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THE SNOWBERGER-WYGAL-SHAMBERGER-DRYDEN-FORESMAN-LINDSAY FAMILY HISTORIES


THE ANCESTORS OF JACOB ARTHUR SHOWBERGER & SARAH ALMA WYGAL



Person Page 2

Mary Snowberger (F)
b. 1762, d. 1793, #57
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Hanss Schneeberger.

     
Mary Snowberger was born in 1762. She was the daughter of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold. Mary Snowberger lived with Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold on 1 April 1763; Ulrich and his family was located in the Antietam Cove, along the east branch of the Antietam, several miles east of Waynesboro on the farm now owned by Mr William Hess, a descendant. He received the warrant for this land on May 18, 1763, and erected the on and one-half storey stone house there in 1810.1
Mary Snowberger married Daniel Burger circa 1780 at Pennsylvania, USA.
Mary Snowberger died in 1793.

Citations

  1. [S21] Unknown Antietam Ancestors.

John Snowberger (M)
b. 1766, d. 1840, #58
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=Great-grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

     
John Snowberger was born in 1766. He was the son of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold.
John Snowberger married Barbara Bayer.
John Snowberger died in 1840.


    Jacob Snowberger (M)
    b. 21 December 1771, d. 30 March 1852, #59
    Pop-up Pedigree
    Relationship=Great-grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

         
    Jacob Snowberger was born on 21 December 1771. He was the son of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold.

    Jacob never married.
    Jacob Snowberger died on 30 March 1852 at age 80.


      Daniel Snowberger (M)
      b. 1 October 1774, d. 15 November 1845, #60
      Pop-up Pedigree
      Relationship=Great-grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

           
      Daniel Snowberger was born on 1 October 1774. He was the son of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold.
      Daniel Snowberger married Mary Foreman.
      Daniel Snowberger died on 15 November 1845 at age 71.


        Elizabeth Snowberger (F)
        b. 1777, d. 1854, #61
        Pop-up Pedigree
        Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Hanss Schneeberger.

             
        Elizabeth Snowberger was born in 1777. She was the daughter of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold.
        Elizabeth Snowberger married Jacob Holsinger.
        Elizabeth Snowberger died in 1854.


          David Snowberger (M)
          b. 1779, d. 1844, #62
          Pop-up Pedigree
          Relationship=Great-grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

               
          David Snowberger was born in 1779. He was the son of Ulrich Schneeberger and Barbara Ingold.
          David Snowberger married Rachel Horn.
          David Snowberger died in 1844.


            Johannnes Schneeberger1 (M)
            b. 1703, d. 1780, #63
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Son of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            The following is an introduction as written by Hilda Snowberger Chance.

            The name Schneeberger and later Snowberger means "Man who lives in snow mountain".
            Such a man was Johannes (Hanns) Schneeberger. He was born and lived in Ochlenburg, district of Wangen, Langvogtei, Switzerland. He was a religious man and was having some problems in Switzerland because of his religious beliefs. He heard about William Penn Woods, Pennsylvania, where one could worship God as he believed and work and live in freedom. The following tells of his struggle to get himself and his family to their new home in the new world.2


            Johannnes Schneeberger was born in 1703 at Ochlenberg, Wangen, Bern, Switzerland; At least 3 other researchers agree with date and place of birth.3 He was the son of Hanss Schneeberger and Verena Weierman.

            Johannnes Schneeberger was baptized on 3 February 1704 at Ochlenberg, Wangen, Bern, Switzerland.3

            Johannnes Schneeberger was also known as Hanss Schneeberger in Switzerland.1

            Johannnes Schneeberger married Barbara Schneeberger, daughter of Peter Schneeberger and Elsbeth Schneeberger, on 14 March 1726/27 at Herzogenbuchsee.2
            Johannnes Schneeberger married Catherine (?) between 1740 and 1742 at Switzerland; Many researchers claim that Johannes married two times. His first wife Barbara died after the first three sons, Johannes (Hanns, John), Ulrich and Joseph. He then married a lady named Catherine who bore him 2 more sons and 2 daughters.
            I do not have any official proof of this second marriage but believe it is probably true.4
            The following note is as stated in the "Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies":
            1751, April 21 R.M. 200, 5.
            Andreas Friedli and Hans Schneeberger, both of the Landvogtei of Wangen, and several Oberlander (inhabitants of the Oberland) wish to emigrate to Pennsylvania with their wives and children. There are also some people here from over there with warrants of authority, who wish to collect the property in this country of some who have already emigrated. All these matters are referred by the government to a special commission for investigation.1

            Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?) emigrated on 22 April 1751 from Ochlenberg, Wangen, Switzerland; The following note is as stated in the "Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies":
            1751, April 22. R. M. 210, 22/23
            Hans Schneeberger of Ochlenberg receives permission to emigrate to Pennsylvania with his wife and his two sons who are of age. His minor children , however, because of the dangers of the journey, are to remain in this country under guardianship. A part of the property must be left here for the education of the children. The rest Schneeberger can take with him after paying the emigration tax of 10 percent and giving up his land-right.

            Further note as written by compilers of source.
            According to the Amtsrechnung of Wangen, Hans Schneeberger and his two sons were allowed to take with them a share of the property amounting to 370 crowns, less 10 percent emigration tax, when they emigrated in the spring of 1751.1


            Johannes (Hans) and part of his family arrived in Philadelphia Port on October 4, 1751 on the ship, the Queen of Denmark. We believe that the family consisted of Catherine, his second wife, and his two oldest sons, Johannes (John) and Ulrich.
            Hilda Snowberger Chance writes that "He made his way across country to Waynesboro, Pa." She further writes, "He chose a place for its similarity to their own beautiful mountainous country, called Snow Hill. The area was known as Little Switzerland."2
            Johannnes Schneeberger was also known as John Snowberger after arriving in America.
            This note is as stated in the source:
            1753, Feb 17/20 R.M. 217 172/201

            In the year 1751 Hans Schneeberger of Ochlenberg in the district of Wangen emigrated to Pennsyulvania with his wife and their two oldest children. The little children, 3 sons and a daughter, and their share of the property, had to be left behind, by order of the government. Schneeberger now asks personally that these children be permitted to emigrate.
            His request is refused on the grounds that he is suspected of being a religious fanatic and that it is to be feared that he may bring up his children to share his opinions. They are recommended to the special care and instruction of the pastor.
            The father Schneeberger is ordered to leave Bernese territory within 8 days and never to enter it again.
            On May 1, 1753, the government orders the Landvogt in the Oberland and the Landvogt of Wangen to institute a search for this Hans Schneeberger, who, in spite of having been expelled from the country, is lingering around and trying to entice people to emigrate (217, 282).1

            Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?) lived in 1755 at Washington Township, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; Hilda Snowberger Chance writes that, "Land grant records show that the Snow Hill property was paid for by a single sister of Hans (Johannes), Catherine.
            Geo. H. Liebegott in his "Early Settlers of Morrisons Cove" , Vol #2 Code A lists in the page dealing with Johannes Snowberger. "That he was a farmer and bought land in 1755 amounting to 200 acres.

            This researcher has no official records on any of the above and I believe that the phrase "single sister of Hans, Catherine" is wrong and should read "his second wife, Catherine". Neither researcher quoted above give any indication and I doubt if they were remotely aware that Johannes was married twice -- if he was.2
            Johannnes Schneeberger died in 1780 at on his farm, Washington Township, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA.5
            Johannnes Schneeberger was buried at Washington Township, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; Both Johannes and his wife Catherine are buried on their farm. The burial spot was near the barn on the original farm, but all traces of the graves and markers have been lost due to the groung having been plowed over for many years.5
            The following note is as stated in the "Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies":
            1783, Feb 6 Mittelwegziehungs-Prot. 2/56
            Communication from the Government to the Landvogt of Wangen
            Hans Schneeberger of Ochlenberg is said to have secretly taken two minor children with him to America, more than 30 years ago. The property of children which is still in this country amounts to about 600 crowns.
            The Uebersax, Muhlethaler, Jost and Konig families, their nearest relatives, petition for the relinquishment of this property, to wihch the government consents.1


            This Article was written by Ella Snowberger and published in the Morrisons Cove Herald. Ella wrote for this newspaper. When a subscription to the newspaper was paid the customer was presented a small booklet containing "Ella's Recollections" for that year. This article was copied from Volume 3. Jan.1,1935. There were Eleven Volumes plus an index. Now long out of print.

            Contributed by Doris Sink, April 2003

            A FAMILY FROM THE ALPS

            Never had the Alps mountains looked more beautiful or seemed more dear. It was the year 1750,Johannes Snowberger and his little family group looked at the beloved mountains with yearning tenderness and regret.

            For so many generations had the mountains been the home of the Snowbergers that love for their native "crags and peaks" was bred into their very souls. Farmers and shepherds, they had dwelt for so long among the upper slopes of the Alps, that they had taken their family name from them. For Snowberger, Schneeberger, as it was in the original German, means "one who lives in the snow mountain.

            It was said of them that the feet of succeeding generations of these people had so persistently pressed the precipitous heights that they had become broadened and elongated. Hence it became quite a joke to declare that the Snowbergers were known by their big feet.

            Here then was Johannes Snowberger, with his wife and children, taking his last look at the majestic cloud wreathed Matterhorn, Jungfrau and Mount Blanc. For the last time he cast his eyes on the glory of the snow crowned peaks as the sun illuminating them, turned them into jeweled diadems. He was saying farewell to his native land. He and his wife and children were leaving Switzerland forever.

            LEAVE FOR NEW WORLD

            Turning their faces westward they started out on the long and hazardous journey to America. They had been happy in Switzerland, but a deep-seated desire for liberty of conscience and the exercise of the right to worship God in accordance with their faith and convictions, impelled them to break the ties of home in exchange for the uncertainties and discomforts of the new world.

            Stories had come to their ears of a province in that far off America where religious tolerance was guaranteed. It was known as Penns Woods, or Pennsylvania. It was this province where in they sought their future home. It had been founded by a member of the British nobility, who had embraced the tenets of the humblest sect of Quakers. His name was William Penn.

            Perhaps the last thing the little band of wanderers heard was a good-by, God bless you, yodeled by the friends they were leaving behind and whom they would never see again in this world. The crescendo of the high-pitched head tones of the yodel had been developed as the medium of communication among the Swiss mountaineers. Its carrying power as it echoed along the heights was utilized to send forth heartening greetings from lonely shepherds to distant comrades who also were keeping solitary watch over their flocks.

            GOOD LESSON IN FOLK TALE

            I wonder whether remembrance of the folk tale about the key flower came to mind as the Snowbergers embarked on their journey. You may recall the story of the Swiss shepherd boy, who one day plucked a strange blue flower which grew on the hill side.

            As he held it in his hand, suddenly a cavern yawned at his feet. Entering it, he beheld a chamber stored with vast treasures of gold and precious stones. A wizened looking dwarf or gnome presided over the wealth ,who bade the boy to help himself. He readily did so, filling his can and pockets with the largest and most brilliant of the gold pieces and the gems. Persistently the gnome droned, "Don't forget the best."

            Then the boy searched for more valuable treasures which he might of overlooked. Satisfied that he had selected the best, he eventually stepped from the treasure chamber into the familiar haunts of the mountain side. But lo! The cavern disappeared and the treasures he had gathered turned into worthless pebbles. He had forgotten the best. He had left behind the key flower which had gained him access to the hidden wealth.

            Johannes Snowberger was not likely to forget the best. His ambition was not to amass gold and precious stone. All he asked was the opportunity to create a home by no help other than his own industry and that of his family. Above even this humble objective was the desire that the new land would grant him the privilege of ordering his life and worshiping God as his inmost convictions directed.

            Eventually the emigrants landed at Philadelphia. They continued westward to the fringe of the frontier.

            MAKE HOME IN PENNSYLVANIA

            John Snowberger passed over the fertile areas of the lowlands. He was seeking the ranges of the Alleghanies in the hope that the mountains would assuage his homesickness.

            At length he found the location he sought. He bought a farm at "Snowhill" at a distance of two and one half miles north of what is now Waynesboro. In fact, this rugged section so strongly reminded the Swiss settlers of their home land that they called the region "Little Switzerland."

            While the Snowberger Family Reunion association flourished during the years from 1906 to 1913, a great deal of genealogical data had been collected. It was definitely established by means of the research then made that John Snowberger was the progenitor of all the Snowbergers in America. At least no other branch could be located, although communication was had with the clan, scattered all over the United States from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

            Neither were any yodelers found among them. While here and there, among the offshoots of the family tree, there were some good singers and musicians, on the whole music does not seem to be the long suite of the Snowbergers.

            They have never been beguiled far from their first love the soil. Representatives of the family have penetrated the professional ranks and the skilled trades, but the majority still cling to farming. The Snowberger name is synonymous with good farming.

            SKETCH OF FIRST SNOWBERGERS

            Johannes, or John, Snowberger was twice married. His first wife died in Switzerland. By her he had three sons, John, Ulrich and Joseph. It was from Ulrich that the Cove Snowbergers are descended.

            John, Ulrich's brother, never married. Here is another characteristic of the family that has consistently followed the generations. There is a large percentage of bachelors and spinsters among them. The accepted term used to be old maid.

            Joseph, the other brother died, unmarried at the age of 25. In a letter written to Daniel T. Snowberger, formerly of Matinsburg, now of Allentown, by D. H. Fahrney, of Waynesboro, in 1908, the writer stated that the Ulrich Snowberger farm at Snow Hill at that time was still in the family name. Snowbergers had owned it successively, for 146 years.

            By his second wife John Snowberger had two sons and two daughters, namely Jacob , Anna, Maria and Andrew . Andrew or Andreas, married Barbara Carper , who became converted to the Seventh Day Baptist Faith. Thereafter she was unfailing in her efforts to persuade her husband, who it seems was a Dunkard, to come over to her belief. Discussion must have waxed constant and emphatic, but Andrew held out against her. He exercised another well-known family trait. When a Snowberger makes up his mind it stays that way.

            The up-shot of the controversy was that Barbara left home to go to Ephrata where the Seventh Day Baptists maintained the cloisters which had no inconsiderable place in Colonial, especially Revolutionary, history.

            With her child in her arms, Barbara walked over the mountain trail of four miles or so when she stopped at a neighbor's home to spend the night. In the meantime Andrew, left to his wifeless and childless devices, experienced a change of heart. At any rate, early the next morning , he appeared at the home where his wife and child had spent the night, with a couple of saddled horses , ready to escort them home. Furthermore he expressed his willingness to observe the Seventh Day as the Sabbath.

            SEVENTH DAY CLOISTER BUILT

            Eventually Andreas Snowberger and his wife, in conjunction with fellow members of the Seventh Day Baptist denomination, conceived the idea of founding a cloister similar to the one at Ephrata.

            The farm at Snow Hill was deeded in 1814 the first of a series of brick buildings was erected. Successively three other buildings 30 by 40 feet were put up, thus forming one long two and one-half story structure, approximately 150 feet in length and 30 feet wide.

            It was called the nunnery. Unmarried people of both sexes were admitted. Their lives with in the cloister were devoted to religious ritual and the work which made the institution virtually self-sustaining.

            A grist mill, cooper and black-smith shop, supplemented the products of the 156 acre farm. The brothers and sisters in their communal life shut out from the world. Each had their allotted day's task.

            The nunnery was a place of peace, simplicity and self-denial. It was discontinued as a cloister in 1895, following the death of the last inmate, Obed Snowberger, by name.

            For years afterward the church authorities permitted it to remain as it was when it was the center of a busy, rigid communal life.

            Visitors were charmed with it's quaint austerity and old fashioned air. It was a veritable treasure house of antiques. Lately the Brother and the sister houses have been dismantled. Part of it is occupied by the pastor of the snow Hill Seventh Day Baptist congregation, Rev. J. A. Pentz and his family.

            The Snow Hill nunnery farm, so closely identified with the earliest history of the Snowberger family, is peculiarly interesting to each one bearing the name. It has been the mecca of many pilgrimages by the members of the clan from all over the United States. The beauty of the location and the spell of the sincerity of the lives that had once been cloistered therein, exert an appeal that is deeply felt.

            MONUMENT TO ANCESTORS

            The Blair County Snowberger Family association had a monument errect about twenty-two years ago in The Snow Hill cemetery to commemorate the memory of Johannes Snowberger and his wife.

            While this article was necessarily greatly condensed to conform to limited space, enough has been given to show that the Snowbergers were among the original inhabitants of the land of William Tell. They value above all things the liberty of thought and of action which the peoples of the world have come to associate with the Swiss, who have maintained their independence in defiance of centuries of European intrigue.



            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.6

                 Children of Johannnes Schneeberger and Barbara Schneeberger:
            Johannes Schneeberger Jr.   b. 1735, d. 1808
            Ulrich Schneeberger+   b. 21 Nov 1736, d. 21 May 1811
            Joseph Schneeberger   b. 1740, d. 1765

                 Children of Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?):
            Andreas Schneeberger+   b. 1742, d. 1 Aug 1825
            Jacob Schneeberger+   b. 1746, d. 11 Jul 1819
            Anna Schneeberger   b. 1748
            Maria Schneeberger+   b. c 1750, d. 1795

            Citations

            1. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            2. [S13] Hilda Snowberger Chance, Snowberger & Kegarise Records.
            3. [S15] Barbara Lenore Snowberger, "BL Snowberger", Ancestral File, Some Ancestors of Barbara Lenore Snowberger.
            4. [S14] Geo. H. Liebegott Morrisons Cove.
            5. [S14] Geo. H. Liebegott Morrisons Cove, Vol 2 Code A.
            6. [S7] Name of researcher.

            Barbara Schneeberger (F)
            b. 1703, #64
            Pop-up Pedigree

                 
            Barbara Schneeberger was born in 1703 at Ochlenberg, Wangen, Bern, Switzerland.1 She was baptized on 19 August 1703 at Parish Records, Switzerland.2 She was the daughter of Peter Schneeberger and Elsbeth Schneeberger.

            Barbara Schneeberger married Johannnes Schneeberger, son of Hanss Schneeberger and Verena Weierman, on 14 March 1726/27 at Herzogenbuchsee.2

                 Children of Barbara Schneeberger and Johannnes Schneeberger:
            Johannes Schneeberger Jr.   b. 1735, d. 1808
            Ulrich Schneeberger+   b. 21 Nov 1736, d. 21 May 1811
            Joseph Schneeberger   b. 1740, d. 1765

            Citations

            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, a family tree from the roots to the twigs -- Lynn Sanders on Ancestry.com.
            2. [S13] Hilda Snowberger Chance, Snowberger & Kegarise Records.

            Joseph Schneeberger (M)
            b. 1740, d. 1765, #65
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            Joseph Schneeberger was born in 1740 at Switzerland. He was the son of Johannnes Schneeberger and Barbara Schneeberger. Joseph Schneeberger was also known as Joseph Snowberger.
            Joseph Schneeberger died in 1765 at Snow Hill, PA.
            The "Lists of Swiss Emigrants" shows the following:
            1782 Etat der Landesabwesenden p. 335.
            The Landvogt of Wangen reports to the Government that the brothers Jakob and Joseph Schneeberger of Ochlenberg, commune of Bollodingen, emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1752. They have not lyet surrendered their home-right.1

            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.2

            Citations

            1. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            2. [S7] Name of researcher.

            Andreas Schneeberger (M)
            b. 1742, d. 1 August 1825, #67
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            Andreas Schneeberger was born in 1742 at Switzerland. He was the son of Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?).
            Andreas Schneeberger married Barbara Garber. Andreas Schneeberger was also known as Andrew Snowberger.

            Communication from the Government to the Landvogt of Wangen. Mittelwegziehungs-Prot. I, 99.
            The three brothers Hans (Johannes Jr), Ulrich and Andreas Schneeberger and their two sisters Anna and Maria from the commune of Ochlenberg have settled in America, in Maryland.In return for the surrender of their citizenship and land-right they are permitted to take their property of 1220 crowns with them after the tax of 10 percent has been deducted.

            Added by compilers --
            Later upon protest from the commune this decision was altered, March 15, 1775, so that only Andreas, Anna and Maria Schneeberger receive their shares of the property. Hans (John) and Ulrich took their property out of the country in 1751 at the same time as their parents took theirs, and they have no further claims. Two other sons, Joseph and Jakob, belong to the family of whom nothing is said. Their shares of the property are to continue to be administered by athe commune. (p147/48).1
            Andreas Schneeberger began military service between 1779 and 1781 Andrew served in the Revolution under Capt. Samuel Royer.2

            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.3

            Andreas Schneeberger appeared on the census of 1790 at Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; The census shows 5 males, 3 >16 and 2 <16. There are 4 females.4

            Andreas Schneeberger was living in 1800 at Washington Township, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA.5
            Andreas Schneeberger died on 1 August 1825 at Snow Hill Nunnery, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; He was buried in the Snow Hill Cemetery.2

            Descendants of Replogle/Brumbaugh/Hoover/Metzger/Fluck/Kegerreis/Ritchey/Brallier/Houser as found on Ancestry.com World Trees.

            [The Ancestors and Descendants of John Calvin and Mary Clapper Kagarice by Nina Kagarice Bigsby & Margaret Kagarice Yoder (1980)]
            According to Emma C. Monn writing in "Historical Sketch of Snow Hill (Nunnery)" the Snowbergers were of Dunkard persuasion. Andrew married Barbara who later joined the Seventh Day Baptists. The story is told this this gave trouble between her and Andrew and resulted in her taking her child in her arms and starting to walk to Ephrata, many mikles away, for her conscience sake. After tramping over the mountain for a distance of four miles, she stopped at a house for the night. Early the next morning her husband arrived with a team of horses, ready to yield to her desire regarding the Sabbath if she would reutrun home with him. Barbara's faith evidently won, for shortly afterward he also was baptized and heir home became a rallying place for Sabbath keepers from the difference congregations.
            Andrew, formerly a meber fo th Amish brach of Ducnkard Church, becam a Seven-Day Baptist minister and deede land of his father, Johannes, to the church for the Nunnery at Snow Hill, north of Waynesboro, Pa. Two of his daughters were first nuns. Andrew, his wife, and most of her children are buried there. In 1814 the first community house was built, and the community pretty well established. [Information on the Snowbergers came from Hilda Snowberger Chance.]

            [Antietam Ancestors, Vol iii, No. 1, Winter 1989]
            Andrew Snowberger, son of the immigrant Hans, served in the Revolution under Captian Samuel Royer, 1779-81. He settled on the Snow Hill tract of his father and built a stone house on the site of the present Brothers' house at Snow Hill, where he died August 1, 1825, and lies buried.

            The Seventh Day Baptist Monastical Society of Snow Hill, which still owns the nucleus of the Snow Hill tract, two miles north of Waynesboro, aw founded during the final decade of the Eighteenth century by Peter Lehman, a Seventh Day Baptist clergyman whose migration to Snow Hill was foretold in a dream of Barbara, wife of Andrew Snowberger. Snow Hill quickly became the successor to the famous Ephrata Cloisters as the most flourishing of the several Seventh Day German Baptist communities in America. Part of Andrew's residence became the cloister for the single Brothers and Sisters, and later Andrew deeded a large part of his farm to the Society.
            The first community house at Snow Hill was erected in 1814, and was enlarged in 1835, 1838, and 1843. The white meeting-house... was erected across the meadow from the community house in 1829. Numerous dependencies, including a grist mill, were also built on the property, and during the first half of the Nineteenth century, Snow Hill was a self-contained community. Its history is too detailed and far too important to be told here. "Historical Sketch of Snow Hill", by Emma C. Monn, and "Snow Hill Cloister" by Charles W. Treher, are both authoritative works on the subject. It will be noted, however, that Obed Snowberger, a grandson of Andrew, was somewhat of the unofficial historian of the cloister, and that he was the last surviving single brother of the Society. He died in 1895. The Snow Hill Society, German Seventh Day Baptists, succeeded to the property and still hold weekly Sabbath services in the white church.




            PA-FRANKLIN-SNOWHILL-L Archives

            From: JBowders@aol.com
            Subject: [SNOWHILL] Construction and Growth of Snow Hill
            Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 17:53:40 EDT

            Good Evening Readers,

            I have transcribed from the research of Charles M. Treher who
            submitted this document in 1961, as well as more information, for his masters
            thesis at Shippensburg State College, now University. I would recommend
            reading "Snow Hill Cloister", by Charles M. Treher, published by the
            Pennsylvania German Society, 1968. I found a copy on Abebooks.com for $30.

            As many of you know, the property is now in the posession of the
            Morrison's Cove Community. Changes have been made to the Snow Hill community
            house and rooms have been converted to the look of a motel for use as a
            retreat. It is my understanding that parts of the building are also rented
            to tenants. Does anyone know more of that? Someone also reported that it
            was difficult to access the cemetery as there were unfriendly dogs roaming
            the property. When my Dad, Elmer Q. Gleim, took a Brethren Heritage bus tour
            of the property in 2000, he was given permission by the owners of Morrison
            Cove. Perhaps that is what is required to access the cemetery today.

            "The first community house, the original cloister building, was
            erected in 1814. This was a two-story brick building, thirty by forty feet,
            the first of the group still standing. It was made so that a spring provided
            running water through the basement, which provided natural refrigeration.
            Large stones were allowed to remain in the floor of the basement, on which
            milk and butter were cooled. Elsewhere the basement constituted the root and
            fruit cellar.

            The interior provided six small 'Kammern,' or bedrooms, and three
            large sitting rooms. In the bedrooms, single beds made with ropes
            intertwined covered by a chaff tick provided comfortable sleeping, even if
            the rope bed tended to be screechy. Tables and stands for holding washing
            materials, Bible, hymn books, and prayer books were provided. Wall closets
            for clothing and bed clothing and chests for personal effects indicate
            orderliness. The living rooms contained comfortable rockers, straight
            chairs, benches, kerosene lamps, and grandfather clocks. On the first floor
            also was the ample kitchen which supplied the common refectory for the
            solitary of both sexes.

            The most important feature however, was the Saal, or chapel, on the
            second floor, which became the meeting place of the entire congregation for
            fifteen years. Plain oak benches, solid though comfortless, with a desk in
            front, occupied the Saal where the Vorsteher, or leader, counseled his flock.
            Back of the Vorsteher a broadside interpreted the mysticism which
            characterized their credo. This was printed on two pieces of paper pasted on
            a panel twenty-two by fifteen and one quarter inches. Printed at Ephrata in
            German, this broadside was brought to Snow Hill, hung on the chapel wall,
            where it proclaimed to all:

            The Life of the Solitary
            A veritable spiritual mirror, wherein the true picture of the solitary
            life appears, and of what its constitution really consists when it portrays
            its legitimate matter and brings it into the light.

            From 1820 to 1830, the solitary orders grew to number five men and ten
            women. The dress of the sisters consisted of a plain dress with large white
            handkerchief pinned about the shoulders. A large white or gray bonnet was
            the headdress. The brothers dressed in plain coat and pantaloons and wore
            broad-brimmed hats. Some have described the dress as Quaker fashion; others
            have described the habits as similar to the Capuchin, or White Friar Order
            more closely resembling that of Ephrata. Residents in the neighborhood who
            saw the peculiar garb, particularly of the sisters, thought Snow Hill to be a
            Catholic nunnery."

            A further description of the clothing of Snow Hill was given by Obed
            Snowberger when he described Sister Melonia's (Lydia Mentzer) funeral garb
            as,"She was clothed in white. Her vestments, being a white gown, white
            handkerchief over her shoulders, and white cape, were the same articles of
            dress she was accustomed to wear in the days of her life."

            These neighboring residents applied the name nunnery when speaking of
            the cloister. When the railroad from Mont Alto to Waynesboro included a stop
            across the road, the station was called 'Nunnery'. This affixed the
            appellation of nunnery to the cloister which is common usage in the area even
            to the present time. Peter Lehman was much opposed to the use of this term
            and wanted it simply to be called Institution. Had the logical name Snow
            Hill Cloister been used, this applied name might not have become common. For
            this reason, and also because the founding was a direct offshoot of Ephrata
            Cloister, the author has taken the liberty to use the name Snow Hill
            Cloister, which was never used by the monastic society."

            "Andrew Snowberger, the prior, died in 1825 aged 79 years. He was
            succeeded by Samuel Snowberger. Samuel was the son of Andrew Snowberger,
            Jr., and grandson of the former prior. Samuel was born in 1799, and at the
            age of twenty-six became the leader of Snow Hill, always remaining a celibate
            brother.

            Meanwhile, the secular congregation was growing so that the Saal in
            the cloister was no longer sufficient as a meeting place. Subscriptions for
            $1,500 were solicited, and in 1829, a meeting house was erected. It was
            placed just across the stream from the cloister along the road to Tomstown.
            Included with the building was a large oven where the love feast was
            prepared.

            "On June 17, 1834, the community was incorporated under the name of
            'The Seventh Day Baptist Monastical Society of Snow Hill'." This new society
            was not the same as 'The Seventh Day Baptists of Snowhill'..." The new
            incorporators were: John Snowberger, Henry Bauman, Barbara Lehman, Veronica
            Snowberger, Susannah Fyock, Hannah Fyock, and Mary Fyock, and Mary Toms.
            Also signing the charter were Solomon Monn, Charles (Carolus) Hoch, Samuel
            and David Snowberger.

            "Again the need for new buildings arose, and the second house erected
            in 1835, adjoining the first. This was a two-story brick house thirty feet
            square. In the meantime, the old stone house of Andrew Snowberger was
            removed. By 1837, the number of monastics had reached twenty-three;
            therefore, in 1838 the brick house on the west end was erected adjoining the
            others. This was also a two-story brick structure, thirty by forty feet, and
            designated as the brother house. The period from the incorporation until
            1845 was the period of greatest increase in membership, from eleven to around
            thirty. Consequently the fourth house was erected in 1843, a two-story
            brick, thirty by forty feet, adjoining the others, and added to the sister
            house. The houses are built together and give the appearance of one house in
            a long row, nearly one hundred and fifty feet long.

            The total number of rooms upon completion exceeded fifty. The
            interior provided nine large community rooms, used for sitting rooms,
            refectory, and kitchen. The second floor contained the original Saal, the
            library (called the book room), and hallways opening into a large number of
            small sleeping chambers. A large attic was also pressed into service
            sometimes for sleeping. The basement with its convenient stream furnished
            the laundry and refrigeration."


            Source: Treher, Charles M., "Snow Hill Cloister", The Pennsylvania German
            Society, Volume II, Gettysburg, PA: The Times and News Publishing Company,
            1968, 47-55.

            transcribed and submitted by Dianne Gleim Bowders.

                 Children of Andreas Schneeberger and Barbara Garber:
            Anna Snowberger   (living)
            Barbara Snowberger   b. 28 Apr 1768, d. 23 Oct 1851
            Susan Snowberger   b. 1770, d. 18 Jan 1828
            Andrew Snowberger   b. 1771
            John Snowberger   b. 1776
            Jacob Snowberger   b. 1779
            Elizabeth Snowberger   b. 1779
            Maria Snowberger   (living)

            Citations

            1. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            2. [S20] See citation Cemetery Records, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~snowhillcloister/snow_hill_cemetery_records.htm, unknown repository address.
            3. [S7] Name of researcher.
            4. [S17] Federal Census, unknown repository address, 1790 census, Ancestry.com.
            5. [S5] Ancestral Search, online http:\\www.ancestry.com, 1800 Washington Franklin county, PA.

            Jacob Schneeberger (M)
            b. 1746, d. 11 July 1819, #68
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            Jacob Schneeberger was born in 1746 at Switzerland. He was the son of Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?).
            Jacob Schneeberger also went by the name of Yuckle. Jacob Schneeberger was also known as Jacob Snowberger.
            Jacob Schneeberger began military service in 1780 Jacob served in the fifth Co., 1st Batt. under Capt. Samuel Rogers.
            Jacob Schneeberger married Catherine Miley.1

            The "Lists of Swiss Emigrants" shows the following:
            1782 Etat der Landesabwesenden p. 335.
            The Landvogt of Wangen reports to the Government that the brothers Jakob and Joseph Schneeberger of Ochlenberg, commune of Bollodingen, emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1752. They have not lyet surrendered their home-right.2

            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.3

            Jacob Schneeberger appeared on the census of 1790 at Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; There are 1 male listed as over 16 and 1 male listed as under 16. There are 6 females listed in the family.4

            Jacob Schneeberger was living in 1800 at Washington Township, Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA; Jacob is listed with his nickname Yuckel.5
            Jacob Schneeberger died on 11 July 1819.

                 Child of Jacob Schneeberger and Catherine Miley:
            Veronica Snowberger   d. 13 Jan 1841

            Citations

            1. [S20] See citation Cemetery Records, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~snowhillcloister/snow_hill_cemetery_records.htm, unknown repository address.
            2. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            3. [S7] Name of researcher.
            4. [S5] Ancestral Search, online http:\\www.ancestry.com, 1890 Franklin county, PA.
            5. [S5] Ancestral Search, online http:\\www.ancestry.com, 1900 Washington Franklin county, PA.

            Anna Schneeberger (F)
            b. 1748, #69
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Granddaughter of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            Anna Schneeberger was born in 1748 at Switzerland.1 She was the daughter of Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?). Anna Schneeberger was also known as Anna Snowberger.
            Anna Schneeberger married Fredrocl Roher.1

            Communication from the Government to the Landvogt of Wangen. Mittelwegziehungs-Prot. I, 99.
            The three brothers Hans (Johannes Jr), Ulrich and Andreas Schneeberger and their two sisters Anna and Maria from the commune of Ochlenberg have settled in America, in Maryland.In return for the surrender of their citizenship and land-right they are permitted to take their property of 1220 crowns with them after the tax of 10 percent has been deducted.

            Added by compilers --
            Later upon protest from the commune this decision was altered, March 15, 1775, so that only Andreas, Anna and Maria Schneeberger receive their shares of the property. Hans (John) and Ulrich took their property out of the country in 1751 at the same time as their parents took theirs, and they have no further claims. Two other sons, Joseph and Jakob, belong to the family of whom nothing is said. Their shares of the property are to continue to be administered by athe commune. (p147/48).2

            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.3

            Citations

            1. [S15] Barbara Lenore Snowberger, "BL Snowberger", Ancestral File, Some Ancestors of Barbara Lenore Snowberger.
            2. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            3. [S7] Name of researcher.

            Johannes Schneeberger Jr. (M)
            b. 1735, d. 1808, #70
            Pop-up Pedigree
            Relationship=Grandson of Hanss Schneeberger.

                 
            Johannes Schneeberger Jr. was born in 1735. Johannes Schneeberger Jr. was also known as Hanss Schneeberger. He was the son of Johannnes Schneeberger and Barbara Schneeberger.
            Johannes Schneeberger Jr. emigrated with Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?) on 22 April 1751 at Ochlenberg, Wangen, Switzerland; The following note is as stated in the "Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies":
            1751, April 22. R. M. 210, 22/23
            Hans Schneeberger of Ochlenberg receives permission to emigrate to Pennsylvania with his wife and his two sons who are of age. His minor children , however, because of the dangers of the journey, are to remain in this country under guardianship. A part of the property must be left here for the education of the children. The rest Schneeberger can take with him after paying the emigration tax of 10 percent and giving up his land-right.

            Further note as written by compilers of source.
            According to the Amtsrechnung of Wangen, Hans Schneeberger and his two sons were allowed to take with them a share of the property amounting to 370 crowns, less 10 percent emigration tax, when they emigrated in the spring of 1751.1


            Johannes Schneeberger Jr. emigrated with Johannnes Schneeberger and Catherine (?) on 4 October 1751 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Johannes (Hans) and part of his family arrived in Philadelphia Port on October 4, 1751 on the ship, the Queen of Denmark. We believe that the family consisted of Catherine, his second wife, and his two oldest sons, Johannes (John) and Ulrich.
            Hilda Snowberger Chance writes that "He made his way across country to Waynesboro, Pa." She further writes, "He chose a place for its similarity to their own beautiful mountainous country, called Snow Hill. The area was known as Little Switzerland."2 Johannes Schneeberger Jr. was also known as John Snowberger.

            Communication from the Government to the Landvogt of Wangen. Mittelwegziehungs-Prot. I, 99.
            The three brothers Hans (Johannes Jr), Ulrich and Andreas Schneeberger and their two sisters Anna and Maria from the commune of Ochlenberg have settled in America, in Maryland.In return for the surrender of their citizenship and land-right they are permitted to take their property of 1220 crowns with them after the tax of 10 percent has been deducted.

            Added by compilers --
            Later upon protest from the commune this decision was altered, March 15, 1775, so that only Andreas, Anna and Maria Schneeberger receive their shares of the property. Hans (John) and Ulrich took their property out of the country in 1751 at the same time as their parents took theirs, and they have no further claims. Two other sons, Joseph and Jakob, belong to the family of whom nothing is said. Their shares of the property are to continue to be administered by athe commune. (p147/48).1

            Note by researcher:
            After study of documents of other researcher of immigration records and the official documents of the Swiss government, I have come to the following conclucions:
            1. In 1751, Johannes Sr. (Hans), his wife Catherine and two sons Johannes Jr. (Hans) and Ulrich emigrated to America and landed in Philadelphia.
            2. In 1752, Johannes Sr. returned and spirited his their two sons, Joseph and Jacob to America. (Immigration records show them to having arrived in 1752.)
            3. In 1753, Johannes Sr. returned to Switzerland and spirited their son, Andreas and two daughters, Anna and Maria out of the country and took them to America. This is borne out by Swiss documents noted in fact 3 under Johannes Schneeberger.3
            Johannes Schneeberger Jr. died in 1808; He never married.4

            Citations

            1. [S11] Albert Bernhardt Faust & Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Lists of Swiss Emigrants.
            2. [S13] Hilda Snowberger Chance, Snowberger & Kegarise Records.
            3. [S7] Name of researcher.
            4. [S15] Barbara Lenore Snowberger, "BL Snowberger", Ancestral File, Some Ancestors of Barbara Lenore Snowberger.

            Hanss Schneeberger (M)
            #72

                 
            Hanss Schneeberger married Verena Weierman.

                 Child of Hanss Schneeberger and Verena Weierman:
            Johannnes Schneeberger+   b. 1703, d. 1780


              Verena Weierman (F)
              #73

                   
              Verena Weierman married Hanss Schneeberger.

                   Child of Verena Weierman and Hanss Schneeberger:
              Johannnes Schneeberger+   b. 1703, d. 1780


                Peter Schneeberger (M)
                #74

                     
                Peter Schneeberger married Elsbeth Schneeberger.

                     Child of Peter Schneeberger and Elsbeth Schneeberger:
                Barbara Schneeberger+   b. 1703


                  Elsbeth Schneeberger (F)
                  #75

                       
                  Elsbeth Schneeberger married Peter Schneeberger.

                       Child of Elsbeth Schneeberger and Peter Schneeberger:
                  Barbara Schneeberger+   b. 1703


                    Jacob Souder Shamberger (M)
                    b. 20 February 1847, d. 1936, #76
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=Great-grandson of Nicholas Shamberger.

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger;
                         
                    Jacob Souder Shamberger was born on 20 February 1847 at Carrolton, Carroll Co., Md. He was the son of John Henry Shamberger and Elizabeth Markey.

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger was a witness to the fact that John Henry Shamberger and Elizabeth Markey were living on 14 October 1850 at Baltimore, Maryland, USA.1

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger was a witness to the fact that John Henry Shamberger and Elizabeth Markey were living on 13 July 1860 at Carroll, Maryland, USA.2
                    Jacob Souder Shamberger married Mary Frances Smith, daughter of Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay, on 21 October 1869.

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger was a witness to the fact that John Henry Shamberger and Elizabeth Markey were living on 29 June 1870 at Graham, Nodaway, Maryland, USA.3

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 4 June 1880 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Census has surname listed as Shawberger.4

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 12 June 1900 at Hughes, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.3

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 24 April 1910 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.3

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living in 1920 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Hattie, wife of Frank, son of Jacob and Mary, has died and Frank is running the farm of Jacob and Mary.5

                    Jacob Souder Shamberger was living on 4 April 1930 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Jacob is 83 years of age and is living with his daughter, Fannie and her husband, Clarence Norman. He is a widower.3
                    Jacob Souder Shamberger died in 1936 at Nodaway County, Mo.

                    This note was written by Eula Snowberger Cooper, daughter of Theodore Snowberger and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Shamberger. It can be found in it entirety at http://www.arslanmb.org/shamberg/Eula-Snowberger-history.rtf

                    Jacob
                    , son of John, born 1847 in Md.

                    After the War he decided to go west. His father told him to take his brother, Henry, and "find a place and we will all go." Jacob, 19, and Henry, 17, carried $1,000.00 in gold. They went to St. Joseph b
                    y train, to Savannah by stage coach and walked to Graham. The Baublitts had gone there earlier. They were former neighbors of the Shambergers in Maryland. Jacob and Henry decided this was the place they were seeking. They bought a farm 4 miles southwest of Graham. John and Elizabeth, their younger sons, George and Jesse, a daughter, Nancy, Elizabeth's sister and mother came to the farm. Thomas, the oldest brother, stayed in Maryland. John bought 960 acres of land northeast of Graham for $25.00 per acre. That was to be homes for his children. Jacob, Henry, Jesse and Nancy married and lived there. All went on to Kansas except Jacob.

                    Jacob courted and married Mary Frances Smith of a pioneer family from Illinois. She said, "When we went out together he rode a black horse. I had my own gray. I rode side saddle. I can tell you we made a fine appearance."
                    They were married in November of l869. They built their house on Shamberger land 6 miles northeast of Graham.
                    The land was new, unfenced and unplowed. They brought it into production. The soil was black and rich. Jacob loved the land. Eventually they raised corn, wheat, oats and pasture. They had horses, cattle hogs, and chickens. They set out trees..maples and evergreens like Jacob had known in Maryland. She grew lilies, snowballs, wisteria vines, roses, peonies, tulips and many annual flowers. They raised fruit...gooseberries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, red cherries, grapes, plums, peaches, pears, summer, fall and winter apples. They had all kinds of vegetables and melons and bought little food except sugar, flour, tea, coffee and oranges, bananas, raisins for special treats.

                    There were four children, Elizabeth (Lizzie), Charles, Frank and Fanny. There were 10 grand-children. All lived near. It was a good life. Jacob inherited a share of John's land and bought more of it. He came to have 480 acres and bought more outside. Jacob had gone to school in Maryland and read Latin and German. He was a student of the Bible and of history. Mary had country school in Illinois. Seldom read. She resented not being able to vote. Finally in 1920 she proudly cast her ballot for Warren G. Harding. They were active in community life, school and church. He was a member of the County Commission that co-operated with Holt County to build the first bridge across the Nodaway River at Maitland. She was a pioneer woman who was a good nurse. She went to help when neighbors were ill and when new babies were born. They traveled by train to visit family in Kansas, New Mexico, Idaho and Maryland. They went sight-seeing in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Colorado, the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone Park, Niagra Falls, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, D.C. He was delighted with new inventions such as farm machinery, automobiles, telephone and radio. He bought a sewing machine for each woman in the family. Grandma's hobbies were flowers, needlework, fine linens and dishes. Her Haviland china was her most prized possession.

                    They lived together on the farm for 51 years. She died in 1920. He continued to live there until his death in 1936, in good health until the last. They are buried in Maryville.

                         Children of Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith:
                    Elizabeth Shamberger+   b. 24 Sep 1870, d. 15 Aug 1957
                    Charles Shamberger+   (living)
                    Frank Shamberger+   b. 11 Nov 1875, d. c 1958
                    Fannie Shamberger   b. 25 Aug 1880

                    Citations

                    1. [S24] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, 6th District, Baltimore, MD.
                    2. [S26] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Carroll County, Md Surname is spelled as Shemberger on the census..
                    3. [S29] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    4. [S3] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    5. [S22] Federal Census, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.

                    Mary Frances Smith (F)
                    b. 13 April 1851, d. 27 December 1920, #77
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=3rd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         
                    Mary Frances Smith was born on 13 April 1851 at Jacksonville, Il. She was the daughter of Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay.

                    Mary Frances Smith was a witness to the fact that Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay were living on 5 September 1860 at Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois, USA.1
                    Mary Frances Smith married Jacob Souder Shamberger, son of John Henry Shamberger and Elizabeth Markey, on 21 October 1869.

                    Mary Frances Smith and Jacob Souder Shamberger were living on 4 June 1880 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Census has surname listed as Shawberger.2

                    Mary Frances Smith and Jacob Souder Shamberger were living on 12 June 1900 at Hughes, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.3

                    Mary Frances Smith and Jacob Souder Shamberger were living on 24 April 1910 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.3

                    Mary Frances Smith and Jacob Souder Shamberger were living in 1920 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Hattie, wife of Frank, son of Jacob and Mary, has died and Frank is running the farm of Jacob and Mary.4
                    Mary Frances Smith died on 27 December 1920 at Nodaway, Missouri, USA, at age 69.

                         Children of Mary Frances Smith and Jacob Souder Shamberger:
                    Elizabeth Shamberger+   b. 24 Sep 1870, d. 15 Aug 1957
                    Charles Shamberger+   (living)
                    Frank Shamberger+   b. 11 Nov 1875, d. c 1958
                    Fannie Shamberger   b. 25 Aug 1880

                    Citations

                    1. [S26] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Jacksonville, Morgan, IL.
                    2. [S3] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    3. [S29] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    4. [S22] Federal Census, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.

                    Frank Shamberger (M)
                    b. 11 November 1875, d. circa 1958, #78
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Nicholas Shamberger.
                    Relationship=4th great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         
                    Frank Shamberger was born on 11 November 1875 at Nodaway, Missouri, USA.1 He was the son of Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith.

                    Frank Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 4 June 1880 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Census has surname listed as Shawberger.2

                    Frank Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 12 June 1900 at Hughes, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.3
                    Frank Shamberger married Hattie Fox circa 1904.1

                    Frank Shamberger and Hattie Fox were living on 23 April 1910 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.4

                    Frank Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living in 1920 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Hattie, wife of Frank, son of Jacob and Mary, has died and Frank is running the farm of Jacob and Mary.5

                    Frank Shamberger was living on 3 April 1930 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Roberta is one of the witnesses and is the wife of Fred Shamberger.6
                    Frank Shamberger died circa 1958 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.1

                         Children of Frank Shamberger and Hattie Fox:
                    Fred Shamberger   (living)
                    Marvin Shamberger   (living)

                    Citations

                    1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Shamberger Family Genealogy, Mark B. Arslan http://arslanmb.org/shamberg/shamberg.html.
                    2. [S3] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    3. [S29] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    4. [S28] Unknown record type, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    5. [S22] Federal Census, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    6. [S23] Federal Census, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.

                    Fannie Shamberger (F)
                    b. 25 August 1880, #79
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Nicholas Shamberger.
                    Relationship=4th great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                    Caption:Fanny Shamberger;
                         
                    Fannie Shamberger was born on 25 August 1880. She was the daughter of Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith.

                    Fannie Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 12 June 1900 at Hughes, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.1

                    Fannie Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith were living on 24 April 1910 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA.1
                    Fannie Shamberger married Clarence Norman circa 1919; Clarence and Fannie had no children.

                    Fannie Shamberger and Clarence Norman were living on 15 January 1920 at Maitland, Holt, Missouri, USA.2

                    Fannie Shamberger was a witness to the fact that Jacob Souder Shamberger was living on 4 April 1930 at Graham, Nodaway, Missouri, USA; Jacob is 83 years of age and is living with his daughter, Fannie and her husband, Clarence Norman. He is a widower.1

                    Citations

                    1. [S29] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Hughes, Nodaway, MO.
                    2. [S22] Federal Census, unknown repository address, Clay, Holt, MO.

                    Charles Shamberger (M)
                    #80
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Nicholas Shamberger.
                    Relationship=4th great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         Charles Shamberger is the son of Jacob Souder Shamberger and Mary Frances Smith.
                    Charles Shamberger married Mary Peterson in 1898.1

                         Children of Charles Shamberger and Mary Peterson:
                    Manora ? Shamberger   (living)
                    Elizabeth Shamberger   (living)
                    Meryl Shamberger   (living)
                    Jacob Shamberger   (living)
                    Frances Shamberger   (living)

                    Citations

                    1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Shamberger Family Genealogy, Mark B. Arslan http://arslanmb.org/shamberg/shamberg.html.

                    Charles Geiger Smith (M)
                    b. circa 1823, d. between 1872 and 1880, #81

                         
                    Charles Geiger Smith was born circa 1823 at Tennesee, USA; 1850 census states Vermont as birthstate, however the remainder of the census claim Tennessee.1
                    Charles Geiger Smith married Lydia Lindsay, daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin, circa 1846 at Illinois, USA; It is said that Lydia did not like her stepmother and went to live with her sister in Jacksonville,
                    Illinois, and there met Charles Smith. They raised 16 children near St.
                    Joseph, Missouri.1

                    Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay were living in 1850 at Morgan, Illinois, USA.1

                    Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay were living on 5 September 1860 at Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois, USA.2

                    Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay were living on 24 August 1870 at Jackson, Andrew, Missouri, USA.3
                    Charles Geiger Smith died between 1872 and 1880.

                         Children of Charles Geiger Smith and Lydia Lindsay:
                    Thomas Smith+   b. c 1848, d. b 1900
                    Josephus Smith   b. c 1850
                    Mary Frances Smith+   b. 13 Apr 1851, d. 27 Dec 1920
                    Luden? Smith   b. c 1853
                    Sarah Smith   b. c 1855
                    John Smith   b. c 1857
                    Edward Smith   b. c 1858
                    Laura Smith   b. c 1858
                    Irvin Smith   b. c 1860
                    Russell Smith   b. c 1860
                    Clinton Smith   b. c 1862
                    David Smith   b. 1863
                    Nettie Smith   b. c 1868
                    Jesse Smith   b. c 1872

                    Citations

                    1. [S24] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Morgan County, IL.
                    2. [S26] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Jacksonville, Morgan, IL.
                    3. [S2] Www.Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Jackson, Andrew, MO.

                    Lydia Lindsay (F)
                    b. 6 November 1827, #82
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         
                    Lydia Lindsay was born on 6 November 1827 at Ghent, Carroll, Kentucky, USA. She was the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.
                    Lydia Lindsay married Charles Geiger Smith circa 1846 at Illinois, USA; It is said that Lydia did not like her stepmother and went to live with her sister in Jacksonville,
                    Illinois, and there met Charles Smith. They raised 16 children near St.
                    Joseph, Missouri.1

                    Lydia Lindsay and Charles Geiger Smith were living in 1850 at Morgan, Illinois, USA.1

                    Lydia Lindsay and Charles Geiger Smith were living on 5 September 1860 at Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois, USA.2

                    Lydia Lindsay and Charles Geiger Smith were living on 24 August 1870 at Jackson, Andrew, Missouri, USA.3

                    Lydia Lindsay was living on 15 June 1880 at Clay, Andrew, Missouri, USA.4
                    Lydia Lindsay died.

                         Children of Lydia Lindsay and Charles Geiger Smith:
                    Thomas Smith+   b. c 1848, d. b 1900
                    Josephus Smith   b. c 1850
                    Mary Frances Smith+   b. 13 Apr 1851, d. 27 Dec 1920
                    Luden? Smith   b. c 1853
                    Sarah Smith   b. c 1855
                    John Smith   b. c 1857
                    Edward Smith   b. c 1858
                    Laura Smith   b. c 1858
                    Irvin Smith   b. c 1860
                    Russell Smith   b. c 1860
                    Clinton Smith   b. c 1862
                    David Smith   b. 1863
                    Nettie Smith   b. c 1868
                    Jesse Smith   b. c 1872

                    Citations

                    1. [S24] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Morgan County, IL.
                    2. [S26] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Jacksonville, Morgan, IL.
                    3. [S2] Www.Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Jackson, Andrew, MO.
                    4. [S3] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Clay, Andrew, MO.

                    Jesse Cole Lindsay (M)
                    b. 28 September 1789, d. 6 March 1875, #83
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         
                    Jesse Cole Lindsay was born on 28 September 1789 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA.1 He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                    Jesse Cole Lindsay married Priscilla Ficklin on 12 April 1810 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA.2
                    Jesse Cole Lindsay married Endotia Baker on 27 January 1831 at Gallatin, Kentucky, USA.2
                    Jesse Cole Lindsay died on 6 March 1875 at Ghent, Kentucky, USA, at age 85.

                    General Jesse Cole Lindsay was born in Woodford County, Kentucky 28 September 1789, died 6 March 1875 in Ghent, Kentucky. When a young man he rode horseback to Virginia to visit his Aunt, his father's sister, Catherine Bartlett and other relatives. He was married first to Priscilla Ficklin on the 12th day of April 1810. She was born 29 November 1781 and died 9 March 1830. They moved to Gallatin County, Kentucky and settled on a farm four miles from Ghent. He made eleven trips to New Orleans on flat boats on which he carried his own produce and that of his friends on consignment. On the return trip home they would walk in companies as they had to pass through several unfriendly Indian Tribes. After walking all day they would take turns in guarding the camp at night. He was a general in the Kentucky Militia, a membe of the Christian Church and gave the land on which the present church in Ghent now stands. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and attained the degree of Royal Arch Mason.

                    HISTORY: FamilyHistory.com; Ancestry; Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, Kniffin, 7th ed., 1887, Carroll Co; Jesse was a native of Virginia, but an early settler in Kentucky. He was county sheriff when Carroll and Gallatin constituted one county, and was for a number of years a justice of the peace. He married twice. He died age 86.1

                         Children of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin:
                    Richard Lindsay   (living)
                    Susannah Lindsay   (living)
                    Angeline Lindsay   (living)
                    Mary Frances Lindsay   (living)
                    Elizabeth Lindsay   (living)
                    John Anthony Lindsay   (living)
                    Alice Ann Lindsay   (living)
                    James Hiram Lindsay   (living)
                    Lydia Lindsay+   b. 6 Nov 1827
                    Noah Lindsay   (living)

                    Citations

                    1. [S27] Richard Orr Sebree, Anthony Lindsay by Sebree, page 188, Vol 5, Number 3, Jan 1970.
                    2. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                    Priscilla Ficklin (F)
                    b. 21 November 1781, d. 9 March 1830, #84

                         
                    Priscilla Ficklin was born on 21 November 1781; Researcher Kenneth Lindsay gives her date of birth as 28 Nov 1781.1
                    Priscilla Ficklin married Jesse Cole Lindsay, son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole, on 12 April 1810 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA.1
                    Priscilla Ficklin died on 9 March 1830 at Carroll, Kentucky, USA, at age 48; She is buried in Carroll county, KY.1

                         Children of Priscilla Ficklin and Jesse Cole Lindsay:
                    Richard Lindsay   (living)
                    Susannah Lindsay   (living)
                    Angeline Lindsay   (living)
                    Mary Frances Lindsay   (living)
                    Elizabeth Lindsay   (living)
                    John Anthony Lindsay   (living)
                    Alice Ann Lindsay   (living)
                    James Hiram Lindsay   (living)
                    Lydia Lindsay+   b. 6 Nov 1827
                    Noah Lindsay   (living)

                    Citations

                    1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                    Richard Lindsay (M)
                    #85
                    Pop-up Pedigree
                    Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                         Richard Lindsay is the son of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                      Susannah Lindsay (F)
                      #86
                      Pop-up Pedigree
                      Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                           Susannah Lindsay is the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                        Angeline Lindsay (F)
                        #87
                        Pop-up Pedigree
                        Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                             Angeline Lindsay is the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                          Mary Frances Lindsay (F)
                          #88
                          Pop-up Pedigree
                          Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                               Mary Frances Lindsay is the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                            Elizabeth Lindsay (F)
                            #89
                            Pop-up Pedigree
                            Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                 Elizabeth Lindsay is the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                              John Anthony Lindsay (M)
                              #90
                              Pop-up Pedigree
                              Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                   John Anthony Lindsay is the son of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                                Alice Ann Lindsay (F)
                                #91
                                Pop-up Pedigree
                                Relationship=2nd great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                     Alice Ann Lindsay is the daughter of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                                  James Hiram Lindsay (M)
                                  #92
                                  Pop-up Pedigree
                                  Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                       James Hiram Lindsay is the son of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                                    Noah Lindsay (M)
                                    #93
                                    Pop-up Pedigree
                                    Relationship=2nd great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                         Noah Lindsay is the son of Jesse Cole Lindsay and Priscilla Ficklin.


                                      Anthony Lindsay III1 (M)
                                      b. 14 February 1767, d. 11 April 1831, #94
                                      Pop-up Pedigree
                                      Relationship=Grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                           
                                      Anthony Lindsay III was born on 14 February 1767 at Baltimore, Kentucky, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey.

                                      Anthony Lindsay III was a witness to the fact that Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey were living after 15 February 1773 at Frederick, Maryland, USA; Anthony and Rachel sold their far, amd ,pved westward into the Southern part of Frederick county. This area is now Montgomery county.1

                                      During the winter of the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families, made preparations to move to the Forks of the Elkhorn region. They had heard of George Rogers Clark's capture of the forts at Kaskaskia and Vincennes. It would be safe to travel now.
                                      In late spring of 1779, the wagon train moved west. All of the children with the exception of Catherine, (Kate) and possibly Charles, left with the train. They went through Old Town, then crossed the Mason-Dixon Line into Westmorland county. The area within which they lived is now Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.
                                      The next year all the families moved westward into an area that both Virginia and Pennsylvania claimed jurisdiction. This section is located within the present panhandle of West Virginia. The Cox families had two forts in the area. One was above Buffalo Creek and the other, below the same Creek. No sooner than they arrived, the Indians became troublesome on the frontier. The wagon train had to retreat back to the safety of forts in Westmoreland county. They would have to remain here until the Indians eased their attacks. This would be another year.1

                                      In 1783, the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families reached the Ohio River. They built flatboats to haul their cattle, horses, and wagons loaded with only the necessities of life. The flatboats were lashed together during the journey to withstand the springtime dangers of the swollen Ohio River. The flatboats were nothing more than rafts made of logs. Each had protective sides six feet high and thick enough to withstand rifle balls. Each of the flatboats had a partial roof over their sterns. This provided protection from the elements.
                                      The men took turns as scouts, along the south bank of the river. On horseback they kept three or four miles ahead of the boats. These scouts kept a sharp eye for Indians. At the end of each day, they would find a safe place to camp on the south bank of the river. In the course of the day, these scouts would kill enough wild game to feed everybody.
                                      Apparently their trip down the Ohio was uneventful. They reached the Forks of the Elkhorn about late spring of 1783. All that summer they farmed and built cabins on land the expected to claim.
                                      Because of the Indian threats, Heyden's Station became their haven of safety that first winter. The area where they settled was near the Forks of the Elkhorn, mostly along that river's northern branch. Anthony Lindsay's farm lay within the present bounds of Scott and Franklin counties; however, at that time, it was considered to be Fayette Co., Virginia. The state of Kentucky was yet to be formed.1
                                      Anthony Lindsay III married Alsey Cole, daughter of Richard Cole Sr and Ann Hubbard, in 1788 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA; Researcher Kenneth Lindsay states they were married in Fayette County, Virginia.
                                      Researcher Richard Sebree states they were married in Woodford county, Kentucky.1

                                      Shortly before his father's death, Anthony Lindsay III took over Lindsay Station, which he operated until his own death. This fort was a stockade containing three cabins and room for the stock. During the Indian raids other families took refuge with him. On 3 February 1807, Anthony Linday III was commissioned Captain in the 12th Regiment of the Cornstalk Militia of Kentucky.
                                      For some years there was no settlement nearer than Herndon Station or McConnel's Run about five miles distant. When their oldest child first went to school there were only one or two houses in Stamping Ground, one and a half miles away. This school was held in a round log cabin.1,2
                                      Anthony Lindsay III died on 11 April 1831 at Lindsay's Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA, at age 64; He is buried in the Lindsay's Station Cemetery.1

                                           Children of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole:
                                      Jesse Cole Lindsay+   b. 28 Sep 1789, d. 6 Mar 1875
                                      William Lindsay   b. 20 Jun 1791, d. 17 Oct 1834
                                      Lucy Lindsay   b. 6 Oct 1793
                                      Richard Cole Lindsay   b. 28 Dec 1795, d. 28 Mar 1882
                                      Greenbury Lindsay   b. 19 Feb 1797, d. 10 Mar 1814
                                      Ann Lindsay   b. 13 Jun 1800, d. c 1860
                                      Sallie Lindsay+   b. 15 Apr 1803, d. 12 Oct 1851
                                      Elizabeth Lindsay   b. 24 Dec 1805
                                      John Cole Lindsay   b. 29 Feb 1808
                                      James Madison Lindsay+   b. 7 Mar 1810, d. 19 Aug 1846
                                      Mary Lindsay   b. c 1813

                                      Citations

                                      1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                      2. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Researcher Richard Orr Sebree states that Catherine married a Bartlett and settled in the Allegheny Mountains of Virginia..

                                      Alsey Cole (F)
                                      b. 20 June 1769, d. 7 July 1813, #95
                                      Pop-up Pedigree

                                           
                                      Alsey Cole was born on 20 June 1769. She was the daughter of Richard Cole Sr and Ann Hubbard.
                                      Alsey Cole married Anthony Lindsay III, son of Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey, in 1788 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA; Researcher Kenneth Lindsay states they were married in Fayette County, Virginia.
                                      Researcher Richard Sebree states they were married in Woodford county, Kentucky.1

                                      Shortly before his father's death, Anthony Lindsay III took over Lindsay Station, which he operated until his own death. This fort was a stockade containing three cabins and room for the stock. During the Indian raids other families took refuge with him. On 3 February 1807, Anthony Linday III was commissioned Captain in the 12th Regiment of the Cornstalk Militia of Kentucky.
                                      For some years there was no settlement nearer than Herndon Station or McConnel's Run about five miles distant. When their oldest child first went to school there were only one or two houses in Stamping Ground, one and a half miles away. This school was held in a round log cabin.1,2
                                      Alsey Cole died on 7 July 1813 at Lindsay's Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA, at age 44; She is buried in the Lindsay's Station Cemetery.1

                                           Children of Alsey Cole and Anthony Lindsay III:
                                      Jesse Cole Lindsay+   b. 28 Sep 1789, d. 6 Mar 1875
                                      William Lindsay   b. 20 Jun 1791, d. 17 Oct 1834
                                      Lucy Lindsay   b. 6 Oct 1793
                                      Richard Cole Lindsay   b. 28 Dec 1795, d. 28 Mar 1882
                                      Greenbury Lindsay   b. 19 Feb 1797, d. 10 Mar 1814
                                      Ann Lindsay   b. 13 Jun 1800, d. c 1860
                                      Sallie Lindsay+   b. 15 Apr 1803, d. 12 Oct 1851
                                      Elizabeth Lindsay   b. 24 Dec 1805
                                      John Cole Lindsay   b. 29 Feb 1808
                                      James Madison Lindsay+   b. 7 Mar 1810, d. 19 Aug 1846
                                      Mary Lindsay   b. c 1813

                                      Citations

                                      1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                      2. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Researcher Richard Orr Sebree states that Catherine married a Bartlett and settled in the Allegheny Mountains of Virginia..

                                      William Lindsay (M)
                                      b. 20 June 1791, d. 17 October 1834, #96
                                      Pop-up Pedigree
                                      Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                           
                                      William Lindsay was born on 20 June 1791 at Lindsay Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA; Researcher Kenneth Lindsay states he was born in Jefferson county, KY.1 He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                      William Lindsay began military service on 15 August 1812 William served as a Corporal in Captain Joseph Redding's Co., Scott's Reginem from 15 August 1812 to 14 October 1812. It has been written that he was involved in "Battle of the River Raisin."1
                                      William Lindsay married Permelia Scruggs circa 1815; They had 7 children, Greenbury; William Buford; John S; Anthony Thomas; James; Richard; Judith Elizabeth.1
                                      William Lindsay married Eveline Carpenter; They had one child, Permelia.1
                                      William Lindsay died on 17 October 1834 at Carrollton, Carroll, Kentucky, USA, at age 43; He is buried in Carrollton.1

                                      Citations

                                      1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                      Lucy Lindsay (F)
                                      b. 6 October 1793, #97
                                      Pop-up Pedigree
                                      Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                           
                                      Lucy Lindsay was born on 6 October 1793. She was the daughter of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.


                                        Richard Cole Lindsay (M)
                                        b. 28 December 1795, d. 28 March 1882, #98
                                        Pop-up Pedigree
                                        Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                             
                                        Richard Cole Lindsay was born on 28 December 1795 at Scott, Kentucky, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                        Richard Cole Lindsay married Juliette Herndon Bond circa 1818 at Scott, Kentucky, USA; Richard and Juliette had 11 children: Edward; Mary Elizabeth; Cassandra; Sarah Jane; David Herndon; Richard Preston; Susan Alice; Haggiet Ann; Juliette; John T; Susan.
                                        All were born between about 1820 and 1842. All were born in Kentucky.1

                                        Richard Cole Lindsay and Juliette Herndon Bond were living in 1820 at Gallatin, Kentucky, USA.2

                                        Richard Cole Lindsay and Juliette Herndon Bond were living in 1830 at Gallatin, Kentucky, USA.3

                                        Richard Cole Lindsay and Juliette Herndon Bond were living in 1850 at Carroll, Kentucky, USA.4

                                        Richard Cole Lindsay was living on 21 July 1860 at Shoal, Clinton, Missouri, USA; Richard is a widower and the only member of his family living with him is John T, age 19.5

                                        Richard Cole Lindsay was living on 3 June 1880 at Jackson, Clinton, Missouri, USA; Richard is living with his daughter Juliet H and her husbands family.
                                        Richard Cole Lindsay died on 28 March 1882 at Clay, Missouri, USA, at age 86; He is buried in Kearney, Clay, MO.1

                                        Citations

                                        1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                        2. [S36] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Gallatin, KY.
                                        3. [S37] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Gallitin, KY.
                                        4. [S24] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Dist 1, Carroll, KY.
                                        5. [S26] Ancestry.com, unknown repository address, Shoal, Clinton, MO.

                                        Greenbury Lindsay (M)
                                        b. 19 February 1797, d. 10 March 1814, #99
                                        Pop-up Pedigree
                                        Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                             
                                        Greenbury Lindsay was born on 19 February 1797 at Scott, Kentucky, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                        Greenbury Lindsay died on 10 March 1814 at age 17.1

                                        Citations

                                        1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                        Ann Lindsay (F)
                                        b. 13 June 1800, d. circa 1860, #100
                                        Pop-up Pedigree
                                        Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                             
                                        Ann Lindsay was born on 13 June 1800. She was the daughter of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                        Ann Lindsay died circa 1860.1

                                        Citations

                                        1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                        Sallie Lindsay (F)
                                        b. 15 April 1803, d. 12 October 1851, #101
                                        Pop-up Pedigree
                                        Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                             
                                        Sallie Lindsay was born on 15 April 1803 at Scott, Kentucky, USA. She was the daughter of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                        Sallie Lindsay married James Cole circa 1823 at Woodford, Kentucky, USA; James and Sallie were first cousins.1

                                        After the death of her husband, James Cole, Sallie and her children moved in and lived with her father-in-law, Richard Cole, until his death in 1839. They lived at the Black Horse Tavern where Richard Cole was the owner.2
                                        Sallie Lindsay married Robert Thomason on 16 September 1838 at Shelby, Kentucky, USA.1
                                        Sallie Lindsay died on 12 October 1851 at Clay, Missouri, USA, at age 48; She is buried in New Hope Cemetery, Kearney, Clay, MO.1

                                             Children of Sallie Lindsay and James Cole:
                                        Zerelda E Cole+   b. 29 Jan 1825, d. 10 Feb 1911
                                        Jesse Cole   b. 29 Nov 1826, d. c 18 Nov 1895

                                             Children of Sallie Lindsay and Robert Thomason:
                                        Sarah Elizabeth Thomason   b. 24 Aug 1839
                                        Martha Ann Thomason   b. 23 Jul 1841, d. 2 Oct 1919
                                        Mary Alice Thomason   b. 2 Dec 1844, d. 24 May 1930

                                        Citations

                                        1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                        2. [S40] AUTHOR.

                                        Elizabeth Lindsay (F)
                                        b. 24 December 1805, #102
                                        Pop-up Pedigree
                                        Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                             
                                        Elizabeth Lindsay was born on 24 December 1805 at Scott, Kentucky, USA. She was the daughter of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.


                                          John Cole Lindsay (M)
                                          b. 29 February 1808, #103
                                          Pop-up Pedigree
                                          Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                               
                                          John Cole Lindsay was born on 29 February 1808 at Lindsay Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.


                                            James Madison Lindsay (M)
                                            b. 7 March 1810, d. 19 August 1846, #104
                                            Pop-up Pedigree
                                            Relationship=Great-grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                                 
                                            James Madison Lindsay was born on 7 March 1810 at Scott, Kentucky, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.
                                            James Madison Lindsay married Mary Keene circa 1834; James and Mary had 8 children: Charles, Fanny, James William, Samuel Keene, Harriet Ann, Robert Henry, Helen Mary, Margery. The children were born between 1834 and 1846.1

                                            James was a judge in Scott County. His old homeplace still stands on the locust Fork Pike.1
                                            James Madison Lindsay died on 19 August 1846 at Scott, Kentucky, USA, at age 36.1

                                                 Children of James Madison Lindsay and Mary Keene:
                                            Frances Lindsay   b. 17 Apr 1834, d. 18 Jun 1860
                                            Charles Lindsay   b. 2 Dec 1835, d. 31 Oct 1853
                                            James William Lindsay   b. c 1836
                                            Samuel Keene Lindsay   b. c 1838
                                            Harriet Ann Lindsay   b. 10 Dec 1840, d. 1 Feb 1907
                                            Robert Henry Lindsay   b. c 1842
                                            Helen Mary Lindsay   b. c 1844
                                            Margery Lindsay   b. c 1846, d. 1869

                                            Citations

                                            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                            Mary Lindsay (F)
                                            b. circa 1813, #105
                                            Pop-up Pedigree
                                            Relationship=Great-granddaughter of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                                  Mary Lindsay was also known as Polly Lindsay.1
                                            Mary Lindsay was born circa 1813; Researcher Kenneth Lindsay states that Mary or Polly was born 23 Jul 1813. He also reports that her mother Alsey Cole died 7 Jul 1813. I have changed the date of birth to circa 1813.2

                                            Shortly before his father's death, Anthony Lindsay III took over Lindsay Station, which he operated until his own death. This fort was a stockade containing three cabins and room for the stock. During the Indian raids other families took refuge with him. On 3 February 1807, Anthony Linday III was commissioned Captain in the 12th Regiment of the Cornstalk Militia of Kentucky.
                                            For some years there was no settlement nearer than Herndon Station or McConnel's Run about five miles distant. When their oldest child first went to school there were only one or two houses in Stamping Ground, one and a half miles away. This school was held in a round log cabin.1,3 She was the daughter of Anthony Lindsay III and Alsey Cole.

                                            Citations

                                            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                            2. [S7] Name of researcher.
                                            3. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Researcher Richard Orr Sebree states that Catherine married a Bartlett and settled in the Allegheny Mountains of Virginia..

                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr1 (M)
                                            b. circa 1736, d. 1801, #106
                                            Pop-up Pedigree
                                            Relationship=Son of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                                 

                                            The following history was compiled by Kenneth Lindsay. He has a home page at www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay

                                            Anthony Lindsay Imigrant Ancestor

                                            Anthony LINDSAY, Sr., in my opinion, was born __ ___ 1705 and Christened in Stepney, London, England. It has not been proven; however, many of us believe he was a son of Samuel LINDSAY and Elizabeth __________. Nobody seems to know where, or when, Anthony died; however, there is reason to believe he may have died in Baltimore Co., Maryland. If so, he is probably buried in that county.
                                            See 1730-1 Maryland Colonial Wills, Prince Georges Co., folio 20, page 158. It appears that Francis Tolson paid Anthony's way from London to the Maryland Colony.
                                            Anthony Lindsay married Tolson s step-daughter, Alice PAGE, about 1725. She was born about 1700, probably in London, England, She was the daughter of ________ PAGE and Ann MARSH. We do not know when, or where, she died.
                                            Different Versions of Origin in America
                                            For over a hundred years there has been many disputes concerning the originating founder of the Lindsay family in America. Most of these stories originated with the Lindsay Family Association of America. During its twenty years of existence, several reports were issued. This Lindsay Family Association was abandoned before many satisfactory conclusions were documented.
                                            Over those years, the association did some valuable work. In fact, once I had worked back to John C. Lindsay, their work greatly helped locate his brothers and sisters.
                                            In the later part of the last century, there were several conflicting, yet similar, stories of the origin of this branch of the Lindsays. Margaret Isabelle Lindsay, author of The Lindsays of America, wrote the following three accounts about this particular branch of the Lindsay tree. In her book, she wrote,"Having been furnished with two or three records of this family, in justice to those who kindly sent each to me, I insert them all."
                                            The following accounts of these different versions are in Margaret Isabelle Lindsay's own words:

                                            The First Version
                                            "The first was that the early ancestor of the family, a wealthy Scotch sea-captain, who was lost at sea, had several sons who settled in America long before the Revolution; one in Maryland, twelve miles from Baltimore; some in Virginia, and some in South Carolina."
                                            "The one who settled in Maryland being the parent tree of this branch, and whose name was Anthony, and who married a daughter of one Lloyd Dorsey of Maryland, he first moved to Pennsylvania, and then to Kentucky, with part of his family, about the year of 1784."
                                            In regards to this first account, which appears in The Lindsays of America, page 257, there seems to be some basis for fact. For instance, several years ago, I spent two weeks in Baltimore searching for my Lindsay origins.
                                            I found that an Edmond Lindsay's estate was appraised by James Smallwood and Ralph Shaw September 24, 1677. In the appraisal, there was no mention of Edmond Lindsay being a sea-captain; however, it did say he was lost at sea.
                                            Regardless, nobody by the name of Lindsay is listed as a Maryland sea-captain in Captains and Mariners of Early Maryland, by Raphael Semmes, published at Baltimore in 1937. This leads me to have some doubt as to the validity of the first account given in The Lindsays of America. Besides, Anthony Lindsay was born fifty-nine years after Edmond Lindsay was lost at sea.

                                            The Second Version
                                            "The second was that three brothers Lindsay landed in Charleston, South Carolina, from Scotland, and that one of the three went to Virginia, whose son emigrated to Kentucky at an early day, and was the founder of this family, his name also being Anthony."
                                            This account could be true, if we change one word. That single word would be "Maryland," in the place of "Virginia."

                                            The Third Version
                                            "The third was that three brothers came over from Scotland long before the Revolution, one, Anthony Lindsay, settling near Baltimore, the other two going into Virginia; that said Anthony Lindsay was in America long enough before 1775 for his eldest son, John C. to be born and attain sufficient age to serve in the American army. At the close of the Revolution, the family removed from Maryland to Scott county, Kentucky, having bought a farm with the Continental money received for the one in Maryland. He took with him a wife, five sons and three daughters."
                                            This third account appears to be true, with one exception. That single exception appears in the first sentence. I don't think that the Anthony, referred to, was born in Scotland. Although, his name happens to be Anthony, too. The Anthony in the third account would be his son. It is the son, whose eldest son John C. Lindsay, who had attained sufficient age to have served in the Revolutionary war. This John Lindsay happens to have been my great-great-great grandfather, who died in Hancock Co., Kentucky.

                                            The Fourth Version
                                            The fourth account in The Lindsays of America is the most complete and probably the most reliable as it was given to Margaret Isabella Lindsay by Eudora (Lindsay) South. Eudora was well educated and well traveled. Anthony Lindsay of Lindsay's Station was her great grandfather. Margaret Isabella Lindsay's account is as follows:
                                            "In the fourth, The record states that Anthony Lindsay and wife nee Dorsey emigrated from Maryland county Maryland to Heyden's Station on the Kentucky river, just above where Frankfort now stands, in 1784. They had twelve children, viz.:"

                                            Margaret Isabella goes on to list the names of the children and a little bit about each. The names of the children, I found to be correct; however, the chronological order of birth is incorrect. Perhaps they weren't intended to be in order as no dates were given.

                                            The Clue in Mrs. South's Account to The Lindsays of America
                                            Mrs. South stated that Anthony Lindsay's first child, Kate Lindsay, married her first cousin, John Lindsay. She further wrote that they lived in Baltimore county.
                                            If it is true she did marry her first cousin; then, we know that Anthony Lindsay had, at least, one brother. Since she said they lived in Baltimore county, I looked at the 1790 census.
                                            There is a John Lindsay living on a plot of ground called "Judah's Delight" located in "Gunpowder Manor." Research revealed that this John Lindsay was married to Elizabeth Baldwin, daughter of Silas Baldwin.
                                            Both John and Elizabeth (Baldwin) Lindsay are buried in the Old Baptist Cemetery, on Baldwin Mill Road in Hartford county. Their tombstone's say that John Lindsay died June 17, 1814, aged 55 years; and, Elizabeth Lindsay, born 1764, wife of John Lindsay, died May 23, 1838.
                                            Obviously, this isn't the John Lindsay who is a nephew of Anthony Lindsay. Therefore, we must look at places other than Baltimore county. There is only one other John Lindsay listed in the Maryland 1790 census. That John Lindsay is in Prince George's county. In my opinion this county is the most likely place to look, since there was an Anthony Lindsay living there in 1738 who was at the proper age to be the parent of the Kentucky Anthony Lindsay.
                                            The 1790 Federal Census of Prince Georges County
                                            Following are all the Lindsays who are listed as heads of families in Prince Georges in 1790. They are:
                                            Charles Linsey, p. 95, (1 male over 16 & 3 females)
                                            Charles Linsey, p. 95, (1 male over 16 & 1 female)
                                            Charles Linsey, p. 95, (1 male over 16 & 3 females)
                                            John Linsey, p. 95 (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, 3 females & 2 slaves)
                                            Samuel Linsey, p. 95, (1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, 2 females & 1 slave)
                                            As you can see, there is no Anthony listed; however, the Samuel Linsey is Samuel Lindsay, the first son of Anthony and Alice (Page) Lindsay. Samuel was born in England, or Prince Georges Co., Maryland, about 1728.

                                            The Oaths of Allegiance & Fidelity
                                            The "Oaths of Allegiance and Fidelity" to the State of Maryland and the cause of freedom was required of all free males 18 years of age or older. This became law following the action taken by the General Assembly 5 February 1777. Records exist that show two Anthony Lindsays taking this oath. One was in Frederick County. This one, of course, is Anthony Lindsay, Jr., since his son, Anthony Lindsay III, who was born 14 February 1767, would have been too young to have taken the oath. The other Anthony Lindsay was in Baltimore County. This one, in my opinion, is the husband of Alice Page and was the parent of the one in Frederick County. If so, we know he was still living at the time and would have been about 72 years old. His death must have occured sometime after 1777 and before 1790.
                                            They had at least 3 children:
                                            Samuel LINDSAY, b. about 1728; d. 16 April 1800
                                            John Tolson LINDSAY, b. about 1730; d. __ ___ ____
                                            Anthony LINDSAY, b. about 1736; d. __ ___ 1807

                                            Referemces
                                            IGI Files seen at the Evansville Family History Center of the Church of Latter-Day Saints which was called to my attention by Lindsay Nuttall of Bloomington, Indiana.
                                            The Lindsay Family Association of America was organized at Boston February 16, 1904. This association published 10 Annual Reports between 1904 and 1913. The pages were numbered consecutively. Most of these Reports were written by Margaret Isabella (Lindsay) Atkinson, the Association's Historian. All these Reports and her Lindsays of America can be found, in their original form, in the Library of Congress. The LDS Genealogical Department has copies on microfilm in Salt Lake City. (US) 1,016,924.
                                            "There were many branches scattered throughout all the colonies; however, this Anthony Lindsay's stem comes from the Maryland branch."

                                            Information disclosed in the Annual Report of 1906 reveals this about the earliest Lindsays in the Maryland Colony:
                                            "The Lindsays and Lindseys were among the early settlers of this state, coming over with the first Lord Baltimore colonists. They were of St. Mary's County, Charles County, Calvert County, Baltimore County, Somerset County, Worcester County, Frederick County, Hartford County, and possibly elsewhere. James Lindsay, 1644, is a joint heir to personality in the will of Governor Leonard Calvert, the early Maryland Governor an brother to Lord Baltimore. James Lindsay left a son, James, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary.
                                            "While we possess some information of these Lindsays, there are yet several branches to be heard from. Many descendants are living in other states, south and west, particularly Kentucky."
                                            Original Maryland patent series, Liber Q, page 131.
                                            General Services Administration, Washington, DC, Revolutionary War Pension File #S305545 (John Lindsey)

                                            Heads of Families at the First Census 1790 Maryland, Government Printing Office, 1907, revised 1977 by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, Maryland.
                                            Maryland Calendar of Wills, page 181, the will of Francis Tolson, Prince Georges Co., Maryland.
                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr was born circa 1736 at Prince Georges, Maryland, USA.1 He was the son of Anthony Lindsay Sr and Alice Page.1
                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr began military service circa 1754 During the French & Indian War the French in 1753 came and began to build forts in the Ohio valley. The governor of Virginia sent George Washington to warn them off. Washington was in his teens, a Virginia militia officer, and was surveying Lord Fairfax's lands. A small army was under the command of George Washington with orders to drive the French out of the valley. The French sent an expedition out to combat this; however, the Virginians found them first. Washington's little army attacked; thus, starting the French and Indian War. They defeated the French in this initial battle. Anthony Lindsay, age 18, is said to have been the dispatch-bearer with Washington's army. He is reported to have been the messenger dispatched by Washington to Governor Dinwiddie relaying news of this French defeat.

                                            Anthony did a second tour of duty after the British sent forces to defeat the French and Indian forces. His second tour, again, was as a member of Colonel George Washington's unit.1

                                            There is speculation and some researchers say with certianty that it was while Anthony was carrying his dispatch to Govenor Dinwiddie that he stopped and stayed at the home of Nicholas Dorsey at Eldersburg, in Baltimore county. There is where he met Rachel Dorsey who was to become in wife.2
                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr married Rachel Dorsey, daughter of Nicholas Dorsey and Sarah Griffith, circa 1756 at Eldersburg, Carrol, Maryland, USA; He served with George Washington and Braddock when they marched
                                            against the French and Indians at Fort Duquesne. While bearing
                                            dispatches to Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia, he stopped at the home of
                                            Lloyd Dorsey, a large landowner in Maryland where he met and fell in
                                            love with Dorsey's daughter, Nellie(elsewhere called Rachel). They
                                            were married at the close of the French and Indian War. About 1780
                                            they left Maryland and located in Kentucky at a time when this
                                            commonwealth was still a part of Virginia, settling in that portion
                                            now Scott Co.1

                                            Anthony purchased adjoining property from Rachel's brother, Charles Dorsey. Anthony and his wife were apparently good farmers.1

                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey were living after 15 February 1773 at Frederick, Maryland, USA; Anthony and Rachel sold their far, amd ,pved westward into the Southern part of Frederick county. This area is now Montgomery county.1

                                            Elkhorn Region of Fincastle County (Kentucky) Explored
                                            News of the new fertile ground of Kentucky swept over Frederick county like wildfire. Still filled with adventure, the 39 year-old Anthony Lindsay, along with other Marylanders in the spring of 1775, joined a party led by Charles LeCompte. He left his eldest son, John C. Lindsay, then sixteen years old to look after the farm and family. Anthony and the others trekked their way over ground they had all travelled during the French and Indian War. They rested at Cresap's Old Town, climbed over the Allegheny Mountains, down the Monongahela Valley, and on to Fort Pitt. Here they joined with a party of Pennsylvanians, led by William McConnell.
                                            At Fort Pitt, they built canoes, a flatboat for their horses, gathered supplies of food and gunpowder. They made their way down the Ohio River, camping on the south bank each night. They were all cautious men and well aware the Shawnees watched their progress.
                                            They made camp at the confluence of the Ohio and Kentucky Rivers. This was wher the present city of Carrollton in Carroll Co., Kentucky, now stands. Each day they fanned out to explore the new territory on both sides of the Kentucky River. They moved on down that river to the mouth of the Elkhorn River. Again, they set up camp and explored both banks of that river, before moving on down to the forks of the Elkhorn.
                                            They moved their camp to the forks, and spent weeks exploring the land drained by both branches of that stream. They liked what they saw. William McConnell was a surveyor and staked all their claims. The next few weeks was spent building cabins as improvements. William McConnell and a few others remained. LeCompte led the others back up the Ohio to Cox's Fort by canoe. After a brief stay at this fort, they made their way to Fort Pitt. The party divided, each returning to their respective homes. No doubt, while at the Forks of the Elkhorn, Anthony Lindsay made up his mind to bring the family there as quickly as possible.
                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr witnessed the death of Anthony Lindsay Sr between 1777 and 1790 at USA; The "Oaths of Allegiance and Fidelity" to the State of Maryland and the cause of freedom was required of all free males 18 years of age or older. This became law following the action taken by the General Assembly 5 February 1777. Records exist that show two Anthony Lindsays taking this oath. One was in Frederick County. This one, of course, is Anthony Lindsay, Jr., since his son, Anthony Lindsay III, who was born 14 February 1767, would have been too young to have taken the oath. The other Anthony Lindsay was in Baltimore County. This one, in my opinion, is the husband of Alice Page and was the parent of the one in Frederick County. If so, we know he was still living at the time and would have been about 72 years old. His death must have occured sometime after 1777 and before 1790.1 Anthony Lindsay Jr ended military service on 17 January 1777 at Frederick, Maryland, USA; Upon his return to Frederick county, Anthony Lindsay learned that the colonist were on the brink of war with the mother country. He found that Maryland had already set up a provisional government and blood had already been shed near Boston. The colonists had declared independence. Armies were being raised. Actually, Maryland was one of the earliest colonies into the field. Part of the quota of troops requested of her by Congress was two rifle companies. These were to be raised in the backcountry.
                                            Anthony Lindsay's Service in Revolutionary War
                                            In the later part of 1776 there were numerous Indian threats to the extreme western settlements of Maryland and northern Virginia. On the 17 January 1777 Anthony Lindsay was appointed a Second Lieutenant in the Linganon Battalion of Frederick county.1

                                            During the winter of the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families, made preparations to move to the Forks of the Elkhorn region. They had heard of George Rogers Clark's capture of the forts at Kaskaskia and Vincennes. It would be safe to travel now.
                                            In late spring of 1779, the wagon train moved west. All of the children with the exception of Catherine, (Kate) and possibly Charles, left with the train. They went through Old Town, then crossed the Mason-Dixon Line into Westmorland county. The area within which they lived is now Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.
                                            The next year all the families moved westward into an area that both Virginia and Pennsylvania claimed jurisdiction. This section is located within the present panhandle of West Virginia. The Cox families had two forts in the area. One was above Buffalo Creek and the other, below the same Creek. No sooner than they arrived, the Indians became troublesome on the frontier. The wagon train had to retreat back to the safety of forts in Westmoreland county. They would have to remain here until the Indians eased their attacks. This would be another year.1

                                            In 1783, the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families reached the Ohio River. They built flatboats to haul their cattle, horses, and wagons loaded with only the necessities of life. The flatboats were lashed together during the journey to withstand the springtime dangers of the swollen Ohio River. The flatboats were nothing more than rafts made of logs. Each had protective sides six feet high and thick enough to withstand rifle balls. Each of the flatboats had a partial roof over their sterns. This provided protection from the elements.
                                            The men took turns as scouts, along the south bank of the river. On horseback they kept three or four miles ahead of the boats. These scouts kept a sharp eye for Indians. At the end of each day, they would find a safe place to camp on the south bank of the river. In the course of the day, these scouts would kill enough wild game to feed everybody.
                                            Apparently their trip down the Ohio was uneventful. They reached the Forks of the Elkhorn about late spring of 1783. All that summer they farmed and built cabins on land the expected to claim.
                                            Because of the Indian threats, Heyden's Station became their haven of safety that first winter. The area where they settled was near the Forks of the Elkhorn, mostly along that river's northern branch. Anthony Lindsay's farm lay within the present bounds of Scott and Franklin counties; however, at that time, it was considered to be Fayette Co., Virginia. The state of Kentucky was yet to be formed.1

                                            Three years earlier, in 1780, the county of Kentucky was divided into three counties. these were, Fayette, Jefferson, and Lincoln counties. All of them were counties of Virginia. This was the division at the time Anthony Lindsay brought his family to the Forks of the Elkhorn area. Nelson County was formed in 1784. It was taken off Jefferson county. In 1785 three more counties were formed. These were Bourbon, taken off Fayette county, Madison, taken off Lincoln county, and Mercer, taken off Lincoln county. Settlers came down the Ohio to Kentucky in droves.
                                            On 17 September 1788 Anthony Lindsay signed a petition to further divide Fayette county. Thus, Woodford County was formed from Fayette in May 1789. Anthony Lindsay's farm now lay in Woodford. Mason County was formed the same year. It was taken from Bourbon County.1

                                            On October 18th, 1790, General Joshia Harmar, in the first of a long series of expeditions to overawe the Ohio Indians, was defeated by them near Fort Wayne. This began five more years of Indian threats to Kentucky and the Northwest. This loss caused great concern to Anthony about the safety of his family. Bryant's Station was too far away. He would build his own. It was here in Woodford County in 1790 that Anthony and Rachel (Dorsey) Lindsay built Lindsay's Fort. This fort was a typical Two-Family Station of that day. Located high on a ridge overlooking a broad Buffalo Trace, a twelve-foot high stockade completely enclosed the area between two log block-houses. About two hundred feet apart, the houses stood at opposite ends of the stockade. their only doors and windows were in the side of the wall which enclosed the two rows of logs that stood on end, making the stockade.
                                            The two identical blockhouses were two story high. The top floor overhung the first floors by five feet. This made the fort easy to defend. There were no blind spots for the enemy to scale the stockade wall. There were no windows on the outside walls; however, there were a great many slits used for loopholes.
                                            The first level of each block-house, 16' by 25'and 14'high, was devoid of any wooden floor. The bare ground served each one very well. There was a large open fireplace to the east end of each blockhouse. This was used for both heating and cooking. All sorts of pans, kettles, chairs, and muskets hung from its four walls. The walls of the loft, or second floor, were 10 feet longer than the ground floor. It extended 5 feet over the ground floor on all sides. The floor of the loft was covered with rough hewn planks. To reach the loft, you climbed a ladder extended through an opening cut in the floor of the loft. There were many built-in bunks extending from all four walls.
                                            In the middle of the loft was a table four benches. On the table lay a couple of books and a burning candle, with its flickering flame, made shadows dance off the walls. In addition the second floor had another loft of its own. This loft covered only half of the overhead space and was used mainly for storage and sleeping.
                                            There were other buildings built along both stockade walls. All these had sloping roofs. Most were used for cattle, horses, and other livestock; however, a few were pressed into service as housing in times of Indian troubles when neighbors took refuge with the Lindsays. This happened frequently the next few years. It grew more intense in the early spring and summer of 1791.
                                            Today, this site is designated and marked by the Kentucky Historical Society. The plaque reads as follows:
                                            LINDSAY'S FORT
                                            "Elkhorn Region first explored in 1775. William McConnell and Charles LeCompte led a party that included Anthony Lindsay. In 1790, he built a fort here on an old Buffalo Trace, main thoroughfare from Georgetown to the Ohio River. Lindsay's grave 100 yards north."1



                                            Kentucky Becomes State
                                            On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became a state. This was soon followed by other county divisions. Scott county was taken off Woodford. This left Lindsay's Station in the new county of Scott. At the same time, Shelby county was taken off Jefferson and adjoined Scott county to the west. All of Anthony's children, except Nicholas Lindsay, lived close by Lindsay's Station. Nicholas had went across the Ohio River into the Northwest Territory, where he had built a blockhouse and ran a tanyard in the present Dearborn Co., Indiana.1
                                            Anthony Lindsay Jr died in 1801 at Lindsay's Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA; Kenneth Lindsay gives the date of death as 1807 and states: "That he was buried in the old cemetery located near the old fort he had founded.1

                                                 Children of Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey:
                                            Catherine Lindsay   b. 1757
                                            John Lindsay   b. 15 Mar 1758
                                            Nicholas Lindsay   b. 1762
                                            Charles Lindsay   b. 1765
                                            Anthony Lindsay III+   b. 14 Feb 1767, d. 11 Apr 1831
                                            Rachel Lindsay   b. 1769
                                            Betsey Lindsay   b. 1771
                                            Vachel Lindsay   b. 15 Feb 1773
                                            Lucy Lindsay   b. 1775
                                            Elisha Lindsay   b. 1776

                                            Citations

                                            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.
                                            2. [S7] Name of researcher.

                                            Rachel Dorsey (F)
                                            b. circa 1737, d. 1805, #107
                                            Pop-up Pedigree

                                                 
                                            Rachel Dorsey was born circa 1737 at Baltimore, Maryland, USA.1 She was the daughter of Nicholas Dorsey and Sarah Griffith.1
                                            Rachel Dorsey married Anthony Lindsay Jr, son of Anthony Lindsay Sr and Alice Page, circa 1756 at Eldersburg, Carrol, Maryland, USA; He served with George Washington and Braddock when they marched
                                            against the French and Indians at Fort Duquesne. While bearing
                                            dispatches to Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia, he stopped at the home of
                                            Lloyd Dorsey, a large landowner in Maryland where he met and fell in
                                            love with Dorsey's daughter, Nellie(elsewhere called Rachel). They
                                            were married at the close of the French and Indian War. About 1780
                                            they left Maryland and located in Kentucky at a time when this
                                            commonwealth was still a part of Virginia, settling in that portion
                                            now Scott Co.1

                                            Anthony purchased adjoining property from Rachel's brother, Charles Dorsey. Anthony and his wife were apparently good farmers.1

                                            Rachel Dorsey and Anthony Lindsay Jr were living after 15 February 1773 at Frederick, Maryland, USA; Anthony and Rachel sold their far, amd ,pved westward into the Southern part of Frederick county. This area is now Montgomery county.1

                                            During the winter of the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families, made preparations to move to the Forks of the Elkhorn region. They had heard of George Rogers Clark's capture of the forts at Kaskaskia and Vincennes. It would be safe to travel now.
                                            In late spring of 1779, the wagon train moved west. All of the children with the exception of Catherine, (Kate) and possibly Charles, left with the train. They went through Old Town, then crossed the Mason-Dixon Line into Westmorland county. The area within which they lived is now Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.
                                            The next year all the families moved westward into an area that both Virginia and Pennsylvania claimed jurisdiction. This section is located within the present panhandle of West Virginia. The Cox families had two forts in the area. One was above Buffalo Creek and the other, below the same Creek. No sooner than they arrived, the Indians became troublesome on the frontier. The wagon train had to retreat back to the safety of forts in Westmoreland county. They would have to remain here until the Indians eased their attacks. This would be another year.1

                                            In 1783, the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families reached the Ohio River. They built flatboats to haul their cattle, horses, and wagons loaded with only the necessities of life. The flatboats were lashed together during the journey to withstand the springtime dangers of the swollen Ohio River. The flatboats were nothing more than rafts made of logs. Each had protective sides six feet high and thick enough to withstand rifle balls. Each of the flatboats had a partial roof over their sterns. This provided protection from the elements.
                                            The men took turns as scouts, along the south bank of the river. On horseback they kept three or four miles ahead of the boats. These scouts kept a sharp eye for Indians. At the end of each day, they would find a safe place to camp on the south bank of the river. In the course of the day, these scouts would kill enough wild game to feed everybody.
                                            Apparently their trip down the Ohio was uneventful. They reached the Forks of the Elkhorn about late spring of 1783. All that summer they farmed and built cabins on land the expected to claim.
                                            Because of the Indian threats, Heyden's Station became their haven of safety that first winter. The area where they settled was near the Forks of the Elkhorn, mostly along that river's northern branch. Anthony Lindsay's farm lay within the present bounds of Scott and Franklin counties; however, at that time, it was considered to be Fayette Co., Virginia. The state of Kentucky was yet to be formed.1

                                            Three years earlier, in 1780, the county of Kentucky was divided into three counties. these were, Fayette, Jefferson, and Lincoln counties. All of them were counties of Virginia. This was the division at the time Anthony Lindsay brought his family to the Forks of the Elkhorn area. Nelson County was formed in 1784. It was taken off Jefferson county. In 1785 three more counties were formed. These were Bourbon, taken off Fayette county, Madison, taken off Lincoln county, and Mercer, taken off Lincoln county. Settlers came down the Ohio to Kentucky in droves.
                                            On 17 September 1788 Anthony Lindsay signed a petition to further divide Fayette county. Thus, Woodford County was formed from Fayette in May 1789. Anthony Lindsay's farm now lay in Woodford. Mason County was formed the same year. It was taken from Bourbon County.1

                                            On October 18th, 1790, General Joshia Harmar, in the first of a long series of expeditions to overawe the Ohio Indians, was defeated by them near Fort Wayne. This began five more years of Indian threats to Kentucky and the Northwest. This loss caused great concern to Anthony about the safety of his family. Bryant's Station was too far away. He would build his own. It was here in Woodford County in 1790 that Anthony and Rachel (Dorsey) Lindsay built Lindsay's Fort. This fort was a typical Two-Family Station of that day. Located high on a ridge overlooking a broad Buffalo Trace, a twelve-foot high stockade completely enclosed the area between two log block-houses. About two hundred feet apart, the houses stood at opposite ends of the stockade. their only doors and windows were in the side of the wall which enclosed the two rows of logs that stood on end, making the stockade.
                                            The two identical blockhouses were two story high. The top floor overhung the first floors by five feet. This made the fort easy to defend. There were no blind spots for the enemy to scale the stockade wall. There were no windows on the outside walls; however, there were a great many slits used for loopholes.
                                            The first level of each block-house, 16' by 25'and 14'high, was devoid of any wooden floor. The bare ground served each one very well. There was a large open fireplace to the east end of each blockhouse. This was used for both heating and cooking. All sorts of pans, kettles, chairs, and muskets hung from its four walls. The walls of the loft, or second floor, were 10 feet longer than the ground floor. It extended 5 feet over the ground floor on all sides. The floor of the loft was covered with rough hewn planks. To reach the loft, you climbed a ladder extended through an opening cut in the floor of the loft. There were many built-in bunks extending from all four walls.
                                            In the middle of the loft was a table four benches. On the table lay a couple of books and a burning candle, with its flickering flame, made shadows dance off the walls. In addition the second floor had another loft of its own. This loft covered only half of the overhead space and was used mainly for storage and sleeping.
                                            There were other buildings built along both stockade walls. All these had sloping roofs. Most were used for cattle, horses, and other livestock; however, a few were pressed into service as housing in times of Indian troubles when neighbors took refuge with the Lindsays. This happened frequently the next few years. It grew more intense in the early spring and summer of 1791.
                                            Today, this site is designated and marked by the Kentucky Historical Society. The plaque reads as follows:
                                            LINDSAY'S FORT
                                            "Elkhorn Region first explored in 1775. William McConnell and Charles LeCompte led a party that included Anthony Lindsay. In 1790, he built a fort here on an old Buffalo Trace, main thoroughfare from Georgetown to the Ohio River. Lindsay's grave 100 yards north."1



                                            Kentucky Becomes State
                                            On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became a state. This was soon followed by other county divisions. Scott county was taken off Woodford. This left Lindsay's Station in the new county of Scott. At the same time, Shelby county was taken off Jefferson and adjoined Scott county to the west. All of Anthony's children, except Nicholas Lindsay, lived close by Lindsay's Station. Nicholas had went across the Ohio River into the Northwest Territory, where he had built a blockhouse and ran a tanyard in the present Dearborn Co., Indiana.1
                                            Rachel Dorsey died in 1805 at Lindsay's Station, Scott, Kentucky, USA; She is buried beside her husband. The Kentucky Historical Society placed a Bronze Plaque marking the site of Lindsay's Station reads: "Lindsay's grave is 100 yards north."
                                            The site where Lindsay's Station stood is located about three miles north of Stamping Ground, Scott county, Kentucky.1

                                                 Children of Rachel Dorsey and Anthony Lindsay Jr:
                                            Catherine Lindsay   b. 1757
                                            John Lindsay   b. 15 Mar 1758
                                            Nicholas Lindsay   b. 1762
                                            Charles Lindsay   b. 1765
                                            Anthony Lindsay III+   b. 14 Feb 1767, d. 11 Apr 1831
                                            Rachel Lindsay   b. 1769
                                            Betsey Lindsay   b. 1771
                                            Vachel Lindsay   b. 15 Feb 1773
                                            Lucy Lindsay   b. 1775
                                            Elisha Lindsay   b. 1776

                                            Citations

                                            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                            John Lindsay (M)
                                            b. 15 March 1758, #108
                                            Pop-up Pedigree
                                            Relationship=Grandson of Anthony Lindsay Sr.

                                                 
                                            John Lindsay was born on 15 March 1758 at Prince George, Maryland, USA. He was the son of Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey.

                                            John Lindsay was a witness to the fact that Anthony Lindsay Jr and Rachel Dorsey were living after 15 February 1773 at Frederick, Maryland, USA; Anthony and Rachel sold their far, amd ,pved westward into the Southern part of Frederick county. This area is now Montgomery county.1

                                            During the winter of the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families, made preparations to move to the Forks of the Elkhorn region. They had heard of George Rogers Clark's capture of the forts at Kaskaskia and Vincennes. It would be safe to travel now.
                                            In late spring of 1779, the wagon train moved west. All of the children with the exception of Catherine, (Kate) and possibly Charles, left with the train. They went through Old Town, then crossed the Mason-Dixon Line into Westmorland county. The area within which they lived is now Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.
                                            The next year all the families moved westward into an area that both Virginia and Pennsylvania claimed jurisdiction. This section is located within the present panhandle of West Virginia. The Cox families had two forts in the area. One was above Buffalo Creek and the other, below the same Creek. No sooner than they arrived, the Indians became troublesome on the frontier. The wagon train had to retreat back to the safety of forts in Westmoreland county. They would have to remain here until the Indians eased their attacks. This would be another year.1

                                            In 1783, the Lindsay, Dowden, and Quisenberry families reached the Ohio River. They built flatboats to haul their cattle, horses, and wagons loaded with only the necessities of life. The flatboats were lashed together during the journey to withstand the springtime dangers of the swollen Ohio River. The flatboats were nothing more than rafts made of logs. Each had protective sides six feet high and thick enough to withstand rifle balls. Each of the flatboats had a partial roof over their sterns. This provided protection from the elements.
                                            The men took turns as scouts, along the south bank of the river. On horseback they kept three or four miles ahead of the boats. These scouts kept a sharp eye for Indians. At the end of each day, they would find a safe place to camp on the south bank of the river. In the course of the day, these scouts would kill enough wild game to feed everybody.
                                            Apparently their trip down the Ohio was uneventful. They reached the Forks of the Elkhorn about late spring of 1783. All that summer they farmed and built cabins on land the expected to claim.
                                            Because of the Indian threats, Heyden's Station became their haven of safety that first winter. The area where they settled was near the Forks of the Elkhorn, mostly along that river's northern branch. Anthony Lindsay's farm lay within the present bounds of Scott and Franklin counties; however, at that time, it was considered to be Fayette Co., Virginia. The state of Kentucky was yet to be formed.1

                                            Citations

                                            1. [S18] See citation, "Ancestral File", Ancestral File, Kenneth Lindsay, http://www.geocities.com/~kenlindsay/.

                                            Compiler:
                                            Dean Hagen

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