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AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
09 DECEMBER 1915

These are extracts from the Auckland Weekly News magazines and have been extracted with permission.

Page 27

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES - New Zealanders serving with Australian troops

ARMSTRONG, J – Plymouth; COOMBES, D H – embarked for England; COSGROVE, R – Southampton; DENNIS, Spr D – hospital London; DICKIE, J – hospital Alexandria; HARDEY, Sgt Mjr E A – hospital Oxford; HARDY, Sgt Mjr E A – embarked for England; IRVING, C – hospital Alexandria; LOND, Sgt R B – embarked for England;McCARTHY, J J A – Birmingham; MITCHELL, C I – Oxford; RESTON, Pte W – died of illness; ROBINSON, Pte J J – dangerously ill; RODGERS, Pte W – hospital Malta; SMALL, Pte J – embarked for England; SUTTON, Pte J B – killed in action; WAGHORNE, C G – hospital Southampton; WILSON, L/Cpl T E.

Page 52

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES - New Zealanders serving with Australian troops

ADAMSON, Pte H – hospital London; BORNE, Pte D R – returned to duty; CHISHOLM, Pte J – returned to duty; CLARK, Pte C – wounded; HILL, Pte H – returned to duty;HORNSBY, Pte A – hospital London; LONG, Sgt R B – hospital Oxford; MARSHALL, Pte W A – returned to duty; RUSSELL, Pte E J – embarked for England.

Page 56

Extract from a letter by Captain WALLINGFORD

New Zealand’s Splendid Troops
Referring to hostilities in the latter end of last August, Captain WALLINGFORD says:
“I watched that fight as if I were in the dress circle of a theatre. Our boys were simply splendid under the fire from the Turkish guns. That fire was magnificently placed and the serving of the guns was superb. New Zealand can be proud of her boys. There are none to beat them and I put a good seal of the credit down to our cadet system. I liked the Maoris very much. They dig well, are splendid sentries and seem to do everything one asks. I think we ought to have regiments of them in each district.”

When the Guns Were Needed
A reference follows to the death of Major GRANT: “I was the last one he spoke to” says Captain Wallingford. “I had been placing some guns so as to protect our right flank and had had a hot fight with the rifle. We caught the Turks fairly napping. Try and imagine a lot of rabbits with a few of my machine-gunners and myself ‘potting’ at them at 250 yards. When they bolted into their run three machine guns played on to them. First I would take the rifle and then have a turn at a gun, until none remained. The Artillery played on to us from somewhere behind and hit a lot of the troops.”

“After about half an hour of that I went to see the brigade staff. I reached the apex and there found the Auckland Regiment with the Gurkhas getting ready to assault Chun Bair. Major GRANT came to me and said “Look here, Wallingford, we have to charge that hill, can you do anything for us? I replied that I could if I was given time to bring up the guns. At that moment the brigadier gave the order to get away. There was a bit of a pause for someone to give the lead. I stood fascinated because I knew it meant slaughter to step over that apex. Then all at once I saw Major Grant step out. He called to his men and away they went like a pack of wolves breaking cover. It was awful watching one’s friends and all the splendid fellows going to their death and knowing that if I only had the guns I could silence the Turks in a few minutes.”

Death of Major GRANT
“After they had been launched and had been smashed and held to a trench in front, about 120 yards away, the brigadier asked me to get up the guns and try and beat down the Turks’ fire. Although the boys were ‘dead beat’ up they came and we soon had the guns going from behind some bushes. Within 20 minutes the Turks’ fire was beaten. We had to hang on, expecting a counter-attack at any moment. Poor Major Grant was carried down that evening after dark. He died the next day, I believe. In conclusion Captain Wallingford expresses the belief that at the end of his voyage back to New Zealand he will be well again and able to resume service.


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