Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

CORRIGAN, ANNIE nee TROUP

 

Annie Troup was born on the 30 August 1863, the daughter of Harry and Annie Troup nee Ross, of Ryee, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. After the early death of her parents, five orphaned children were brought up by an aunt. Later, Annie lived with her eldest sister and her husband, while she trained as a pupil teacher at Little Goval school near Ryee.

 

In 1885, Annie sailed from Plymouth to Sydney where she worked as a governess for two years, before coming to Canterbury, New Zealand, about 1887. She again worked as a governess in Ashburton before marrying James Randall Corrigan at Tinwald on the 12 June 1889. They farmed at Lake Flat, near Lake Ellesmere, before moving to Hawera in 1893.

 

From about 1902, after the family moved to "The Oaks", Annie was often called upon by Hawera's two resident doctors, Westenera and Sloane, to go out in her pony trap to nurse patients in their own homes. She did not have any formal nursing qualifications, but her caring nature made her ideally suited for this role, which she carried out for over ten years.

 

In 1912, the Corrigan family took an extended holiday to the United Kingdom, which enabled Annie to introduce her own family to their Scottish relations. During the First World War, Annie was an active worker for patriotic appeals for the war effort and many garden parties and other fund raising activities were held at her home. At the conclusion of the war, her nursing experience again came to the fore when she nursed patients during the 1918 influenza epidemic.

 

Jim Corrigan represented the Patea electorate in parliament from 1922 to 1925 and while Annie preferred a background role as an MP's wife, she had many official duties to perform during this time. Annie had a long association with St John's Presbyterian Church. She was a Sunday school teacher, a leader of bible class and "Busy Bees" which were the junior missionary society of the Presbyterian Church, and a member of the Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union (PWMU). From 1910, with the Young Woman's Bible Class, Annie began sending Christmas hampers to the Wellington orphanage. Eggs sent in these hampers were carefully wrapped separately, and from then on, eggs were sent regularly to the orphanage. In 1949, the committee, with Clarice Fyson as convener, collected and dispatched 394 dozen. Annie also helped with catering for the Egmont Sheep Dog Club annual trials for many years.

 

Annie Corrigan died at "The Oaks" on the 10 April 1957 and is buried at the Hawera cemetery.

 

SOURCE

Ross Corrigan, Hawera (grandson)

 

 

Return To HOME

FAMILIES I AM RESEARCHING | MISCELLANEOUS GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH |NEW ZEALAND DISASTERS AND TRAGEDIES | NEW ZEALAND AND WORLD WAR ONE | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR BY LOCATION | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR BY CONFLICT | NEW ZEALAND ROLLS OF HONOUR MILITARY NURSES | PAKEHA/MAORI TRANSLITERATIONS |PASSENGER LISTS TO NEW ZEALAND | SHAND FAMILY HISTORY | SPONDON, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND | TE PUKE, BAY OF PLENTY, NEW ZEALAND | WOMEN OF SOUTH TARANAKI