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NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
PERSONNEL PARAGRAPHS
NOVEMBER 1917

These are extracts from the Auckland Weekly News magazines and have been extracted with permission. Thanks to Jackie Walles for these.

November 1917

ALAN, Lance Corporal Godfrey, killed in action, was the youngest son of Mrs E Inwood of Westport. He was just 22 at the time of his death and sailed with the 12th Reinforcements. The young soldier was a member of the Westport railway workshops staff at the time of his enlistment. One brother, Philip, has just been invalided home and the last remaining single son goes into camp shortly. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.21

ALLEN, Lieutenant John Candlish, who is reported to have been killed in action, was the second son of the late Mr W Shepherd Allen of Annandale, Piako. He was born in England but came to NZ with his parents when about 13 years of age. Lieut Allen, who resided at Remuera, was engaged in farming at Annandale when he enlisted. He took a prominent part in all matters relating to progress in agriculture and was one of those concerned in the establishment of the Auckland Farmers’ Freezing Co, he having been one of the original directors of that company, as well as being associated with the erection of the first freezing works at Whangarei. He was a prominent member of the Farmers’ Union, a director of the Tauranga Sawmilling Co, and a member of the Bay of Plenty Licensing Committee. Some years ago he contested the Parnell seat in the House of Representatives. He took a keen interest in rifle shooting, was a good shot and for some time was president of the Morrinsville Rifle Club. He also held a commission as captain in the Motor Service Corps. Lt Allen, who was 45 years of age, left on active service last year. After reaching England he was in charge of some agricultural operations under the direction of the military authorities. On going to France he acted for a time as quartermaster to two battalions before proceeding to the firing-line. He leaves a widow, two sons and a daughter. Two of his brothers are on active service and both have recently been wounded. One is Lieut R C ALLEN, DSO and the other is Lieut-Colonel S S ALLEN. [AWN 01.11.1917] p.17

The King held an investiture at Buckingham Palace which was attended by 200 officers, men and nurses, including Sergeant ANDREW, a New Zealander, who was awarded the Victoria Cross for daring initiative in an attack on a German position in July. Sgt Leslie Wilton ANDREW is a son of Mr W J Andrew, headmaster of Wanganui East School. He was 22 years of age at the time of his enlistment in 1915. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

ASHTON, Captain Sidney, Auckland Mounted Rifles, who has been killed in action at Beersheba, was a farmer near Tauranga before going to the front. He was in the second fight at Gaza and latterly was second in command of the fourth squadron of the Auckland Mounted Rifles. He was about 46 years of age. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

BARKER, Captain Paul of the Royal Artillery, late of Waihi, and 2nd Lieut Anthony RENDLE of the Devonshire Regt, late of Ashburton, have been killed in action. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.26

BARKER, Private Wilfred W, son of Mrs C Barker, Croydon Rd, Mt Eden, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field. He was born at Te Awamutu and worked for Dexter & Crozier. He left with the 9th Reinforcements, ASC. It was while driving the wounded from the front line under gas and shell fire that he won the distinction. Oswald BARKER is serving with the Mounted Forces in Egypt. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.24

BEAUMONT, Mr Walter E C, who has just joined in England, the NZ Field Artillery, is the well-known Auckland sculler. For the last few years he has been engaged in business between Canada and Great Britain. [AWN 29.11.1917, p.17]

BEETHAM, Lieutenant R F R, Wellington Mounted Rifles, has been wounded and his place as ADC to the General Officer commanding the NZ Division has been taken by Lieut W G WOOD, Wellington Regiment. [AWN 01.11.1917, p.47

BENNETT, Lieut E B (Dick), reported to be killed in action, was born in Auckland 22 years ago but latterly resided at Palmerston North. He was well known throughout the North Island in cricketing circles, having for some years played with the Manawatu representative team. He was employed in the office of Cooper & Rutherford, solicitors, Palmerston. Entering camp as a volunteer in the 14th Reinforcements as a non-commissioned officer, he was later posted to the 17th’s, and at the examination for commissions passed at the top of the list, being later drafted to the 22nd Reinforcements with which he left NZ. His two brothers also hold commissioned rank, Captain J H BENNETT, having returned from France yesterday after being wounded on three occasions, while Lieut Ray BENNETT, who won his commission in France, has served right through with the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of Mr & Mrs A E Bennett of Palmerston North. [AWN 01.11.1917] p.17

BENNETT, Lieutenant J, left the Dominion with the Rifle Brigade, at that time holding the rank of lieutenant. He received his captaincy in Egypt. In France he saw much service being wounded on no fewer than three occasions, at the Somme, in a trench engagement and at the Battle of Messines. [AWN 01.11.1917, p.17]

After 2 ½ years, Mr & Mrs A BISSETT, late of Feilding but now of Wanganui, have received the bugle used by their son George F BISSETT before he was killed on Gallipoli. The bugler boy engraved on the instrument the name of each camping place and the bugle has three bullet holes in it. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.22

BLAIR, Colonel D B, who has been awarded the Distinguished Service Order and previously the Military Cross, was educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School. He served in the South African war and afterwards was for many years in America. On the inception of the territorial scheme in NZ he joined the NZ Staff Corps and was adjutant to the 1st Canterbury Mounted Rifles until the outbreak of the present war when he left with the Main Body as adjutant to the Canterbury Mounted Regt. He subsequently transferred to the Infantry. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.17

BLAKE, Harold D, Private, killed in action in France on 12 October, was the fifth son of Mrs Blake of Church Road, Epsom. He left with the 14th Reinforcements and was transferred to the machine-gun section on arrival in England. He was educated at the Epsom school and up to the time of his enlistment was employed in the maintenance branch of the Railway Dept. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

BOLES, 2nd Lieut G H, of Thames, who gained the DCM, left the Dominion as a private. He saw service in Egypt against the Senussi and later proceeded to France with the Rifle Brigade. The action for which Lt Boles, then sergeant-major, received his decoration, took place in France. With the assistance of only 30 men he succeeded in holding an isolated position for a considerable time, eventually rejoining the main body without the loss of a single man. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.16

BOND, Captain Victor R, youngest son of Mr S Bond, Lower Symonds Street, was wounded on 19 October. He was also wounded in the Somme battle and returned to NZ in January last. Two months later he went back to England as adjutant on a troopship. His last wound was received while serving with the Wellington Infantry. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

BROWNE, Private Tono, Kawiti, has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished service on the western front. He is a descendant of a famous line of Maori warriors, the great grandson on both sides of Kawiti of Ruapekapeka Pa fame. The name Browne was added when Colonel Gore Browne was Governor of NZ. He has been on active service for a year having joined the Expedition Force early in 1916. His home is at Waiomio, near Kawakawa and the Ruapekapeka Pa overlooks the Maori settlement there. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.24

BUDGE, Lance Corporal John, killed in action in Palestine, was the second son of Mr John Budge of Kiokio and was 28 years of age. He was born and educated at Takapuna. He went to the Waikato with his parents and was afterwards farming on his own account at Maungatautari near Cambridge. He left NZ with the 16th Reinforcements as a mounted man and in Egypt joined the Camel Corps. He was promoted to Lance Corporal on the field. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

BUNTING, Private Stanley, killed in action, was the son of Mrs Bunting of Masterton. He enlisted at the beginning of last year with the AIF after a short farewell visit to NZ and had taken part in the various engagements in which the Australian troops had been throughout the year, including Lagnicourt, Bullecourt, and the recent heavy fighting of September. A surveyor by profession, the late soldier had lived in the East for some years before going to Australia and many friends, both in NZ and elsewhere, will greatly regret to hear of his death. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

BUTLER, Alexander Edward (Lex), died of wounds, aged 25 years, was educated at Palmerston North High School where he passed his matriculation examination, solicitor’s general knowledge and medical preliminary with a view to following the medical profession. He was then compelled to discontinue his studies, owing to defective eyesight and decided to take up farming as a means of livelihood. He enlisted in the main body with both mounted and infantry but was twice turned down on account of his eyesight. He then enlisted in the 2nd Reinforcement as a stretcher-bearer, joined up with the Main Body in Egypt, saw service on the canal, participated in the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April, also the evacuation; since when he had seen continual service on the western front in France. A younger brother, Ernest, is now serving in France. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

CALDER, F C C, Flight Lieutenant, RNAS, Auckland, is under orders to proceed to an Eastern theatre. For the past two years he has been employed at flying stations in the British Isles and in France and for some time past he has been instructor at Dover. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

CALDWELL, Flight Commander Keith L, M.C., Royal Flying Corps, only son of Mr D R Caldwell of Auckland. He has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when leading offensive patrols. On one occasion he led a patrol of 5 machines against 12 hostile aircraft all of which he drove down out of control. He has personally destroyed five hostile machines and has had over 50 contests in the air in all of which he has displayed splendid skill and fearlessness and set an excellent example to his squadron. He was one of the first pupils to graduate from the NZ Flying School at Kohimarama. He was formerly on the staff of the Auckland branch of the Bank of NZ. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

CARMICHAEL, Sergeant James Edward, killed in action, was formerly a member of the Auckland City Fire Brigade. He was residing in Dunedin when he enlisted. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

CARMODY, Sergeant James, killed in action, was a son of Mr J Carmody of Gisborne. He left with the 23rd Reinforcements. He was educated at St Patrick’s College, Wellington, and during the last five years was first assistant teacher at the Huntly school. He was a prominent member of the local bowling club. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

CASHMORE, Corporal F R, Rifle Brigade, has been awarded the Military Medal. Born and educated at Birmingham, England, he was employed by Wheeler Bros., Karangahape Road. He was a Signaller in the Territorials. He was seriously wounded some time ago. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

CHESNEY, R O, Major, NZSC, has relinquished the appointment of D.A.A.G. to the NZ Division and is seconded for duty in England. He is succeeded by Major W L ROBINSON, hitherto second in command of the 3rd Battalion, Canterbury Regiment. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

CLARK, Lieutenant Humphrey, who has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the field, is the son of Mr Archibald Clark of Auckland. On 9 October during an attack, he laid wires behind the advancing lines and maintained them under shell fire. He also assisted in the capture of a party of Germans in a dug-out. He is attached to the Signalling Co. of the Worcestershire Regiment. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.22

CONNELL, Private Alfred, killed in action, was the fourth son of Mr R Connell of the Matamata Commercial Hotel. He enlisted with the 18th Reinforcements. He was employed by the Farmers’ Auctioneering Co. Private Connell was a cricketer, tennis player and keen footballer and had represented Matamata in each sport for several seasons. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

COOK, Rifleman Sydney G M, son of Mr John Cook, Point Street, Mt Eden, was killed in action on 12 October. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

DEVEREUX, Captain Geoffry de B, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is a son of the Hon. Mrs H B Devereux of Market Road, Epsom. He is a native of Auckland and is an old Grammar School boy. He was a member of the College Rifles and prior to the war held a commission in the 3rd, Auckland, Regiment. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

DIXON, Gunner G S, of the machine-gun section of the 16th Reinforcements, who has been seriously wounded, is reported by private advices to be in hospital at Boulogne. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

DIXON, Lieutenant Lionel M, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is well known in Auckland. He saw two years service in the South African War as a member of the Imperial Yeomanry. He came to NZ after the Boer War and for some years he was on the office staff of the Auckland Education Board. Subsequently he went to Taihape as secretary of the Taihape Freezing Co. Lieut Dixon went into camp with the non-commissioned draft for the 9th Reinforcements but gained a commission and finally left with the 12th Draft with the Wellington Infantry. At Messines he was wounded in the head and he rejoined his regiment only a short time before the recent offensive. His wife, the daughter of Mr A S Webber, is at present residing in Auckland. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

DONNE, Second Lieutenant S E, who died of wounds on 22 October, was the second-youngest son of Mrs A E Anderson, Dunedin and brother of Mrs Griffiths, Tauhei. He was born at Queenstown, Wakatipu, 26 years ago and was educated at Otago Boys’ High School. He was a keen athlete, being well known in football circles in Dunedin, Invercargill and Wellington. He enlisted at Wellington where he was employed in the office of the Public Works Dept and left with the 23rd Reinforcements. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

DONNELLY, Corporal Arthur H, Australian Infantry, aged 25, was born at Roxburgh and was the younger son of Mr William Donnelly. He was a carpenter and was only in Victoria a few months working at the Wonthaggi Hospital when war broke out. He enlisted and was accepted early in August 1914. He landed at Gallipoli and was wounded at the end of August 1915 and invalided to England. On his recovery he served some months on the Australian headquarters staff before rejoining his regiment in France, where he served through all the heavy fighting of the last year. He was wounded in the leg three months ago but after five days in hospital he rejoined his unit, although the wound was still troublesome. He was killed in action on September 20, 1917. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.21

DUIGAN, Lieutenant D F, a Military Cross winner, who is 25 years of age, was a law student in the office of Mr B Wyman when he enlisted. He is a native of Wanganui and was educated at Nelson College and the Victoria University College. He left NZ with the 9th Reinforcements. He was seriously wounded in No Man’s Land in France last year and it is believed that he would have lost his life but for the fact that he was rescued by his commanding officer, Col R C ALLEN (then Major Allen), who has been awarded the DSO for gallantry at Messines. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

ELLIS, Lieutenant Edwin G, who has died of wounds, was the second son of Mr R H ELLIS of Tararu, Thames. He left NZ early in the year with the 24th Reinforcements. He was educated at Thames and afterwards joined the Railway Dept as a cadet. He subsequently entered the employ of Hemingway and Robertson and while there qualified as a public accountant. In 1914 Lieut Ellis commenced the practice of his profession as an accountant. He was very well known in rowing club circles and was a keen player of lacrosse. One of his brothers is now in France and another, after being invalided home, is leaving again shortly with a reinforcement draft. [AWN 01.11.1917] p.17

ERLAM, Lieutenant H, Cheshire Regt, formerly sergeant 1st, Auckland, Battn, is now captain South Lancashire Regt, Captain Erlam, who served for fourteen years in the Royal Navy and has the Persian Gulf Medal, has held a commission in the 12th Cheshires since August 1915. [AWN 30.08.1917, p.62]

FAULKNER, Lance Corporal Ernest, killed in action on 20 October, left with the 27th Reinforcements, aged 34 years and was the fourth son of Mr & Mrs J Faulkner of Northcote and was educated at Gisborne. He entered the plastering trade but prior to going into camp he had been fruit-growing at Northcote. He was married to the eldest daughter of Constable Biddek of Birkenhead. He leaves a widow and infant son. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

FELS, Gunner Harold H, reported killed in action, was the only son of Mr W Fels, managing director of Hallenstein Bros. and grandson of the late Mr Bendiz Hallenstein. Born in Dunedin in 1891, he was educated at the Dunedin and Waitaki Boys High Schools and was for five years engaged in the company’s Dunedin warehouse. He was a keen member of B Battery for some years before war broke out. He left with the 18th Reinforcements. He was reported wounded twice. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

FORDE, Lance Corporal Hugh Douglas, who died of wounds on 26 October, was the eldest son of Mr & Mrs F H Forde of St Heliers Bay. He was 22 years old and was educated at St John’s College. After leaving college he joined the staff of the NZ Insurance Co. to which he was attached up to the time of his enlistment. He left with the 13th Reinforcements and after reaching England was for some months engaged in staff work at Sling Camp. He left for France early in January with a howitzer battery in which he was serving when he received the wounds which proved fatal. A young brother, Private Norman Arthur FORDE, went with the 22nd Reinforcements and was killed in action on 4 October. He was educated at St John’s College and prior to enlisting was engaged as a motor mechanic in Auckland. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

GARLAND, Lieutenant E H, Wellington, RFC, is now reported a prisoner of war in Germany. He was one of a squadron engaged in a bombing raid over Belgium. All the machines got back with the exception of two. He was seen from the British lines to make a forced landing on the beach at Ostend. He was one of the earliest pupils of the Auckland flying school and received his commission in the RFC six months ago. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

GIBSON, Lieutenant Mackenzie, reported killed in action in France, was the younger son of the Rev Mackenzie Gibson and was born at Akaroa. He was educated at Waimate and at Christ’s College, afterwards joining the staff of the Bank of NZ. He enlisted at Greymouth on 7 August 1914 as a private and left with the main body. His first fighting was in the engagements on the Suez Canal. He took part in the landing at Gallipoli and in the storming of Achi Baba. After three months continuous fighting on the peninsula he was invalided to England but returned to Gallipoli and as sergeant major was in charge of a small band of men on the night of the evacuation. On returning to Egypt he received his commission. He was a keen soldier and during the last six months had made repeated application to be sent forward. On 8 August he was allowed to go forward to the firing line where he saw two months further fighting before his promising career was cut short. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

GORDON, Flight Lieutenant A W, son of Mr L W Gordon of Thames, died of wounds on 12 August. Flight Lieut COOK, DCM, writes to the effect that “Lieut Gordon, with two other British scout pilots, attacked ten enemy aeroplanes, and was successful in bringing one down when an accident to his machine resulted in his having both legs broken. He was taken to a military hospital but his injuries unexpectedly proved fatal 13 days afterwards.” Lt Gordon obtained his first flying experience at the NZ Flying School at Kohimarama. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

GORRIE, Trooper Donald B, who was about 32 years of age, eldest son of Mr H T Gorrie of Auckland, has been killed in action in Palestine. He was married and is survived by his widow, formerly Miss WEST, and a five year old daughter. He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and King’s College. On leaving the latter he joined the firm of Alfred Buckland & Sons, of which his father is the principal and entered the auctioneering branch. He enlisted about 18 months ago and went to Egypt as a member of the Camel Corps but at the time of his death was serving with the Mounted Rifles. He was a thorough sport and took a keen interest in horses, being a polo player and always following the hounds with the Pakuranga Hunt Club. His younger brother, Lieutenant Jack GORRIE, who went Home early in the war and enlisted in an Imperial regiment, was killed in France on 19 July 1916. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

GREEN, 2nd Lieut J L, killed in action on 12 October, was the second son of Mr Chas Green of Motueka, Nelson and nephew of Mr George Green of Thames. He sailed with the main body and served in Egypt and Gallipoli as corporal, gaining his commission in England. He was 25 years of age and we well known in NZ cycle racing circles. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

GRIMWADE – A number of letters from officers in France have been received by Mr E E Grimwade, in connection with the death of his son Lieutenant E N GRIMWADE, who succumbed to wounds on 1 August. He left NZ with the 20th Reinforcements. His brother Leonard was killed at Gallipoli soon after the landing. Writing of his death, Lieut P WILLIAMSON says: “When he was hit he was not on duty but was at his own risk looking around and attending to the comfort of his men. As an officer he was beloved and respected by all who knew him.” Lieut F de la MARE wrote: “Your son was in charge of several advanced posts. Having established himself in one, he made his way across the open to see if all was well with the non-commissioned officers in charge of the others. It was a duty under the circumstances which only a very gallant man would have attempted. He placed as he always did, the safety and comfort of his men before his own.” Captain W WATSON wrote: “Your son proved himself a most gallant and courageous officer, with a supreme contempt for danger and a high regard for duty.” [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

GUY, Company Sergeant Major Albert Hector, son of Mr John A Guy of Ngatimoto, has been killed in action. He was the second son of Mr Guy and left NZ with the Main Body. Mr Guy has two other sons at the front. Prior to enlisting Albert was farming at Ngatimoti. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

HANNA, Lieutenant Samuel, younger son of Mr A Hanna, solicitor, of Auckland, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Lieut Hanna, who was employed in his father’s office, left Auckland for England in March 1915, when he was partly through his legal examination and enlisted in the Royal Navy Air Service. He was for some six months in Flanders and afterwards went to Russia with the armoured motor-car portion of the Royal Naval Air Corps under Commander Locker-Lampson. Lt Hanna who is 26 years of age, has since served with distinction in Roumania, the Caucasus and other parts of the eastern theatre of war. He is now on leave and he will pay a visit to Auckland shortly. His older brother Lieutenant Hugh HANNA, is on active service with the 28th Reinforcements of the NZ Expeditionary Force. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.16

HANNA, Lieut Samuel, younger son of A Hanna, solicitor, arrived in Auckland last week on furlough. He left NZ for England in March 1915 and enlisted in the Royal Army Air Service, serving in Roumania, the Caucasus and other portions of the eastern theatre of the war. He subsequently went to Russia with the Armoured Motorcar Section of the Royal Naval Air Corps. He left Petrograd about 7 weeks ago. He was recently awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.22

HARKNESS, Flight Lieutenant D E, R.N., a New Zealander, is visiting Auckland. He was born in Nelson and went to England in 1915, training at Hendon then gained a commission in the Royal Naval Air Service. He went to the western front early in 1916 and was engaged in flying for several months. He was wounded and awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for valuable service rendered in the bombing of German zeppelin sheds at Brussels. In December 1916 he was forced to descend on Dutch soil. A short time ago he was allowed leave to visit England, then extended leave to visit NZ. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.51

HARVEY, Private David, NZMC, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr J Harvey, late of Huntly, and now of Valley Road, Auckland. Prior to enlisting he was a miner. A brother was killed at Gallipoli two years ago. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

HASTE – Advice was received in Levin recently of the death in action of Private Fred HASTE, brother of Miss Haste, librarian, and before his enlistment a well known and highly respected resident of Levin. He was a member of the firm of Pringle & Haste, builders. He was one of the first businessmen of Levin to enlist, leaving with the Fighting Fifths. He saw service on Gallipoli and then went on to France where he passed unscathed through all the heavy fighting on the Somme. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

HASTIE, Corporal John Malam, killed in action, was the oldest son of Mr J Hastie of Te Awamutu and was 26 years of age. Prior to enlisting in the 6th Reinforcements he was in trade as a butcher at Whangarei. He saw service at Gallipoli and afterwards joined the Canadian tunnellers. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

HAWKE, Lance Corporal C H, aged 28 years, who was killed in action in France on October 12, was the second son of Mr & Mrs Charles Hawke of Martinborough, late of Greytown. He was well known in Greytown and Martinborough. He worked for the WFCA at Greytown for a number of years, also for Mr Kershaw, Martinborough. He enlisted with the 10th Reinforcements and went through practically all the heavy fighting in France, being right through the Somme, Messines and other big battles. He came through without hurt until 12 October, when he was killed. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

HAYWARD, Private Lionel B, aged 20 years, died of wounds, was the second son of Mr F Hayward, Maungakaramea. After leaving Maungakaramea school he entered the Whangarei post office but after a year’s service he resigned and assisted on his father’s farm until he enlisted with the 7th Reinforcements. He went through the Somme and Messines battles. His eldest brother Albert is now in camp. Pte Hayward was a grandson of the late Mr Albert Reed of Whangarei. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

HINE, Captain John Bird, wounded, is the member for Stratford in the House of Representatives. He was elected as a member of the Reform Party in 1908 and re-elected in 1911. Captain Hine has a farm at Toko near Stratford where his wife now resides. He left for the front last year. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

The Royal Humane Society’s bronze medallion and certificate were presented at Wellington to Sergeant Major HOLMES who jumped from a fast moving train on 26 June to rescue Private LAKE who had fallen from the platform, having his leg severed by the wheels. By rendering first aid promptly he saved Mr LAKE’s life. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.45

HOUCHEN, The Rev. Clement, senior Anglican chaplain with the NZ Division in France, recently wounded, is reported to be progressing satisfactorily. His injury is a gunshot wound near the eye. He received the Military Cross for gallantry in tending the wounded under heavy shell-fire at Flers and was with an advanced dressing-station during the Messines battle. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

HOUGH, Gunner R, of the Chatham Islands, who was awarded the DCM, left with the 12th Reinforce-ments. He earned his decoration during a fight by picking up a burning shell and throwing it over a parapet. He was invalided owing to an attack of pleurisy. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.16

HUBBARD, Captain A C, killed in action, was a son of Mrs Hubbard of Paeroa. When he enlisted he was farming in the Thames Valley where he was very well known and highly esteemed. He was one of those who started the dairy industry in that district and was chairman of directors of the Thames Valley Co-op. Dairying Co. A few months ago he won the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

HUMPHRIES, Private Walter John, who died of wounds on 8 October 1917, was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs F Humphries of Carrington, Carterton. He was a descendant of some of the earliest pioneer settlers of Wellington. His grandfather, the late Mr Thomas Kempton of Elm Grove, Greytown, came to NZ in the early forties and for a long time was a volunteer in the time of the Maori troubles. His grandfather, the late William Kempton, came out to NZ was in the 65th Regiment and took part in the Maori war. Jack was very eager to enlist at the commencement of the war but owing to his youth, was unable to gain his parents’ consent. As soon as he came of military age he enlisted and finally left NZ with the 21st Reinforcements. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

JEFFREY, Private R, of Dunedin, who has received the DCM, was a member of the 3rd Reinforce-ments. He was twice wounded at Gallipoli but remained on the peninsula until the evacuation. Conspicuous bravery in rescuing wounded at the battle of the Somme was the action by which he won the award. He was finally wounded just before the battle of Messines. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.16

JOHANSON, Private W O, killed in action on 4 October, was the youngest son of Mrs M Johanson of Te Kuiti and a brother of Mrs Higham of Takapuna. He enlisted two years ago at the age of 17. He was serving in the artillery. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

JOHNS, Lieutenant W H, Auckland Mounted Rifles, killed in action at Beersheba, was a son of Mr J Johns of Pukekohe. He was born and educated at Te Awamutu. He was a student at the Auckland Training College for some time and at the time of his enlistment in the Main Body he was engaged in teaching at Te Awamutu. He went away as a trooper in the 4th Waikato Mounted Rifles and was wounded at Gallipoli in August 1915. He was mentioned in despatches for the excellence of his work on that occasion. He was invalided home and before returning to the front gained his commission as a second lieutenant. He left on this occasion as a machine-gun officer. He was prominent in hockey circles and had represented the Auckland Province and Waipa. He was married shortly before leaving for the front on the second occasion. A younger brother was wounded in Flanders recently. Another brother is at present in camp with a reinforcement draft. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

JORY, 2nd Lieut N A, aged 21, Auckland University College and Auckland candidate for the Rhodes Scholarship, is in Featherston Camp with the 34th Reinforcements. He is the son of Rev D J Jory of Birkenhead. He was educated at Auckland Grammar School and was a member of the team of rifle shots who went to Natal shooting for the school in 1913. His most notable scholastic achievement was getting first place in the junior scholarship examination for NZ. Also the Gillies Scholarship at the AUC, besides two NZ University senior scholarships for chemistry and physics respectively. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.47

KENNEDY, Private James, killed in action, was a son of Mr & Mrs W Kennedy of Keith St, Wanganui. He left in the 20th Reinforcements. He volunteered early in the war but was rejected. Some months later he enlisted in Taihape and was accepted for active service. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

KEYMER, Corporal George Edward, son of Mr W Keymer of Waimamaku formerly of Mt Eden and Birkdale, who left with the 24th Reinforcement draft in the Auckland Infantry was killed in action on 12 October. Cpl Keymer, who was in his 22nd year, was educated at the Birkdale school and Technical College and was a carpenter by trade. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

KEYMER, Corporal G E, killed in action, was the second son of Mr W Keymer of Waimamaku. He was born in Auckland and educated at the Richmond Road School and Grammar School and Technical College. He later served his time as an apprentice to Mr F Robinson, builder, Birkenhead. Previous to going to the front he worked in the Waikato. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

KINDBERG - The family of Mrs M Kindberg of Vogeltown, New Plymouth, have a fine record. Six sons have seen service on Gallipoli or on the western front. Private Gus (4th Reinforcements) was wounded in the right thigh at Gallipoli and right hip at the Somme. Private Andrew (13th Reinforcements) was wounded in the foot at Messines; Private Robert (11th Reinforcements) returned some time ago having received gunshot wounds in the chest, penetrating the lungs at the Some. Edward (20th Reinforcements) has been ordered back owing to ill health. Two others are at the front, whilst a seventh goes into camp on 9 January. This fine record was laid before the Minister of Defence at the Soldiers’ Club on his visit to New Plymouth and he expressed the opinion that Mrs Kindberg’s family were deserving of congratulation for the part they had played. [AWN 15.11.1917] p.16

KING, Lieutenant Colonel George A, late of Hamilton, who has been killed in action, was a native of Canterbury and was educated there, being an old Christ’s College boy. He formerly was engaged in farming in the northern part of the South Island. On the institution of the territorial system he was appointed adjutant to the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles. Subsequently he was promoted to the charge of No.4 group and he held this position on the outbreak of war, when he immediately volunteered for active service. He left NZ as staff captain in the Mounted Rifle Brigade. He went through the Gallipoli campaign and was wounded there. When the troops returned from Gallipoli to Egypt, Colonel King was placed in charge of the Maori Pioneer Force and so far as latest advices show he held that position until the time of his death. He was the holder of the DSO and also a French decoration. He leaves a wife and two children. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

KING – The late Lieutenant Colonel G A KING, DSO, Croix de Guerre, of the NZ Staff Corps, son of Mr & Mrs George King, New Plymouth, was born in 1885. In 1911 he joined the NZ Staff Corps as lieutenant and was appointed adjutant, 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles, and group commander No.4 Group, Auckland District, in October 1913. In August 1914, he was appointed staff captain to the NZ Rifle Brigade. Leaving with the main body, he served in Egypt and Gallipoli and was appointed second in command of the Auckland Mounted Rifles, with the rank of major and re-transferred to staff captain NZ Mounted Rifles in October 1915. On 1 March 1916 the deceased soldier was given command of the NZ Pioneer Battalion in France with the rank of lieutenant-colonel and he served with this battalion through the Somme and Messines battles. In August last he was appointed to command the First Battalion, Canterbury Infantry Regt, and it was while serving with this regiment that he was killed in action on 12 October. Lieut-Col King leaves a widow and two children who reside at Central Terrace, Kelburn. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.21

LANG, Lieutenant W R, a Military Cross winner, is the elder son of Mrs Charles Lang of Waipu. He left NZ as a second lieutenant in the 9th Reinforcements, was promoted to first lieutenant after the Battle of the Somme and received his decoration for distinguished work at the capture of Messines. He was appointed temporary captain in August. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

LESLIE - When a NZ hospital ship was at Tahiti, one of the wounded men on board, Sergeant Roy J LESLIE of Onehunga, died and was buried with military honours. The English residents will look after the tombstone and supply flowers. The Governor of Tahiti provided a burial plot and expressed his intention of erecting a suitable monument. The English Consul has written to the NZ government asking it to provide a brass plate with the name and inscription and the government has replied promising to do this, thanking the government of Tahiti and asking for copies of photographs of the grave. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.21

LEWIN, Cpl C and Private R A JOHNSON, both Main Body Expeditionary Force, Auckland Infantry Battalion, have been awarded the Military Medal, LEWIN for conspicuously good work at Gallipoli, and JOHNSON for gallant conduct at the Battle of the Somme. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.47

LEWIS, Gunner G F, killed in action, left with the 13th Reinforcements. He was transferred to the machine gun section on arrival in England. His early childhood was spent in Paraguay in the colony founded by the late Mr Wm Lane. Since arriving in NZ in 1905 and until his enlistment, he has been engaged in dairy farming at Maungaturoto. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

LLOYD, Sergeant Leonard John, who has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, of Auckland, 15th Reinforcements, has been on the western front since early this year. He came to NZ from Llandudno as a boy and took up farming in the Taranaki and Wanganui districts. About five years prior to enlisting he retired and lived privately at Cardwell St, Onehunga, where his wife and two daughters now reside. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.24

MacCORMICK, Major Kenneth, NZMC, who has been awarded the DSO, is the only son of Mr C E MacCormick, Judge of the Native Land Court, He is a native of Auckland and received his education at the Parnell and Ellerslie public schools and the Auckland Grammar School. He went to the Otago University as a medical student and when the war broke out he was in his fifth year. He and other fifth year students were permitted to sit the final examinations in advance of the usual time. He passed his examination and volunteered for service, leaving with the Main Body as a lieutenant. He was attached to the Auckland Mounted Rifles and served through the Gallipoli campaign with considerable distinction; in addition to being promoted captain, he was mentioned in despatches by Sir Ian Hamilton. He was invalided home but after spending about two months in NZ he returned to Egypt. [AWN 08.11.1917].P.29

MATTHEWS, Private, killed in action, late of Hastings, was acting as stretcher-bearer at Messines. His officer writes: “After working all night and all day, he brought in another wounded man at 3pm. I told him to lie down for a sleep. Our regimental aid post consisted of only three shell holes on Messines ridge. A shell landed in the one in which he lay, killing him instantly and also three others. Three of us scrambled out but could do nothing for him, though we just saved another man from being buried alive. Matthews was a fine lad and showed no sign of fear.” [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

McDONALD, Lance Corporal Gordon Murray Stewart, killed in action in France on 4 October, was the youngest son of Mrs Janet McDonald and the late Coll. McDonald, McMillan Street, Roslyn, formerly of Kilmog. He was born at Kilmog on 10 October 1895 and was educated at the Evansdale, Merton and George Street school. Prior to leaving with the 21st Reinforcements he served for eight months on coast defence work. His brother James left with the 6th Reinforcements and is at present in France. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

McGAHAN, Private Thomas, Third Pioneer Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces, son of Mrs Thomas McGahan of Tuakau, has been wounded and admitted to Northampton War Hospital, England, on 11 October 1917. Mrs McGahan’s youngest son was killed in the battle of the Somme and another is a member of the Mounted Rifles in Palestine. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

McILROY, George, fifth son of Mr & Mrs J W McIlroy of Cowper St, Greymouth, has been killed in action on 12 October. He was born in Kumara and was 23 years of age. After his primary course at the Kumara school he was educated for six years at the Nelson College and was one of the foremost, both as a scholar and as an athlete. He went to Dunedin and was articled to the firm of Statham & Aspinall, solicitors. In Dunedin he sat for a military examination and obtained his lieutenancy. Under the NZ defence system and especially after the outbreak of war, he was kept very busy in training men. Finally he obtained leave to go to the front and left NZ with the 17th Reinforcements, being officer commanding G Company. His promotion to a captaincy was rapid and for some time past he and his brother, who also joined the forces, have been in the thick of the fighting. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

McKENZIE, 2nd Lieut F E, of Feilding was awarded the Military Cross at Messines for conspicuous gallantry. He has had a distinguished career in the field. Leaving NZ with the Main Body as a private, he attained the rank of sergeant three weeks after the landing at Gallipoli. He was wounded on the peninsula and after his recovery was sent back. He took part in the evacuation and shortly afterwards was sent to France, where he received his commission on the field at the battle of the Somme during which action he was severely wounded on two occasions. Lt McKenzie, who is reported to have taken part in nearly every action in which the New Zealanders were engaged, only arrived in England five days before the departure of the contingent of which he was a member. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.16

McKINSTRY, Private Laurence James, killed in action, was the third son of Mr J McKinstry of Papakura. He was educated at the Papakura district school and later was apprenticed to McGregor and Montgomery of Auckland. Later he went to Taranaki but returned to Papakura a few years ago. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

McRAE, Captain Phillip Felton, Rifle Brigade, was the eldest son of Mr G R McRae and was born at Palmerston North and educated at Tokomaru school and Palmerston High School. He came north to Hoteo six years ago, with his parents. He was posted to the 15th, North Auckland, Regiment and took a keen interest in his military duties, riding five miles to drill, often through rain and mud at night. He rapidly rose through all grades, finally gaining his commission as first lieutenant. He left NZ on 9 October 1915. He was promoted captain in June 1916. He has been through all the fighting with the New Zealanders and was never wounded or sick. After the Somme battle he had his first leave to England. He was 26 years old and was a grandson of the late Phillip R McRae, Blairich Run, Marlborough, and also of the late John Felton Heighway, mining engineer, Thames. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

MELVILLE, Pte Donald, 33rd Reinforcements, died at Featherston Military Camp of cerebro-spinal meningitis. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

MICHAEL, Corporal Henry W, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is a partner in the firm H W Michael & Co., merchants, Navua, Fiji. He was born in Fiji and educated in Auckland. He is known as a crack rifle shot and won several medals and trophies. Two years ago he went to England and joined an Imperial regiment. When last heard of he ranked as a Corporal in charge of scouts, snipers and observers. About a month ago at Ypres he was wounded and invalided to England. Mrs Michael and their two children are living in Auckland. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.16

A most impressive service in memory of the late Lieut H A E MILNES was held at St Paul’s Church, Auckland, last week. He was formerly principle of Auckland Training College for Teachers. He was killed on active service in France on 4 October 1917. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.24

MOFFATT, Private Alf., who was killed in action on 3 October 1917, was the younger son of Mr J Moffatt of Wharehine and was 22 years of age. He enlisted in the 11th Reinforcements but owing to sickness was transferred to the 12th. He was taken ill with pleurisy in Egypt and for some time was in hospital in England with throat trouble. He went to France at the end of June 1917. He was a member of the 4th Brigade and was in the Otago Battalion. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

MONK, Private Frank L, who was killed in action on 12 October, was the only son of Mr W J Monk of Arawa Street. Prior to leaving for the front he was successively employed in the offices of the NZ Loan & Mercantile Agency Co at Palmerston North & Hamilton. He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and after leaving school he was for some time in Messrs Gillespie & Sons office. He was a grandson of the late Mr Richard Monk formerly MHR for Waitemata. He was 26 years of age. He left with the 20th Reinforcements. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

MOORE, Captain W E, M.C., of the Royal Field Artillery, was reported missing on 14 November. Captain Moore, who is a barrister & solicitor, left Auckland about ? months ago. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

NANKERVIS, Private William H, reported killed in action on 22 October, was the third son of Mrs H C Nankervis, Elgin St, Grey Lynn. He left with the 17th Reinforcements and had seen considerable service when he was awarded the Military Medal. He left a widow and three young children who reside in Union St, Auckland. His two younger brothers have been wounded and are now in England. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.16

NEILD, Private C W, killed in action, formerly resided at Paeroa with his parents. He was 22 years old and when he enlisted was in the employ of the Waihi Paeroa Gold Extraction Co. He left NZ with the 18th Reinforcements and four months ago was wounded. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

NELSON, Private Bart., killed in action, was the elder son of Mr B Nelson of Crummer Rd, Grey Lynn. He was born in Natal, South Africa and came to NZ about nine years ago. At the age of 18, whilst employed in the Immigration Dept, Wellington, he enlisted and left with the 16th Reinforcements. Invalided owing to shell shock and classed as ‘unfit for service’, he nevertheless again volunteered and went on active service. His father and grandfather both served in the British Army and his great-grandfather fought and died in the Crimean war. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

NEWTON, Sergeant George, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr & Mrs G W Newton of Newtown, Wellington. He served throughout the Gallipoli campaign and received his promotion to sergeant in France where he served with the Canterbury Infantry. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

NICKLIN, Private A, of the 9th Reinforcements, who was killed in action on 4 October, was one of four sons of Mr A Nicklin of Putaruru who have been in the firing-line. Gunner L M NICKLIN, who enlisted with the Main Body was wounded at the Somme. Private Edgar NICKLIN, who left with the 19th Reinforcements, and Corporal H NICKLIN of the Royal Warwickshire Regt, are the two other brothers. The four soldiers were born at Walsall, Staffordshire, England. [AWN 15.11.1917] p.16

NIGHTINGALE, Rifleman Cliff M, was born in Auckland Province and on leaving school was on the staff of the Whangarei Advocate. He subsequently joined the reporting staff of the ‘New Zealand Herald’, remaining there till he left for camp last year, subsequently sailing with the 22nd Reinforcements. He is highly popular with his comrades. During the voyage Home he won two first prizes for literary contributions to the reinforcement magazine, the Navuan Nautilus. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

O’BRIEN, Charles, Driver, ASC, formerly of Wellington, died at the Trentham Military Hospital on Thursday. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

A treasured relic of Gallipoli in the shape of a small book entitled ‘Precious Promises’ which was found by an Australian soldier at Gallipoli after a charge of the Anzacs, has just found an owner at Auckland. The book was the property of Corporal R WOODHOUSE, son of Mrs A Woodhouse of Auckland who is now serving on the western front. The recovery was the outcome of a paragraph in a Sydney newspaper. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.51

OVERINGTON, Private Albert, seriously wounded, was farming at Hoteo, North Auckland when he enlisted in the 24th Reinforcements. He was previously employed as a carpenter by the Railway Dept. He was born in Surrey, England, and is one of six brothers now on active service. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.17

PALMER, Regimental Sergeant Major W, wounded on 18 November in Palestine, is the son of Mr W Palmer of Leicester, England. He left NZ with the Main Body, with the Auckland Mounted Rifles. He has been awarded the Military Cross. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

PARTON, Sergeant R A, who has been awarded the Military Medal, left NZ with the 5th Reinforce-ments in June 1915 and has served continuously ever since, having fought at Gallipoli, in Egypt and in France. He is the youngest son of Mr W Parton of Wellington. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

PATTON, Rifleman William Charles, killed in action, was a son of Mr John Patton of Pip Pio. He was born in Upper Tairua, Thames. He enlisted at the Thames in 1915 and proceeded to Egypt with the 3rd Battalion of the Rifle Brigade early in 1916. He was 28 years of age. On the day previous to his death, his brother in law Private J D MICHIE of the Machine-gun Section, of the Auckland Infantry Regt, was killed. A brother Private Cuthbert H PATTON of the Lewis Gun Section, was wounded in the Somme advance. He returned to the Dominion last August and is at present an inmate of King George’s Hospital, Rotorua. Another brother, Terence F P PATTON, has just reached military age and enlisted. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.16

PEARCE, Sergeant Arthur H, killed in action on 23 October, was the second son of Mr F A Pearce of Te Kuiti and late of Whangarei. He was 27 years of age and left with the 6th Reinforcements of the Wellington Infantry. He was educated at the Whangarei High School and was in charge of the Public Trust Office at New Plymouth when he enlisted. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

PEPPERELL, L/Cpl Frank, killed in action, was the oldest son of Mr & Mrs W F Pepperell who are amongst the oldest residents of Lichfield. He was born there 23 ½ years ago and resided with his parents up to the time of his enlistment in the 14th Reinforcements. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

PERRIN, Private John H P, killed in action, was the third son of Mr & Mrs W Perrin, Spring Street, Onehunga where he was born. Pte Perrin, who was married, was a member of the Onehunga Volunteer Fire Brigade for twelve years and won several medals at fire brigade competitions. He left for the front with the 19th Reinforcements. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

POLAND, Gunner Frank, killed in action, was the second son of Mr Hugh Poland, MP, of Paeroa, and was 22 years of age. He was born at Paeroa and educated there and at the Thames High School. He joined the staff of the Bank of NZ and enlisted from the Hamilton branch of the bank with the 12th Reinforcements. He had previously enlisted with the Main Body but was rejected as too young. His elder brother James, who joined the 7th Reinforcements, was wounded at Armentieres in August 1915 and has since returned home and been discharged. Another brother, Roy, is now in camp. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.17

PORRITT, Lieutenant Eric Ainslie, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is a son of Colonel E W Porritt of Paeroa, officer commanding the 6th, Hauraki, Regt. He completed his education at the Wellington College. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

REDSTONE, Corporal Bernard D, son of Mr & Mrs J E Redstone of Gisborne, previously reported missing, was killed in action on 4 October. He left with the 25th Reinforcements. He was very well known all over the Gisborne district and had a wide circle of friends. He was educated at the Gisborne main and high schools and on leaving school entered the engineering profession but was compelled to relinquish this after three years as a result of bad health. He then joined the staff of Kirk Burnand & Sievwright, solicitors, and prior to enlisting was engaged in the motor business of Messrs J E Redstone Ltd. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

REIDPATH, Lance Corporal J G, a soldier on garrison duty in Samoa, has discovered that during his absence on service he has been called up in the 10th ballot in the Hauraki group. He enlisted in January of last year and has been on service ever since. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

REEVES, Flight Lieutenant Fabian P, son of the Hon. W Pember Reeves, who was reported missing on 6 June, is now believed to have been killed on that date. He was only 21 years of age. [AWN 29.11.1917, p.17]

ROLLETT - A cablegram has been received stating that Dereck Carr ROLLETT was wounded and gassed in France on 16 October. Owing to some mistake this name appeared in the casualty lists as D CARR. A later cablegram states that he is progressing satisfactorily. He is the youngest son of Mr Wm Carr Rollett of Matamuku Downs, Tokoroa and joined the 22nd Specialist Corps but transferred to the infantry. Mr Rollett’s eldest son Ray was killed at Gallipoli. The third son Norman, who was also in the NZ Expeditionary Forces, is in an English hospital recovering from an attack of pneumonia. [AWN 15.11.1917] p.16

ROSE, Lieutenant E Jack, killed in action, was the third son of Mr R G Rose of Gladwyn Rd, Epsom. He was educated at Nelson College and later at King’s College, Auckland. He was a keen football and tennis player. He afterwards became a student at St John’s College, Tamaki. In January 1916 as a corporal he went into camp where he soon gained promotion, finally winning a commission in the 19th Reinforcements. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

ROSE, Private William of Tirau, killed in action, enlisted with the 20th Reinforcements. He was educated at King’s College and was for some time employed by Wingate & Co, Auckland. Later he joined his brother in partnership in the firm of Rose Bros. Ltd., of Tirau. His brother Frank left NZ with a reinforcement draft recently. Private Rose’s mother now resides at Mt Eden. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

ROSE, Private William, killed in action, was the youngest son of Mrs C L Rose of Mt Eden. He was born at Tirau 19 years ago and was educated at King’s College. On leaving school he was employed at Messrs Wingate’s Ltd in Auckland. Subsequently he joined his brother Lance Corporal Frank ROSE, in the business of Rose Bros Ltd at Tirau. He enlisted and left with the 17th Reinforcements. He took part in several important engagements on the western front, including the battle of Messines and was killed in the action east of Ypres on 4 October. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

SANDERSON, Private A R, who died of wounds, was the youngest son of Mr W L Sanderson of Ahuroa where he was born and educated. He entered the Railway Service in 1913 and at the time of his enlistment in the 9th Reinforcements was porter on the North Auckland Main Trunk line. His brother, who went to Gallipoli with the 3rd Reinforcements, is serving in France. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

SANDERSON, Private Benjamin, killed in action in France on 23 October, was the fourth son of Mrs E and the late Benjamin Sanderson, Okupu, Great Barrier. He is one of four brothers who volunteered for active service. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.16

SCOTT, Lieutenant V R S, killed in action, left with the 12th Reinforcements as 2nd Lieutenant, gaining promotion on the field in June. Prior to his enlistment he was farming in the Waikato. He leaves a widow. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

SCOTT, Driver William, second son of Mrs W A Scott, First Avenue, Kingsland, was wounded on 24 October. He enlisted at Gisborne. Her other son, John O SCOTT, who was wounded some time ago, is at present at Hornchurch Convalescent Home. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

SEAWARD, 2nd Lieut Cyril F, who has been awarded the Military Cross, left NZ with the Main Body and participated in the Gallipoli campaign. He was invalided to England on account of sunstroke but later returned to Gallipoli. He was then wounded in the lung and sent back to Egypt. Later he returned to NZ where he obtained his commission and again went away with the 23rd Reinforcements. He was born in England and had only been in NZ about five years before the war. For some time he was employed by Dalgety & Co., at Auckland and later he became manager of the Farmers’ Freezing Co. at Te Awamutu. His elder brother Noel was killed in France while serving with the Ambulance Corps and his younger brother is at present in the Flying Corps. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.29

SHARLAND – Advice that his nephew Flight Lieutenant Frederick James SHARLAND, RFC, was killed in action in France on 24 October, has been received by Mr F W Brookfield of St Heliers Bay. Lieut Sharland, who is the son of the late Mr F C Sharland, was 33 years of age. He was born and educated in Auckland. After attending a course at the Kohimarama Flying School he accompanied his mother to England, arriving early last March. After passing the tests of the Royal Flying Corps with honours, he was granted a commission in the corps and was on duty in France till the time of his death. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

SHIRTCLIFFE, Lance Corporal John A, killed in action, was the only son of Mr & Mrs J Shirtcliffe of Lillington Road, Remuera. He was educated at the Newton West and Remuera schools and when he enlisted was apprenticed to the painting trade. He was only 19 years old. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

SMITH, Lieutenant Albert D, killed in action, aged 23, was a son of Mr Robert Smith of High Street, Waimate. Previous to enlisting he had served his time as a chemist. He left for camp a year ago last January and left with the 14th Reinforcements. He was sent to France, where he was wounded on 16 November 1916. He had a broken ankle. After a few months he got his promotion as first lieutenant. [AWN 22.11.1917] P.21

SPACCESSI, Private, killed in action, was well known in Levin, where he had resided for some time before going on active service. He was born in Bastia, Corsica, 22 years ago and had been in NZ about two years. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

STABLES, Lieutenant R H, who has died of wounds, was a resident of Auckland for about four years prior to enlisting. He was the son of a school teacher who was a resident of Auckland many years ago but who subsequently resided in Napier and Dunedin. Lt Stables also was a teacher for some time but several years ago he left that profession and commenced journalistic work at Invercargill. He left the latter town to join the reporting staff of the Auckland Star. Shortly after the war broke out he spent his annual holiday in a hospital for the purpose of undergoing an operation necessary to make him fit for active service. Subsequently he enlisted in the 16th Reinforcements. He obtained a commission in NZ and left with the 22nd Reinforcements as a 2nd Lieutenant. He was married shortly before leaving the Dominion, his wife being a daughter of Captain J Clarke of Onehunga. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

STERRITT, Sergeant D, wounded in October, was last week awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He is the eldest son of Mr & Mrs D Sterritt of Pirongia. He was born in Co. Donegal, Ireland, and upon coming to NZ with his parents joined the Police force. He joined the Otago Infantry 18th Reinforcements. When in Ireland he joined the North Ireland Horse and was a sergeant in the regiment for a number of years. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

THOMPSETT, Second Lieutenant Norman, NZIA, killed in action on 12 October, was a native of Kent. He was an architect by profession. He went to the front with an early reinforcement and saw service at Gallipoli. He was invalided to England as the result of enteric fever and after a prolonged convalescence at Hornchurch, proceeded to the western front where he was transferred from the Auckland Battalion to the Otago Battalion. He was selected on the field for a commission and after qualifying in England he returned to the firing line. [AWN 15.11.1917] P.21

TUNKS, Corporal Wilfred D, killed in action, was the son of Mr C J Tunks, solicitor, View Road, Mt Eden. He was 22 years of age and had been on active service for over two years. Born in Auckland, he was educated at King’s College and the Grammar School. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

TWISLETON, Captain F M, Auckland Mounted Rifles, has died of wounds. He went with the 2nd Reinforcements, taking with him into camp forty members of the Poverty Bay squadron of the Legion of Frontiersmen. They were attached to the Otago Mounted Rifles to make up deficiencies. He gained the Military Cross for service on Gallipoli. When the troops were sent to France the Otago Mounted Rifles under his command were formed into a company of the Pioneer Battalion and he served with them throughout the Somme and Messines operations. Latterly there was further reorganisation and Capt Twistleton, who had been suffering in health, applied for a transfer to Palestine. This was apparently granted as he is listed with the Auckland Mounted Rifles. Mrs Twisleton and children are at present residing in England. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

VEALE, A A, Lieutenant, RFC, Cambridge, who recently returned to duty after being badly wounded is now fighting instructor and home defence pilot at a flying station in the home counties, where he is regularly employed on anti-raid duty. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

VINCENT, Sergeant G A, son of Mrs J Fowler, Kingsland, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. He volunteered to go forward under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire to obtain information. He got to within 60 yards of the enemy front line returning with the required information although he had to pass through a hail of machine-gun bullets. He again went out and manned a Lewis gun near the enemy lines and held on with eight men for 38 hours. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.20

VINCENT, Private Mark, killed in action, was the youngest son of Mr W Vincent of Ngaruawahia. He left with the Main Body and had been on active service ever since. He was in the landing at Gallipoli and was wounded some months later. He left with the first troops for France. He was in the NZ Divisional Signalling Co. of the 3rd, Auckland, Company. He was well known in football circles. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

WARD, Gladstone, Lieutenant, son of Sir Joseph Ward, after serving for more than a year in the mechanical transport branch of the ASC at various stations in the United Kingdom, left for Egypt in March. There he was detailed for duty in Palestine on the transport of the artillery. Later he was transferred to the Tank Corps, with which important unit he has been ever since. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

WATERS, Sergeant Rupert L, who is reported wounded, is a son of Captain Waters of Clevedon. Private advice has been received that he is seriously ill in El Arish Hospital with gunshot wounds in the left arm. Only a month or two ago he was discharged from hospital, having received gunshot wounds in his right arm at the engagement at Gaza. His younger brother, Sergeant Mervyn L WATERS, sailed and served with him on Gallipoli and in the Egyptian campaign until killed in action at El Romani. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

WATERS, Captain D, left NZ with the Tunnellers. He was with his corps right through the Arras campaign and other operations. He was invalided home owing to sickness. [AWN 01.11.1917, p.17]

WEBB – The fruitgrowing community in particular has sustained a severe loss in the death of the late Sergeant T C WEBB, who has recently been reported killed in action in France. Before he enlisted he was an officer of the Orchards Division of the Dept of Agriculture. He carried out the arduous duties of secretary of the National Apple Show held in Wellington in 1916 and his work in this connection had much to do with the successful inauguration of the NZ Fruitgrowers’ Federation. The Department devoted Mr Webb’s services to this work alone for some considerable time and he generously spent the great part of his own leisure time to it for many weeks and was untiring in his efforts to make it a success. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

WEST Corporal Herbert J, who was killed in action on 4 October, left NZ with the 14th Reinforcements. He was the eldest son of Mr Frank N West of Kingsland. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

WHITEHORN, A H S, Major, AMR, is in temporary command of the training units and depots in Egypt, in place of Lieutenant Colonel C R SPRAGG, WMR, who is commanding the Desert Column Rest Camp at Port Said. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17

WILKINSON – Still another Hastings boy has made the supreme sacrifice. Mr F C Wilkinson of Southampton St, Hastings, was advised by the Minister of Defence that his brother, Private A V WILKINSON, had died of wounds on 20 October. The late private enlisted at Hastings with the 22nd Reinforcements and, prior to this, held the position of secretary to the Hastings firm of Lowe’s Ltd. He was the second son of Mr E Wilkinson of Gisborne where he was well known. About three years ago he married Nurse BARKER who died 12 months ago at the Napier Hospital. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.22

WILSON, Private Harry W, of the Machine-gun Corps, who was killed in action in Palestine last month, was a son of Mr J E Wilson of Clevedon. An elder brother, Sergeant Douglas WILSON of the Main Body, of the Auckland Mounted Rifles, was killed on Gallipoli. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.20

WINTER-EVANS, Lieut Col A, killed in action, left NZ with the Rifle Brigade. Prior to joining the Expeditionary Force he held a commission in the Motor Service Corps. He was manager of the Consolidated Goldfields at Reefton. He was awarded the DSO for gallantry at Messines. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.22

A treasured relic of Gallipoli in the shape of a small book entitled ‘Precious Promises’ which was found by an Australian soldier at Gallipoli after a charge of the Anzacs, has just found an owner at Auckland. The book was the property of Corporal R WOODHOUSE, son of Mrs A Woodhouse of Auckland who is now serving on the western front. The recovery was the outcome of a paragraph in a Sydney newspaper. [AWN 08.11.1917] p.51

WORNER, Corporal G W, killed in action in France, was born in Geraldine and came to Auckland eight years ago. For four years prior to enlisting in the 19th Reinforcements he was a member of the City Fire Brigade. Deceased, who was 30 years of age, was well known as a footballer, having played for the City Rovers and Grafton Athletic clubs. Three years ago he was also a member of the Waitemata Boating Club. His two brothers, Alex and Alfred, left with the 14th Reinforcements. The first-named brother has been killed and the other has been wounded. [AWN 01.11.1917] P.17

WORTH, Sergeant W V, aged 27, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the son of Mr W H Worth of Helensville. He left with the Rifle Brigade but has since transferred to the Engineers. He was wounded on the Somme and upon recovery returned to France. He was Chief Clerk in the office of Mr Stanley Chambers, public accountant. [AWN 08.11.1917] P.24

YOUNG, R, Brig-General, was very unfortunate in receiving a wound the day after he took over command of his brigade. He was, in fact, in the act of taking it over from Acting Brigadier A E STEWART when he received a bullet wound through the neck. Injury to the lung has since developed and it is unlikely that General Young will be able to return to duty for a month or two. [AWN 29.11.1917] P.17


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