the supreme sacrifice and two others are now serving with the forces. Corporal Alfred E DRUMMOND left with the 6th Reinforcements as a private and saw service on Gallipoli and in France. He was killed in action on 4 October, 1917. He was aged 36. Private Walter DRUMMOND was a member of the 8th Reinforcements. He was killed in action in France on 26 September 1916. He was 23 years of age. Private Charles DRUMMOND, aged 30, was a member of the 7th Reinforcements. In France he joined the ‘bombers’ and was wounded in the leg by the accidental explosion of a bomb, the limb subsequently having to be amputated. He is expected to return to NZ shortly. Private Arthur DRUMMOND of the 17th Reinforcements is now in France. He is at present a member of the Machine-gun Corps. He is 25 years of age. [AWN 28.03.1918]

LUPTON A good record of service in the war’s cause, is to the credit of the family of Mr C H Lupton of Takanini. All five sons volunteered although two were not accepted. Private Albert LUPTON, the eldest son, returned to NZ last week. Accompanied by a younger brother, Private Henry LUPTON, he left with the 17th Reinforcements. He was severely wounded in the head on 4 July last year, so severely in fact that for a long time no hope was given for his recovery. The fifth and youngest son, Trooper Fred. LUPTON, on attaining his 20th birthday, enlisted and is now in training camp. The sons who were rejected are Alfred of Frankton, and Chris of Takanini. [AWN 21.03.1918]

MAYELL The Mayell family of Remuera. One brother was killed in November 1916, one has been on active service for two years, one left with the 22nd Reinforcements and the fourth brother, Richard W MAYELL has volunteered. [AWN 07.03.1918]

READ Private Claude Raymond READ, reported died of meningitis at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, on 26 February, is the youngest son of Mr & Mrs H Read, Pencarrow Ave, Mt Eden. He left with the 19th Reinforcements, Auckland Infantry. His elder brother, Lieutenant L W READ, was killed in action on 9 December 1916 after over two years active service at Gallipoli and the western front. His eldest and only surviving brother, Sergeant G L READ, left with the 20th Reinforcements and is still in France. Prior to enlisting, Private Read was on the Auckland staff of the Royal Insurance Co. [AWN 28.03.1918]

ROBINSON, Corporal Lawrence, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is one of four sons of Mr & Mrs Alfred ROBINSON of Grey St, Palmerston North. He left NZ with the 3rd Reinforcements but unfortunately stricken with sunstroke, followed by enteric fever whilst in Egypt and was invalided home but went back again with the 10th Reinforcements and was transferred to France where he was wounded on the third day of the Somme battle. He is now on service again in France. His brother Charles, who was invalided home in December 1916, has been in the Rotorua Sanatorium and Auckland Hospital ever since. He left with the Main Body. Private A J ROBINSON, 10th Reinforcements, was killed in action in France last August. Private Albert W ROBINSON, 28th Reinforcements, is now on active service in France and another brother will soon be of military age. [AWN 28.03.1918]

APRIL 1918

COURTNEY Mr Thomas Courtney of Epsom Avenue, has received advice that his brother, Private William COURTNEY, was wounded in France on 29 March. Pte Courtney, who left NZ with the 15th Reinforcements, is the seventh son of the late Mr Henry Courtney, of County Antrim, Ireland, and is one of five brothers now on active service. One of his brothers was wounded in Palestine. [AWN 18.04.1918]

DELANEY Another good record of service is that of the family of Mr Hugh Delaney of Tyrone, Matamata. His second son Private Albert H DELANEY, who was wounded on 3 March 1918 for the third time, left with the 7th Reinforcements. Another son, Sergeant Arthur DELANEY, has been killed and the third, Norman, was so severely wounded he was invalided home. [AWN 25.04.1918]

FOSTER A good record of service for the Empire is that of the family of the late Mr John Foster of Coromandel. Four brothers have borne arms, two of them paying the supreme sacrifice. The eldest of the four, Private Thomas FOSTER, was 30 years of age and prior to enlisting was engaged in farming. He was well known in the Hokianga and Thames districts. Henry Martin FOSTER was killed in action on 21 June 1917. James FOSTER is still serving with the mounted forces in Egypt and Kunney FOSTER was invalided home about 12 months ago. [AWN 11.04.1918]

GODLEY, Lance Corporal W Percival, who died of sickness in France on 3 April, was 29 years of age. He was a son of Mrs Godley of New Lyn. Educated in England, he came to NZ 15 years ago and, prior to enlisting in the 25th Reinforcements, was an orchardist at Oratia, New Lynn. The deceased was the youngest of Mrs Godley’s three sons who volunteered. The eldest, Lance Corporal Rupert GODLEY, went away with the 6th Reinforcements and returned last year wounded and suffering from shell-shock. The second son, Frank, went away with the 13th Reinforcements and is still on active service in France. [AWN 18.04.1918]

HALLY Sacrifice for the cause of the Empire has been made to a marked degree by the family of Mr James HALLY of Cambridge, two of his sons having been killed and a third wounded. The youngest son Lieut Col HALLY, M.C., aged 25, of the Machine-gun Corps, was killed in action on 6 April. He was a solicitor practicing at Morrinsville. He left NZ in May 1916 with the 13th Reinforcements. Over a year ago he was awarded the Military Cross for leading a successful raid on the enemy trenches. His brother died of wounds at Gallipoli and his other brother, who was wounded, has been invalided home. [AWN 25.04.1918]

MOORE A fine record of service for the Empire is that of the family of Mr F A Moore of Alfriston, whose four sons are in the NZEF. Lance Corporal F N MOORE, the second son, has been reported wounded. He left NZ with the 19th Reinforcements. Kenneth, who also left with the 19th Reinforcements, received the Military Medal for gallant service at the battle of Messines. The eldest son saw service on Gallipoli and was wounded at Messines. He is at present in England. The fourth brother is serving with the Wireless Corps. [AWN 18.04.1918]

TERRY Another good record of service is that of the family of Mrs W Terry of Frankton Junction. The eldest son, Private John McL TERRY, who died of wounds in France, was born and educated in Dunedin. He left NZ with the 24th Reinforcements. He was for 13 years in the Mosgiel Woollen Co’s warehouse and was well known in rifle-shooting and football circles, holding several gold medals for prowess in the former sport. Two brothers left with the Main Body. Acting Sergeant Frank W TERRY fell during the operations on Gallipoli and Gunner W S TERRY was recently wounded after over two years service in France. [AWN 18.04.1918]

TILSLEY Captain R TILSTLEY, DCM, has advised his mother, Mrs J Tilsley of Hobson Street, that her eldest son, Lance Corporal W A TILSLEY, officially reported “missing, believed killed” has been killed in action. Prior to the war he was associated with his brothers in an electrical business in Rotorua. He left NZ with the 19th Reinforcements. Captain R TILSLEY left with the Main Body, earning his distinction at Gallipoli where he was wounded. He has been wounded twice in France. The only other son, J TILSLEY, has recently been discharged as medically unfit after serving eighteen months. [AWN 25.04.1918]

WELLS Another good record of service is that of the family of Mr Fred H Wells, 18 Domain Street, Devonport. Four sons have gone to the front, one, Private F B A WELLS, having made the supreme sacrifice. Private Wells, who was killed in action on 29 March, was 35 years of age. He left NZ with the 9th Reinforcements but after the battle of the Somme transferred to a Canadian regiment with which he fought at Ypres. Later he rejoined his old unit and saw service at Armentieres and Messines. Private Wells was previously a member of the North Shore Albion Football Club. Of his brothers, two – Claude and Stewart – are in France, and the third, Harold, in Palestine. [AWN 18.04.1918]

MAY 1918

AITKEN, Private H, son of J G Aitken, Devon Road, Frankton, has been awarded the Military Medal, is one of three brothers on active service. He left with the Ambulance Corps of the 7th Reinforcements. He had not had a day’s illness since he left. Prior to enlistment he worked for the local firm of Messrs Watt Hunt & Armstrong of Hamilton. His brothers left with the 10th and 13th Reinforcements. [AWN 23.05.1918]

BOUCHER Three sons of Mr E W Boucher of Rotorua have joined the NZEF, one having been killed at the front and another wounded. Sapper Edgar W Boucher who, after having been reported as missing is now reported as killed in action on 12 October last was, prior to the war in the employ of Mr T McFarlane, C.E., as a surveyor. He was one of the Auckland signalers who went to Samoa with the Advance Court. At Samoa he joined the civil service and was appointed Assistant Surveyor to Mr McDonald. Later he re-enlisted and went with the 9th Reinforcements to Egypt and France. He was slightly wounded at Pozieres. He is supposed to have been killed by a shell whilst returning from carrying out a telephone wire (sic). One of his brothers, Private A F BOUCHER, who left with the 22nd Reinforcements was wounded on 4 October but has now recovered and is believed to be again in France. The youngest brother, Private C N BOUCHER, is now in camp. All three brothers were educated at the Pah College and at King’s College. [AWN 16.05.1918]

BRUNT A good record of service in the cause of the Empire is that to the credit of the sons of Mr J Brunt of Opotiki, three of whom have served with the NZEF. Private Arthur BRUNT, who was killed in action on 30 March, was the third son. He was educated at Opotiki School and at the time of enlistment in the 18th Reinforcements was a bricklayer and contractor at Opotiki. He was an energetic member of the Oddfellows. His eldest brother Jack BRUNT, also enlisted in the 18th Reinforcements but returned to NZ invalided at the end of 1917. His youngest brother Percy BRUNT enlisted and went to C1 camp in February last and is now drafted into the 40th Reinforcements. [AWN 09.05.1918]

GASKELL, Lance Corporal F A, who has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, is the second Te Kowhai boy to win this distinction. He is at present serving in France and is one of four brothers who are on active service. [AWN 16.05.1918]

HINTON A creditable record of service for the Empire is that of the family of Mr Thomas Hinton of Eureka, Waikato. Four members of the family have seen active service with the NZ forces. Claud HINTON joined the Samoan Contingent and upon his return to NZ enlisted in the 5th Reinforcements. He saw action at Gallipoli and in France, being wounded in each of these theatres of war. He was in hospital for a considerable time and invalided back to NZ, being discharged as unfit for further service. Sergeant Thomas George HINTON, Main Body Divisional Signal Corps served in Egypt and Gallipoli and was wounded on the Peninsula. He returned to NZ with the rank of Sergeant Major and returned to Palestine with the 28th Reinforcements with the rank of Lieutenant. Sergeant Frank A HINTON left with the 15th Reinforcements. While training in England he injured his leg and resigned to take up a position in the Royal Flying Corps in England and recently obtained the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Private Ross HINTON, 29th Reinforcements, took part in the recent fighting in France and was severely wounded on 1 April. [AWN 02.05.1918]

MAYALL, Sergeant David, son of Captain Geo Mayall of Valley Rd, Mt Eden, has been awarded the Military Medal for meritorious work in the field. He left NZ with the Main Body. Whilst a patient in hospital in October 1917, he voluntarily acted as a donor for blood transfusion, with the object of saving the life of a comrade. The army commander in routine orders has expressed his appreciation of the gallant conduct of Sgt Mayall. Three of Captain Mayall’s sons are now at the front, a fourth having returned recently. [AWN 23.05.1918]

NORTON, 2nd Lieutenant R H, recently returned dangerously ill with a gunshot wound in the face and chest, is the youngest son of Mr H H Norton of Auckland. He enlisted as a private with an early NZ reinforcement, and saw continual service at Gallipoli and in France until granted a commission last year. He has been wounded on several occasions. He later acted as bombing instructor at Sling Camp but early this year elected to return to the trenches and took part in the recent severe fighting. He was previously on the local staff of the Public Trust Department and was well known in hockey and yachting circles. Two of his brothers are on active service, Sergeant S H NORTON with the Australian Forces, and Corporal L H NORTON, acting as bayonet instructor at Trentham. [AWN 23.05.1918]

PEAKE, Captain Thomas, Roto-o-rangi, left NZ as a Corporal with the Auckland Mounted Rifles. He was in Egypt when he was transferred with a commission to the Middlesex Regt, Reserve Unit, which is commanded by his father, Lt Col H R PEAKE. He served with the Middlesex Regt in France until Passchendaele where he received his fourth wound, being severely injured in the spine. The Peake family has a fine military record. One brother, Sergeant G PEAKE, left with the NZ Infantry, was wounded on Gallipoli and in France and is now discharged. Lieut R H PEAKE, left as a private with the NZ Infantry, was wounded on the Somme and is now in the Royal Field Artillery in France. Captain Allen PEAKE served in the Middlesex Regt early in the war, was wounded at Ypres and is again on duty in England. [AWN 23.05.1918]

ROGERS A good record of service has been established by the sons of Mr W Rogers of Brighton Road, Parnell. Private F T ROGERS, the third son, who left with the 28th Reinforcements, has been killed in action. The second son, Private W E ROGERS, left with the 9th Reinforcements and has recently returned badly wounded. Sergeant J H ROGERS, the eldest son, left with the Main Body, was wounded twice at Gallipoli and after the evacuation went to France where he was again wounded twice. He was recently awarded the Military Medal. After recovering from his last wound, he returned to France. All three soldiers were born and educated in Australia. [AWN 23.05.1918]

JUNE 1918

BISHOP, Private W N C, killed in action 23 May 1918, youngest of three sons of Mr J J Bishop of Danvegan, Titirangi, all of whom volunteered for active service. Private Bishop, who was 21 years of age, was educated at Titirangi and Avondale public schools. As a lad of 17 he entered the service of the Postal Dept in Wellington four years ago and was subsequently transferred to Auckland. He enlisted on attaining his 20th birthday and left with the 28th Reinforcements less than a year ago. His eldest brother, Lieutenant J J BISHOP, 13th Reinforcements, was killed in action last October whilst leading his men with great gallantry during the severe fighting in Flanders. Sergeant T A BISHOP, the only surviving brother, who left with the 12th Reinforcements, has been serving on the western front for the past year. [AWN 13.06.1918]

JULY 1918

WOOD Few of the many numerous families who have gone on service for King and country can show a better record than that of Mrs Wood of Waikumete. No fewer than six of her sons have left on active service, namely: Private Gilbert WOOD, 19th Reinforcements; Private F W WOOD, 21st Reinforcements; Private Richard WOOD; Private Leonard WOOD, 28th Reinforcements; Private Charles WOOD, 32nd Reinforcements; Private W A WOOD, 39th Reinforcements. The majority of these lads was brought up at Waikumete. Their patriotism speaks volumes for their mother’s training, the lads having had the misfortune to lose their father many years ago. [AWN 11.07.1918]

McNAMARA Sergeant S A McNAMARA, brother of Miss May McNamara, Loisville, St Heliers Bay, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a hand to hand combat with a squad of enemy cavalry. He is aged 20, the youngest of three brothers who left with the 3rd Reinforcements. He was wounded last November and invalided home. The youngest brother, Private R McNAMARA, is about to leave NZ. [AWN 11.07.1918]

AUGUST 1918

HOLLINGER A good record of service was disclosed on Thursday at the Auckland Military Service Board when Thomas HOLLINGER of Avondale appealed for the retention of his son Private Arthur HOLLINGER, one of five soldier sons. The appellant stated that three of his sons were still on active service. It was explained that an appeal had been lodged on behalf of his son now in camp but had been withdrawn because it was thought the returned solider would be allowed to remain in NZ. The parents, being advanced in years, wish to have one son at home with them. Pte Hollinger said he was allowing the appeal to be made solely on account of his parents. He did not wish a few months leave, however, with the possibility of being sent back to the front as soon as he had established himself in a position. He considered he was justified in asking for a discharge seeing that he had served three years, was not a fit man and that all his brothers were away. The Board agreed to recommend indefinite leave without pay, the application to be renewed if the appellant was again called up. [AWN 01.08.1918]

KIRKWOOD A fine record of war service is held by the family of Mrs J A Kirkwood, Turama Rd, Onehunga, whose four sons have served, or are serving, in the present war. Lieutenant S KIRKWOOD, RNR, joined the motor patrol service two years ago. At Greenwich he passed all his examinations, being appointed sub-lieutenant, with promotion to lieutenant about twelve months ago. He took part in the historic raid on Ostend, Lieut Kirkwood being in a motor-launch which was to take off the crew of one of the blockships. Owing to the shifting of a buoy, the launch collided with the blockship, with the result that the exhaust pipe of the launch broke, causing the fumes to fill the engineroom. The two engineers were overcome, whereupon Lieut Kirkwood went below and took charge of the engines, controlling the boat until she was picked up by another vessel. For his services on this occasion Lieut Kirkwood was awarded the DSO. Lieut Kirkwood, who is 32 years of age, was employed by Messrs Macky Logan, Caldwell & Co. Ltd., prior to leaving with the motor patrol. Lieutenant Ronald A KIRKWOOD, RNR, who was employed by Messrs Abbott, Foote & Jones, is 36 years of age and was a prominent yachtsman prior to enlisting with his brother in the motor patrol. He took part in the memorable naval raid on Zeebrugge. Private W KIRKWOOD, left NZ two years ago and was wounded in the right arm. He is now in Sling Camp. The youngest of Mrs Kirkwood’s four sons, Mr Robert R KIRKWOOD, served at Samoa and was invalided home. [AWN 01.08.1918]

SEPTEMBER 1918

BAGNALL A striking record of sacrifice in the service of the Empire is that of the family of Mrs A E Bagnall of Sarsfield St, Ponsonby. Gunner A E R BAGNALL, of the 9th Battery, NZ Field Artillery, who died of wounds in France on 26 August, was the youngest son. He enlisted on attaining the age of 20, leaving NZ with the 27th Reinforcements as a corporal in the infantry but in England was transferred to the artillery. He was wounded in the right thigh in February last but rejoined his unit in April. He was educated at the Turua school, matriculated in 1914 and passed the senior Civil Service examination in 1916. Upon leaving the Grammar School, Gunner Bagnall joined the staff of the Auckland Lands & Survey Office and received his appointment to the field survey branch about the time of his enlistment. He took a keen interest in all outdoor sports and in 1914 won the swimming championship of the Grammar School and was a member of the Grammar Old Boy’s senior fifteen. Another brother, Sergeant George S BAGNALL, left with the Main Body, serving in Egypt, Gallipoli and France and as the result of wounds received in France in June 1916 is now totally incapacitated. A third brother, Sergeant Alan BAGNALL, who left with the 10th Reinforcements, has served continuously in the 9th Battery for two and a half years. [AWN 19.09.1918]

BEESON A fine record of service in the Empire is that of the sons of Mrs A Beeson of Clonbern Road, Remuera, four of them having enlisted. Lance Corporal Charles Basil BEESON who has just been reported killed in action in France, was the fifth son. He was born and educated at Waiorongomai. Prior to enlisting in the 17th Reinforcements he was engaged in the teaching profession and was well known in the Matamata district where he took a keen interest in local, public and social affairs and church matters. Three brothers have enlisted – Sergeant Major A V BEESON, recently returned invalided; Private E S BEESON, in the United States Aviation Corps; and Corporal G I BEESON, NZFA, who is in Featherston Camp. [AWN 26.09.1918]

FARRELLY An instance of a father and three sons – all the male members of the family – having enlisted, is afforded by a household of Waitekauri. Private R L (Dick) FARRELLY, killed in France, was the second son of Sergeant R G FARRELLY of the quartermaster’s store, Trentham, and late of Wait3ekauri. He was educated at the Havelock school, Marlborough and Waitekauri school. He was well known in Waikino and Paeroa as a footballer. He enlisted at Methven, Canterbury, in the 8th Reinforcements, Mounted Rifles, but was transferred in Egypt to the Otago Infantry with which he went to France. Later he was put in the Lewis gun section. A younger brother, Trooper Oliver FARRELLY, was killed in Gallipoli on 8 August 1915. Another brother, C G FARRELLY, entered camp with the 45th Reinforcement. [AWN 26.09.1918]

JACKA Another good record of service is that of the sons of Mr Thomas Jacka, late of Prospect Tce, Mt Eden, and now of St Heliers Bay. 2nd Lieutenant Frederick Clifton JACKA, killed in action on 30 August, left NZ three years ago with the 8th Reinforcements as a private. He rose from the ranks one step at a time until being selected to sit for his commission at the close of last year. Obtaining his commission, he was immediately drafted back to his old regiment and served with it up to the time of his death. Prior to his enlistment, Lieut Jacka was for 11 years in the service of the Kauri Timber Co. He was the second son of the family. A younger brother, Sergeant Major T S JACKA, was killed in action on 28 September 1917, while a third, Corporal H W JACKA, is on service. [AWN 19.09.1918]

JOHNSTONE A fine record of service to the Empire has been established by the family of Mr & Mrs A Johnstone of Pateranga. All five sons enlisted, four being accepted. One has been killed in action. Lieutenant Keith C JOHNSTONE, the youngest son, who was killed recently, was 23 years of age. He left NZ with the 5th Reinforcements and was wounded on Gallipoli but after recovering proceeded to France. He was later in Base Records in Rouen and afterwards gained a commission in the Imperial Forces. He was born in Masterton and was a farmer before enlisting. He was always a lover of sport and was for three years captain of the Pateranga Hockey Club and at one time a member of the Waipa representatives. Driver Norman B JOHNSTONE is in France, Driver Ray N JOHNSTONE is at home invalided after three and a half years’ service, and Private A K JOHNSTONE is in camp. [AWN 26.09.1918]

OCTOBER 1918

BROWN A splendid yet sad record of war service has been established by the five sons of Mrs G Brown of 193 Dominion Road, Mt Eden. News has just been received of the death of the third son to give his life in the Empire’s cause. The soldier just killed in Private Harcourt Martin BROWN, who died as the result of wounds received in France. He was Mrs Brown’s third son and left NZ with the 26th Reinforcements. The brothers, who previously lost their lives, were Corporal James BROWN, who was killed in Palestine, and Lance Corporal William BROWN, killed in action in France. The former was a member of the Samoan advance guard and afterwards served on Gallipoli, whither he went with the 6th Reinforcements. William, who was a member of the 5th Reinforcements, was wounded at the evacuation and on recovering went to France. Another son, Private Edward BROWN, who was a member of the 2nd Reinforcements, served through the Gallipoli campaign and after the evacuation went to France whence he was invalided to NZ, suffering from pleurisy. George, the youngest son, is on his way to the front. Mrs Brown’s only daughter is married to Staff Sergeant S J HUGILL of the Army Pay Corps at the Featherston Camp. [AWN 03.10.1918]

CARROLL Private Terence CARROLL, who died at sea, was the third son of Mr John Carroll of Kuaotunu. Prior to enlisting in the 40th Reinforcements he was employed on the staff of the Public Trust Office, Auckland. He was educated at the Kuaotunu school and at the Sacred Heart College, Auckland, where he passed the public service and matriculation examinations in 1916. One of his brothers, Charles CARROLL, returned a few months ago invalided from the front. Another, John CARROLL, of the Survey Dept., Auckland, is at present in England suffering from the effects of wounds received at the battle of Passchendaele last year. [AWN 03.10.1918]

FITZWILLIAM Good service in the cause of the Empire has been performed by the sons of Mr & Mrs A Fitzwilliam of Eden Terrace. Sergeant Alfred H FITZWILLIAM, who was killed in action at the age of 31, was born and educated in Auckland, afterwards following farming pursuits at East Tamaki. He enlisted in the Main Body and was wounded once on Gallipoli and again in France. Private Robert FITZWILLIAM also fought with the Main Body on Gallipoli and was later invalided home. Corporal Fred A FITZWILLIAM is at present in France, with the 31st Reinforcements, and Trooper William BELLINGHAM, Mrs Fitzwilliam’s eldest son by a former marriage, will return home shortly after service with the 19th Reinforcements. Two of Mrs Fitzwilliam’s sons in law, Private John MILLEN, of the Main Body, and Quartermaster Sergeant Steve PERRIN, are at home invalided. Two sons have been rejected for service. [AWN 10.10.1918]

GREY, Private F R, 28th Reinforcements, has been killed in action. He was the youngest son of Mrs G L Grey of Balmoral Road, Mt Eden. Before joining the forces he was an engineer in the employ of Messrs Warran & Co, Auckland. Three other sons of Mrs Grey joined the colours. Gunner C W R GREY, who left with the Main Body as an artilleryman, was invalided home after the evacuation of Gallipoli. Lieutenant G L GREY is still on active service with the Imperial Flying Corps. Private R GREY, another son, was gassed in France and is now in a hospital at Hornchurch, England. [AWN 17.10.1918]

IRWIN Private Foster IRWIN, who was killed in action on the western front on 9 September, was the sixth son of Mr Foster Irwin of Morrinsville. He went to the front with the 22nd Reinforcements. He was 30 years of age and was a well known footballer and hockey player. Four brothers are on active service. [AWN 10.10.1918]

MAHONEY One of the many inspiring, but tragic, records of sacrifice for the Empire is that of the family of Mr C Mahoney of Taneatua, three of whose four sons have laid down their lives while on service. Second Lieutenant Brian G MAHONEY was killed on 3 September in an aeroplane accident. At the outbreak of war he was in Tonga, where he was engaged in copra planting. He came to NZ in time to join the 5th Reinforcements and went to Egypt as a private in the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles. He served on Gallipoli and later was transferred to the 16th, Waikato, Infantry. He saw some heavy fighting on the Somme, received his sergeant’s stripes and was recommended for a commission in the Imperial Army. He joined the Royal Munster Fusiliers and was attached to the Royal Air Force in February last. He was almost through his training as a pilot when he met his death. His youngest brother, Ulie, who left with the 3rd Reinforcements, was killed at Quinn’s Post in June 1914. Another brother, Lance, who also left with the 5th Reinforcements, lost his life at Bir-el-Abd, in Sinai Peninsula, on 9 August 1916. The eldest brother, Ernest, joined the Queen’s Bays in England in August 1914, saw much service in France and is now a lieutenant in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. [AWN 10.10.1918]

MEENAN A fine record of service to the Empire has been established by the family of Mr & Mrs J D Meenan of Rangiputa, Awanui Heads. All four sons enlisted and were accepted. H C MEENAN, the second eldest son was killed in action on the Somme in 1916. The eldest son H I MEENAN was seriously wounded in a bayonet charge on the Marne in 1916. After three months in hospital in England he returned to France and is still with his Unit. A D MEENAN was slightly wounded last month but his still with his Unit. Driver P T MEENAN is in training at Sling Camp, England. [AWN 24.10.1918]

MILLS A splendid record of service in the present war stands to the credit of the family of Mrs C POPE and the late Mr G MILLS of Cheltenham near Feilding. Eight sons are either on service or are due to enter camp shortly. Sergeant W J MILLS and Private Frederick H MILLS left NZ in 1915 and are now in France. Trooper C A MILLS, 14th Reinforcements and Driver Arthur MILLS, 16th Reinforcements, are both in Egypt. Gunner Frank MILLS, 28th Reinforcements and Private H J MILLS, 13th Reinforcements are in France. Private L J MILLS has just reached military age and goes into camp on 6 February. The eighth brother, and the only one of the family who was drawn in the ballot, is Isaac MILLS who is married. He has not yet gone to camp on account of an accident. Of all those now on active service, only one, Private H J MILLS, has been wounded. [AWN 31.10.1918]

SLADE Lieutenant D G SLADE, killed in action in France on 30 September, was the second son of Mr & Mrs Slade of George Street, Rocky Nook. He left NZ as a private in the 6th, Hauraki, Company, with the Main Body and was in the Suez Canal battle. He was at the landing at Gallipoli and took part in the Peninsula campaign until he was wounded and contracted enteric fever. He was invalided to England and was for some time at Hornchurch as sergeant of the Military Police. After gaining his commission last year he took part of the 28th Reinforcements to France and afterwards returned to NZ on duty furlough, arriving in Auckland in January last. He left again as officer commanding C Company of the 36th Reinforcements. Lieut Slade was educated at the Marist Brothers’ School and the Sacred Heart College, Ponsonby, and was a well known footballer. Prior to enlisting, Lieut Slade was employed on the office staff of Messrs Jagger & Harvey. He was in his 25th year. His elder brother, Private H A SLADE, was killed in action at Messines. A younger brother, Private R E SLADE, volunteered for active service at the age of 19 and left with the 37th Reinforcements, joining his brother’s company at Sling Camp. He was accidentally wounded while training and is now in Codford Hospital, England. The husband of Lieut Slade’s only sister is also with the forces. He has been wounded and is now in hospital in England. [AWN 17.10.1918]

NOVEMBER 1918

HINTON Advice has been received that Lieutenant Francis A HINTON, eldest son of Mr & Mrs Thos. Hinton of Eureka, Waikato, was killed in an aeroplane accident in England on 9 November. The late Lieut Hinton, who was 30 years of age, left with the 15th Reinforcements, holding the rank of sergeant. While in England he injured his leg and was under orders to return to NZ but obtained permission to join the Royal Air Force. He had been nearly two years in the aviation service and some time ago obtained the rank of flight lieutenant. Three other sons of Mr & Mrs Hinton have seen active service – Lieutenant J G HINTON, a Main Body man; Private C H HINTON, Samoan contingent and 5th Reinforcements; and Private Ross HINTON, 29th Reinforcements – each having been wounded. [AWN 21.11.1918]

MAHONEY 2nd Lieutenant B J MAHONEY, who was killed in an aeroplane accident on 3 September, was one of the four sons of Mr & Mrs C Mahoney of Taneatua. At the outbreak of the war he was in Tonga and came to NZ in time to join the 5th Reinforcements. He left as a trooper in the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles and after serving for some time in Egypt proceeded to Gallipoli. He served through the closing months of the Peninsula campaign and later transferred to the 16th, Waikato, Infantry. He saw some heavy fighting at the Somme, where he received his sergeant’s stripes and was recommended for a commission in the Imperial forces. He joined the Royal Munster Fusiliers and became attached to the Royal Air Force in February last. He was just completing his training as a pilot when he met his death. His youngest brother, Ulic, who left with the 3rd Reinforcements, was killed at Quin’s Post, Gallipoli. Another brother, Lance, who left with the 5th Reinforcements, was killed at Bir-el-Abd, Sinai Peninsula, on 9 August 1916. The eldest brother, Ernest, joined the Queen’s Boys in England in August 1916 and saw much service in France. He is now a lieutenant in the Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers. [AWN 21.11.1918]

WATSON Five sons of Mr & Mrs J Watson, 29 Graham St, Auckland, have served with the forces during the present war. Two have made the supreme sacrifice. One, Walter WATSON, who left NZ with the 3rd Reinforcements, died of wounds on 25 March 1917. Private advice has been received of the death of the second son, Corporal John E WATSON, who succumbed to influenza in France on 5 November, the disease having been contracted during convalescence after wounds received on 15 September. His wife, Mrs G C Watson, resides at 103 Franklin Rd, Ponsonby. Several years ago he was attached to the staff of the Auckland district headquarters of the Defence Dept. He entered camp as a non-commissioned officer and left NZ with the 33rd Reinforcements. Of the other three brothers, one, QMS Fred. WATSON, left the Dominion with the 6th Reinforcements and is now at Sling Camp. Private A C WATSON belonged to the 17th Reinforcements and returned invalided last January. Private Earle C. WATSON was discharged from camp some time ago. [AWN 28.11.1918]

DECEMBER 1918

HUNTER, Lieutenant A C C, who was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, was in command of a company forming part of the leading waves of assault and himself led the foremost troops. When the advance was finally held up he encouraged his men to dig in and sent back valuable reports to the battalion. A second brother, Trooper A G H HUNTER, left with the 28th Reinforcements, Mounted Rifles. He was transferred to the Imperial Camel Corps but some time ago rejoined the Mounted Rifles. Private E T HUNTER, who was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field is the second son of Mr & Mrs K Hunter, Katikati. He was admitted to hospital in England on 4 October suffering from contused hip and knee. He left NZ as a Corporal and handed in his stripes when overseas. [AWN 12.12.1918]


Return To HOME

FAMILIES I AM RESEARCHING | MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH |NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – BY LOCATION | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – BY CONFLICT | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR – MILITARY NURSES | PAKEHA/MAORI TRANSLITERATIONS |PASSENGER LISTS TO NEW ZEALAND | SHAND – FAMILY HISTORY | SPONDON, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND | TE PUKE, BAY OF PLENTY, NEW ZEALAND | WANGANUI COLLEGIATE SCHOOL | WOMEN OF SOUTH TARANAKI