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NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE
AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
PERSONNEL PARAGRAPHS
JANUARY 1918

These are extracts from the Auckland Weekly News magazines and have been extracted with permission. Thanks to Jackie Walles for these.

JANUARY 1918

ABBOTT, 2nd Lieut Harry W was attached to the 4th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade as a Sergeant. He was wounded in France. He has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

ABRAHAM, Captain A T, MC, Manchester Regt, the eldest son of the late Rev T P Abraham, rector of Risby, Suffolk, was killed in action on 22 October at the age of 32. At one time he was farming in NZ and he left the Dominion to take up work in Vagros Island, B.C. On the declaration of war he joined the Canadian Infantry as a private so that he saw service very early in 1915. At the first battle of Ypres he was badly gassed. Recovering, he returned to the front, remaining there until he was commissioned to the 3rd, Manchester, Reg. In June of this year he was awarded the Military Cross, the next month he received his first promotion and his captaincy was bestowed on him 10 days before he was killed. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

ACKINS, 2nd Lieutenant H J was a member of the 26th Reinforcements. He was invalided sick from France. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

ADAMS, Rifleman Joseph, awarded the Military Medal, is the third son of Mr Joseph Adams of Pukekohe. He is 22 years of age and was born and educated at Pukekohe. He was a member of the Pukekohe Fire Brigade and a prominent local footballer. An elder brother, Rifleman George ADAMS, was killed in action last November [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

ANDERSON, Sergeant H, of Norfolk Island, won the DCM and also a bar to the medal at Fleurbaix near Armentieres. He received the first honour for successfully leading a raid after the officers had been incapacitated and the second for holding a position, under heavy shell fire, in similar circumstances. He went to the front with the 3rd Rifle Brigade. He was wounded at Armentieres and in Flanders. He has been recommended for another bar to his DCM for gallantry in the later fighting. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

ANGEL, Lance Corporal Edmund, Ponsonby, late of Matakohe, who died of wounds on 29 December 1917, was the youngest son of Mr W A Angel, 203 Ponsonby Road. He left with the 3rd Reinforcements when not 15 years of age and was wounded at Gallipoli. He was invalided to England and upon recovery went to France early in 1916. He had been on active service on the Western Front for over 18 months when he received the wound that caused his death. His brothers William and Richard also left with the 3rd Reinforcements, the former returning wounded in May 1916. Richard, who was promoted to Sergeant at Gallipoli, went to France after the evacuation of the Peninsula and was awarded the Military Medal. He returned to NZ last April and received his commission. He left again for the front with a recent Maori Contingent. [AWN 31.01.1918] P.20

AYREY, Private Alfred S , Christchurch, Main Body now returned. Served on Gallipoli, taking part in both the landing and the evacuation with a brief respite in Alexandria owing to sickness. He later went through the engagements at the Somme, Messines and Ypres, in which the New Zealanders took part and was wounded in the right side on 12 October in the attack on Bellevue Spur. He was attached to the Divisional Signal Co. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

BAIGENT, Major C V, NZ Medical Corps, left NZ with the rank of captain as regimental medical officer of the Otago Battn, Main Body. He went right through the Gallipoli campaign after which he was in Egypt for some time. He gained his majority in France on March 1, 1917. He has returned for duty. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

BAKER, 2nd Lieutenant C G went to France with the 13th Reinforcements. He was wounded at Messines and Passchendaele. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

BANNERMAN, Lieutenant J W H, who has died of wounds, was for some years editor of the Bluff Press. He was born in Dunedin, his father being manager of the National Bank of NZ there and was educated at the Otago Boys High School where he had a remarkable career as an athlete. Later he represented both Southland and Otago on the cricket field and was the author of a very valuable “History of Otago Representative Cricket”. He was also an enthusiastic territorial officer. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

BANNATYNE, Private Charles E, reported killed in action on 20 December, was the eldest son of Mrs E Bannatyne of Tauranga. For many years he was a timber worker on the East Coast, eventually taking up farming at Omanawa Falls, Tauranga. He left with the 23rd Reinforcements and had been on active service on the western front for about six months. [AWN 24.01.1918] p.19

BARNETT, Sergeant R of Southland, won the Military Medal by rescuing wounded under heavy shell fire during the Battle of the Somme. He left as a private in the 8th Reinforcements and was wounded at Messines. He was promoted after the battle of the Somme. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

BARTON, 2nd Lieutenant Vivian has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He left NZ with the 5th Reinforcements. From Egypt he was sent to Salonika where he was wounded. He was invalided back to Egypt and after he recovered was sent to France. A brother, Staff Sergeant O BARTON, was a member of the Main Body but was invalided to the Dominion, wounded, some time ago. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

BEAUCHAMP, 2nd Lieut H, of Timaru, is a DCM man. He went to the front with the Main Body and went right through the peninsula campaign. After the evacuation he took part in operations in the Sinai Peninsula and in Palestine. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

BEGG, Colonel Charles Mackie, NZMC, of Wellington, was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in November 1915, for distinguished service during the operations in Gallipoli. He left with the Main Body of the Expeditionary Force, in command of the Field Ambulance. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

BEETHAM, Lieutenant R F, Military Cross, of Masterton, went to the front as a trooper in the Wellington Mounted Rifles, Main Body. He received a commission in the Dardanelles campaign and subsequently took part in operations on the Suez Canal and in France where he was wounded at Messines. He received a commission in May 1915 and won his second star in France in April 1916. His name was published in the list of New Year honours on 2 January as having been awarded the Military Cross and he did not know of the award until informed upon his arrival at Auckland. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

BERNARD, 2nd Lieutenant Victor R has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a Sergeant with the 11th Reinforcements. He took part in operations in Palestine. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

BEVIN, Sapper Ray, Divisional Signalling Co., has been nominated for a commission in the RFC and has returned to England for training. He is the second son of Mr A Bevin, Epsom. He left with the 8th Reinforcements and spent two years as a despatch rider in France. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.22

BLACKMAN, 2nd Lieutenant A R of Ponsonby, was a member of the First Battalion of the Rifle Brigade. He took part in operations on the Eastern frontier of Egypt and in France but he was not wounded. He received the Military Medal for his work at the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

BLAIR, Dr Mary, has been mentioned in General Milne’s despatch for services with the Salonika force. She is a daughter of the former engineer-in-chief in NZ and studied at Victoria College and London University where she graduated. She served for some time in Flanders and two years ago went to Servia in charge of a hospital unit for Scottish Women’s Hospital. After the retreat she went to Ajaccio in charge of the hospital for Servian refugees. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

BRIFFAULT, Captain Robert – Advice was recently received by the Base Records, Wellington, that the Military Cross had been awarded to Captain Robert Briffault. In making this announcement, the director explained that the Defence Dept had no record of this officer and therefore, could not communicate with his next of kin. Evidently the officer named in the official cable message is the well known Auckland surgeon. He proceeded to England in May 1915 and obtained a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He saw service on Gallipoli where he remained until the evacuation and was then invalided to Alexandria. Following his recovery he returned to England and about 18 months ago was transferred to France, where he has been continuously on service ever since. He has been close to the firing line since taking up his duties in France and has been engaged almost exclusively at dressing stations. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.17

BRISTER, 2nd Lieutenant S G of Christchurch, was awarded the Military Medal and the Russian Order of St George for gallantry at Armentieres. He left the Dominion as a private in the Main Body and was invalided from Gallipoli to England. He was wounded at Armentieres. [AWN 10.01.1918] p.21

B ROWN, 2nd Lieutenant C S left with the 20th Reinforcements. He was wounded at La Basseville. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

BRUCE, Captain David, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is well known in the Waikato, having resided for many years at Te Pahu and recently at Hinuera. He took an active interest in local affairs and was a member of the Raglan County Council until he left Te Pahu. He was a keen volunteer and although on the reserve when the war broke out he offered his services and was attached to the Pioneers under Lieut Col G A KING, with whom he had been previously associated in the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

BUSH, Captain L L T left with the 7th Reinforcements as 2nd Lieutenant and was promoted in Egypt. He received his captaincy in France where he was wounded at the battles of the Somme and Passchendaele. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

CALAME, 2nd Lieutenant P, of Dunedin, was a member of the Main Body. He worked his way through the ranks on Gallipoli and in France, until finally selected for a commission. He won the Military Medal at the battle of the Somme. He has returned for duty. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

CAMERON, Lance Corporal Alan, of Dorset St, Mataura, who has been awarded the Military Medal, enlisted with the First Battn of the Rifle Brigade. He was recently transferred to the Engineers and is now a wireless operator. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

CAVELL, 2nd Lieutenant A H has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a corporal attached to the Main Body. He went right through the Gallipoli and Sinai campaigns and also took part in Palestine actions and escaped injury in all engagements. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

CHILMAN, 2nd Lieutenant W has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. was a private of the 2nd Reinforcements. He was invalided to England from Gallipoli and after 20 months’ duty at the base was selected for a commission. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

CLARK, Lieutenant Humphrey, son of Archibald Clark of Auckland, has been promoted to the rank of Captain. He went Home in 1915 and after a short period at the officers’ training camp at Cambridge, he obtained his commission and was attached to the Signalling Co. of the Worcestershire Regt. He was awarded the Military Cross last October for bravery in the field. During an attack he laid wires behind the advancing lines and maintained them under shell fire. He also assisted in the capture of a party of Germans in a dugout. Before leaving for England he was a member of the College Rifles. [AWN 31.01.1918] P.17

CLARK – Mrs E Clark of Glenfield, Takapuna, has been advised by the Minister for Defence that her youngest son, Private J W Clark, has been awarded the Military Medal. Pte Clark, who is 21 years of age, left with the 21st Reinforcements. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

CLEMENS, Private Roy, who was dangerously gassed on 13 October and is still seriously ill, has been awarded the Military Medal. He was a member of the Garrison Artillery and was stationed at Fort Cautley prior to his leaving for the front over two years ago. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

COOK, 2nd Lieutenant F was a member of the 18th Reinforcements. He was wounded at Messines. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

CORFE, Lieut Col A C, South African Defence Force, who has been serving with the Royal West Kent Regt, has practically won the DSO three times within six months. The decoration appeared in the Gazette of 4 June, a first bar on 26 September, and a second bar on 19 November. He is an old boy of Christ’s College. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

CORY-WRIGHT, Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, of Tairua, Coromandel Peninsula, left NZ for England on 4 February 1916 and offered his services to the Imperial authorities. He was commissioned on 20 May of the same year and was engaged on submarine patrol work. He has been invalided through sickness. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

DANSEY, Captain Harry Dalamere, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is a son of Mr Dansey of Rotorua, who was formerly in the postal service and at one time was postmaster at Rotorua. For some time he was in the railway service at Dunedin but prior to the war he had been practicing as a civil engineer in Auckland. He left NZ as a lieutenant in the Maori contingent. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

Awarded in the list of New Year honours is the Military Cross to Captain Harry Delamere DANSEY of the Maori Pioneer Battn, serving in France. He is the eldest son of Mr R D Dansey of Rotorua and formerly postmaster at Ashburton. He was educated at Rotorua, Three King’s College (sic) and Auckland Grammar School and served in the Railway Dept from cadet to assistant engineer at Christchurch and Dunedin. Prior to the war he practiced his profession as civil and consulting engineer in Auckland. He left with the 2nd Maori Contingent as 2nd Lieutenant and quartermaster. For services at the Somme battle he was mentioned in despatches, promoted to lieutenant and given the command of a company. Afterwards he was attached to the NZ and British Tunnelling Corps. Rejoining his unit, he was promoted captain and given charge of a whole army corps’ tramway and railway system, which position he now holds as superintendent. Two of his younger brothers are in France. 2nd Lieutenant George R DANSEY, late of the Telegraph Dept, has risen from the ranks and Captain I DANSEY, who has served from the beginning of the war. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

DAWSON, Major Thomas Henry who has been made a companion of the Order of St Michael & St George, was born in Auckland and was educated at King’s College. He joined the College Rifles when that corps was formed in 1897. He was a sergeant major in the 4th NZ Contingent which served in the South African War. During the progress of the war he received a commission in the B order Regiment. He holds the Queen’s Medal with three clasps and the King’s Medal with two clasps. Shortly after the close of the war Major Dawson resigned his commission and returned to Auckland. Since then, and up to his departure on active service in 1914, he practiced as a solicitor. He rejoined the College Rifles with the rank of Lieutenant and was promoted to Captain on 5 December 1906. When the NZEF was mobilised he was transferred from the command of the Divisional Signal Co. to the 3rd, Auckland, Regt with the temporary rank of major and given command of the company drawn from that regiment. Major Dawson was mentioned in despatches on 5 November 1915. He is held in high esteem in military circles and is widely popular in the Auckland athletic world. He was a member in 1914 of the Management Committee of the NZ Rugby Union and president of the College Rifles Football Club. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

DEAN, Sergeant Hector, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is a son of Mrs M Stephenson of Birkdale. He enlisted when 17 years of age, left with the Rifle Brigade and has been three years on active service. Prior to enlistment he was engaged as a machinist by the Steel Construction Co. His brother Walter, who left with the same reinforcement, has been wounded and is still in hospital. Another brother who was wounded on Gallipoli, has returned to NZ. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

DEARDON, J F, Captain, DSO, M.C., of the Royal Fusiliers, has been awarded a bar to his Military Cross. He is a son of Mr P R Dearden of Longcliffe, Canterbury, and has lately had several staff appointments. [AWN 24.01.1918] p.18

DENIZE – Advice has been received by Mrs John Denize of Victoria St, Onehunga, that her son Private V DENIZE, has been awarded the Military Medal. He was wounded in the right knee at Messines. Pte Denize, who is 20 years of age, left with the 24th Reinforcements. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

DICKSON, Euan, Flight Sub Lieutenant, RNAS (Thames), has been awarded the DSO for good work in bombing German depots in very thick weather, to assist the Passchendaele advance. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

DOUGLAS, Private Robert George, killed in action on 30 November, was the eldest son of Mr R T Douglas, one of the early settlers of Wairoa North, later of the Miranda and now of Herne Bay. Pte Douglas, who left with the 22nd Reinforcements, saw a great deal of fighting, the latest news received from him being sent just after the Passchendaele battle. Prior to enlisting he was farming at Miranda. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

EHAU, Lieutenant K A H was a member of the 2nd Maori Contingent. He saw service at Gallipoli, in Egypt and in France. He was wounded at the Somme and received a severe wound in the fighting near Warneton on 31 July. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

ELLIS, 2nd Lieutenant J W has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. 2nd Lieut Ellis, who was a private in the Main Body, went right through the Gallipoli campaign after which he saw service in France as a divisional gas sergeant. A brother, Private F R ELLIS, also returned on Thursday. He went away with the Main Body but was invalided back to the Dominion through sickness and discharged. He re-enlisted and again went to the front with the 26th Reinforcements but has been invalided home for the second time. Two other brothers are also on active service, Private E V ELLIS has been gassed and is at present in England and Private G F ELLIS was wounded at Armentieres but is still with his unit. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

ERLAM, Captain H, Cheshire Regiment, attached South Lancashire Regt, formerly Sergeant NZEF, is mentioned in General Milne’s despatch for services with the Salonika force. [AWN 24.01.1918] p.18

FAITHFULL, Private W, son of Mr W Faithfull of Dargaville, has been awarded the Military Medal. He left with the 4th Reinforcements and has been on active service ever since. Three brothers have also served. Mr D Faithful, now discharged, was one of the first to enlist in Dargaville and saw service on the Suez Canal in a brush with the Turks, being subsequently invalided home. Private Bert FAITHFULL Enlisted with the 9th Reinforcements and Private Lloyd FAITHFULL followed his brothers in the 19th Reinforcements. [AWN 117.01.1918] P.17

FEARN, 2nd Lieutenant S W was a sergeant with the 5th Reinforcements. He saw much service in France. P.20 He is one of 36 officers who returned to the Dominion for duty from the front and have been selected from the various theatres of war for commissions. He qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

FERGUSON, Captain George H has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He went with the Main Body as a lieutenant. He was wounded at Gallipoli and invalided to England. He was promoted in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

FERNANDEZ, Corporal J, of Wellington, is a Main Body man. He was invalided back to the Dominion from Gallipoli through sickness and received his discharge. He re-enlisted and again went to the front with the 11th Reinforcements and was wounded at La Basse Ville. He was awarded the Military Medal for coolness and daring under fire at Messines, whereby an objective was gained. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

FITZSIMONS, 2nd Lieutenant Ernest R has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He left with the Main Body as a private, was wounded at Gallipoli and invalided to Lemnos where he remained five weeks. He returned to the Peninsula and remained on service until the evacuation. After about 18 months in France he was wounded at the Somme and invalided to England. A brother, Private L J FITZSIMONS, was wounded at Messines but is still at the front. Private H J FITZSIMONS was wounded at the Somme and invalided home. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

FLOOD, 2nd Lieutenant John W Who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission left NZ as a private. He was invalided to England from Gallipoli as the result of sickness. Subsequently he went to France where he remained on duty until promoted. A brother, Private D FLOOD, is at present in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

FLYNN, Private Edward, King St, Timaru, who has been awarded the Military Medal, left with the 4th Reinforcements. He has been twice wounded. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

FORD, 2nd Lieutenant P G left with the Main Body as a private. He was right through the Gallipoli campaign after which he was transferred to Egypt with the rank of Sergeant. He went to France as sergeant-major and shortly before he was invalided through sickness he received his commission. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

FRANKAU, 2nd Lieutenant P E, Rifle Brigade, killed in action while attached to the Cameronians, was the second son of the late Frank Danby, the novelist. In 1911 he married Miss Frances B Miller of Te Puke. Early in life he gave up his scholastic career in order to devote himself to farming and exploration. He had travelled considerably and finally had settled in Rhodesia, enlisting at the outbreak of the war in the Rhodesian Contingent. He obtained his commission in April 1915. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

GARDNER, 2nd Lieutenant L J left with the Mounted Rifles, 9th Reinforcements, as a sergeant. Subsequently he was attached to the Artillery and sent to France where he earned his promotion. He was severely wounded at Passchendaele. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

GARD’NER, Lieutenant Colonel, DSO, is well known in NZ. He has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was attached to the RNZA, permanent force, at Dunedin from 1902 to 1911, when he was transferred to Wellington as assistant-director of ordnance and artillery. Early in 1912 he went to England and was attached to the Staff College and later was at Aldershot. At the outbreak of war he joined the NZEF but almost immediately was transferred to the Rifle Brigade with the rank of Brigade Major and later to the divisional staff in Egypt. In March 1916 he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and given command of the divisional ammunition column and sent to France. He was attached to the staff of the 2nd Anzac Corps in March 1917 and held that position until he was appointed deputy-quartermaster-general of the NZ Military Forces, a position which he has returned to take up. Lieut Col Gard’ner, who saw considerable service at the Somme and Messines, was awarded the DSO in June 1917. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

GAVIN, Captain Noel John Hay, RAMC, MC and bar, Wellington, who died in France on 1 November, met his death as the result of an accident. His horse bolted and fell, throwing him on to his head and fracturing his skull. He died very shortly after reaching a casualty clearing station. He had been in England on leave and had been back in France only a few days before he met his death. He had been attached for some time to the 14th, Royal Irish Rifles. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

GERRARD, Private Stanley, of the 33rd Reinforcements, died on Monday last week at the residence of his mother, Victoria Road, Devonport. He was the youngest son of the late Mr J P Gerrard. An inquest regarding the death of Private Gerrard was opened by Mr E C Cutten, S.M., on Monday afternoon. Evidence was given by the mother of the deceased that her son had returned on leave from Tauherenikau on Sunday morning. He was then complaining of a headache and in the afternoon went to bed. About 2.30 a.m. on Monday he still complained of a headache. His sisters visited him at about 6 a.m. and thought he was asleep. A doctor was called but life was then extinct. Corroborative evidence was given by the sisters of the deceased. Medical evidence was that death was due to acute gastric-enteritis and a verdict was returned accordingly. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.20

GIBBS, Major David John, who has received the DSO, was formerly a member of the clerical staff of the Wellington Harbour Board. He joined the old Wellington Engineers Co. in the early volunteer days and rose from the ranks to the position of commanding officer. At the outbreak of the war he volunteered for active service and went away with the Samoan force. Subsequently he went to Egypt with the engineering section of one of the early reinforcements and he commanded a section of the 5th Reinforcements at the Suvla Bay landing. He has served throughout the whole of the operations of the NZ division in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

GIBSON, Sergeant William W, died of wounds in Palestine on 2 December, was the fourth son of Mrs S A Gibson of Albany. Prior to enlisting in the 4th Reinforcements he was in partnership with a brother in a carrying and contracting business. He served through the Gallipoli campaign and was in all the engagements with the Turks in Egypt. He received a wound that proved fatal on 14 November, exactly three years from the time he left NZ. Two brothers are at the front; George is a trooper in the NZ First Camel Brigade in Palestine, and James is serving in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

GILLETT, Signaller Henry Joseph Arnold, who has been reported killed in action, was the only son of Mr & Mrs Gillett of Owen’s Road, Epsom. He was 22 years of age. He was born in Australia but has for some years been in the service of the NZ Post Office at Marton, Auckland and Wanganui. He enlisted from Wanganui as a signaller and went with the 6th Reinforcements, seeing service on Gallipoli where he was wounded. He landed in France, his father’s native country, with the first of the New Zealanders and was on active service there until his death. His officers and comrades speak highly of his heroism and devotion to duty. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

GILSHMAN, 2nd Lieutenant S E of Kakaramea, Taranaki, took part in the Gallipoli operations and also saw service in France without being wounded. He was awarded the Military Medal for services at the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

GODFREY, Sergeant Major James A, who died of wounds in France on 26 December, was a brother of Mr J A Godfrey of the Survey Dept., Auckland. He was born in Picton, Marlborough. Prior to his departure for the front, he was on the staff of the Railway Dept. He enlisted as a private in the Canterbury Infantry of the Main Body. He took part in the landing at Gallipoli and was wounded in July 1915. He returned to the peninsula and remained until the evacuation. After a couple of months service in France he was again wounded but returned to the front and served through last winter. He went through the battle of Messines and was awarded the Military Medal and also mentioned in Sir Donald Haig’s despatches for leading his men into action when his officers had been killed. Another brother, Corporal D GODFREY, was wounded in the advance on Jerusalem. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

GORDON, 2nd Lieutenant T J of Hokianga, left NZ as a private in the Main Body. He served throughout the Gallipoli campaign and while on service in France was selected for a commission and returned to the Dominion for duty. He has never been wounded and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Meritorious Service Medal at Messines and the Croix de Guerre at the battle of the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

GOULDING, 2nd Lieutenant Fritz Stanley, who has been awarded the Military Cross, was educated at Napier High School. He was later a law student at the Auckland University College. He has two brothers on active service and another brother was killed at Gallipoli. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

GRANT, Lieutenant T S, killed in action on the western front, was the youngest son of Mr & Mrs Grant of Maungaturoto and formerly of Ormondville. Prior to enlisting in the 8th Reinforcements he was managing a mill in the Dannevirke district. He was employed for a while at the base in Egypt as sergeant but was subsequently transferred to the artillery and proceeded to France. He received his commission in April last and went through the fighting in France from the first days of that Somme battle. An elder brother recently returned from the front wounded. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

HALL, Lieutenant Colonel George Thomas, who has been appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George, was a keen officer in the territorials, holding the rank of major in the Army Service Corps. Prior to going to the front he was on the staff of Messrs Levin & Company, merchants, of Wellington. He left NZ with the Main Body in charge of the canteens and saw service in the Mediterranean operations. Since then he has been in England, where he holds the appointment of assistant quartermaster general to General Richardson. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

HANDYSIDE, Lieutenant T F, advice of whose death in action in Palestine has just been received, was 33 years of age and the son of Mr J S Handyside of Hawkes Bay. The deceased was farming at Whangarei at the outbreak of war. He left NZ about three years ago and went to London where he joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He served in France and at Salonika but was last heard of from Gaza. He married the second daughter of Mr H S Ruddock of the Auckland Stock Exchange and has two sons, the eldest being six years of age. Mrs Handyside and her children reside at Whangarei. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.20

HANNA, Lieut P R M, Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr T H Hanna of Whakapirau, who was wounded in the shoulder on 2 October, has been granted six months leave and is expected to visit Auckland shortly. Lt Hanna, who was one of the first Main Body men to enlist in Auckland, was on the local staff of the National Bank. He left as a sapper in the Divisional Signal Company and after going through the Gallipoli campaign obtained a commission in the RFA. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.21

HARLE, Lieutenant G D, Rifle Brigade, who enlisted in the British Army at the beginning of the war, has been in England on a few days leave from France. At a recent sports meeting at an Army School in France, he wond the quarter-mile, the high jump and the obstacle race and was second in the half-mile and three-mile cross country. He also won the revolver and rifle-shooting and individual bayonet competition and was in charge of the party which won the night wiring competition. He was formerly in the NZ Railways and served for two years with the Canadian Pacific Railway before coming to England to enlist. [AWN 24.01.1918, p.23]

HARRIS, Driver Rayner, Raetihi, left NZ with the artillery of the 3rd Reinforcements and was sent to Gallipoli in July 1915. On 29 June of this year he was wounded in five places, one of these wounds causing spinal injuries from which he is slowly recovering. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

HEDGES, Sergeant Alfred E, brother of Mr A W Hedges, Clonbern Rd, Remuera, has died of wounds on 13 December. Prior to leaving for the front he was secretary to the diocesan office, Nelson. Her served about 18 months in the South African war. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.20

HELLABY, Captain J A B of Auckland, has been granted six months leave of absence from military duty and intends to visit NZ. He belonged to the Royal Engineers until ill health compelled him to relinquish his commission a few months ago. Mrs Hellaby and their two daughters are turning to Auckland shortly. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.21

HERBERT, 2nd Lieutenant Henry S has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He went to Gallipoli as a private with the Main Body. Later he was transferred to Egypt and took part in the Sinai and Palestine campaign. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

HILL, Bombardier Hector Gray, reported killed in action on the western front on 8 December, was a son of Mr A G Hill of Westport, a veteran of the Maori war, who acted for some time as guide to Major von Tempsky. His mother is a sister of Mr F Mander, MP for Marsden. He left with the 9th Reinforcements. An elder brother, Lieutenant L A HILL, who left with the Main Body, is still on active service on the western front. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

HOOD, Flight Lieutenant George, son of Mr F Hood of Upper Plain, Masterton, fell a distance of 2,000 ft and sustained such injuries as necessitated the amputation of a leg. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.22

HULL, Trooper John Kingston, son of G G Hull, Otaua, Waiuku, has been awarded the Military Medal. He left with the 8th Reinforcements and is serving in Palestine. Before he enlisted he was farming with his father. He was born and educated at Otaua and Pukekohe High School. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.19

IRVINE, Sergeant G W McL, of Kent, received the Military Medal for ‘carrying on’ after he had been badly wounded. He went to the front with the 11th Reinforcements and was wounded in Flanders. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

JACKSON, 2nd Lieutenant Allan B has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He went to Gallipoli as a sergeant of the 6th Reinforcements. After the evacuation he reverted to the ranks and went to France as a corporal. He was wounded at the Somme and invalided to England. Two brothers, 2nd Lieutenant G JACKSON and Private E J JACKSON, are at present serving in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

JARRETT, 2nd Lieutenant Owen G has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a corporal in the 2nd NZ Rifle Brigade. He was engaged in a trench mortar battery in France until selected for a commission. A brother, Sapper C J JARRETT, is with the engineers in France. He has been wounded. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

JOHNS, Captain Frederick Noel, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is the eldest son of Mr F J Johns of Wanganui. He was born at Wanganui and received his primary education there, afterwards going to Edinburgh University, where he passed his final medical examinations a few years ago. Returning to NZ shortly after the outbreak of war he almost immediately joined the Medical Corps of the NZEF. He saw service on Gallipoli and was there at the evacuation. For some time past he has been in charge of a field dressing station in France. His only brother, Lieutenant Haldane JOHNS, is in the Royal Navy and is at present engaged on submarine work. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

KIDD, Captain A, NZ Medical Corps, went to the front with the 16th Reinforcements. He was wounded at Messines. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

KING, Lieutenant Colonel George A, late of Hamilton, to whose DSO a bar has been added, was killed in action on 12 October 1917. He was born in Canterbury and was educated there, being an old Christ’s College boy. He formerly was engaged in farming in the northern part of the South Island. On the institution of the territorial system he was appointed adjutant to the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles. Subsequently he was promoted to the charge of No. 4 Group and held that position on the outbreak of war, when he immediately volunteered for active service. He left NZ as staff captain in the Mounted Rifle Brigade. He went through the Gallipoli campaign and was wounded there. When the troops returned from Gallipoli to Egypt, he was placed in charge of the Maori pioneer force and apparently held that position until the time of his death. In addition to his DSO he was the holder of a French decoration. He left a wife and two children. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

In a letter to the widow of Lieut Colonel G A KING, DSO & Croix de Guerre, who was killed on 12 October, just after he had taken over the command of the First, Canterbury, Battalion, General Godley writes: “I must write a line to tell you how deeply I sympathise with you in the loss of your gallant husband and how much we all deplore his loss. He had proved himself on active service a soldier of conspicuous courage and ability and in the various responsible staff appointments and commands which he has held in the NZEF, he has invariably won the complete confidence of his superiors and the esteem and affection of his juniors and those under his command. Colonel King was an officer which NZ can ill afford to lose and for myself I have lost a subordinate who, from the time he joined the NZ Staff Corps, has always served me most loyally and faithfully and has always been one of its very best officers. On all sides I hear the most profound expressions of regret at his loss and I know they are amply justified. He was killed while in command of his battalion in the attack and if he had to die, from what I know of him, he would have preferred such a soldier’s death.” [AWN 17.01.1918] P.48

JOLL, Private H L of Howe Street, Newton, winner of the Military Medal, left NZ with the third reinforcements in December 1914. He was wounded at Gallipoli but returned to the line and took part in the evacuation. He was also wounded at the battle of the Somme, for his part in which he was awarded the decoration. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

KARINI, Private Toi of Tolaga Bay, went to France with the 22nd Reinforcements and was wounded at Cambrai. He wears the Croix de Guerre. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

KENNEDY, Sergeant Major Edward J F, son of Mr J Kennedy, Brighton Road, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He left the Dominion with the Main Body as a private. His cousin, Sergeant D KENNEDY, who also left with the Main Body, won the Military Medal at Messines. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.17

The friends of Lieutenant Lancel Lytton KING, who was killed in action in France during the successful advance on 4 October, will be interested in an extract from a letter received by his mother from his commanding officer who writes: “From the birth of the Fourth Brigade your brave son has been an officer of this company, during which time he has won the respect of his fellow officers and the love of every man serving under him. Fighting in the forefront of a great battle, as only the strong and the brave can fight, he fell. His body was disfigured by no ghastly wound; he suffered no pain, he being killed by the concussion of a high explosive shell. When darkness fell upon the battlefield the lads who had followed his splendid lead laid him to rest. He had died for his country and all that country stands for. Lieut King died leading his men, each one of whom honoured and respected him as soon as they came to know him. When we lost him he was by far the most popular officer we had and one of the most popular officers I have known both amongst officers and men.” [AWN 03.01.1918] P.20

KNAPP, Lance Corporal John M, whose next of kin is shown as Mrs E Knapp of Victoria, was in a contingent of sick and wounded members of the NZEF returning to NZ. He died en route on 24 December from pneumonia and was buried at sea on Christmas Day with military honours. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.58

KNIGHT, Private Clifton Wallace, killed in action on 28 December, was the eldest son of Mr F W Knight of Mt Eden Road. He was 21 years of age, born in Adelaide, Sth Australia, and came to NZ with his parents eleven years ago. After completing his school career he entered the office of Messrs Jackson and Russell and on matriculating two years ago took up the study of law at the Auckland University College. He left with the nineteenth reinforcements and on reaching England was trans-ferred to the signallers, being company signaller in the Fourth Brigade at the time of his death. [AWN 31.01.1918f, p.45]

LACROIX, The Rev C, Roman Catholic Chaplain, NZEF, who has been specially mentioned in written orders for gallantry in connection with a train collision in France, is well known in NZ. Coming originally from France, he was first engaged in the Taranaki province and worked among the Maoris in the King Country when Taihape and Mangaweka were little more than bush townships. He removed subsequently to the West Coast which district he left to join the forces as a chaplain. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.21

LAFFERTY, 2nd Lieutenant A W was a member of the 17th Reinforcements. He was wounded at La Basseville. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

LANGWELL, Sergeant Herbert James, SON OF Mrs E M Langwell of Huntly Ave, Newmarket, has been awarded the Military Medal. He left with the 9th Reinforcements and saw service in Egypt before proceeding to the western front. He was wounded in the Somme battle but recovered and took part in the Messines advance. He is now in hospital suffering from trench fever. Two brothers, Corporal J W LANGWELL and Private S H LANGWELL, have also been admitted to hospital – one suffering from illness and the other from the effects of a wound received at the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

LAWRENCE, 2nd Lieutenant Reginald J has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He is a Main Body man. After six months service at Gallipoli he was transferred to Egypt with the Mounted Rifles. Later he was sent to France with the ASC. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

LEPPER, 2nd Lieut C of Lepperton, Taranaki, was awarded the Military Medal for services at Chunuk Bair. He went to the front as a private with the Main Body and after the Gallipoli operations proceeded to France as a sergeant. He was wounded at Armentieres and subsequently was gassed at Fleurbaix. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

LEWER, 2nd Lieutenant E left as a Company Sergeant Major of the 1st Battn of the Rifle Brigade. He took part in the campaign against the Senussi and was then sent to France. He was promoted at the battle of the Somme but was severely wounded on 10 June 1917 at La Basseville. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

LEWER, 2nd Lieutenant E, of Wellington, who won the Military Cross, went to the front early in the war as a sergeant and earned promotion on the field. He received his decoration for conspicuous gallantry at Messines. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

LORIE, 2nd Lieutenant A, who was killed on 28 December, served as a private in the Samoan advance guard. He returned to NZ and went away with the 5th Reinforcements. He remained constantly on duty with the 3rd, Auckland, Regiment until after long and continuous service in France, he was sent to the Cambridge University Officers’ Training Corps. After a short training in that and other officers’ corps, he was appointed to the 6th, Hauraki, Regiment. He fought in nearly all the principal battles in which NZ troops were engaged in France and escaped wounds until the conclusion of the battle of Messines. Recovering after a few days at a rest camp, he returned to the front but was gassed and sent to hospital in September. He could not have been back in the firing line long before he met his death. He was the only son of Mrs S E Lorie of Pokeno. He was educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School and later in Auckland. Before enlisting he was farming in the Waikato district. Private advices state that he has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.20

LUCAS, Captain R H, RAMC, son of Canon Lucas of Nelson, has been awarded by the King of Italy, the medal of the Chevalier de la Corona d’Italia for hospital organization on the Italian front. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.21

LURY, 2nd Lieutenant George H has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a sergeant in the 3rd Reinforcements. He was wounded at Gallipoli and invalided to England. Later he was sent to France. He has three brothers in the Imperial Army. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

MacINTYRE, 2nd Lieutenant Archibald, has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He landed at Gallipoli with the 4th Reinforcements. He was at the evacuation after which he went to France and was on continuous service until selected for a commission. A brother, Lieut R H M MacINTYRE, is an officer of the Imperial Forces and is at present in command of an armoured car. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

MACLEAN, Mrs L, wife of the Rev W Maclean, C.F., NZEF, has been mentioned in despatches for her work at the County of Middlesex War Hospital, Napsbury. Mrs Maclean, who is a daughter of Mr W H Ingram, Invercargill, came to England in August 1916 and shortly afterwards commenced work at Napsbury. Her husband was minister of Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church at Remuera and had been with the NZEF since moving from Egypt to France. He has just joined the NZ Discharge Depot at Torquay. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

MARTIN, Sergeant Guy, son of Mr H Martin, Victoria Ave, Mt Eden, who for some years prior to going on active service, was employed in the commercial department of the ‘Auckland Star’. He was at the Gallipoli landing and about 3 months later was invalided to England. When recovered he returned to Egypt and later went through the Somme and Messines offensives. While serving with the artillery on the Belgian coast, he was wounded by a high explosive shell, suffering severe injuries to his right leg. He is now making good progress. [AWN p3.01.1918] p.16

MASSAM, 2nd Lieutenant Joseph A has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He left NZ as a private with the Main Body. He saw much service on Gallipoli and in France with a machine-gun section without sustaining injury. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

McCARROLL, Lieutenant Colonel J N, left with the Main Body as major in command of the 11th, North Auckland, Mounted Rifles. He took part in the Gallipoli campaign, including the evacuation operations and has been on active service in Egypt ever since. He was wounded on Gallipoli in May 1915 and after a short furlough in England and France returned to active service. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel and has been in command of the Auckland Mounted Rifles for some time. He was again wounded in the recent fighting in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem and, according to recent cable advice, is now convalescent. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

McCAW, Private John T, Waitahuna, returning to NZ, succumbed to injuries and was buried at sea. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

McCUTCHEON, Captain A M, RAMC, an old boy of St John’s College, Auckland, has been mentioned in despatches for services at Salonika. He graduated at Glasgow University and joined the RAMC in September 1914. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

McGANN, Staff Nurse Susannah Josephine, who has been awarded the Royal Red Cross, second-class, is a member of the NZ Trained Nurses’ Assn and of the Auckland Nurses’ Club. She obtained her certificate in Queensland but had been in Auckland for some years prior to going to the front more than two years ago. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

McGHIE – The Minister for Defence has advised Mrs McGhie, Ardmore Rd, Ponsonby, that her husband, Captain John McGHIE, NZMC, has been awarded the Military Cross. Prior to his enlistment he was resident house surgeon at the Auckland Hospital. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

McGOVERN, Joseph, has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He went to Samoa as a private and later joined the 8th Reinforcements. After seeing service in France, he was attached to the headquarters staff in London. A brother is attached to the RFC, Australian forces, in Palestine. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

McGREGOR, Lieutenant Ewen John, awarded the Military Cross, is the elder son of Mr Ewen McGregor of Hamilton. He was a member of the machine-gun section of the 4th, Waikato, Mounted Rifles and left as a sergeant in the machine-gun section of the Main Body. He saw service on Gallipoli and later in France, where he received a commission. He was wounded and returned to NZ a few months ago. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

McIVOR, 2nd Lieutenant, was a corporal in the Wellington Mounted Rifles, Main Body. He took part in operations on Gallipoli Peninsula and subsequently transferred to the Camel Corps and saws considerable service in Palestine where he was selected for a commission. He has returned for duty. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

McKENZIE, Captain J G, was a private in the Main Body. During the Gallipoli campaign in which he was wounded, he was promoted 2nd Lieutenant. After the evacuation he received his second star and went to France as adjutant of the 3rd Artillery Brigade. In January 1917 he received his captaincy but shortly afterwards was gassed at Messines and invalided to England where he was attached to the NZ Artillery depot as second in command. His superior officer was Lieut Col I T STANDISH, DSO, CMB, who is well known in Auckland. Capt McKenzie has just returned to the Dominion on special duty. A brother, Lieut E R McKENZIE, is also a member of the Dominion forces. He has been wounded three times. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

McKINNON, Private R R, of the ?19th Cameron Highlanders, Canadians, the eldest son of Mr W McKinnon of Te Rore, has received a shrapnel wound in the left hand. He is progressing favourably at the Base Hospital, Boulogne. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

McLEAN, Rev Walter, who has been awarded the Military Cross, was for some years minister of the Somervell Presbyterian Church at Remuera. He left with one of the early reinforcements. After some months hospital duty in Egypt, he was sent to France where he has served with the NZ forces for nearly two years, [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

MILL, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas, CMG, NZMC, who has been made a companion of the Order of St Michael and St George, is a son of Mr Thomas Mill of Port Chalmers, well known in shipping circles throughout NZ. He was for some time in private practice in Christchurch but when war broke out he was in practice in Geraldine. He disposed of his practice and went Home early in 1915 and became attached to the NZ medical service in London. For some time he has been in charge of the Walton on Thames Hospital. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

MILLER – Advice has been received by Mr J N Miller of Paeroa that his son, Sergeant G F MILLER of the First Australian Divisional Signal Co. has been awarded both the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal. He is the eldest of three brothers who have seen service. The youngest, Private J S MILLER, having made the supreme sacrifice while Lance Corporal P S MILLER has been invalided home. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

MILLS, Gunner John McArthur, aged 24, youngest son of Mrs D Mills of Opotiki, has been awarded the Military Medal. He left with the Main Body, being attached to the headquarters staff of the 4th, Auckland, Mounted Rifles as a signaller. He saw service in Egypt and Gallipoli. At the end of 1915 he was invalided to England but returned to Egypt in January 1916 when he was transferred to the Field Artillery. He has served on the western front ever since. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

MITCHELL, Private Harry, a New Zealander, while walking in a dark lane in Essex, was accidentally killed by a motor car which overtook him, the starting handle pinning him to the ground. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.45

Advice has been received by Mr Thomas MOFFATT of Hamilton, that the Military Medal has been awarded to two of his sons for gallantry at Graveastafel on 4 October. Both brothers left with the 7th Reinforcements. The third one, Sergeant George Claude MOFFATT, was killed in action in the battle of 4 October, while leading his platoon. He served with the Wellington Infantry. He won his stripes in the field and was twice mentioned for an award for gallantry at Messines. His elder brother, Lance Corporal L P MOFFATT, was a member of the Auckland Signal Co. He was dangerously wounded at Messines. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

MORIARTY, 2nd Lieutenant Daniel M has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a lance-sergeant in the 8th Reinforcements. He was wounded at the Somme but after a short convalescence in England, returned to the firing line. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

MORONEY, 2nd Lieutenant D went to Samoa as a private and upon his return to the Dominion joined the 9th Reinforcements as a staff sergeant. He was on the staff in England when selected for a commission. Three brothers are also on active service. Sergeant James MORONEY was wounded at Messines, Private Joseph MORONEY was wounded in France and Private E MORONEY has so far escaped unscathed. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

MULLANY, Lieutenant Charles L is one of 36 officers who returned to the Dominion for duty from the front and have been selected from the various theatres of war for commissions. He qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England. He went to Samoa as a private. Returning to the Dominion he was attached to the 3rd Battalion of the Rifle Brigade and sent to France. He was wounded twice and he was also gassed in June 1917. He was promoted to Lieutenant nine months ago. A brother, Corporal E J MULLANY, was killed in France on 11 October 1917 while endeavouring to rescue a wounded comrade. Another brother V J MULLANY was wounded Messines. Lt Mullany was recommended for the Royal Humane Society’s medal for life-saving in England and also for the Military Medal for services in France. In connection with the former recommendation, he dived from a pier at Brighton, England and rescued a drowning man after three other soldiers had made unsuccessful attempts. Another brother lost his life in NZ while endeavouring to save a life. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

MURCHISON, Major Donald Sinclair, DSO, is a member of the well known Lake Coleridge family. He was educated at Christ’s College and Canterbury College, at both of which he took a prominent part in football. He was studying for law when the war broke out and he immediately joined up with the Canterbury Yeomanry Corps, receiving his commission as a lieutenant. He was wounded at Gallipoli and invalided to England. On returning to duty he became adjutant at the NZ camp at Westham, Weymouth. He afterwards did duty as adjutant and officer commanding at various convalescent camps. He went to France with the New Zealanders and rapidly rose to his present rank. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

NEILSON, Captain A E left NZ with the 3rd Battn of the Rifle Brigade in February 1916. After a few months in Egypt he was transferred to France where he saw considerable service, being finally invalided home as the result of sickness. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

NEWMAN, Major Clarence Nathaniel, NZ Field Artillery, who has been awarded the DSO, is one of three sons of Mr J W Newman of Mt Eden. He went to the front with the artillery of the Main Body. He was at Gallipoli from shortly after the landing until the evacuation and has been on service in France since leaving the peninsula. For services at Gallipoli he was mentioned in despatches and subsequently received a Servian decoration. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

Eighteen Victoria Crosses have been awarded, including one to Private Henry James NICHOLAS, a New Zealander, for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in attack. He belonged to a Lewis gun section which was ordered to form a defensive flank to the right of an advance which was subsequently checked by the enemy as a strong point. Private Nicholas rushed forward alone, shot the officer in command of the strong point, and overcame the garrison of 16 by means of bombs and his bayonet, capturing four wounded prisoners and a machine-gun practically swingle-handed, saving many casualties. Subsequently, when the advance reached its limit, Private Nicholas collected ammunition under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire. His exceptional valour and coolness throughout the operations was an inspiring example to all. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.25

The only Henry James NICHOLAS in the Base Records is No. 24,213, 1st Battalion Canterbury Infantry, the second son of Mr R Nicholas, Berry St, St Albans, Christchurch. He is 26 years old and was a carpenter before enlisting. Private H J Nicholas, V.C., enlisted with the 13th Reinforcements. He has not been wounded or suffered illness in any way, having been in the firing line all the time. Prior to his enlistment he was apprenticed to a builder at St Albans. After serving his time he went to Australia where he followed the trade for about four years and then returned to NZ. He was only here for a few months in different parts of Canterbury when he enlisted. He is a native of Canterbury, having been born at Lincoln. He was educated at the Normal and East Christchurch Schools. He was a good sportsman, boxing being the branch in which he particularly specialised. When at Sling Camp, in England, he won the middle-weight boxing championship for his regiment. He was well-known in NZ as an amateur boxer. Before leaving NZ, he was a member of No. 1 Company Field Engineers (Territorials). He has another brother, Ernest, who is at present in England. This brother left with the 12th Reinforcements and his elder brother, Frederick, left with the Main Body, was wounded at Gallipoli and has since returned. Another brother is under military age. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.25

NICHOLSON, Sergeant J A, killed in action on 24 December, was the son of Mr J Nicholson of Waihi. He was educated at Waihi High School and the School of Mines, and prior to enlisting with the 8th Reinforcements was employed as electrical engineer in the Grand Junction mine. He was gassed in August 1916 and spent some months in French and British hospitals and upon his recovery was employed as drill sergeant at Sling Camp and Codford Camp until 6 November when he again went to the front. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

NICHOLSON, Private N A of Toa Toa via Opotiki, won the Military Medal at Messines. He has been at the front since early in 1915. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

NIELD, Corporal A H, son of Mrs Nield, Mangawhare, Northern Wairoa, has been awarded the Military Medal. He volunteered in 1915 and has been three times wounded. He was born at Mangawhare and is 23 years of age. Prior to his enlistment he was engaged in the butchery business. He is the holder of the Royal Humane Society’s silver medal for bravery on the West Coast. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

NORRIS, Private J R of Waihi, has won the DCM, one bar to the medal and the French Medaille Militaire. He left NZ with the Main Body and took part in most of the actions in which the Dominion troops were engaged. The French decoration was awarded Private Norris for rescuing a wounded officer under fire. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

O’BRIEN, 2nd Lieutenant Denis O has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a sergeant attached to the First Tunnelling Corps of Engineers. He had been on continuous service in France until he received his promotion. Prior to joining the forces he was chairman of the Buller County Council. A brother, Sapper C P O’BRIEN, is with the tunnellers in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

OHLSON, Sergeant Athol W M, who was recently awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, is a son of Mr F J Ohlson, Epsom, and is 24 years of age. He is an old boy of the Auckland Grammar School and at the time of his enlistment was a law clerk. He served in Samoa and, returning from that expedition, again enlisted in the First Battalion of the Rifle Brigade as a signaller, being promoted to non-commissioned rank before leaving NZ. He took part in the operations against the Senussi and afterwards went through the Somme, Messines and Flanders battles. He is at present in England, studying for a commission. Two brothers are on active service of whom one has been gassed and is at present in hospital in England. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.17

OLIVER, 2nd Lieutenant S left NZ as a corporal of the 7th Reinforcements. He was raised to the rank of Sergeant in Egypt and received his commission in France. He was wounded at La Basseville. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

OSBORNE, Corporal D S, of Allerton, won his honour at Messines by holding a line under heavy fire. He left NZ with the 9th Reinforcements and after serving in Egypt went to France. In September 1916 he was severely wounded at the Somme and was finally put out of action at Ploegstreet in July of this year by a piece of shell entering his left side. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.17

OTENE, Corporal R of Hastings, was a member of the First Maori Contingent. He was wounded at Gallipoli but remained on the peninsula until oper4ations were concluded. He was severely wounded in the leg at the battle of Messines and invalided home. He was awarded the Military Medal on 7 August 1915 for work on Gallipoli and he was decorated in France by General PLUMER. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

PARSONS, Private J, of Ponsonby Road, received the Military Medal for conspicuous work at Messines. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

PEARSON, Private Reginald M of Northcote, who has been awarded the Military Medal, left with the No.2 Rifle Brigade, Field Ambulance. He was on the office staff of Bycroft & Co, Auckland, and was born and educated at Whangarei. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

PIPER, 2nd Lieutenant Donald V has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He went to Gallipoli with the Main Body as a private. He was invalided to England as the result of sickness. A brother, Flight Sergeant N V PIPER, of the RFC, is a prisoner of war in Germany. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

PURCELL, Private Robert, Takapuna, of the 2nd, Wellington, Battalion, while in London on leave from the Command Depot at Codford, was run over by a motor bus near Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road, and killed. The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

QUINN, Captain R N, left NZ in charge of the Army Service Corps of the 7th Reinforcements with the rank of Lieutenant. He received his captaincy in Egypt. He has been invalided home through sickness. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

RAEBURN, 2nd Lieutenant Douglas A who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission is another officer who took part in the Gallipoli operations and also saw considerable service in France without being wounded. He left NZ as a private. Three brothers are also members of the Dominion Forces. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

REED, Captain N J, went to the front with the 1st Battn of the Rifle Brigade as Lieutenant in November 1915. He took part in the Egyptian campaign against the Senussi, after which he was sent to France where he was promoted. He became a casualty in the Flanders fighting. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

REID, 2nd Lieutenant A S, son of A S Reid, Herbert St, Mt Eden, went to the front with the 22nd Reinforcements and was wounded at Belllevue Spur. A brother, Private R A REID, died of wounds on 6 October and another brother, Private L H REID, was wounded at Gallipoli and twice in France after which he was invalided home. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

RHODES, Lieutenant B A left with the Samoan Expeditionary Force as a private. After returning to NZ he received a commission and went to the front with the 15th Reinforcements. He was promoted in France where he was wounded. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

RICHMOND, Major James MacDonald, of Wellington, awarded the DSO, held a commission in the RNZA prior to the outbreak of war and left with the Main Body as lieutenant. He received the Military Cross for services in the Gallipoli campaign. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

RICHMOND, Major J M, M.C., who was recently awarded the DSO, is the eldest son of Mr Maurice Richmond of Christchurch who was formerly professor of law at Victoria College. He held a commission in the RNZA and in 1914 was appointed assistant military secretary to General Godley. He left for the front with the Main Body of the NZEF as a member of General Godley’s personal staff and has seen service on Gallipoli and in France, winning the Military Cross. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.17

ROBERTSON, Lance Corporal Edgar H, 2nd, Auckland, Infantry Battalion, who was killed a few days after the battle of Bellevue Spur, was the second son of Mrs Robertson of Lawrence Street and the late Captain J Robertson of the Union Co. A fine tribute to the soldier’s memory is paid by tribute to the soldier’s memory is paid by his platoon sergeant who writes – “He led his section of rifle grenadiers in the Messines attack in June last in a manner which gained for him the highest praise and he did equally well in the last attack at Ypres. Although only a lad he held the unswerving confidence of men old enough to have sons his age.” [AWN 24.01.1918] P.19

RUSSELL, Major General Sir Andrew Hamilton, KCB, KCMG, is General Commanding the NZ Division in France. He was born at Napier in 1868 and is the son of the late Captain Hamilton Russell of the 58th Regt. He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst. In 1887 he joined a border regiment as 2nd Lieutenant and served for five years on foreign service. In 1892 he came to NZ to join his father who was then farming at Flaxmere in partnership with his brother, Sir William Russell. Later he managed his father’s property when it was divided and until he subdivided the estate he conducted one of the finest farms in the neighbourhood. In 1900 the Hawkes Bay Mounted Rifles was formed and he was elected to the command, a position he held until he was promoted Major of the Wellington Mounted Brigade. Later he became Lieutenant Colonel, which rank he held at the outbreak of war. On his service being accepted, he was appointed Colonel in Command of the Mounted Rifles Brigade of the Main Body of the NZEF. Shortly after landing at Gallipoli he was promoted Brigadier General. For his services on Gallipoli he was given a knighthood and was created CB when the 1917 New Year’s honours list was announced. On the creation of the NZ Division in Egypt, he was appointed to the command with the rank of Major General. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

RYAN, Private Francis Edward of the 34th Reinforcements, committed suicide at Featherston camp on Saturday by cutting his throat with a razor. The deceased reported sick on returning from Christmas leave and was admitted to the camp hospital suffering from gastritis. Nothing unusual was noticed about his behaviour but on Saturday morning he got out of bed and was ordered back by a sergeant. Some time afterwards, two privates in the ward saw him in the act of cutting his throat. They summoned the sergeant and a struggle followed, the sergeant sustaining bad cuts on the arm. The razor was secured by Ryan’s injuries were so serious that he died in a few minutes. The deceased, who came from Middlesex, leaves a widow and an infant. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.21

SAINSBURY, Edward, a returned soldier, farmer at Queenstown, died in the hospital at Dunedin. He returned some months ago and has been an inmate of the hospital ever since. [AWN 10.01.1918, p.17]

SCANLEN, Mr Basil A (Auckland) has lately taken up work at a munitions factory. He was formerly With the NZEF but ill-health for two months after his arrival in England prevented him doing any war work. Mr Scanlen was recently married to his nurse, Miss Ada Mary Mabel LANGMAID, only daughter of the late Captain Samuel Langmaid. Mrs Scanlen has been engaged in military nursing since the beginning of the war and she has returned to France to resume her duties there. Mr Scanlen is the second son of Mr Winslow Scanlen of Auckland. [AWN 24.01.1918, p.23]

SELLERS, Mr A W (Auckland) who arrived in England a year ago and has been in the RFC for the last six months as a first-class air mechanic, has been given his discharge from the army on account of ill-heath. Mr Sellers is unable, because of his health, to returned to NZ yet. [AWN 24.01.1918, p.23]

SHELHAM – Advice has been received by Mrs H Shelham, Hadlow Tce, Grey Lynn, that her husband, Rifleman H SHELHAM, has been awarded the French Croix de Guerre. He left with the 14th Reinforcements. He has been wounded and is at present in Walton on Thames Hospital suffering from the effects of poison gas. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

SHORT, Major A V, NZ Medical Corps, Military Cross, of Wellington, went to the front with the Main Body as a lieutenant. He served through the operations on Gallipoli, after which he was in Egypt for a time. He was promoted captain before going to France and received his majority last March. He was slightly wounded before the battle of Messines after which he was awarded the Military Cross. He has returned on duty. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

SLADE, 2nd Lieutenant Daniel G has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He landed at Gallipoli with the Main Body but was invalided to Egypt through enteric fever. Subsequently he was sent to France. Later he was invalided to England. A brother, Private H A SLADE, was killed at Messines. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

SMITH, 2nd Lieutenant Percy A has qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England for a commission. He was a Main Body man, on Gallipoli Peninsula and after 14 months service in France was selected for a commission. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

SMYTHE, Major R B, RNSC, DSO, He is one of 36 officers who returned to the Dominion for duty from the front and have been selected from the various theatres of war for commissions. He qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England. He was prior to the outbreak of war in the RNZA and the RNZE. He was in charge of the submarine mining station at Auckland from 1906 to 1911 in which year he went to England and joined the Staff College at Camberley. As the outbreak of war he was on the staff head-quarters at the Tyne defences and in June 1915 he was sent to Gallipoli and attached to General Birdwood’s staff as GSO3. After the evacuation he was sent to France and promoted to GSO2 in the First Australian Division. In the latter part of 1916 he was awarded the DSO. Shortly afterwards he was transferred to England where he was attached to the Australian training camp as staff officer. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

SPEIGHT, Lieutenant H, Military Cross, of Parnell, went to the front with the Artillery, attached to the Main Body. He received his commission in France and was awarded the Military Cross for service at the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

SPRAGG, Flight Lieutenant Wesley Neal, only son of Mr & Mrs Wesley Spragg of Mt Albert, was killed in action in Egypt on New Years Day. He left Auckland for London on 5 October 1915 and there joined the Royal Flying Corps, qualifying for his commission as flight lieutenant. He was later employed as aeroplane machine-gun instructor, a class of work in which he was considered an expert. The late Lieut Spragg was an old boy of King’s College and prior to the war was a partner in the firm of Haydock & Spragg, motor engineers, Auckland. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.20

STITT, Major Alan Duncan, DSO, is a son of the late Mr Matthew Stitt of Ashburton. He was educated at Christ’s College where he was identified with various athletic sports, particularly football. He played half-back for the college first fifteen. He was at Lincoln College when war broke out and left with the Canterbury Battn of the Main Body. He served through the Gallipoli campaign where he made a name for himself as an efficient and daring officer. On going to France, promotion came to him rapidly and in the Messines battle he had charge of a battalion. He has been wounded on more than one occasion. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

STOCKER, Lieutenant V of Christchurch, was awarded the Military Cross in October 1916 at the battle of the Somme for remaining at his post for several hours through heavy shell-fire after all the other officers had been put out of action. [AWN 10.01.1918] p.21

STOCKER, Lieutenant Valentine, MC, was an artillery gunner in the Main Body. After the Gallipoli operations he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. He was wounded during the battle of the Somme but after a short period in England returned to the firing line where he gained his lieutenancy. He has returned for duty. Two brothers, Private L STOCKER and Gunner H STOCKER, have been killed in action, while a third, Sergeant E STOCKER, of the Otago Machine-gunners, was permanently incapacitated and discharged. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

STRUTHERS, Sergeant W of Pukahu, who received the DCM, went to the front with the first Battalion of the Rifle Brigade. He fought against the Senussi in Egypt after which he was sent to France. He won his decoration at the battle of the Somme where, after all the officers and the other non-commissioned officers of his company had been put out of action, he took it back to be reorganised. This done, he again returned to the attack, despite a severe wound. He was again wounded in June of this year, his left arm being paralysed. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.17

SUTHERLAND, Sister Mary, NZANS (Auckland) who served for some time with the Stationary Hospital in France, is now on the staff of No.2 NZ General Hospital at Walton. Her sister, Miss H SUTHERLAND, is attached to a British hospital in Alexandria. [AWN 24.01.1918, p.23]

SWAN, Lieutenant G, Military Cross, of Mosgiel, was a lance-corporal in the 8th Reinforcements. He went to France with the rank of sergeant and was made 2nd Lieutenant late in 1915. Last March he received his second star. He was wounded at Messines and was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in that action. A brother, Corporal W B SWAN, was a member of the Main Body and is still on active service. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

TAYLOR, 2nd Lieutenant Clyffe E who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, landed at Gallipoli as a private. He was invalided to England with enteric fever but upon recovering he proceeded to France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

TAYLOR, 2nd Lieut J A, of Egmont went to the front with the First Battalion of the Rifle Brigade. He took part in the operations against the Senussi on the eastern frontier, after which he was sent to France. He was wounded at Armentieres but later took part in actions at the Somme, Fleurbaix and Messines. He was awarded the DCM for work at the Somme. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

THOM, Sergeant W Napier, NZ Machine-gun Corps, son of Mrs Kensington, Rendel Place, Eden Tce, has been awarded the Bar to the Military Medal for gallantry in the field. He is a former scholar of the Kauaranga Thames Boys’ School. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.19

THOMPSON, Captain J, left with the 5th Reinforcements as 2nd Lieutenant. He was promoted in France in July 1916 and received his captaincy last March. He was wounded at Gallipoli and also in the battles of Somme and Messines in France. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

THOMPSON, 2nd Lieutenant Roy who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, landed at Gallipoli with the Main Body as a sergeant. He was wounded at the battle of the Somme. A brother, Private A O THOMPSON, is at the front. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

THOMSON, 2nd Lieutenant A F, of Opawa, wears the Military Medal for services at Gallipoli. He went to the front with the Main Body as a private. He was wounded at Gallipoli and after recovery returned to the peninsula and was at the evacuation. He was severely wounded at the battle of the Somme and invalided to England, where he was selected for a commission. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

TRAYNOR, 2nd Lieutenant F J left with the 19th Reinforcements. He was wounded in the Flanders fighting. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

TUCK, 2nd Lieutenant George Albert, of the Auckland Infantry, awarded the Military Cross, went to the front with the Main Body. He has been twice wounded, once at Gallipoli and once in France. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

UNWIN, Major William H He is one of 36 officers who returned to the Dominion for duty from the front and have been selected from the various theatres of war for commissions. He qualified at Officers’ Cadet Training School in England. He was on the staff of the Walton on Thames Hospital for about 18 months. He acted as senior medical officer on the voyage to the Dominion. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

VERCOE, 2nd Lieutenant W R was a member of the 13th Reinforcements. He was invalided through sickness after the battle of the Somme. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

VICKERMAN, Major Hugh, DSO, is the youngest son of Mr C R Vickerman who was district engineer for Auckland in the Public Works Dept for some years. He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and the Auckland University College and was attached to the Public Works Dept at Wellington. He left NZ with the rank of captain in the Tunnelling Corps of Engineers and has been on active service on the western front for nearly two years. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

WALSH, 2nd Lieutenant John N who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, left NZ with the First Battalion of the Rifle Brigade. He took part in operations against the Senussi on the eastern frontier and later proceeded to France with his battalion. A brother, Private J WALSH, was killed in Egypt while two brothers Private L WALSH and Private B WALSH, are still on active service. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

WARD, Captain Charles K, an officer who disappeared recently, belongs to the NZ Dental Corps. Enquiries suggest he may still be alive as he was seen after the discovery of an abandoned vehicle. (London 22 Jan) Captain WARD, a NZ officer from Mt Felix Hospital at Wilton is missing. He came back from France ill. His vehicle, hat and letters have been found in the Thames. (London 27 Jan) [AWN 31.01.1918] P.17

WATT, Private Henry, Dunedin, left NZ with the 2nd Reinforcements, Otago Infantry. He landed on the peninsula on the memorable 25 April and was wounded a few days later. After 2 months in hospital in Egypt he returned to Gallipoli where he remained until the evacuation. In France he saw much fighting until he was wounded during the offensive at Messines on 7 June. The wounds were caused by shrapnel and mainly in the back. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

WEBB, Driver William Wilson, who died at the Walton on Thames Hospital on 7 December, was the only son of Mr Seth Webb of Cambridge. Prior to enlisting in the Main Body he was farming at Opotiki. He saw service in Egypt and at Gallipoli and went to France after the evacuation of the Peninsula. Last March he was invalided to England suffering from pleurisy and subsequently succumbed to illness. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

WEBB, Private Wm T, Palmerston North, returning to NZ, succumbed to injuries and was buried at sea. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

WHITE, Private Arthur William, killed in action in France on December 18, was a son of Mr Henry White of Owen’s Road, Epsom. He left for the front a year ago with the 22nd Reinforcements in the Machine-gun Section. He served in the war in South Africa. For some years he was engaged as a builder at Te Awamutu. He was a member of the Auckland Male Choir for some years and of church choirs in Auckland and Te Awamutu and had a large circle of musical friends. He leaves a widow. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.20

WHYTE, Lieutenant Colonel James H, who has been awarded a bar to the DSO, was a trooper in the First NZ Contingent for South Africa. Subsequently he joined the 7th contingent and served through the war. He holds the Queen’s Medal with four clasps and the King’s Medal with two clasps and the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his South African service. After the war he decided to take up a military career and was one of four NZ officers sent to England for training. On his return from England he was stationed at Napier as acting brigade major of the Wellington Mounted Rifle Brigade. He left with the Main Body and was awarded the DSO in November 1915 for distinguished service in Gallipoli. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

WILKES, Captain Thomas Martin, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is the son of Mr Walker Wilkes, Thames. He was educated at King’s College, Auckland, and is well known in athletic circles, having been a member of the University College Rugby football team. He was also a North Island representative. He joined the NZ Staff Corps in 1911 and left for the front with the 2nd Battalion NZ Rifle Brigade in November 1915. He has lately been transferred to the flying corps and is now in training in England. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.17

WILLIAMS, Captain H D, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is the son of Mr W Williams, Meremere, Taranaki. He left NZ with the 3rd Reinforcements and served in the Gallipoli campaign where he was severely wounded. He was in hospital in England for several months and on discharge, being unable to ride or walk properly with ease, he joined the Flying Corps. He has been four times mentioned in despatches, one at Gallipoli and three times in France, and a short time ago was awarded the Military Cross and promoted from Lieutenant to Flight Commander for bravery. [AWN 31.01.1918] P.17

WILSON, Sergeant C G, of Oamaru, winner of the Military Medal, went to the front with the Main Body. He won his decoration by taking command of a platoon – during an engagement at Gallipoli – after the officer had been put out of action. He was wounded on the peninsula and again during the battle of the Somme. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.17

WILSON, Sergeant C G of Oamaru, winner of the Military Medal, is a Main Body man. After his officers had been put out of action in an engagement at Chunuk Bair, Gallipoli, he took charge of two platoons and although wounded himself, continued fighting. He took part in the evacuation and after a lengthy service in France was wounded on the Somme. [AWN 03.01.1918, p.17]

WILSON - Advice has been received that Private G C L WILSON, a well known Canterbury and NZ representative cricketer, has been killed in action. [AWN 03.01.1918] P.20

WILSON, Private J H, son of Mrs J Wilson of Puriri Park, Pukekohe, has been awarded the Military Medal. Prior to enlisting with the 20th Reinforcements he was farming at Pukekohe and was well known in football and athletic circles. A brother, Private W WILSON, of the 23rd Reinforcements, was recently reported wounded. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.21

WILSON, Private J H, son of Mrs J Wilson, Pukekohe, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and not the Military Medal as presently reported. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.17

WISHART, 2nd Lieutenant George A, who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, served through the Gallipoli campaign and in most of the battles in France, in which the New Zealanders were engaged. He was never wounded. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

WOODS, Lieutenant B A, RNVR, Auckland, was formerly in the Auckland Mounted Rifles with the Main Body and received his commission in the British armoured cars last March. He joined his unit in Russia and served through the fighting in Galicia. He is now on leave and is visiting relatives in South Wales. [AWN 24.01.1918, p.23]

WORSLEY, Frank H, Lieutenant Commander, RNR, who formerly commanded the Countess of Ranfurly and was afterwards a member of the Shackleton Expedition, has been awarded the DSO for services in action against enemy submarines. [AWN 24.01.1918] P.18

WORTH, 2nd Lieutenant Conrad H, who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, was severely wounded at Gallipoli and was invalided to Egypt. Later, he took part in operations at Gaza and in Palestine. A brother, Private W WORTH, is at the front. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

WYATT, 2nd Lieutenant John C E who has qualified at Officers' Cadet Training School in England for a commission, left NZ as a corporal. He fought at Gallipoli and in Palestine without being wounded. A brother, Private G K L WYATT, is at the front. [AWN 10.01.1918] P.20

YOUNG, 2nd Lieutenant E H was a private attached to the 8th Reinforcements. He was in Egypt for a time and was then sent to France with the rank of corporal. He was in most of the actions in which New Zealanders were engaged and was steadily promoted to commissioned rank. He was severely wounded at Passchendaele. [AWN 03.01.1918] p.16

YOUNG, Sapper Frank Gledstone R, died of wounds on 8 December in France, was the fifth son of the Rev H Young, Bassett Road, Remuera, and was born in Hokianga in June 1886. He was an old Prince Albert College boy, who served his apprenticeship at the railway workshops in Wanganui and Newmarket, finally joining the Auckland repairing staff. He sailed with the 26th Reinforcements and was drafted to the Engineers, Fourth Field Company, in which his younger brother, Sapper P YOUNG, had already been for some months. He was for some time an active member of the Beresford Street Congregational Church and choir and was well known in Auckland as an enthusiastic temperance worker. [AWN 17.01.1918] P.20


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