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Ephraim's glory is like the firstling of his bullocks and his horns are like the horns of unicorns: with them he shall push the people together to the ends of the earth.
~ Deuteronomy 33:17

Stephen's Smith Family - Ancestors, Descendants and Cousins

Notes


Capt Edward Anderson Smith

BIOGRAPHY: Edward and his father, Anderson Smith, were among the first settlers in the vicinity of Cameron, Missouri. Edward Smith made the first settlement of southeast Clinton (now DeKalb) County, in the year 1833. Coming here from Clay County Missouri, he built his cabin near the old spring, on the farm. He came here because the country was new and suitable for hunting game of all kinds and bees; but after staying awhile he liked the country and settled permanently, entering quite a large tract of land.
     In his early residence here, Edward and his wife had to depend on themselves. They made everything at home that they could. They raised their flax, pulled it and spread it out to rot the stalk, then broke it, scutched, hackled it and spun it on a wheel, wove it, then made the garment from the cloth. It was said that it did not get good until it was worn a year or two. The sheep must have special care and penned at night to keep them from the wolves. After a year of watchful care, the wool must be sheared, washed, picked, carded, spun, woven, and then made into garments. They had a mine of wealth, and were willing to mine it themselves.
     Edward Smith and his father Anderson Smith, homesteaded 1,000 acres north of what is now Cameron, Missouri. Edward served as a captain of a volunteer regiment organized in DeKalb County for service in the Mexican War of 1847, but the regiment was never called to active sevice.
     In 1849 "Ned" married Elizabeth Reed Estes Brooks widow of George Estes (1st) and James Brooks (2nd). She had one child to her first husband and four to her second. They then had nine children together. In 1860, Ned and Elizzbeth had living with them, Jonathan Bing, age 28, a house carpenter. (In 1861 Ned's daughter Louisa Jane married Jonathan Russell Bing.) Were they perhaps building a house? In the 1860 census, they had 13 children living at home, they perhaps needed a larger house.
     His sixteen children, except for the first, were born on his farm north of Cameron.

AN OLD NEIGHBOR GONE HOME
     A great grief has fallen on our community. Capt. Edward Smith, of DeKalb county, Mo., died on Monday morning at 3 O'clock, August 4, 1879.
     It is an evidence of the loving and genial nature of the man, that he will be better known if we call him "Uncle," since age had begun to show its traces. Capt. Smith was one of the first settlers of this country. He was born in Tennessee moved from there to Illinois, then came to Clay Co, Mo. At an early age he married a Miss Alcy Best, then moved to DeKalb county. This wife died about 30 years ago. He then married the widow Brooks, formerly Miss Elizabeth Reed, of Kentucky, (sister of William T Reed) with whom he lived till his bereaved family and sorrowing neighbors followed him to his last resting place.
    During the Mexican war, he joined a company at Plattsburg, Mo., to drill, in order to be prepared if necessary. There he was elected captain of the company, and has since received the title of Captain.
    "Uncle Ned," was the father of 16 children, all of whom are living but two, and all present during his last hours but three. Father Smith was a man of good sense, always "up and doing while it was called to-day," and a more honorable, truthful man never lived."
"Dear is the spot where Christians sleep,
And sweet the strains that angels pour.
Oh! why should we in anquish weep?
He is not lost, but gone before." - A Friend.
[Obituary-14 Aug 1879, Cameron Observer, Cameron, DeKalb, Missouri]


Elizabeth Reed

BIOGRAPHY: Mrs. Elizabeth (Betty) Smith died August 4, 1897 at the home of her son, Edward Smith, 1 mile west of Cameron, Mo., aged 74 years. Nine children survive her; Edward and Wash Smith, Mrs John L. Trice, Mrs. A.J. stoner, George Estes, Mrs. Marion Brooks, James Brooks all of Cameron. Mrs. Joel Trice of Winfield, Ks. and John W. Brooks of california. She was born Nov. 13, 1823 in Scott Co., Ky. and came to Missouri in 1848, and was buried in Wamsley Cemetery.


Capt Edward Anderson Smith

BIOGRAPHY: Edward and his father, Anderson Smith, were among the first settlers in the vicinity of Cameron, Missouri. Edward Smith made the first settlement of southeast Clinton (now DeKalb) County, in the year 1833. Coming here from Clay County Missouri, he built his cabin near the old spring, on the farm. He came here because the country was new and suitable for hunting game of all kinds and bees; but after staying awhile he liked the country and settled permanently, entering quite a large tract of land.
     In his early residence here, Edward and his wife had to depend on themselves. They made everything at home that they could. They raised their flax, pulled it and spread it out to rot the stalk, then broke it, scutched, hackled it and spun it on a wheel, wove it, then made the garment from the cloth. It was said that it did not get good until it was worn a year or two. The sheep must have special care and penned at night to keep them from the wolves. After a year of watchful care, the wool must be sheared, washed, picked, carded, spun, woven, and then made into garments. They had a mine of wealth, and were willing to mine it themselves.
     Edward Smith and his father Anderson Smith, homesteaded 1,000 acres north of what is now Cameron, Missouri. Edward served as a captain of a volunteer regiment organized in DeKalb County for service in the Mexican War of 1847, but the regiment was never called to active sevice.
     In 1849 "Ned" married Elizabeth Reed Estes Brooks widow of George Estes (1st) and James Brooks (2nd). She had one child to her first husband and four to her second. They then had nine children together. In 1860, Ned and Elizzbeth had living with them, Jonathan Bing, age 28, a house carpenter. (In 1861 Ned's daughter Louisa Jane married Jonathan Russell Bing.) Were they perhaps building a house? In the 1860 census, they had 13 children living at home, they perhaps needed a larger house.
     His sixteen children, except for the first, were born on his farm north of Cameron.

AN OLD NEIGHBOR GONE HOME
     A great grief has fallen on our community. Capt. Edward Smith, of DeKalb county, Mo., died on Monday morning at 3 O'clock, August 4, 1879.
     It is an evidence of the loving and genial nature of the man, that he will be better known if we call him "Uncle," since age had begun to show its traces. Capt. Smith was one of the first settlers of this country. He was born in Tennessee moved from there to Illinois, then came to Clay Co, Mo. At an early age he married a Miss Alcy Best, then moved to DeKalb county. This wife died about 30 years ago. He then married the widow Brooks, formerly Miss Elizabeth Reed, of Kentucky, (sister of William T Reed) with whom he lived till his bereaved family and sorrowing neighbors followed him to his last resting place.
    During the Mexican war, he joined a company at Plattsburg, Mo., to drill, in order to be prepared if necessary. There he was elected captain of the company, and has since received the title of Captain.
    "Uncle Ned," was the father of 16 children, all of whom are living but two, and all present during his last hours but three. Father Smith was a man of good sense, always "up and doing while it was called to-day," and a more honorable, truthful man never lived."
"Dear is the spot where Christians sleep,
And sweet the strains that angels pour.
Oh! why should we in anquish weep?
He is not lost, but gone before." - A Friend.
[Obituary-14 Aug 1879, Cameron Observer, Cameron, DeKalb, Missouri]


Edward Oldham Smith

Edward attended the Cameron High School, but did not finish. He was a member of the First Methodist-Episcopal Church, Cameron, Missouri. Edward was no military service. He had a bone disease, a family trait that was evident in several members of the family. His legs were weak and broke easily. His final years were spent in a whell chair. On February 14, 1942 he was married to Sylvia (Edmondson) Hopper. She had one daughter, Isal Adele Hopper. Edward and Sylvia had no children.

MARRIAGE: NEWLYWEDS RETURN
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Smith, who were wedded as mentioned before, in Kansas City, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, in the home of Rev. and Mrs. Frank James, returned home Tuesday afternoon, following their honeymoon in Kansas City and St. Joe and have resumed management of the Red Horse Tavern. They will reside in the apartments of the bride on North Main street, where they will receive callers and best wishes of their many friends.


Eugene Dunlap Smith

Eugene Smith graduated Cmaeron High School, and was a truck driver. He lived most of his adult life in kansas City, Missouri, moving back to Cameron after retirement.


Dora May Brown

Dora Brown graduated from Ottumwa High School


Edward Maschal Smith

BIOGRAPHY: Edward (Ed) Maschal Smith was born on the family farm near Camerson, Missouri. He was not a high school graduate, but attended the Missouri Wesleyan College in Cameron, Mo. for part of two years and graduated about 1890 from the Business Department. He was a farmer near Cameron on the land settled by his great-grandfather, Anderson Smith in 1833. Ed was a member of the Methodist Church in Cameron. He saw no military service.

OBITUARY of EDWARD MASCHAL SMITH
    Edward Mascal Smith, son of Thomas H. B. Smith and Rebecca Smith, was born Aug. 29, 1869 on the homestead farm, 5 miles north of Cameron, Mo., which his grandfather settled, and the log house which his great grandfather built still stands.
    There he grew from boyhood to manhood.
    On Jan 20. 1892, he married Miss Florence Dunlap, to which union 6 children were born, Ruth, who resides in the family residence on West St. teaching in the Goodrich Public School, Cameron, Paul W. of Keytesville, Mo.; Edward, Cameron, Mrs. John R. Jackson, Kansas City, and Eugene, Cameron, who with his faithful and devoted wife, one brother, Dr. O. A. Smith, of Cameron, and 13 grandchildren, mourn his passing from this life to the eternal life.
    Brother Smith attended Cameron High School and Missouri Wesleyan College.
    During his boyhood he was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal church, South, Cameron, Mo., and on Nov. 6, 1898, he transferred his membership to the First Methodist episcopal church here during the pastorate of Rev. J. H. Poland, where he has been a regular attendant and a faithful member, holding for some years the offices of Trustee and custodian. He was a member of the Men's Bible Class taught by Hon. H. F. Lawrence.
    A few weeks ago he suffered an attack of appendicitis and on Monday, September 4, 1933, he was taken to the Missouri Methodist Hospital in St. Joseph, where on Monday, September 11, 1933, he was translated from this life to the everlasting life, after an earthly pilgrimage of 64 years and 13 days.


Florence Cordelia Dunlap

BIOGRAPHY: Florence Cordelia Dunlap, was born on her parents farm in DeKalb county, near Maysville, Missouri. She attended Willow Brook Country School for several years and on moving to Cameron, Missouri attended Cameron Public School.
Florence graduated from high school. She was a member of the Methodist Church.
    Florence was afflicted in early adulthood with a genetic bone disease, causing bones to break easily. She had one child, one grandson and a greatniece with this problem. She was a very petite lady, 4 feet 11 inches and her husband was about 6 foot 3 or 4. The last 10 years or more of her life was spent in a wheel chair. After her husband's death in 1933 she was cared for until her death in 1951 by her daughter Ruth.

OBITUARY - MRS. ED SMITH PASSES
    Mrs. Cordelia Florence Smith, widow of Ed M. Smith, died at her home on West cornhill street where she had resided with her daughters, Mrs. Homer Burton, and Miss Ruth Smith, about midnight last night. Mrs. smith, who was 82 years of age, was born in DeKalb county, and had spent her entire life in this community. Until her health failed, she was prominent and active in the work of the First Methodist church.
    The deceased is survived by six children, Paul Smith, of Keytesville, Mo.; Miss Ruth, a teacher in the Cameron schools; Mrs. Homer Burton, (Helen), of Cameron; Edward Smith, Mrs. John Jackson, (Lois), and Eugene smith, all of Kansas City. Her husband died about fifteen years ago.
    The body is at the Poland Funeral Home where services will be held at 2 o'clock sunday afternoon with Rev. W. F. Null in charge. Burial will be in Graceland cemetery.

ATTENDED FUNERAL OF MRS. SMITH
    Besides the immediate family members from out of town attending funeral services for Mrs. E. M. Smith on Sunday were the following:
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smith, of Terry, Mont.; Miss Beatrice Smith, of Hershey, Neb.; Mr. and Mrs. Eneric Moreau, of New Orleans, La.; and Mrs. Hugh Dunlap, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Dunlap, of Maysville; Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dunlap, of Winston; Mr. and Mrs. John Dunlap of Marysville; Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Smith, of Carrolton; Harold Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Benton Smith, Miss Betty Ruth Smith, of Brunswick; Miss Dorothy Smith of Keytesville; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Daniels of Lathrop; Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Burch, of Overland park, Dansas; Mrs. Virginia Smith, Mrs. Maude Smith, Miss Helen Dunlap, and Paul Smith, of Kansas City, Mo.; and Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Hamlet, of Hamilton.

A TRIBUTE TO MRS. E. M. SMITH
    As we pause today to pay tribute to Mrs. E. M. Smith , one of Cameron's pioneer citizens, we feel awed, humble and conscious of how inadequate are words. Here, is a great lady whom we are going to miss.
    The question comes, "Who is great?" The answer may include scientists, artists, statemen, and so on. To them we owe much, but we are led to believe, with the poet, that they are not the only "great" for they could never have builded alone.
    "Each has a part in the building. No one ever builds alone.
    Whether it is a cross he is gilding, or whether he is carrying a stone."
    We believe that each person who possesses things of character, integrity and honor has a part "in the scheme of things." A part that keeps the other things clicking. This is an universal plan and service for it can include all of us. In this light, our friend, Mrs. Smith, was great.
    Hers was the spirit that served as an oil of encouragement to those with whom she came in contact. Afflicted as she was, for the last seven years a wheel chair patient, and for more than a year a bed patient, -- yet, visitors to her room have gone away inspired and with a sermon in courage patience, serentiy and faith in God greater than any pulpit sermon. Indeed the Lord was her light and salvation. She had no fear, for the Lord was the strength of her life. The spirit of confidence possessed her soul.
    She enjoyed beauty, art, music, good literature and the news of the world.
And even to the last of her days, she kept posted on world events. She apprecieated all of the cultural things of life. She was proud of the fact that her mother was the second cousin of Charles Dickens.
    Discipline, staunchness, loyalty, great of heart, these were her characteristices. She had attained balance of character worth emulation.
    Cordelia Florence Dunlap was the youngest of eight children born to Parthena Dickens and Samue Spence Dunlap. She was born near Dekalb, Mo., on August 15, 1868. While still quite young she moved to the vicintiy of Cameron, Mo. Often she has talked about the wide open spaces of this section at that time and how she had to part the prairie grass with her hands, so high it was as she walked from her home, now North Eighth street, Cameron to the little Episcopal Church located at what is now Pine and Fourth streets.
    On January 20, 1892 she was married to Edward M. Smith of Cameron community. They started housekeeping on the Smith estate northwest of town and lived there until the family moved to town 33 years ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith established their church membership with the South Methodist Church, Cameron where they were active until moving their membership to the first Methodist Church 3rd and Pine street, some time before the two churches united. The Church and its attending activities was of great interest to Mrs. Smith. She gave it an enthusiasm and industry that made her associaties happy. So long as her health permitted she was active in the 2nd and 3rd W.S.C.S. circles (For many years she was a valued member of the Home and Foreign Missionary Societies).
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith were the parents of six children, all of whom survive her passing. Paul, of Keytesville, Mo.; Edward O., Eugene and Lois (Mrs. John Jackson) all of Kansas City, Mo. Helen (Mrs. Homer Burton) and Miss Ruth of the home. Mrs. Smith has one living sister, Mrs. Anna Cummings, Chenney, Washington. Seventeen grandchildren, eight great grand children, and a large number of nieces, nephews and friends who will miss her kindly council and encouragement.
    Mr. Smith's death seventeen years ago and the untimely death of her beloved namesake, Codelia Burton was a hard sorrow but she met them both with fortitude. Always she seemed to have strength to meet her every need. As a mother she achieved success in rearing her children to noble woman and manhood.
She was following their present achievements with keen interest when she suffered a heart attack Friday night, Feb. 9, 1951 and passed on to her immortal rest.
    We bid adieu to Mrs. Smith with this prayer, "That we may so act that the lives we touch each day may feel the cheer and strength of daily association with the divine as did our friend, Mrs. E. M. Smith.
(Nancy Jane Knoch)
    Memorial services for Mrs. Smith were held from the Poland Funeral Chapel at two o'clock Sunday afternoon, Feb. 11, 1951. Music was furnished by Mrs. Dorothy Donaldson, soloist, Mrs. Zola Mae Vandereau, accompanist, prof. W. F. Null delivered the memorial.


Lela Ruth Smith

BIOGRAPHY: Ruth was born on the family farm north of Cameron, Missouri. She taught elementary schools, starting in 1917 and started teachng in the cameron grade school in 1923. She graduated from Missouri Wesleyan College, Cameron, Missouri in 1928 with an A.B. degree. She retired from teaching in 1959.
    Ruth cared for her mother, who had a genetic bone disease causing her bones to break easily until her mother's death in 1951.
    One of Ruth's hobies was painting. Her nephew, Wayne Smith's widow has a wooded scene with deer, that was painted by Ruth. Also a piece of china, of which she painted a number of pieces.
    Ruth was a member if the Cameron Methodist church. She died in Cameron and was buried there at the Graceland Cemetery.

BIOGRAPHY: HARRIS SCHOOL Sub-district No. 5 changed to District No. 2 in 1909 Assembled by Mrs. lawrence Lockhart. Information given by Muriel Hainline Brown Benjamin, Miss Ruth L. Smith (now deceased), Co. supt. John w. Edie from 1926-29 report and Lillian Cline.

BIOGRAPHY: Mr. Thomas Harris went around to the people in the community soliciting money to build and carry on the school; hence, the name HARRIS SCHOOL.
    On April 21, 1874, the people called a meeting in the vicinity of the old Harris farm and organized the HARRIS SCHOOL. Thomas Harris was chosen by ballot for a three year term, A. B. Smith for two years and J. W. Grisham for one year. They decided to have a four month school term. The sum of $35.00 per month was paid to J. W. Parry, the first teacher. The subjects taught were: Reading, Arithmetic, Penmanship, Algebra, Geography, History, and Grammar.
    In November, 1916, the old building burned in the night. Ruth Smith, who furnished this picture, reported the fire was caused by spontaeous combustion oa coal in the shed shown in the picure and spread to the school building. Her brother supplied this information. while the school was being rebuilt, classes were held in the tenant house on the farm of Edward M. Smith (Ruth Smith's father). Mr. Harris was the grandfather of Elton Harris (lawyer), husband of Maude Dice Harris (deceased).
    Ruth Smith, great-great-granddaughter of Anderson Best Smith went to school in the old building in grades one and two. church services and school were held in his home before the first Harris School was built.
    Opal Pearce found the deed recorded in Book 15 on page 135, dated Oct. 1, 1870 and filed Jan. 14, 1895 from Edward and Elizabeth Smith to Sub-district No. 5, Consideration $18.00 for 1 acre in the SE corner NW 1/4 SE 1/4 Sec. 3, Twp. 57, R. 30. Edward Smith entered the farm August 29, 1855.

DEATH: Last Will and Testament of Ruth L. Smith - FILED: May 17, 1976, Melvin E. Griffin, Probate Judge
    I, Ruth L. Smith, of Clinton County, Missouri, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, do hereby make, publish and declare this my Last Will and Testament, hereby expressly revoking all wills and codicils heretofore by me made.
I.     I direct that prompt payment be made of any and all my just debts, expenses of last illness, funeral expenses and the cost of administering my estate, and direct that my Executor, hereinafter named, purchase and have installed a suitable marker for my grave, and in the event that at the time of my death my brother, Edward smith's grave does not have a marker for his grave at the time of my death, then and in that event I direct that my said Executor purchase and pay the cost of installing a suitable marker for his grave.
II.     I hereby direct that my Executor hereinafter named proceed immediately to sell and dispose of the assets of my estate, both real, personal and mixed and whersoever situated,  which I may die seized or possessed of, and collect the proceeds of all life insurance payable to my estate and all of said funds realized from the sale of said property and collected and accumulated by said Executor, i give, devise and bequeath to the folowing persons in the following manner, to-wit:
    (a)   Oneo-fourth share of the residue of my said estate to my brother, Paul W. smith ahd his wife Olga smith or the whole to the survivor of them as the case may be, or equally to their children, them surviving as the case may be absolutely and forever.
    (b)   One-fourth share of the residue of my said estate to by brother, Eugene D. and his wife, Dora Smith or the whole to the survivor of them as the case may be, or equally to their children, them surviving as the case may be absolutely and forever.
    (c)   One-fourth share of the residue of my said estate to my sister, Lois Jackson or to her children her surviving, equally, share and share alike, absolutely and forever.
    (d)   One-eighth share of the residue of my said estate to my nephew, Laurence Burton to be his absolutely and forever.
    (e)   One-sixteenth share of the residue of my said estate to my nephew, Charles Smith to be his absolutely and forever.
    (f)   One-sixteenth share of the residue of my said estate to my nephew, Thomas R. Smith to be his absolutely and forever.
    (g)   In the event that any of the aforementioned benficiaries or their children, as herein above provided shall fail to survive me, then and in that event the bequests herein made shall lapse and be added to the shares of those beneficiaries or their children, as herein above provided, who do survive to receive distribution, in the same proportion as the original bequest.
III.     I hereby nominate and appoint Paul W. Smith as Executor without bond, but in the event he should be unable or unwilling to serve in this capacity then and in that event I appoint charles smith as Executor of this my Last will and Testament, and hereby expressly provide that they should be permitted to serve without the necessity of posting bond for the faithful discharge of their duties and that they may sell and dispose of my estate in order to facilitate adminstration thereof without first obtaining a court order.
    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand to this my Last Will and Testament on this 21st day of June, 1972.
/s/ Ruth L. Smith
    We, the undersigned, hereby certify that Ruth L. Smith, the Testatrix named in the foregoing will, subscribed her name hereto.

DEATH: SERVICES FOR Ruth L. Smith
DATE OF BIRTH April 22, 1893
DATE OF PASSING May 6, 1976
DATE OF SERVICE Saturday, May 8, 1976 3:30 p.m.
HELD AT Poland-Thompson Chapel, Cameron, Missouri
CLERGYMAN Dr. Charles L. Vinzant
PLACE OF INTERMENT Graceland Cemetery, Cameron, Missouri CASKET BEARERS Charles Smith, Thomas Smith, Charles Hamlet, Harold Smith, Don Taylor, Charles Estep


William Homer Burton

BIOGRAPHY: He attended Cameron high School for 3 years and was a mechanic. He saw no military service.


Helen Dersie Smith

Born on the family farm near Cameron, Missouri, graduated from cameron High School in 1917. She was a housewife and mother, and a member of the Cameron Methodist Church.

DEATH: SERVICES FOR HELEN D. BURTON
DATE OF BIRTH August 21, 1894
DATE OF PASSING December 8, 1971
DATE OF SERVICE Friday, December 10, 1971
HELD AT Poland-Thompson Chapel
CLERGYMAN Rev. Charles L. Vinzant
PLACE OF INTERMENT Graceland Cemetery, Cameron, Missouri CASKET BEARERS Charles Hamlet, Tom Smith, Charles Smith, Wayne Smith, Harold Smith, Don Taylor


Lawrence Ennis Burton

BIOGRAPHY: Lawrence graduated from Cameron High School, and in 1942 graduated from the Mid-West School of Horology, Albany, Missouri, after attending for two years. He was first employed by the Leibrandt Jewelry Co., Cameron, Missouri, after which he was employed two years in kansas City, Missouri. He was watchmaker at the Sloan Jewelry Co., Cameron, Missouri, and at the time of his death he owned the Sloan Jewelry co.
    He had and injerited bone disease. He had broken his legs, 20 times by the time he was 20. Occasionally he was able to be on crutches, but for the most part, he pulled himself about by his arms, while scooting on the ground. When he was a child he was unable to walk and his father put a hand lever on a toy wagon, fastened to the back wheel, so he could power the wagon and get around and play like other children.


Mary Cordelia Burton

BIOGRAPHY: Cordelia Burton graduated from Cameron High school. She studied piano and organ from 1930 to 1941 under Mrs. H.C. Kelsey of Cameron, Missouri. she atteded baker University, Baldwin City, Douglas, Kansas during the school year 1941-42, studying home economics. She attending the University of Missouri, Columbia, Boone, Missouri, when she became ill in March, 1943. She died May 25, 1943.

DEATH: Obituary - Sickness, Death Cordelia Burton Shocks Us All
    The death of Miss Mary Cordelia Burton at the home of her parents came as a very distinct shock to many of her friends and acquaintances, who had not realized the gravity of her condition. She was taken ill quite suddenly some weeks ago in Columbus, Mo., where she was a student at the state university. She was brought home and later taken to a Kansas City hospital for examination and treatment. Upon recommendation of physicians there she was brougth home and a complete rest was ordered. She was given every cure and the best madical attention but those near to her had realized recently that it was going to be a losing fight.
    Cordelia was the only daughter of Homer and Helen (Smith) Burton and was born april 22, 1923, and had only a short time ago passed her twentieth birthday. She was educated in the Cameron Schools and was graduated with the class of 1941. She was a good student and took a prominent part in all ghigh school activites, especially the music. She was also a regular attendant at the Methodist Shruch and sunday school and a member of the choir.
    In the fall of 1941 she entered the Baker University in Baldwin, Kans., where she studied for one year. In the fall of 1942, she entered the University of Missouri and her ambition was to complete her college course.
    The grief stricken family have the sincere sympathy of all in their great sorrow, for all who knew Cordelia realize to a great extent what grief her lose is causing them. she was kind and considerate of others, with a happy, friendly disposition that endeared her to all who knew her.
    She is survive by her parents of the home; two brothers, Lawrence of the home, and William, who is employed in Ill., and by her grandmother, Mrs. E. M. Smith, Cameron, and a number of other relatives.
    Funeral services will be conducted from the Methodist Church, this afternoon, at 3:45, Rev. C. H. French, the pastor, officiating. Honorary casket bearers will be close friends of the deceased: Carole Demarest West, Norma Ruth Fiddick, Mary Emma Fiddick, Ernestine Davis, Mary Ruth Dorsey and Mary Emma Brown; active casket bearers: Robt. Brown, Herbert Lovell, Leland Warner, W. B. Conklin, Ross Nickell and Gerald McLoughlin. Interment will be in the graceland cemetery.
    Relatives and friends from out of town, here for the services, are: Mrms. John Jackson and daughter, Barbara, Mrms. Eugene Smith, Mrs. R. C. Burch, Mrs. B. C. Baldwin, Miss Ernestine Davis, Kansas City, Paul Smith and family, Keytesville, Mo.; Mrms. Frank McCullough and Miss Ruth Keller, Jefferson City; Mrms. Fred Keller, Tarkio; Billie Burton, Joliet, Ill.; Mrs. W. N. Kirkman, Hershey, Nebr.


Samuel Wayne Smith

    Wayne Smith was born September 2, 1921, at 105 E. Cleveland, in Keytesville, missouri, in a rented house, while the farm home ws beng made winter ready for the Smith family, where they moved in the spring of 1922. Wayne grew up on the family farm, atteded the Agee Grade School, and graduated from the Keytesville High School in 1940.
    After graduation he worked at the Howard Garage in Keytesville, where he boarded with the owner, Estil Howard and his wife Erma. After abut a year Wayne went to Concordia, Kansas to work for his uncle, Elburt Crawford as bookkeeper, at the First National Bank in concordia.
    He was drafted into the U.S. Army at Concordia and entered service at Jefferson Barracks, in St Louis, Missouri in July 1942. Wayne had basic training in the medical corps at Camp Robinson, Arkansas, then further training at Camp Livingston, Louisiana. He left the United States in September 1943, going first to Glasgow, Scotland, then to Malvern, England followed by Colwin Bay, North Wales, crossing the English Channel to LaMans, France where he spent quite sometime, then to Nancy, France.
    After V.E. Day he was sent to marseille, france, where he boarded a ship, headed for the South Pacific. Three days out of port, the orders were changed due to the Japanese surrender, and the ship headed for New York and home.
    On returning home in September 1945, he married Louise Bentley in Keytesville, Missouri. She was the daughter of Fonzo and Mary (Drew) Bentley. he was discharged from the army at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri the last of October 1945. He worked in auto parts, both as salesman, and parts manager. In 1974 he suffered a heart attack, and after several months returned to work, but after 3 years was forced to retire because of his health. His hobbies are geneology, and quilting.