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NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
PERSONNEL PARAGRAPHS
JULY 1917

These are extracts from the Auckland Weekly News magazines and have been extracted with permission. Thanks to Jackie Walles for these.

JULY 1917

ADDISON, Captain A S, is about 26 years of age and a native of Victoria, having obtained his medical degree at the Melbourne University. For about two years prior to enlisting he was on the staff of the Auckland Hospital in the capacity of junior resident medical officer. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

ALISON, Private Charles F, reported missing is the eldest son of Mr T Alison, builder, Devonport. He is 24 years of age and prior to enlisting nearly two years ago was employed by Macky Logan Caldwell & Co. Ltd. He is a nephew of Messrs E W & Alex. Alison. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

ALLEN, Lieut Colonel R C, awarded the Distinguished Service Order, was formerly of Annandale, Piako. He succeeded Lieut Col PLUGGE in command of a reinforcement draft in September 1915 with the rank of major. He is a brother of Lieut Col S S ALLEN who is also in command of a battalion. Lt Col Allen was wounded in the Messines battle. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

ANDREW, Private Clifford, killed in action on 27 June, was the elder son of Mr John Andrew, 25 Ponsonby Rd and was 21 years of age. He was educated at the Hamilton West and Ponsonby schools. After leaving school he was apprenticed to the cabinetmaking and served four years in his trade. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

ANDREWS, Private T, killed in action on 13 June, was born at Fingal, Tasmania. At the time of his enlistment he was employed in Hamilton by Messrs Hayter and Gunn. His only relative in NZ is Mr R A Andrews of Hamilton. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

ATKINSON, Private J, killed in action in France, was the second son of Mr James Atkinson of Waihi. Prior to enlisting last year deceased followed the occupation of miner and was in the employ of the Waihi Gold Mining Co. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

BAILEY, Lieut Allan, Field Artillery, an Aucklander, has been killed in action. A younger brother was killed in February. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.22

BARR – the death has occurred in the Balkans of Captain Hugh BARR, RAMC, of Dunedin. He received his commission in 1915 and for one year was attached to the 28th General Hospital. Last October he was in London on furlough. [AWN 26.07.1917] p.21

BARTON, Second Lieutenant J M, Canterbury Infantry, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is a son of the late Mr James Barton of Dunedin. He went to the front with the fifth reinforcements and saw service in Gallipoli. Two brothers are also serving – Lieutenant J H BARTON in the Australian Navy and Corporal F B BARTON in the Otago Infantry. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

BASSETT, Trooper Sam, husband of Mrs A Bassett of 5 Haslett St, Eden Terrace, was gassed on 28 June and is now in Walton on Thames Hospital. He enlisted in 1915. He is the youngest son of Mrs J Bassett of Ellerslie. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

BAXTER, Bombardier James N, Artillery, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is well known in the Waikato. He is the second son of Mr James Baxter, Ohaupo. Prior to the war Bdr Baxter was engaged in the office of Watts, Hunt & Armstrong. He took a keen interest in territorial training, being an enthusiastic member of G Battery. He left with an early reinforcement. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

BENNETT, Private Clifford H, reported missing, is a son of Mrs R Bennett of Ruawai. He was born at Tairua 25 years ago and was for a number of years on the staff of Bycroft Ltd., Auckland. He is well known among the junior grades of football as ‘Paeroa Bennett’, he having captained his team for several seasons. His grandfather, Mr Mathew Bradley, fought in the Maori War. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

BISHOP - The number of Auckland fighting families who have sent all their sons to the war is constantly increasing. The three sons of Mr J Bishop of Dun Egan, Titirangi, have all enlisted as volunteers. The eldest son, J BISHOP, who left NZ as a sergeant last year, received a commission in London after several months’ service in France and has returned to the Front. Sergeant T A BISHOP, the second son, after being detained on duty for some months in England, also recently went to France. The third and youngest son is Private W N C BISHOP, who is now in camp. The three brothers were educated at the Titirangi and Avondale schools and the Auckland Grammar School. Their grandfather, the late Mr J Bishop, fought in one of the Maori wars. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.16

BISSET, Private Athol L (Jack), was born and educated at Opuawhanga. He was engaged in farming. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48 (Listed under “Men who have Fallen”)

BOLLARD, Corporal E A, who has died of wounds, left NZ with an early reinforcement and took part in the landing on Gallipoli, when he was wounded; upon his recovery he rejoined his unit and remained until the evacuation. In France he served as a Lewis machine-gunner. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

BRAY, Sapper Harold Roy, who died of wounds on Easter Monday last, was the eldest son of Mrs P Bray, Campbell Rd, Onehunga. He was 23 years of age. He left NZ in an early reinforcement and was transferred to the Engineers in Egypt before leaving for France. He served his time to the carpentering trade with his uncle, W J Sayers, of Onehunga. He took a keen interest in athletic sports and put up some good performances as a sprinter. He was also a prominent member of the Northern Union Football Assn. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

BRETT, Sub Lieut Leslie H, son of Mr Arthur R Brett, was killed in a flying accident on 22 July. He was 23 years of age. He was educated at King’s College and subsequently joined the staff of the Auckland ‘Star’. He enlisted on the outbreak of war and after a term of service with the Samoan Advance Guard, returned to Auckland and obtained his discharge. Having considerable mechanical experience he went to England and joined the Royal Naval Flying Corps. On completion of his course at the Flying School, he was sent on service to the Mediterranean where he participated in several aerial engagements. On one occasion his machine fell into the sea but he escaped serious injury. Two of his brothers are now serving with the NZEF. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.47

BRUCE, Temporary Captain David, Pioneer Battalion, was recently reported slightly wounded. Through a telegraphic error his rank was given as Corporal. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.20

BURNAND, Lance Corporal Harry, killed in action, was born at Otorohanga in September 1892. He was educated at the Otorohanga school and Hamilton High School. In 1909 he entered the office of Ellis & Burnand at Manunui and remained there until October 1915 when he left for Trentham. At Trentham he was transferred into the Machine Gun Co., attached to the Rifle Brigade. He was promoted lance corporal in the field in France. His parents, Mr & Mrs J H D Burnand, reside at Mahunui. Cpl Burnand was one of two sons. The eldest son, Jack, was wounded in Egypt last year and is now fighting in Palestine. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

BUTT, Private Henry M, second son of Mr C Butt, Whangarei, aged 19, has been killed in action. He left with a later reinforcement and landed in England last March. For the two years prior to enlistment he was employed at the Whangarei Heads freezing works. An older brother is a Sergeant Major in the Defence Office, Hawera. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

CALLENDER, 2nd Lieutenant Geoffrey Gordon, awarded the silver medal of the Order of the Crown of Italy, is the son of Mr W Callender, general manager of the Bank of NZ. He is now stationed at No.1 School of Aerial Gunnery, Hythe. He was one of the first pupils of the NZ Flying School, Kohimarama, where he qualified for his commission. The act for which he has gained the Italian honour was probably the following: Flying over the German lines he engaged an enemy aeroplane and brought it down. He was, however, wounded in the cheek and his engine stopping, he had to volplane from a height of 10,000ft. with ten miles to go to reach his own lines. On the way down he was engaged by another German aviator but he accounted for him and succeeded in landing safely in his own lines. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

CAUSER, Private Walter, third son of Mr John Causer of Maungaturoto, was killed in action in Flanders on 21 June. He was in his 40th year. He was educated in the Maungaturoto school and has since carried on farming operations in the neighbourhood. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

CLARKE, Walter John, formerly 9th Reinforcements, NZEF. The death occurred at the Military Annex to the Auckland Public Hospital, on Thursday of Walter John CLARKE. When the transport on which the late soldier left NZ was at Albany, a man fell overboard and the deceased dived in to the rescue. He injured himself internally be so doing, an operation being found necessary upon his arrival in Egypt. In consequence, he was invalided to NZ and had been under medical treatment at intervals ever since. Deceased’s son, who was between 16 and 17 years of age, managed to get away with a reinforcement and was wounded and taken prisoner, subsequently dying while a prisoner of war in Germany. Deceased’s next of kin is his brother, Mr W H Clarke of Bond St, Grey Lynn. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.20

CLINKER, Rifleman H S, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry at Messines, is the third son of Mr & Mrs H Clinker, Mackay St, Thames. He attended Kaueranga School and enlisted in the 13th Reinforcements. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

COBB, Lieutenant J W, whose death has been reported, left NZ as sergeant of the Wellington Infantry Regiment, Main Body, and was wounded shortly after landing at Gallipoli. After recovering from his wounds in Egypt he returned to Gallipoli and was promoted to company sergeant major. He remained on the peninsula until the evacuation. Prior top embarkation for France he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and transferred to the Auckland Infantry Regt. On arrival in France he was attached to the Australian Mining Corps and later to the NZ Tunnelling Corps but was recalled to his unit early this year. Prior to enlisting he was a joiner, having lived in Te Kuiti for about seven years. He was a keen territorial. His sister, Mrs Blackman, resides at Te Kuiti. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

COFFEY, Private Maurice, the only son of Mr Edward Coffey, for many years in the Telegraph Dept., at Auckland. Private Coffey was at the Mt Roskill school and was apprenticed as a letterpress machinist. He left with the contingent which took possession of Samoa. About a year later Private Coffey returned to Auckland and re-enlisted. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

COOPER, Lieutenant A C, M.C., son of Mrs A Agnew, Waihi, has been killed in action. He left NZ with the Main Body and gained his commission on the field. He is credited with having captured the first German machine-gun that came to the New Zealanders. He came through the Gallipoli campaign uninjured. In the Somme battle he was wounded but remained at his post and kept up revolver fire on the enemy. It was in connection with this incident that the Military Cross was awarded. The deceased is well known as a footballer. [AWN 05.1917] P.28

CORIN, Corporal William Bennett, husband of Mrs F J Corin of Otahuhu, has died of wounds in the Third London General Hospital on 14 June. He was in Australia when war was declared and joined the Australian Forces as a private. He took part in the Somme battle where he received his wounds that proved fatal. His only son, Private William H CORIN, is on active service in France, having left NZ with one of the early contingents. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

COX, Rifleman R J, killed in action at Messines on June 7, was the eldest son of Mr R Cox of Matatoki, Thames Valley and was 23 years of age. He was born at Thames in 1894 and was educated at the Waikaraka, Puriri and Kopu schools. After school he worked on his father’s farm until his enlistment. He volunteered for one of the earliest reinforcements but was rejected but was accepted for a later reinforcement and left NZ early in January 1916. He landed in Egypt and then proceeded to France where he saw considerable fighting. He went through the battle of the Somme without being injured. A brother is at present in camp. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

CROWHURST, Corporal Samuel A, Auckland Infantry, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is the son of Mr S G Crowhurst of Roxburgh St, Newmarket. He enlisted in the Auckland Infantry and left with an early reinforcement. He has been on active service since in Gallipoli and France. He comes of a fighting family. His brother, Corporal Victor R CROWHURST, who left in the same reinforcements, was wounded at Gallipoli and again in France and is now in the Brockenhurst Hospital. Another brother, Private Arthur CROWHURST, enlisted in the Rifle Brigade and succumbed to cerebro-meningitis while in camp. Two other brothers, Francis and Leslie, went into training camp last week. The Newmarket Borough Council at a meeting last night congratulated Mr & Mrs Crowhurst upon the distinction conferred on their son and also upon the fine record of the family. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

DAVIS, Private Charles Edward, killed in action 7 June, was the only son of the late Mr Charles Davis of Annandale and Cambridge. He left NZ with an early reinforcement. He took part in the Somme offensive, where he became ill. After being in hospital for five months he rejoined his unit. Prior to enlisting he was in the employ of Ellis & Burnand, Hamilton. He was born at Cambridge nearly 21 years ago. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

DEWAR, Lance Corporal Owen B, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the son of Mr A E Dewar of Auckland. He enlisted at the age of 18 and left NZ with one of the earliest reinforcements, being attached to the machine gun section. After service in Egypt he went to France. During the Somme fight in which he participated, his section lost 25 men out of a total of 29. Just prior to the Messines battle he was gassed but remained with his section. He is now in England. His brother Dick is also serving in the Expeditionary Force, being attached to the artillery. [AWN 12.07.1917] p.48

DIGBY SMITH, Major A, awarded the Distinguished Service Order, was formerly resident in Dunedin where he was employed by the Customs Dept. It was recently cabled that he was wounded at Messines. Prior to being transferred to the Rifle Brigade for service abroad, Major Digby Smith held the rank of Captain in the No.2 Field Co. Engineers at Dunedin. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

DIGHTON, Sergeant Leslie Probyn, killed in action, was the youngest son of Dr A A Dighton, Cheltenham, England, and was educated at Cheltenham College. When he enlisted in the Canterbury Infantry Battalion he was manager in NZ for the Neuchatel Asphalt Co. and prior to his arrival in NZ held important positions in Jamaica, Greece, Austria and West Australia. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.19

DOBBIE, Private Hugh, admitted to hospital in France on 16 June, suffering from severe gunshot wounds through the right thigh, is reported to be progressing favourably. He was formerly employed as a shipwright by the Auckland Harbour Board. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

DOUGHERTY, Private D M (‘Monte’), is the eldest son of Mrs Dougherty of Mt Albert. He was employed by S Winterbourne & Co., gun merchants. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48 (Listed under “Men who have Fallen”)

DOWSING, Private Robert, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr A H Dowsing of Richmond. He received his education at Richmond Road school. For many years he was employed by Messrs Lamb & Smith and at the time he enlisted he was employed by Messrs Wingate & Co. He was a keen yachtsman, being a member of the Richmond Cruising Club. His wife resides in Kingsland. His brother, Private C E DOWSING, who has been wounded, was a keen footballer and boxer and won the featherweight championship in Auckland two years ago. His wife resides at King Street, Richmond. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

EVANS, Lieut Colonel A Winter, Rifle Brigade, awarded the Distinguished Service Order, was manager for the Consolidated Goldfields, Reefton. Prior to joining the Expeditionary Force, he held a commission in the Motor Service Corps, Canterbury Military District. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

ELLIOTT, Rifleman Hugh, aged 39, killed in action, was the fifth son of the late Mr Samuel Elliott and Mrs Elliott, Opotiki. He attended the Opotiki school and in 1910 joined his brother John farming at Tamaki. The brothers then went to Rototuna near Hamilton farming. In 1916 he joined the Rifle Brigade. Two brother, William and George, are also members of the British forces, William being in South Africa and George in France. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

FARRELL - Five sons of Mr John Farrell, Dexter Ave, Mt Eden, all of whom enlisted voluntarily, are now at the front. A sixth son has just been called up but owing to weak health he may not be able to follow his brothers. One of Mrs Farrell’s sisters has three sons and another sister has tow sons on active service. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.16

FARRINGTON, Driver Maurice C, who has been awarded the Military Medal, comes from a fighting family, practically all of his male relatives having served at some time or other in the Imperial Army or Royal Navy. He was born in India 41 years ago and shortly after his arrival in NZ he engaged in farming at Levin. Later he took up his residence in Auckland where, in 1913, he started in business as a motor importer and mechanic. He enlisted early in 1915 and proceeded to the front as an infantryman, holding the rank of Corporal. After seeing service at Gallipoli he was transferred to France, where he was attached to the Army Service Corps, being engaged driving a motor-ambulance. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.48

FITZGERALD, Lieutenant Roy Jamesm MC, Gloucester Regt., is reported wounded and missing. He belongs to Wellington and received his commission in August 1915. [AWN 26.07.1917, p.21]

FITZPATRICK, Private C A, awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, was the only son of Mrs Fitzpatrick and the late Mr Charles Fitzpatrick, 46 Murdoch Road. He was educated at St Patrick’s College, Wellington, and left with the 5th Reinforcements. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

FLOWER, Private Harold R, who was killed in action on 7 June, was the eldest son of Mr Harold E Flower, of Maungaturoto. He was educated at the Maungaturoto school and afterwards engaged in farming. He volunteered as soon as he reached the age of 20 years. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

FOLEY - The three sons of Mr T Foley, Eden Vale Road, have seen considerable service in the Expeditionary Force. Edmund FOLEY left in the main body of the Auckland Mounted Rifles, served on Gallipoli and through the Sinai campaign and has received his commission. The eldest son, W E FOLEY, left NZ in October 1915 in the Rifle Brigade. He saw service in Egypt, having been in the engagement on Christmas Day 1915 when the Sensual were routed. He has been in France since April 1916 and went through the whole Somme offensive without receiving a scratch. His wife has just received news that her husband has been wounded in both the upper and lower extremities. A younger brother, Jack, who left NZ with him, is still in France with the Artillery. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.16

FOWLER, Motor-mechanic H, has died of pneumonia. He went from NZ in December in connection with the Motor-boat Patrol. [AWN 26.07.1917, p.21]

FRANSHAM, Private Stanley Benjamin, who died of wounds on 7 June, was the second son of Mr & Mrs Fransham of Whitford and was 20 years of age. He was born and educated at Avondale. Prior to his enlistment he was farming at Te Rore, Pirongia. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

FREE, Captain Cuthbert W awarded the Military Cross, is about 25 years of age and is the eldest son of Mr S L P Free, solicitor of Christchurch, who is now acting as military representative before the First Otago Military Service Board. He was educated at Christ’s College and Canterbury College. He was a good athlete and rifle shot. He left NZ as a lieutenant in the Canterbury Mounted Rifles, Main Body, but he transferred to the infantry. He was wounded at Gallipoli and again in France. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

FRICKER, Sergeant Harry Ernest, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the youngest son of Mrs W Fricker of Picton Street. Sgt Fricker, who is 32 years of age, left with the Main Body of the NZEF and after serving for four months on Gallipoli was invalided to England. While there he was touring for some time with the NZ football team, after which he proceeded to France. Prior to enlisting, he was an enthusiastic League footballer, being a member of the Ponsonby United team. By occupation he was a house decorator, in partnership with his brother. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.48

GASSON, Corporal Ernest Walter, killed in action 7 June, was the youngest son of Mr J Gasson, Devonport. He left NZ with the Rifle Brigade and was 21 years of age. He saw considerable fighting and went through the Somme battle. Before enlisting he was employed as a plumber at Morrinsville. An elder brother was killed in action last September. [AWN 26.07.1917, P.21]

GEARD, Sergeant A G, killed in action, is the second son of Mr Charles Geard, Cape Colville. Born in Coromandel, at the age of 10 he came with his parents to Cape Colville. He worked on the farm until he enlisted at the age of 20, when he joined the Expeditionary Force as a Rifleman and was promoted in France. He was a good rifle shot and the first to enlist from the Cape Colville district. An older brother, Private C S A Geard, is presently serving in France. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

GEDDES, Lieutenant William McK, awarded the Military Cross, is the second son of Mrs McKail Geddes of Wynyard Street. He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and before leaving NZ as second lieutenant in an early reinforcement draft was in the employ of Brown Barrett Ltd. He received his first military training as a member of A Battery. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

GIBSON, Private Albert J B, reported wounded, is the eldest son of Mr F R Gibson, late of Te Awamutu. He had been only a short time in France when he was wounded. His young brother, Noel P Gibson, sailed with the Main Body, and was present at the landing at Gallipoli but was lost at Hill 60 on 28 August 1915. Another brother, George W GIBSON, sailed with an early reinforcement drafts and after a few months in Egypt, was killed in action at Kantar on 9 August 1916. His youngest brother Fred is now on active service. The only brother of the family left is married. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.16

GIDDENS, Corporal C P, killed in action at Messines, was 24 years of age and a native of Brighton, England. Prior to enlisting he was employed in the Waihi mine. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

GORDON, T J, CSM, who has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, came to Motukaraka with his parents as a child and has lived in the Hokianga District ever since. He was educated at Kohukohu school then followed the occupation of bushman until the outbreak of war, when he enlisted immediately and left with the Main Body. He went through the Gallipoli campaign unscathed and during the early period of his service has been off duty only for a few days through shell shock. His father belonged to the 18th Royal Irish and his grandfather also was a soldier. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

GRAY, Lieutenant Wynne P, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is the only son of the late Mr John A F Gray and Mrs Gray of Remuera. He was educated at King’s College and served his articles with Russell & McVeagh, later taking charge of a branch at Opotiki for Reed, Bailey & Towle. He left NZ with an early reinforcement as second lieutenant and has been on active service ever since. He was promoted to first lieutenant at Gallipoli and after the battle of the Somme was transferred to the machine gun section and since has been acting as adjutant to his battalion. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

GRIFFITHS, Lance Sergeant G G, who has gained the Military Medal, is the son of the Rev Mr Griffiths, Congregational minister of Waipu. He left for the front with the 12th Reinforcements. Prior to enlistment he was farming at Kauroa. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

GRUNDY, Private H R, awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is the eldest son of Mr H Grundy, Mt Eden. He arrived in Auckland with his parents about five years ago and up to the time of his enlistment was in the office of Mr W McKeich, Fort Street. He left NZ with an early reinforcement and after a short period of training in England, went to France where he has served for the past 12 months. [AWN 12.07.1917] p.48

GUNION, Rifleman Alan Douglas, severely wounded in the head and arm, is the youngest son of Mrs E Gunion and the late Mr Robert Gunion. He was born in Otago Central and was educated at the Otago Boys’ High School. He entered the Bank of NZ at Alexandra and moved to different towns. He was stationed at Taihape when he enlisted in the 17th Reinforcements. His older brother, V H Y GUNION, who was wounded in the Somme battle last September, is back again in France on active service. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

HALL, Corporal Lionel W B, who is reported to have died of wounds on 12 June, was the second son of Mr Thomas Hall, District Land Registrar at Auckland. He was born in 1893 at Auckland and educated at Napier High School and Victoria College, Wellington. He joined the Government Survey Dept at Wellington and when the war broke out was with a survey party in the King Country. He immediately enlisted, was transferred to the Divisional Signal Co. and went away with the Main Body. He was in the landing on Gallipoli and afterwards at Cape Helles. Like his elder brother, Corporal V J B HALL, who fell at Gallipoli and who went with the Main Body as a private, though holding a commission in the territorials, Cpl LWB Hall was diffident about accepting promotion, owing to defective night sight. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

HARDING, Captain Ernest, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is the son of Mr A E Harding of Aoroa. He was educated at Wanganui College where he commanded the college cadets. He left with the original Rifle Brigade as a first lieutenant and in Egypt gained his captaincy. He was wounded at the Somme and was invalided to England, rejoining his company two months ago. He is 22 years of age and is a brother of Corporal Ralf HARDING, who last week was awarded the Military Medal. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

HARDING, Private Rolf W, Auckland Infantry, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is a son of Mr A E Harding of Aoroa. He was born at Aoroa and completed his education at the Wanganui Collegiate School. While at Trentham he passed the examination for a commission but being unwilling to wait for a vacancy, he sailed for the front as a private. He is 22 years of age and is famed as a good shot. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

HEALEY, Private Martin, killed in action 5 June, was the third son of Mr T Healey of Huntly and was 27 years of age. Prior to enlisting he was employed by the Huntly Brick & Fireclay Co. He was a keen cricketer, having played for Huntly, also for Hikurangi,. He was also a member of the Huntly Gun Club. He left NZ in September last with his brother, Private T H HEALEY who is still with the NZ forces in France. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

A soldier named Thomas W HILL, who had been missing from Trentham since 8 February, was found on Sunday hanging in the bush at Silverstream. He was about 35 years of age and a native of NZ. He is believed to have a wife at Frankton. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

HISLOP, Private Alexander, who died of wounds on 11 June in France, was a son of Mrs C Hislop of Waihi. For some years he followed the occupation of miner and prior to enlisting for active service last year was employed by a coaching firm. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

HODDER, Private Victor J, aged 25, killed in action, was born at Richmond, Surrey, England, and arrived in the Dominion in December 1913. He saw service at Gallipoli and on the evacuation was transferred to France. At the battle of the Somme he was wounded in the face, being invalided to England. On recovery he was again sent to the front. Private Hodder is one of four brothers of a Devonport family who have served in the present war and is the second to be killed. Another brother was severely wounded but is again in the trenches. [AWN 05.08.1917] p.16

HOE, Sergeant Stanley R, died of wounds in France on 8 June, was the eldest son of Mr R Hoe, Woodhill, Kaipara. He was educated at Woodhill School and Auckland Technical College. He served in Egypt with the Mounted Brigade and in France. After the Somme engagements he was selected to assist in training a brigade in England just before the battle at Messines. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

HOGAN, Private William, missing, is the youngest son of Mrs Hogan, Mt Eden. He was a farrier at Rotorua when he enlisted and took a keen interest in football and other sports. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.19

HULME, Sergeant George, son of Mrs J P Hulme, Thackeray St, Hamilton, was killed in action on 22 June. He left with the fourth reinforcements and had been all through the Gallipoli, Flanders and Somme campaigns. Subsequent to the latter battle he was invalided to England and after a short rest returned to the firing line. In recognition of his bravery on the Somme he was promoted from the rank of corporal to sergeant and had also been recommended for decoration. Sgt Hulme was born in Auckland 23 years ago and went to Hamilton about 11 years later. He spent 18 months at the Moscow University, Idaho, where his cousin is one of the professors. When the war broke out he left the university to come home and subsequently joined the fourth reinforcements. He distinguished himself as an athlete in running, swimming and football, winning events in Auckland and other places. He also competed in France, winning the NZ championship and the relay race. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

INGRAM, Corporal Frank C, killed in action at Messines, left with a reinforcement at the beginning of last year. After a short stay in Egypt he was drafted to France where he had been 14 months in the trenches. He was promoted corporal after the Somme offensive. Cpl Ingram, who was 26 years of age, was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs W H Ingram of Invercargill. His brother, Sergeant H INGRAM, had been fighting side by side with him in France and another brother, Sub Lieutenant W R INGRAM of Auckland, is serving with the RNVR. His sister, Mrs W McLEAN, is nursing at Lady Hammersmith’s Hospital in London and his brother in law, the Rev Walter McLEAN, late of the Somerville Memorial Church, Remuera, has been doing duty in France for nearly two years. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.16

INNES-JONES, Bugler Humphrey Irwin, reported wounded in the Messines fight, is one of six sons of Mr Innes Jones of Kihikihi who have enlisted for active service. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

JOHNS, Corporal A Clive, killed in action, was the youngest son of Mr J Johns of Te Awamutu and was 23 years of age. He was born at Pukekohe and was educated at the Pukekohe High School, the Auckland Grammar School and the University College. Before enlisting he was on the staff of L D Nathan & Co. for five years. Cpl Johns was well known in hockey and tennis circles, having been a member of the Mt Eden Hockey Club, secretary of the Auckland Hockey Assn and an Auckland representative player in 1914. He also belonged to the Auckland Tennis Club. A brother, Lieut W H JOHNS, was wounded at Gallipoli, returned to NZ and is now back in Egypt. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

JOHNS, Private Clive – Official advice was received on Monday by Mr Walter Johns of Pukekohe, stating that his brother was not killed as was reported, but was wounded in the shoulder and is now in a hospital in France, progressing satisfactorily. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.21

KEAM, Corporal S J (Jim), killed in action 7 June, was the youngest son of Mr Samuel Keam of Welcome Bay, Tauranga. He was born at Brunnerton 29 years ago. He was farming in the Bay of Plenty district prior to his enlistment last year. He was an active member of the Tauranga Methodist Church, being one of its local preachers. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

KEVEN, Company Sergeant Major J H Harry, killed in France on 7 June, left as a Private with the Mounted Brigade. He went through the Gallipoli campaign and the Somme battle and met his death on the first day of the Messines offensive. He is the second son of Mr F N Keven, Regent St, Waihi. He was to have returned to NZ at an early date for a commission. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

KIRKWOOD, Private W J, reported severely wounded in the right arm, is one of four sons of Mrs J A Kirkwood, Turama Rd, Onehunga. Prior to enlistment he was employed on the Auckland tramways. Two brothers are with the Royal Motor Boat Patrol and three served with the Samoan Contingent. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

KNIGHT, Gunner Archibald P, MGC, died of wounds, was the youngest son of Mr C J Knight, chief warder, Mt Eden Prison. He was 20 years of age and was educated in Wellington. Prior to enlisting he was employed in the railway service. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

KNIGHT, Captain Cedric L, awarded the Military Cross, is the son of Dr A O Knight of Epsom. He is now only 23 years of age and was born and educated at Elstow, Bedford. Prior to enlisting in one of the first reinforcements, he was at the Auckland University studying engineering. After being on Gallipoli for some time, he was wounded and invalided to England. He quickly recovered and went to France, where he has been ever since. It is only recently that he sat for his captaincy and he is believed to be one of the youngest captains in the NZ Forces. A letter was received from his commander by Dr Knight speaking in praiseworthy terms of Captain Knight’s services. Captain Knight was an enthusiastic footballer, being a member of the University Club. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

LENNAN - A splendid record of one family’s war service was disclosed when the Auckland Military Service Board reviewed the case of Paul LENNAN, dairyman, Waiwera. His mother, Mrs Dora LENNAN and Major WHITNEY supported the appeal for exemption on the ground of undue hardship, he being practically the sole support of his parents. Out of a family of 8 sons, one had been killed in action, three were now serving in France and one in Egypt. The sixth brother had been retained for home service and the seventh, who was married, had enlisted and been granted extension of time to complete some contracts. His father was 74 years old and unable to work, while his mother at 65 was in very poor health. They lived with appellant who was the youngest of the family and had recently married. Appellant was managing a farm for a neighbour so that the latter’s sons could enlist. Aided by his sister, he was at present milking 39 cows. With so many brothers away he considered he had to stay and look after his parents and maintain the farm. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.16

MACKAY, Private Gilbert J, son of Mr G J Mackay, Wood St, Ponsonby, has died of wounds in France. A cablegram received previously by Mr Mackay stated that his son was dangerously ill as the result of a severe wound in the chest. Private Mackay was well known in yachting circles in Auckland and had for 10 years been in the employ of the Auckland Harbour Board. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

MACKAY, Sergeant J Campbell, killed in action on 21 June, was the son of Mr J Mackay of Newstead, Waikato. Prior to leaving for the front he was in business at Tangitu. He was well known in the King Country and was a prominent athlete, having represented that district in Rugby football for many years. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

MAHONEY, Sergeant James, killed in action, was the third son of the late Mr Denis Mahoney and was born in Wellington 27 years ago. He was a cricket and hockey player. Previous to enlisting he resided in Auckland, where he was well known in sporting and musical circles. He left NZ last year. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

MARSHALL, Patrick O’Connor, a returned undischarged soldier, died in Victoria Military Hospital,, Wellington, on Thursday. He left with the 8th Reinforcements and returned to NZ on 11 May. His NOK resides in Wellington. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.17

MARX, Private Eric Harold, killed in action on 7 June, was the fifth son of J Marx. He was educated at the Mangatoki school and for a number of years was engaged in the dairying industry in Taranaki. Prior to enlisting he was sheep and cattle farming in the Cambridge district. He fought through the Somme and other engagements without mishap. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

MASSEY, Lieutenant F G, awarded the Military Cross, is the youngest son of the Prime Minister and is a native of the Auckland district. He received his education at the Mangere school, the Auckland Grammar School and the Auckland University College. He took up the study of the law and served his articles with Hesketh & Richmond. He passed the solicitors’ examination t the age of 19 years. After being in the office of Messrs Earl & Kent for a time, Lieut Massey commenced practice on his own account as a solicitor in Auckland. He left NZ as second lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade and after serving in Egypt, went to France, being amongst the first New Zealanders to arrive on the Western Front. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

McCATHIE, Sapper James, reported to have died of wounds on June 20, was a son of Mr G B McCathie of Manukau Road, One Tree Hill. He enlisted in an early reinforcement. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

McDIVITT, Private Reginald H, Auckland Infantry, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is the eldest son of Mr W McDivitt of Pukekohe and was born in Victoria 22 years ago. He was educated at Pukekohe and Remuera schools. Prior to enlistment he was employed by the Gane Milking Machine Co. at Hamilton and Auckland. He left with the Main Body and was wounded at Gallipoli. He accompanied the NZ force to France and fought through the Somme engagements. He was a keen Rugby footballer and is a member of the Druids Lodge, Taumarunui. His brother, Frank McDIVITT, well known as a jockey, is also in the trenches. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

McGAVIN, Lieut Colonel D J, M.D., F.R.C.S, of the Medical Corps, awarded the Distinguished Service Order, practiced in Wellington previous to going on active service. Col McGavin’s reputation as a surgeon was a very high one. When the late Dr A A MARTIN of Palmerston North, was fatally wounded in France, it was to Col McGavin that he asked to be taken. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

McGONAGLE, Private Cyril, who has been killed in action in France, and not wounded as at first reported, was the youngest son of Mr A McGonagle, now of New Plymouth and formerly of Otahuhu. The late Pte McGonagle, who left NZ with the Main Body, and fought through the Gallipoli campaign, was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery but whether it was for some deed at Gallipoli or during the fighting in France, his father does not know. During the Somme offensive Pte McGonagle was responsible for a brilliant piece of bomb throwing. The New Zealanders were held up in an advance by an obstruction in front of a German trench and Pte McGonagle was selected to break this down by means of high explosive bombs. The intervening space was strewn with dead and wounded but the private, crawling along, succeeded in achieving his object. He was subsequently complimented before his company for his brave deed. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

McKENZIE, Private E, Hamilton, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, left with one of the earlier reinforcements but was taken ill on the transport and consequently did not take part in the landing on Gallipoli. He was invalided to England where he spent eight months in hospital. Afterwards he went to France and took part in the battle of the Somme. Prior to leaving Hamilton, Pte McKenzie was in the employ of Ellis & Burnand for 12 or 14 years. One brother, H A McKENZIE, was killed in action at Suvla Bay. His mother resides in Hamilton. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

McKENZIE, Second Lieutenant F E awarded the Military Cross, is a Main Body man, having enlisted as a private from Auckland. He was at the time on the staff of Jackson Russell Tunks & Ostler, solicitors. He has seen a great deal of service with the Expeditionary Force, having been in the action on the Suez Canal, in the Gallipoli landing, and through the ‘Daisy Patch’ charge at Cape Helles. He was in some exciting work later at Quinn’s Post, having been the companion there of Sergeant TILSLEY when the latter won the DCM. He was slightly wounded but remained with his unit to take part in the August advance. He was sent to Malta for a rest but returned to Anzac in time to be one of the evacuation party. Thence he proceeded to France with his unit, winning his commission on the field for gallantry in leading a trench raid in July last year. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

McKENZIE, 2 Lieutenant F E, M.C., is the fifth son of Mr Kenneth McKenzie, Mangarimu, Feilding. He was previously employed in Jackson & Russell’s office in Auckland. He joined the Mounted Brigade and was wounded at Gallipoli and the Somme. He has a brother in France and George was killed at the Somme. The fourth son is now home on final leave. The eldest son served in the South African war. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

McNEILL, Gunner Roy B, son of Mr A McNeill, Ladies Mile, Remuera, who enlisted in the Australian Force and who was reported missing, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Gunner McNeill, who was a music teacher, sought to enlist in NZ early in the war but being under age he was not accepted. He then went to Australia and enlisted there. His brother, Gunner D McNEILL, who also enlisted in Australia, was invalided home some time ago. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.19

McRAE, Sergeant A P, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr W McRae of Te Kuiti, has been killed in action. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.21

MILLER, Rifleman R S, killed in action in France on May 8, was born at Toka Toka and brought up and educated at Patumahoe where he lived until six years ago when he removed to Waiuku. He was employed by Wallace & Co. and left their service to enlist when 20 years of age. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

MILLIGAN, Sergeant P G, of the Medical Corps, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is an Aucklander who has been on service since the days of the Main Body. Prior to the war he belonged for four years to the territorial field ambulance in Auckland and was always a keen and enthusiastic member of the company. He held corporal’s stripes but reverted to the ranks to get away with the Main Body. He saw service in Egypt and Gallipoli, being amongst those who landed on the Peninsula on 25 April, 1915. After the evacuation he proceeded with his unit to France where he has been ever since. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.48

MOIR, Private David R, died of wounds, was the second son of Mr D Moir of Mangawai and was born in that township 31 years ago. His grandfather was an officer in the Imperial troops and took part in the Maori war. Pte Moir left NZ as an infantryman but at the time of his death was serving with the Ambulance Corps. Prior to his enlistment he was a farm manager. He was a keen hockey player. Two of his brothers are at the front, while one other enlisted, and after spending some time in camp, was discharged as unfit for service. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.16

MOONEY, J P, who has been wounded, is the eldest son of Mr J Mooney, Inspector of Permanent Way, Railways, Hamilton. Before enlisting he was a railway guard. He is one of four brothers who have enlisted. His youngest brother, A MOONEY, was wounded in the Somme battle and is in England making a good recovery. His two other brothers, J MOONEY and J F MOONEY, are still in the firing line. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.18

MOORE, Sergeant Charles Alexander, was severely wounded in the right leg and is now in Walton Hospital. He is the eldest son of Mr F A Moore, Alfriston, late of Onehunga. He left NZ as a Lance Corporal. He has three brothers in the Expeditionary Force, two still in France. Before enlisting he was a carpenter at Makatea. His wife and family reside at Onehunga. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

MUNT, Lance Corporal Reginald A, Divisional Signal Co. who has been awarded the Military Medal, was, prior to enlistment, a resident of Wellington. He is a carpenter by trade but spent a good portion of his life at sea. Upon joining the company upon the mobilisation of the Main Body, he was appointed company carpenter and wheeler. He served through the major portion of the Gallipoli campaign, proceeding with the NZ forces to France, where he has been on service ever since. [AWN 05.07.1917] p.48

NATUSCH, Lieutenant Stanley, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is the third son of Mr C Tilleard Natusch of Belmont, Wellington. He left NZ with the Main Body and was one of the few who went through the Gallipoli campaign without being either wounded or sick. He was mentioned in despatches for work done at the evacuation of the peninsula. He was promoted lieutenant during the Somme operations and was wounded at Messines, his right arm being fractured. His brother, Lieutenant Guy NATUSCH and Lieutenant Guy NATUSCH have also been wounded recently. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

NEGUS, Rifleman F, awarded the Military Medal, is an old Thames boy, aged 43, both of whose parents are dead. He left NZ with a reinforcement draft at the end of 1915, fought at the Somme and was wounded at Messines, where he won his decoration. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.23

NORMAN, Quartermaster Sergeant A H, who has been ‘missing’ since 7 June, was born in India. In earlier days he saw service in Egypt, India and Tibet. After coming to NZ he served in the Permanent Artillery and Mounted Police. He is the son of General Sir F B Norman, KCB and nephew of the late Sir Henry Norman, one time Governor of Queensland. His son is in the British Army Ambulance Convoy in France. He has a brother commanding a Manchester Regiment. His son in law, Dr F D PINFOLD, also is now on duty. His wife resides at Hamilton. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.47

NOTLEY – A private in the 2nd Auckland Infantry – evidently Percy F NOTLEY of Epsom – who is prisoner of war in Germany, has written to his sister in London, informing her that he has been interned in a retaliation camp to which he was removed direct from hospital. [AWN 26.07.1917, p.21]

O’CONNOR, Bugler Michael F, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr D O’Connor, Te Kowhai, late of Ngaruawahia. He was born and educated and spent most of his life there, being engaged in pursuits in the baking business. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

ORR, Rifleman Ernest, killed in action on 7 June, and Lance Corporal Henry Wm ORR, killed in action 8 June, were two of the six soldier sons of Mr J W Orr of Kaitangiweka, Taumarunui. Rifleman Orr left NZ last year and had been on service in France and Belgium since last September. L/Cpl Orr left the Dominion as a member of the Rifle Brigade and saw service in the fighting against the Senusai in Western Egypt and since then on the western front. He took part in the Somme battle in September when he was wounded in the neck. He made a speedy recovery and had been with his unit ever since. The other brothers on active service are: Private Norman ORR, who was awarded the Military Medal for services in the Somme battle; Rifleman A L ORR, reported wounded on 8 June; Private Percy ORR and Trooper Lea ORR of the Australian Light Horse, now on active service in Palestine. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.16

PATTON, Lance Corporal H L, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the youngest son of Mrs Patton of Te Awamutu. He went with the force to Samoa in 1914 and after serving for nine months returned to NZ and enlisted in the 7th Reinforcements. He has been on active service in France ever since. Previous to enlisting he was in the railway service. His only brother, Private William PATTON, is at present in camp. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

PAUL, Lance Corporal James C, killed in action on 8 June during the Messines offensive, was the only son of Mr Matthew Paul of Galbraith St, Waihi. Deceased, who left for the front in June, 1916, was educated at the Thames High School where he passed both the junior and senior Civil Service examination and was afterwards appointed to the accountants branch of the general post office, Wellington. About a fortnight prior to leaving with the NZ forces he passed for a commission but left the Dominion before receiving an appointment. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

PEARSON, Private Ralph, wounded, is the son of Mr George Pearson of Rawene, Hokianga,. He left NZ last year. After learning signalling in England he fought with the Rifle Brigade and was wounded in the thigh on 7 June. He was well known in athletic circles at Hokianga. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

POFF, Sergeant L J, winner of a Military Medal in the fighting at Messines, has been on service with the Divisional Signal Company since the first mobilisation of the NZEF. He is a Canterbury boy by birth but received his education at St Patrick’s College, Wellington. After leaving school he entered the Civil Service and was for a number of years employed in the Government Survey Dept at Auckland. He enlisted in the Main Body and went into camp with the party of College Rifles men who formed the Auckland quota of the Divisional Signal Company. During his residence in Auckland, Sgt Poff was an enthusiastic volunteer, while he was also a member of the University Hockey Club and an excellent rifle shot. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.48

PRATT, Rifleman E, died of wounds, was the youngest son of the late Mr Edward Pratt, NZ Railways and was born at Greymouth. He followed the sawmilling industry and was well known throughout the Rotorua and Hawkes Bay district. Prior to enlisting he was employed by Cashmore Bros., Ponsonby.. He was a member of the Legion of Frontiersmen. He enlisted in the Infantry and afterwards transferred to the Rifle Brigade. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

PREW, Rifleman Albert E, reported wounded is the son of Mr Prew of Budleigh, Devonshire, England. His father has six brothers and a brother in law engaged on active service. His brother, Stephen PREW, left NZ with the Main Body and was killed at Gallipoli. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

PRINCE, Private A T, awarded the Military Medal, is the eldest son of Mr J T Prince of Kohimarama. He was educated at the Tuakau school and at the time of his enlistment was a builder at Tuakau. He has been in France for 16 months, being wounded in the Somme battle. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

QUINN, Private C, Auckland Infantry, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the eldest son of Mr Chas Quinn of Matatoki. He is 23 years of age, and was educated at the Kopu and Convent High School, Thames. He was in the office of Arthur Tooman & Co., Auckland, for 15 months. He afterwards joined the Railway Traffic Dept and was stationed successively at Auckland, Te Aroha and Mercer. He enlisted in the 14th Reinforcements being then on the relieving staff. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

RAXWORTHY, Sapper C H, who died of wounds, was on the postal staff of the GPO, Auckland, prior to his enlisting. Recently he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry during the Somme offensive. He is the second of five sons to give his life, while a third has been twice wounded and the other two are still on active service. Their father, Mr T Raxworthy, resides in Upper Riccarton, Christchurch. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.16

REEVE, William Charles Leslie, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mr E Reeve, Gate Pa, Tauranga. He was born and resided in Tauranga up until he enlisted. His grandfather fought in the Maori wars; his father, who left NZ with an earlier reinforcement, was invalided home last March and his uncle, Rifleman J F REEVE, was wounded on the same day, having previously been through the same battle. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

RIGDEN, Private George A, killed in action 7 June, was the youngest son of Mr John Rigden of Opua, Bay of Islands. With his brother Fred., who is serving in France, he enlisted early last year. He was educated at the Opua School. He took a keen interest in sporting matters, especially in shooting, being a particularly good shot. Prior to enlisting he was employed by the Huntly Brick & Pottery Co. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

ROBINSON, Private Victor W, who has been reported missing, is the son of Mr J Robinson, Taihoa, Matamata. He is an old boy of the Marist Brothers College, Auckland, and a well-known athlete. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.47

ROWLANDS, Private Vernon, killed in action 4 June, was 22 years of age and was the second son of Mr D Rowlands for many years a resident of Whangarei and Northern Wairoa. At the time of his enlistment he was in the King Country in the employ of Ellis & Burnand Ltd. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

RYAN, Lieutenant P V, 7th Light Horse, who is among the Australians reported wounded, is well known in NZ. He sustained his wound while rescuing an officer under fire, for which he was mentioned in despatches. Lt Ryan’s wife lives at Devonport and his two sons are at King’s College. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.20

SALMON, Sergeant Alfred Lewis, who has laid down his life in the war, was a son of Mr H T Salmon of Whatoro, Northern Wairoa and was a native of Masterton. Prior to the territorial system being inaugurated he was a sergeant in the volunteers at Hawera. He enlisted in the 6th, Hauraki, Regiment on the outbreak of war and gained his stripes at Gallipoli where, at the landing, there were 16 casualties amongst 16 men in ascending a ridge, eight being killed and eight wounded. The late soldier was a keen cricketer, footballer and hockey player and he also took a prominent part in various social activities. His brother is serving with the pioneer battalion at the front. Their father, who was in Auckland in 1865, served 17 years with the Armed Constabulary field force and afterwards served a similar period in the police force. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

SANDERS, Lieutenant Commander – Private letters received by the relatives of this officer who has just won the Victoria Cross, give some indication of the deed which probably won him his decoration. At the time of writing, early in May, he had just returned to port and the letters said that the ship which he commanded was completely smashed and crippled as a result of a action with an enemy ship which he engaged at a range of 80 yards and succeeded in sinking, some of the crew, however, being rescued. In the engagement he escaped injury but had two holes driven through his hat and one in the side of his coat. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.18

SAVAGE, Sergeant Charles, killed in action in France, was born at Thames 23 years ago. He went through the Gallipoli campaign uninjured and fought at the battle of the Somme. Three brothers also enlisted, one having returned wounded, the other two are still at the front. Prior to going overseas he was a Drill Instructor at Narrow Neck Camp. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.23

SAVAGE - A good record as a fighting family is that of the SAVAGE family of Tairua, Thames. Sergeant Charles SAVAGE who took part in the battle of the Somme, was killed in action in France on 21 June 1917 aged 24. While in Egypt he attended the School of Instruction and passed the examination. His brother Samuel enlisted in Australia and was twice wounded. Thomas, wounded at the landing at Gallipoli, returned to NZ. He afterwards again enlisted and is presently at the front. Valentine was also at the Gallipoli landing and was invalided home. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

SCOTT - Another family with a good record is that of Mr W Scott, First Avenue, Kingsland, whose eldest son Private John Oscar SCOTT, has been wounded and admitted to hospital. He left NZ with the First Cyclists’ Battn and after spending some time in Egypt was transferred to France. His brother William is at present in France and Edward, the younger brother, is in camp having enlisted directly he attained military age. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.23

SEARLE, Private Edwin, M.M., Auckland Infantry, is a native of Devonshire, England. He came to NZ on leaving school to join his uncle, Mr John Searle of Kaipaki, Cambridge. He left with the Mounted Rifles and transferred to the Infantry in Egypt and has been in France for the last eighteen months. He went through the Somme offensive, receiving only a slight wound and was mentioned in despatches. He is aged 20, the youngest of three brothers lately serving with the Colours. Frank, engineer on HMS Indefatigable, lost his life in the Jutland battle. Private Thomas SEARLE, was severely wounded in Palestine and is now in hospital in England. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.23

SELLARS, Private George M, killed in action, is the third son of Captain E Sellars and grandson of the late Capt Daniel Sellars of Tauranga. He was born in Auckland and attended the Napier Street School before being apprenticed to Mr G T Nichol, shipwright, Auckland, in whose employ he remained until he enlisted. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.28

SELLARS, Mr Arnold W, Auckland, has joined the Royal Flying Corps as a first-class air mechanic. He was sent to France with an advanced scouting squadron and was invalided Home and has now been given light duty. [AWN 29.11.1917, p.17]

SHAW, Private J E, son of Mrs A G Shaw, Russell St, Ponsonby, has been reported missing. In the casualty list published yesterday, his name was wrongly given as SMITH. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.20

SIMSON, Private Charles M, who died of wounds on 4 July 1917, was the eldest son of Ian Simson, Te Aroha. He was aged 30 and was in farming at Te Aroha. The second son has been in France for fourteen months and the youngest son is in camp at Trentham. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.16

SINGER, Dr A L, of Gisborne, who had a commission in the RAMC during 1915, transferred to the NZMC last February with the rank of Captain. He saw a good deal of service in France. [AWN 26.07.1917, p,21]

SMEED, Private Norman, killed in action 7 June, was the fourth son of Mr William Smeed of Tuakau and was 26 years of age. He left NZ last year and took part in the Somme battle. He had been in France ever since. Prior to enlisting he worked on his father’s farm. He was in the infantry when he left NZ but he afterwards joined the machine gun section. He was a keen footballer. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

SMEETON, Captain W J, Royal Field Artillery, of Auckland, is in hospital in London with a gunshot wound in the right thigh but is not considered serious. [AWN 26.07.1917, p.21]

SMITH, Sergeant Ford, reported missing on 21 February, now reported killed in action and buried by the Germans, was 38 years of age and was the fourth son of Mr John Smith, late of Waerenga. He came to Auckland from England with his parents in 1881 and was educated at the Waerenga district school. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.19

SMITH, Private John, of Cornwallis, brother of Mrs E Pearce, Mt Smart Road, Onehunga, has been killed in action at Messines on 7 June. He left with the Main Body and fought all through Gallipoli, being twice wounded. On arrival in France he was transferred to the field ambulance. His parents live at Cornwallis. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.21

SMITH, Private Robert, killed in action, was the elder son of Mrs S Smith of Blairgowrie, Scotland. He came to NZ about 10 years ago and was farming at East Tamaki. He enlisted last year. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

STOW, Private James C, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, is a son of Mrs Lindberg of Onehunga. Prior to enlistment he was in the employ of the Northern Roller Mills. He was educated at Newton West School. His wife and daughter reside in Wellington. His only brother is serving with the Tunnelling Corps. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

STOWELL, Driver David, NZ Divisional Ammunition Column who, on the night of 5 May 1917 at Souvenir Dump, was standing by his mules which were harnessed to a GS wagon of Stokes mortar bombs when an enemy shell burst under the wagon and wounded both mules. The explosion caused the mules to bolt but Driver Stowell, showing great coolness and courage, retained his hold on their heads and after being dragged for about 200 yards, succeeded in regaining control. He immediately returned to the Dump and completed unloading although the road over which he had to pass was being swept with shell fire. He stood a splendid example to his comrades and his coolness and courage under these circumstances prevented what might have been a very serious incident. An entry of this action is to be made in the conduct sheet of Driver Stowell. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.50

TARLIN, Corporal Clarence V, Titirangi, was first reported missing and believed to be wounded on 21 February. He was later reported to be seriously wounded and a prisoner of war and finally was officially reported to have died on 22 February whilst a prisoner of war at Lemberg. He was a son of the late Gunner A J Tarlin of Devonport and of Mrs Clara JACOBSON, now of Titirangi. He was in the employ of the City Council’s waterworks department at Titirangi. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

TE KOOTU, Private H P, Pioneer Battalion, is at Walton Hospital from France with a severe gunshot wound in the right arm. He recently jumped in at the back of a waggon whose two horses had bolted and by moving along the pole nearly to the horses heads, he succeeded in stopping the runaways just short of the junction to certain roads where there is always considerable traffic. The presence of mind and prompt action displayed, undoubtedly averted a bad incident and possible loss of life. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.50

THOMSON - Three sons of Mr William Thomson of Gordonton have taken part in the war. His third son, Alexander McGregor THOMSON, was killed in action on 22 February. Private Thomson, who was born in Sydney 26 years ago, was educated at Pukekohe. He enlisted in the Mounted Rifles but owing to family affairs, he obtained leave from camp. A brother went through the Gallipoli campaign and returned with the loss of an eye. Another brother served through the Somme battle and is still on active service. Private Thomson for a long time was a Corporal in the 16th, Waikato, Regiment. [AWN 19.07.1917]. P.47

TOVEY, Dr Arthur H, of Kaponga, having served for two years with the RAMC, has transferred to the NZMC with the rank of Captain and is at the Brockenhurst Hospital. [AWN 26.07.1917, p.21]

TURNER, Bombardier William H, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field during the battle of Messines, is a son of Mr William Turner, Melrose St, Newmarket. He enlisted in the Artillery of an early reinforcement and has since been continuously on active service. His brother, Bombardier Francis TURNER, is in the same unit and left with the same reinforcement. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.18

VAZEY, Rifleman Eddie, who was killed in action at Messines on June 24, and who was awarded the Military Medal, was the son of Mr E H Vazey of Newton. He attended the Newton East School and was captain of the football team which won the school champion caps in 1912. He was only 18 years of age when he enlisted. He served his time as a linotype operator. His father fought and was wounded in the Maori War, whilst his grandfather, Mr John Keefe, saw service in the Crimean War as a member of the 58th Regiment. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

WATSON, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) W, awarded the Military Cross, is the son of Mr William Watson, a well known Wellington businessman and a director of the Bank of NZ. Prior to enlistment, Captain Watson was engaged in farming at Rangiriri. His wife is a daughter of Mrs Robert Browning of Arney Rd, Remuera. He left NZ with a reinforcement draft in 1915, arriving in time to see service on Gallipoli and afterwards proceeding to France with the NZ force. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.21

WEST, Major, had a narrow escape from death on the occasion of his being wounded recently in France. His wounds, which were caused by a bursting shell, included injuries to the jaw bone, a broken rib and arm, and various body wounds. He is now out of danger. This was Major West’s second experience of this kind as he received a bullet through the neck on the ‘Daisy Patch’ , Gallipoli, and only the unremitting attention of famous English surgeons prevented the loss of his voice. He rejoined the forces in France about nine months ago and rapidly rose to the rank of major. Before joining the Main Body, Major West, who is a Master of Laws, was in the office of Buddle Richmond & Buddle of Auckland. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.20

WHITE, Sergeant John T, serving with the Australia Imperial Forces, has been wounded for the third time. He is the son of Mrs E J White of Ngunguru and late of Karangahake. His only brother, Gunner E S WHITE, is serving in France, having left NZ last year. [AWN 05.07.1917] P.46

Lieut M A WHITE, Royal Flying Corps, of Wellington, who was killed in action, met his death by another British airman, who was killed while flying above him, falling, with his machine on the New Zealander. It occurred during an action of about 20 machines over the enemy lines. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

WHITEHOUSE, Signaller Cyril H, killed in action on 8 June at Messines, was the eldest son of Mr Joseph J Whitehouse, Matatoki, Thames Valley. He was educated at the Puriri and Kopu schools and afterwards engaged in farming. He left with the 7th Reinforcements and won the Military Medal during the battle of the Somme. He was 22 years of age. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.19

WHITMORE, Captain F N, awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Messines, was farming at Nukutawhiti prior to his enlistment. He served in the South African war as an Imperial officer and upon his arrival in the Whangarei district was given a commission in the territorial forces. He went to the front as a lieutenant. His wife is living at Greymouth. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

WILKIE, Private R A, who has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished conduct at the battle of Messines, is the only son of Mr & Mrs Wilkie, Baildon Rd, Grey Lynn, and is 21 years of age. He was born and educated at Portsmouth, England and came to NZ about four years ago. He enlisted in 1915 as a signaller in the Auckland Mounted Rifles but upon arrival in Egypt obtained a transfer to the Otago Infantry, in order to get to the firing line. Although he has been some time in the trenches and went through the Somme and Messines battles, he has so far escaped uninjured. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

WILKIE, Private R A, reported wounded and suffering from the effects of gas poisoning, is a son of Mrs R A Wilkie, Baildon Rd, Grey Lynn. He was recently awarded the Military Medal for gallantry at Messines. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

WILLIAMS, Private Laurie S, who has won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, is 23 years of age and the third son of Mr T R Williams, butcher, Russell, where he was born. He was a Sergeant in the Territorials and left NZ with the 17th Reinforcements. Two brothers are on active service. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.48

WILLIAMS, Captain (Ty Major) Owen W, awarded the Military Cross, is the fourth son of the Rev W J Williams of Sumner. He is a Master of Arts of the NZ University and before enlisting was for five years one of the masters at the Wellington Boys’ College. He left NZ with the Rifle Brigade in January 1916. For a time he was on the staff at Sling Camp. In the engagement at Messines he was wounded but not seriously. One of his brothers, Private B V Williams, was killed. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

WILLIAMSON, Private Harold, reported missing in February last, was killed in a raid and was buried by the Germans south of Grenier Wood on 21 February. The deceased was a son of Mrs M H Williamson of Campbell Road, Green Lane and was in his 31st year. He enlisted with an early reinforcement and was subsequently drafted into the NZ Rifle Brigade. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

WILLIAMSON, Sapper James, NZ Engineer Tunnelling Corps, son of Mrs H W Brierly, Normanby Road, Auckland, has been awarded the Military Cross for gallant conduct. He has been at the front for two years and earned his distinction by going out with an English officer of the British Forces. The incident occurred in a shower of shrapnel. He also has a brother at the front. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.20

WILSON, Lance Corporal H T, killed in action, was the second son of Mr G S Wilson, Ipswich, England. At the time of enlistment he was dairy farming in North Auckland. His youngest brother, who was on service, returned to England some time ago, owing to shell shock and another is still at the front. At the time of his death L/Cpl Wilson was in charge of a Lewis machine gun. Two cousins were killed in France, one was wounded, two are still at the front, whilst three are engaged in military operations in England. [AWN 26.07.1917] P.21

WINKLEY, Corporal J R, who has been wounded and who also has been awarded the Military Medal, is the only son of Mr T Winkley of Calliope Rd, Devonport. He arrived in Auckland from England 8 years ago. He left NZ early in 1918 and went through the Somme battle. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48

WYNYARD, Lance Corporal John, killed in action, was a member of th3e Maori Contingent. He was well known in Auckland as a keen athlete, being a prominent cricketer, footballer and tennis player, as well as an enthusiastic yachtsman. [AWN 12.07.1917] P.47

YOUNG, Private Alfred, awarded the Military Medal, was the second son of Mrs M Young, Somerset, England. He was aged 32 and came to NZ when a lad of 19. Prior to enlisting in 1915 he was employed in the Mountain Rimu Co’s Timber Mill at Mamaku. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.18

YOUNG, Private Claude, is the elder of the two soldier sons of the late Mr Claude Young of Hawera and Mrs A K Young, now of Khyber Pass. He was born at Epsom 24 years ago and was educated at Waikino and Hawera. He was engaged in dairying and farming pursuits. [AWN 19.07.1917] P.48


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