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NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
PERSONNEL PARAGRAPHS
MARCH 1919

These are extracts from the Auckland Weekly News magazines and have been extracted with permission. Thanks to Jackie Walles for these.

MARCH 1919

BROWNE, 2nd Lieutenant L H, son of Mr H G Browne, Clevedon, has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the field. Sergeant LOOKER and Private SMITH, also of Clevedon, have won the Military Medal. [AWN 13.03.1919, p.19]

CARR, Captain J A, DSC, of the Royal Air Force, has been granted his discharge and is returning to Auckland. He was with the NZ forces at the occupation of Samoa and was present at the surrender of the German fleet, being on HMS Furious, the sea-plane carrier. [AWN 06.03.1919] p.23

EVERS, Private John of Devonport, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. He returned to New Zealand on the Zealandic (sic). [AWN 06.03.1919] p.34

HARDHAM, Major W J, V.C., who has been seriously ill with a recurrence of malarial fever which he contracted during the Boer War, is still in Victoria Hospital, Wellington. He was reported on Wednesday to be improving. [AWN 27.03.1919] p.23

LOCKIE, Cpl John Noel, a New Zealander serving with the Royal Engineers, has been awarded the Medaille Militaire. [AWN 13.03.1919] p.20

MASSEY, Major F G,DSO, MC, son of the Prime Minister, has joined Messrs Earl Kent, Solicitors, in partnership. Major Massey, having been severely wounded, returned home from the front a few months ago and recently received his discharge. After serving in Egypt he was drafted to France and took part in the first Somme and Ypres battles in respect of which he was twice mentioned in despatches. At Messines he won the Military Cross and after the second battle of the Somme, where he was wounded, he was awarded the DSO. He has recovered from his wounds. [AWN 06.03.1919] p.23

McILVEEN, Lieutenant S H, RNVR, of Auckland, who has been on patrol service for two years, is seriously ill in hospital at Salonika. [AWN 27.03.1919] p.23

NEEDHAM, Rifleman Oscar, a discharged soldier, died at the King George V Orthopaedic Hospital on 19 February, the certified cause of death being cerebro-spinal meningitis. Deceased was 29 years of age and single, his next of kin being his father, William Bass Needham, Great Malvern, England. [AWN 06.03.1919] p.19

REED, Captain Mervyn R, son of Mr J R Reed, K.C., who has been on active service throughout almost the whole of the war period, returned to Auckland on Saturday. He went to the front as a Second Lieutenant in the Auckland Mounted Rifles. He saw much service in Egypt and towards the end of 1916 was mentioned in despatches. In January 1917 he was severely wounded at the Battle of Rafa but he made a good recovery and returned to the firing line. In August of the same year he was promoted to Captain and given the position of second in command of the 4th Waikato Squadron, Auckland Mounted Regiment. He was invalided to NZ at the end of 1917 but again returned to the front. He was with the forces when the New Zealanders made their record capture of 10,000 Turks. He later contracted malaria in the Jordan Valley and returned to Australia in charge of a draft of New Zealanders on the transport Nestor. He suffered scarlet fever on the ship and spent two weeks in hospital in Melbourne, the draft coming to Auckland in the Mamari. He is an old King’s College boy and subsequent to leaving college was attached as Lieutenant to the Dilworth Institute cadets. [AWN 06.03.1919] p.17

REYNOLDS, Sergeant H E – A free scholarship at Oxford University for a period of three years with a grant of £250 per annum has been granted to Sgt Reynolds, son of Mrs Reynolds, Kenyon Ave, Mt Eden. Prior to departure with the 27th Reinforcements, he had a distinguished scholastic career with Auckland Grammar School and later at the University College. He was one of the two Auckland candidates for the Rhodes Scholarship 1916. He is presently engaged as an Instructor in connection with the educational scheme being carried out among the wounded at Hornchurch. [AWN 06.03.1919] p.24

RICHMOND, Major J M, DSO, MC, RNZA – “Few people in NZ will realise” writes Brigadier General G N JOHNSTON, Commander, Royal Artillery, NZ Division “that in Major J M Richmond, who was killed by a 5.9 shell on the high road between Soleames and le Quesnoy on the afternoon of Sunday, 27 October, 1918, New Zealand lost one of her most promising staff officers. Leaving NZ with the Main Body in October 1914, he served with the NZ Field Artillery without a break until the day of his death. He landed in the first boat conveying NZ troops to the shore at Gallipoli and remained at Anzac till the final day of evacuation, when he embarked in the last boat, having volunteered to assist in the blowing up of an old 5 inch howitzer which was kept in action till the last moment. His orders were models of what orders should be; lucid and concise, they were never misunderstood. In thirty years’ experience I have never known an officer who could so quickly grasp a complicated tactical situation and make it appear simple in orders. He also had a capacity for mental endurance and could continue working for 24 hours at a stretch during operations, only giving in when the critical stages of a battle were over, when it was his habit to sleep for some 12 to 16 hours at a stretch. His eye for country was excellent; he could walk over a new bit of country, go back to headquarters and draw a very accurate panoramic sketch of it from memory. On ordinary days he visited the batteries, brigades and observation stations and never shrank from carrying out his duty, no matter how dangerous. He hated bloodshed and the writer well remembers his horror as seeing blood during the first day of landing at Gallipoli. When inoculated he always fainted and yet there were few braver men in the division. On one of the last occasions on which the writer saw him he was trying to stem the flow of blood from a horse which had just been wounded near Havricourt Wood. Should some future NZ artillery officer wish to get a thorough knowledge of modern war in so far as it effects artillery, and to learn how to write orders, he could do not better than to take as his model those written by Major J M Richmond, RNZA.” [AWN 06.03.1919] p.22

STATHAM, Lieutenant W H, son of Mr W H Statham, of Epsom, has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry during operations from 3 November to the end of hostilities. He went to the front three years ago as Sergeant with the 1st Reinforcements in the Fiji Contingent. Upon gaining his commission he was posted to the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry and served with this regiment with Sir Julian Byng’s Third Army in the last phase of the war as Intelligence Office for his battalion. In this capacity, according to the official record, he secured most valuable information and displayed courage of the highest order. [AWN 20.03.1919] p.23

The body of Mr Charles STEVENS, a returned soldier missing since 26 February, was found last week by ex Constable MABER when crossing the Wanganui River near Winter’s Island. [AWN 13.03.1919] p.18


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