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AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
01 JULY 1915

Page 17

MOUNTED REINFORCEMENTS - From No.1 Group, Auckland

ALEXANDER, Hugh, Auckland
BARRIBALL, Charles , Waiuku
BATTY, Wm, Runciman
BOYS, Robert C, Ellerslie
BUCHANAN, James Leslie, Takapuna
BUCHANAN, Keith Emerson, Waiuku
CLARK, James, Waiuku
CODLIN, George C, Waiuku
COUTTS, Edward, Box No.1, Newmarket
GRIDWOOD, Bertram A, Drury
HALLIDAY, Clarence R, Papakura
HENDERSON, David K, Papatoetoe
HEPWORTH, Wm C, Mt Eden
LITTEN, John Cecil, Howick
McDONALD, Harold John, Waiuku
McDONNELL, Walter, Pakuranga
McLARIN, Francis William, Waiuku
McNAMARA, Stanley Clarence, Waiuku
MEACHEN, William, Waiuku
McLARIN, Charles Ernest, Waiuku
MUNRO, Frank Alexander, Clevedon
PERRY, John, ?Bellbent Tce, Auckland
ROSSITER, Norman Edward J, Waiuku
TARR, George A, 19 Gladstone St, Auckland
THOMAS, Samuel A, 146 Hobson St, Auckland
WALSH, Lawrence, Waiuku
WATTAM, James Richard, Waiuku

Page 19

HART, Major, DSO, Carterton – in a letter to his wife – ‘The bullet that struck me passed first through the head of an Australian private sitting in a trench, killing him instantly.’ Major Hart had 6 loose pistol bullets in his left trouser pocket – the bullet found the pocket, perforated a leather purse, cut off the nose of one bullet, struck another in the centre, squeezing it flat, doubling up both ends, then entered his leg, forcing the squeezed-up bullet to enter also. This resulted in a big flesh wound about 10 times as big as a bullet makes and four other punctures about the size of a bullet wound. The revolver bullets undoubtedly saved him from having a fractured thigh.

Page 25

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES - NZers serving with Australian troops

ABERDEEN, Capt
BRAITHWAITE, Sgt C A – wounded
DUKE, Pte C R – wounded (2nd)
GIBBS, Cpl J – wounded
GRAHAM, Pte J – wounded
KEELEY, Pte G – wounded
LANGSFORD, Capt
LAWSON, Sgt F G – wounded
MATHESON, N – KIA
MATHESON, R – missing
McAHAN, J – KIA
MILLER, L W – KIA
MULLEN, Pte A – KIA
NOARD, Pte J R – wounded
O’BRIEN, Major J C – wounded
ROBERTS, J M – KIA
RUM*ALL, Capt
THOMPSON, F J – missing
WESTNOPP, W – missing

Page 31

MOUNTED VOLUNTEERS

BOYES, E G, Waikiekie
DEMPTER (sic), M, Kauri
DIXON, R R, Waihou
DUNLOP, G A, Thames
DURHAM, R S, Waipu
FINLAYSON, J D, Waipu
MOLLOY, A R, Te Aroha
PIDGEON, C, Waikiekie
SHAW, E L, Paeroa
SIMPSON, J T, Thames

Page 30

WOUNDED IN ENGLAND

At Birmingham and Manchester, the great majority are only slightly wounded and many of the wounds have quite healed, so that hospital treatment is no longer needed. The first New Zealander wounded seems to have been CLARK of the Auckland Infantry, who was hit in the mouth (not dangerously) just as he stepped out of the boat.

The only NZ officer in England is Lieut G F MYERS, Southland, who is in Manchester, almost recovered from a bullet through the toe.

Lieut JARDINE maintained the family reputation for bravery by continuing to hobble about with a trenching tool for a crutch after he had been hit in the leg. He had several wounds before he gave in.

Private G A McINTYRE, 10th, North Otago, was binding up a comrade who had been wounded in the stomach when he received a bullet through the thigh and rolled down the hillside into the trench. As in many cases the bone was untouched and he is almost out of the doctor’s hands.

Lance Corporal G L POPPLE, 16th, Waikato, received a shrapnel bullet in the shoulder on the Sunday afternoon. It is still there but he is progressing well.

Private W O’CONNELL, 74th [?14th] Otago, had a shrapnel bullet in the knee, since extracted. He is ready to leave the hospital.

Private A H HARTLEY, Manawatu, lost an eye through an explosive bullet; quite well again.

Private E W SOPER, Auckland Infantry, had his right leg shattered by shrapnel and at Alexandria it had to be amputated below the knee. He is now able to get about on crutches and is at Manchester.

A Dunedin man named SMITH, who was serving with the Australians, had his hand amputated.

Private CARROLL, Westland, was struck over the heart by shrapnel, the bullet being still in him.

Private McKOY, Divisional Headquarters, is invalided for strain and is not wounded.

Lance Corporal McDONALD, 3rd Canterbury, was wounded by shrapnel in the hand is doing well.

Sergeant GUTHRIE, Hawke’s Bay, has quite recovered.

Lance Corporal L H REID, Engineers, has also a piece of shrapnel in his shoulder.

Private KEMP, Railway Department, Wellington, is probably the first Maori to see fighting in the war. He got a bullet in his hand and also suffered from shock from the burst of a British lyddite shell.

Corporal P F SHIELDS, Masterton, is almost out of the doctor’s hands; a bullet through each hand and one in the left forearm.

Private J S JACKSON, Railway Dept, Auckland, had a bullet right through his body, just missing the spine and coming out through the chest. He is almost comfortable again and is walking about.

Private D McBURNEY, Auckland, but attached Otago Battalion, had his right hand rather badly shattered and still suffers a good deal.

Private T B BUCHANAN, Southland, is almost recovered from a leg wound and shock.

Private F FARQUHARSON, Owaka, Otago, shrapnel in the back; quite recovered.

Private G W MILLS, Southland, quite recovered from a flesh wound, merely grazing the bone.

Private H S LARKINS, Otago, is quite well and going out to a convalescent home. He had a flesh wound in the leg.

NEW ZEALANDERS CHARGE

The New Zealanders hurled themselves forward in a solid phalanx, passing through the 88th Brigade and many of the gallant men of those regiments refusing to yield and right of way to them, joined their ranks and rushed forward in their mad charge.
The line entered one Turkish trench with a rush, bayoneted all there, and then passed on into broken ground, shooting down and stabbing and with men falling amid the terrible fusillade, but not a soul turning back. No sooner had one line charged than another pressed on after it and then a third.
On the right the New Zealanders, and the Australians, advanced at the same moment, but over much more open ground, which provided little or no cover. They were met by a tornado of bullets and were enfiladed by machine-guns from the right and the artillery in vain endeavoured to keep down this fire.
The manner in which these Dominion troops went forward will never be forgotten by those who witnessed it. The lines of infantry were enveloped in dust from the patter of countless bullets in the sandy soil and from the hail of shrapnel poured on them, for now the enemy’s artillery concentrated furiously on the whole line. The lines advanced steadily as if on parade, sometimes doubling, sometimes walking and you saw them melt away under this dreadful fusillade, only to be renewed again as the reserves and supports moved forward to replace those who had fallen.

Page 55

WILSON, Cpl G F, 3rd, Auckland, Regt. in a letter from Cairo: “I hope some of the shirkers will join. We will want all the men that you can send. I have had the bad luck to stop a bullet. Shrapnel got me in the left arm and broke it. This was on the 13th day of fighting, and on a Friday. I always dreaded 13’s and Fridays. It will be quite six weeks before I can get at them again. I fluked some of the Munsters down on the beach with a doctor who fixed me up and I was sent in a naval cutter to a hospital ship. Syd HEALD died a hero, under a hail of bullets, when he went to the assistance of Lt J B McFARLANE, one of our officers who was shot in five places. When he had the wounded officer halfway back he lurched forward dead. There is some sort of merciful influence at work that stops a man from thinking of all the mates that have gone. We all notice it. Norman LEVIEN is at Alexandria in the ordnance store.”


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